Social Work BA

Social Work

Key information

Duration:
3 years full time
Typical A-level offer:
ABB-BBB
UCAS code:
L500
Start date:
September 2018

Social Work at Sussex combines theory with practical experience, giving you a qualification that can change people’s lives.

You go on well-supported work placements, making the most of partnerships we’ve developed over years of collaboration with local organisations.

You graduate ready to apply for registration as a social worker. Our degrees are approved by the Health and Care Professions Council.

Graduate Zoe Joyce describes the opportunities on her Social Work BA

Entry requirements

A-level

Typical offer

ABB-BBB

GCSEs

You must have GCSE (or equivalent) Mathematics and English, both with at least grade C (or grade 4 in the new grading scale).

You should also have a broad range of GCSEs (A*-C), including good grades in relevant subjects.

Additional requirements

You will need to show evidence of basic IT competence and your personal suitability to enter the social work profession in line with national guidance provided by the relevant professional body and regulator.

Other UK qualifications

Access to HE Diploma

Typical offer

Pass in the Access to HE Diploma with 45 level 3 credits at Merit or above, including 24 at Distinction.

Subjects

The Access course should be in the humanities or social sciences.

GCSEs

You must have GCSE (or equivalent) Mathematics and English, both with at least grade C (or grade 4 in the new grading scale).

Additional requirements

You will need to show evidence of basic IT competence and your personal suitability to enter the social work profession in line with national guidance provided by the relevant professional body and regulator.

International Baccalaureate

Typical offer

30 points overall from the full IB Diploma.

Additional requirements

You will need to demonstrate evidence of suitable ability in both Mathematics and English, basic IT competence and your personal suitability to enter the social work profession, in line with national guidance provided by the relevant professional body and regulator.

 

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (formerly BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma)

Typical offer

DDM

Subjects

The BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma should be in Health and Social Care.

GCSEs

You must have GCSE (or equivalent) Mathematics and English both with at least grade C (or grade 4 in the new grading scale).

You should also have a broad range of GCSEs (A*-C), including good grades in relevant subjects.

Additional requirements

You will need to show evidence of basic IT competence and your personal suitability to enter the social work profession in line with national guidance provided by the relevant professional body and regulator.

Scottish Highers

Typical offer

ABBBB

GCSEs

You will also need Mathematics and English, at Standard Grade, grade 1 or 2.

Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced

Typical offer

Grade B and BB in two A-levels

GCSEs

You must have GCSE (or equivalent) Mathematics and English, both with at least grade C (or grade 4 in the new grading scale).

You should also have a broad range of GCSEs (A*-C), including good grades in relevant subjects.

Additional requirements

You will need to show evidence of basic IT competence and your personal suitability to enter the social work profession in line with national guidance provided by the relevant professional body and regulator.

International baccalaureate

Typical offer

30 points overall from the full IB Diploma.

Additional requirements

You will need to demonstrate evidence of suitable ability in both Mathematics and English, basic IT competence and your personal suitability to enter the social work profession, in line with national guidance provided by the relevant professional body and regulator.

 

European baccalaureate

Typical offer

Overall result of at least 75%.

Other international qualifications

Australia

Typical offer

Relevant state (Year 12) High School Certificate, and over 85% in the ATAR or UAI/TER/ENTER. Or a Queensland OP of 5 or below.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Austria

Typical offer

Reifeprüfung or Matura with an overall result of 2.2 or better for first-year entry. A result of 2.5 or better would be considered for Foundation Year entry.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Belgium

Typical offer

Certificat d'Enseignement Secondaire Supérieur (CESS) or Diploma van Hoger Secundair Onderwijs with a good overall average. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Bulgaria

Typical offer

Diploma za Sredno Obrazovanie with excellent final-year scores (normally 5.5 overall with 6 in key subjects).

