People

 

People involved in Sex Diss aren't just intellectually interested in this stuff, they're actually living it a lot of the time. That means that none of it is flat - it's all dynamically alive.” michael rowland
former PhD student

Associated faculty

 

 

Doctoral Researchers

 

  • Ashley Barr (English)

    Awaiting abstract

  • Abby Barras, Applied Social Science (Uni of Brighton)

    My research focuses on trans and non-binary people's experiences of participation in every day sport, but crosses over in to health, fitness and feminism.

  • Evie Browne (International Development)

    Current thesis abstract: This thesis provides a critical ethnographic exploration of the intimate and social relationships of lesbian and bisexual women in Cuba, through the theoretical framework of homonormativities. Through foregrounding the everyday lives of Cuban lesbian and bisexual women, I examine how people perform, subvert or reframe normativities within intimate relationships, family life, community participation, state and international discourses. I analyse the ways in which the socialist context informs these acts, and whether there are tensions or incongruities between global homonormativities and Cuban homonormativities. A central contribution is the finding that homonormativity must be considered in context, as normativities differ from place to place, between societies, and between differing subjectivities. The thesis challenges and complicates ideas of homonormativity and global queer(ness) to include different political and social conceptions of ‘what is normal’, outside the more commonly studied context of democratic systems.  Through hearing the voices of lesbian and bisexual women in Cuba, we can push our theoretical understanding of how homonormativities can be resisted, reframed and contextualised, and potentially even decolonised.

  • Thomas Ebbs (Law Studies)

    Research Project: I am investigating how law has configured (radical) feminist responses to transactional sex, particularly sex work. I am researching the role that civil society organisations hold in shaping such configurations of activism and legalism, through a methodology of governmentality. I am interested in describing how technologies of government distort projects of emancipation.  My research efforts are supervised by Dr Charlotte Skeet and Dr Bal Sokhi-Bulley.

    Broader Interests:  Before I joined the university, I was the Director of Research for Lawyers for Justice in Libya. I helped manage and devise several research projects and programmes, including a cooperative transitional justice archive and a nationwide constitutional engagement campaign. I have also coordinated human rights investigations and submitted communications to international human rights mechanisms.  I previously worked in Cambodia, where I provided legal assistance and advice to sex workers, migrant domestic workers, teachers, and those employed in the garment sector.

  • Ray Filar (Gender Studies)

    My doctoral project is an ethnography of self-identified Syrian queers in Beirut who are also asylum seekers and in the process of relocating to Europe. I also explore dominant figurations of the 'Syrian queer' in the mediatised, digital and militarised narratives of the Syrian war. I employ storytelling as a decolonial method to counter non-Syrian dominant narratives on the Syrian war. 

    My research interests are autoethnography/ethnography, decolonial knowledge production, popular uprisings, Syria and Southwest and North Africa region (SWANA), queer and feminist IR, storytelling and oral history. 

    I would like to help to work on the above-mentioned issues as well as on issues that concern BAME, international and POC students on campus (mental health, visa complications, imposter syndrome, exile and asylum etc). 

  • Razan Ghazzawi (Gender Studies: Humanities)

    My doctoral project is an ethnography of self-identified Syrian queers in Beirut who are also asylum seekers and in the process of relocating to Europe. I also explore dominant figurations of the 'Syrian queer' in the mediatised, digital and militarised narratives of the Syrian war. I employ storytelling as a decolonial method to counter non-Syrian dominant narratives on the Syrian war.

    My research interests are autoethnography/ethnography, decolonial knowledge production, popular uprisings, Syria and Southwest and North Africa region (SWANA), queer and feminist IR, storytelling and oral history.
    I would like to help to work on the above-mentioned issues as well as on issues that concern BAME, international and POC students on campus (mental health, visa complications, imposter syndrome, exile and asylum etc).

  • Charmaine Kohn (Psychology)

    My research is exploring the wellbeing of adoptive parents after their children have been placed with them. More broadly then my specific project I am interested in gender, sexuality and identify as complex concepts for people and how these shape and change over time for some.

  • Tendai Lewis (Cultural Studies)

    Awaiting abstract

  • Jack Lindsay (International Relations)

    Awaiting abstract

  • Vitor Lopes Andrade (Social Anthropology)

    Project: “The local integration of people seeking asylum on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity in the UK and South Africa: a comparative study”.

  • Effie Makepeace (Drama/IDS)

    My PhD research is looking at the role of community theatre in political subjectivity in Malawi, UK and India.  I am hoping to draw on queer theory in my thesis after being involved in queer activism in London and Delhi in recent years.

  • Katherine Parker-Hay (English)

    Research project: Queer’s Late Style: shifting mood in the late and minor texts

    Research interests: affect, minor literatures, feminism, queer studies, temporality, genre, institutional history  

  • Amelia Roberts (English)

    My thesis title is 'Same-Sex Desire and Intimacy in Victor Hugo's Les Misérables and its Adaptations'. So, an interest in nineteenth-century gender and sexuality, but also in present-day queer cultures and queer readings, especially those explored through online communities and creative and critical writing.

  • Kat Sinclair (Cultural Studies)

    Researching the political economy of feminised robotics. In terms of activities, I would be keen to maybe run some kind of workshop with the Devil’s Dyke Network, the nature of which would probably be concerned with embodiment and poetics/performance.

  • Lisa Squire-Smith (Gender Studies: Humanities)

    I am critically exploring the work of feminist philosopher, Elizabeth Grosz, as a way to theoretically map the relationship between discourses and counter-discourses of love and embodied identity.  My particular focus is fluid gender and sexual identities (including the asexual spectrum) and forms of connection.  I am looking at the effects of the biopsychosocial structures produced through the romantic love paradigm upon these corporeal subjectivties and experiences (and vice versa) and their public and inter/personal articulation -both socially and within intersectional feminist, trans, queer and cultural studies- and their interaction with vectors of identity such as disability, race and class.

  • Natalie Wright (English)

    I'm writing on women and gender in the inauguration of academic literary studies in the UK and am more broadly interested in gender in the history of higher education and the novel form, and also contemporary queer theory, trans studies, and marxist/materialist feminisms (preferably all together!).