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Canada

Typical offer

High School Graduation Diploma. Specific requirements vary between provinces.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

China

Typical offer

We usually do not accept Senior High School Graduation for direct entry to our undergraduate courses. However, we do consider applicants who have studied 1 or more years of Higher Education in China at a recognised degree awarding institution or who are following a recognised International Foundation Year.

If you are interested in applying for a business related course which requires an academic ability in Mathematics, you will normally also need a grade B in Mathematics from the Huikao or a score of 90 in Mathematics from the Gaokao.

Applicants who have the Senior High School Graduation may be eligible to apply to our International Foundation Year, which if you complete successfully you can progress on to a relevant undergraduate course at Sussex. You can find more information about the qualifications which are accepted by our International Study Centre at  http://isc.sussex.ac.uk/entry-requirements/international-foundation-year .

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Croatia

Typical offer

Maturatna Svjedodžba with an overall score of at least 4-5 depending on your degree choice.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Cyprus

Typical offer

Apolytirion of Lykeion with an overall average of at least 18 or 19/20 will be considered for first-year entry.

A score of 15/20 in the Apolytirion would be suitable for Foundation Year entry. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Czech Republic

Typical offer

Maturita with a good overall average.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Denmark

Typical offer

Højere Forberedelseseksamen (HF) or studentereksamen with an overall average of at least 7 on the new grading scale.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Finland

Typical offer

Finnish Ylioppilastutkinto with an overall average result in the final matriculation examinations of at least 5.5.

France

Typical offer

French Baccalauréat with an overall final result of at least 13/20.

Germany

Typical offer

German Abitur with an overall result of 2.2 or better.

Greece

Typical offer

Apolytirion with an overall average of at least 18 or 19/20 will be considered for first-year entry.

A score of 15/20 in the Apolytirion would be suitable for Foundation Year entry. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Hong Kong

Typical offer

Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education (HKDSE) with grades of 5, 4, 4 from three subjects including two electives. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Hungary

Typical offer

Erettsegi/Matura with a good average.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

India

Typical offer

Standard XII results from Central and Metro Boards with an overall average of 75-80%. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Iran

Typical offer

High School Diploma and Pre-University Certificate.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Ireland

Typical offer

Irish Leaving Certificate (Higher Level) at H2,H2,H2,H3,H3

Additional requirements

You must have at least O5 in Mathematics and English

Israel

Typical offer

Bagrut, with at least 8/10 in at least six subjects, including one five-unit subject.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Italy

Typical offer

Italian Diploma di Maturità or Diploma Pass di Esame di Stato with a Final Diploma mark of at least 78/100.

Japan

Typical offer

Upper Secondary Leaving Certificate is suitable for entry to our Foundation Years. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Latvia

Typical offer

Atestats par Visparejo videjo Izglitibu with very good grades in state exams.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Lithuania

Typical offer

Brandos Atestatas including scores of 80-90% in at least three state examinations (other than English).

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Luxembourg

Typical offer

Diplôme de Fin d'Etudes Secondaires.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Malaysia

Typical offer

Sijil Tinggi Persekolahan Malaysia (STPM). As well as various two or three-year college or polytechnic certificates and diplomas.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Netherlands

Typical offer

Voorereidend Wetenschappelijk Onderwijs (VWO), normally with an average of at least 7.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Nigeria

Typical offer

You are expected to have one of the following:

  • Higher National Diploma
  • One year at a recognised Nigerian University
  • Professional Diploma (Part IV) from the Institute of Medical Laboratory Technology of Nigeria
  • Advanced Diploma

You must also have a score of C6 or above in WAEC/SSC English.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Norway

Typical offer

Norwegian Vitnemal Fra Den Videregaende Skole- Pass with an overall average of 4.

Pakistan

Typical offer

Bachelor (Pass) degree in arts, commerce or science.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Poland

Typical offer

Matura with three extended-level written examinations, normally scored within the 7th stanine.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Portugal

Typical offer

Diploma de Ensino Secundario normally with an overall mark of at least 16/20. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Romania

Typical offer

Diploma de Bacalaureat with an overall average of 8.5-9.5 depending on your degree choice.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Singapore

Typical offer

A-levels, as well as certain certificates and diplomas.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Slovakia

Typical offer

Maturitna Skuska or Maturita with honours, normally including scores of 1 in at least three subjects.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Slovenia

Typical offer

Secondary School Leaving Diploma or Matura with at least 23 points overall.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

South Africa

Typical offer

National Senior Certificate with very good grades. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Spain

Typical offer

Spanish Título de Bachillerato (LOGSE) with an overall average result of at least 7.5.

Sri Lanka

Typical offer

Sri Lankan A-levels.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Sweden

Typical offer

Fullstandigt Slutbetyg with good grades.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Switzerland

Typical offer

Federal Maturity Certificate.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Turkey

Typical offer

Devlet Lise Diplomasi or Lise Bitirme is normally only suitable for Foundation Years, but very strong applicants may be considered for first year entry. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

USA

Typical offer

We look at your full profile taking into account everything you are studying. You must have your high school graduation diploma and we will be interested in your Grade 12 GPA. However, we will also want to see evidence of the external tests you have taken. Each application is looked at individually, but you should normally have one or two of the following:

  • APs (where we would expect at least three subject with 4/5 in each)
  • SAT Reasoning Tests (normally with a combined score of 1300) or ACT grades
  • and/or SAT Subject Tests (where generally we expect you to have scores of 600 or higher). 

We would normally require APs or SAT Subject Tests in areas relevant to your chosen degree course.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

My country is not listed

If your qualifications aren’t listed or you have a question about entry requirements, email ug.enquiries@sussex.ac.uk.

English language requirements

IELTS (Academic)

7.0 overall, including at least 6.5 in each component

IELTS scores are valid for two years from the test date. Your score must be valid when you begin your Sussex course. You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test.

If you are applying for degree-level study we can consider your IELTS test from any test centre, but if you require a Confirmation of Acceptance for Studies (CAS) for an English language or pre-sessional English course (not combined with a degree) the test must be taken at a UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI)-approved IELTS test centre.

Find out more about IELTS.

Other English language requirements

Proficiency tests

Cambridge Advanced Certificate in English (CAE)

For tests taken before January 2015: Grade B or above

For tests taken after January 2015: 185 overall, including at least 176 in each skill

We would normally expect the CAE test to have been taken within two years before the start of your course.

You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Cambridge English: Advanced.

Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE)

For tests taken before January 2015: grade C or above

For tests taken after January 2015: 185 overall, including at least 176 in each skill

We would normally expect the CPE test to have been taken within two years before the start of your course.

You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Cambridge English: Proficiency.

Pearson (PTE Academic)

67 overall, including at least 62 in all four skills.

PTE (Academic) scores are valid for two years from the test date. Your score must be valid when you begin your Sussex course. You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Pearson (PTE Academic).

TOEFL (iBT)

95 overall, including at least 22 in Listening, 23 in Reading, 23 in Speaking, 24 in Writing.

TOEFL (iBT) scores are valid for two years from the test date. Your score must be valid when you begin your Sussex course. You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about TOEFL (iBT).

The TOEFL Institution Code for the University of Sussex is 9166.

English language qualifications

AS/A-level (GCE)

Grade C or above in English Language.

Hong Kong Advanced Level Examination (HKALE)/ AS or A Level: grade C or above in Use of English

French Baccalaureat

A score of 12 or above in English.

GCE O-level

Grade C or above in English.

Brunei/Cambridge GCE O-level in English: grades 1-6.

Singapore/Cambridge GCE O-level in English: grades 1-6.

GCSE or IGCSE

Grade C or above in English as a First Language.

Grade B or above in English as a Second Language

German Abitur

A score of 12 or above in English.

Ghana Senior Secondary School Certificate

If awarded before 1993: grades 1-6 in English language.

If awarded between 1993 and 2005: grades A-D in English language

Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education (HKDSE)

Level 5, including at least 4 in each component in English Language.

Indian School Certificate (Standard XII)

The Indian School Certificate is accepted at the grades below when awarded by the following examination boards:

Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) – English Core only: 80%

Council for Indian School Certificate Examinations (CISCE) - English: 80%

International Baccalaureate Diploma (IB)

English A or English B at grade 5 or above.

Malaysian Certificate of Education (SPM) 119/GCE O-level

If taken before the end of 2008: grades 1-5 in English Language.

If taken from 2009 onwards: grade C or above in English Language.

The qualification must be jointly awarded by the University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES).

West African Senior School Certificate

Grades 1-6 in English language when awarded by the West African Examinations Council (WAEC) or the National Examinations Council (NECO).

Country exceptions

Select to see the list of exempt English-speaking countries

If you are a national of one of the countries below, or if you have recently completed a qualification equivalent to a UK Bachelors degree or higher in one of these countries, you will normally meet our English requirements. Note that qualifications obtained by distance learning or awarded by studying outside these countries cannot be accepted for English language purposes.

You will normally be expected to have completed the qualification within two years before starting your course at Sussex. If the qualification was obtained earlier than this we would expect you to be able to demonstrate that you have maintained a good level of English, for example by living in an English-speaking country or working in an occupation that required you to use English regularly and to a high level.

Please note that this list is determined by the UK’s Home Office, not by the University of Sussex.

List of exempt countries

  • Antigua and Barbuda
  • Australia
  • Bahamas
  • Barbados
  • Belize
  • Canada**
  • Dominica
  • Grenada
  • Guyana
  • Ireland
  • Jamaica
  • New Zealand
  • St Kitts and Nevis
  • St Lucia
  • St Vincent and the Grenadines
  • Trinidad and Tobago
  • United Kingdom
  • USA

** Canada: you must be a national of Canada; other nationals not on this list who have a degree from a Canadian institution will not normally be exempt from needing to provide evidence of English.

Admissions information for applicants

Disclosure and barring service checkYes
Health check requiredYes
InterviewYes
Specific application procedures

Yes. Find out more about specific entry procedures for this course.

Transfers into Year 2

No

If your qualifications aren’t listed or you have a question about entry requirements, email ug.enquiries@sussex.ac.uk.

Why choose this course?

  • 5th in the UK for Social Work (The Guardian University Guide 2018).
  • Top 5 for graduate prospects in the UK (The Times and Sunday Times University Guide 2017).
  • Take advantage of our excellent partnerships with employers: our placements prepare you for a wide range of careers.

Course information

How will I study?

You learn directly from service users and carers, developing an understanding of their experience. You shadow an experienced social worker and reflect on this experience via assessed work and seminar discussions.

You experience problem- and practice-based learning. Learning takes place mainly at the University. Your learning prepares you for practice by developing your essential knowledge, skills and values in social work.

You also complete a short observational placement.

Modules

These are the modules running in the academic year 2017. Modules running in 2018 may be subject to change.

Core modules


Customise your course

Our courses are designed to broaden your horizons and give you the skills and experience necessary to have the sort of career that has an impact.

Gain programming skills and apply them to areas such as digital media, business and interactive design. Find out about our Year in Computing

How will I study?

You prepare for practice in the field of social work with children and families, and social work with adults.

You also complete your first placement. You examine the importance of inter-professional working and research methods.

Modules

These are the modules running in the academic year 2017. Modules running in 2018 may be subject to change.

Core modules


Customise your course

Our courses are designed to broaden your horizons and give you the skills and experience necessary to have the sort of career that has an impact.

Gain programming skills and apply them to areas such as digital media, business and interactive design. Find out about our Year in Computing

Study abroad (optional)

Apply to study abroad – you’ll develop an international perspective and gain an edge when it comes to your career. Find out where your course could take you.

Practice learning

There is currently a minimum of 200 days of learning practice, 170 of which will be as part of a placement (70 days in Year 2 and 100 days in Year 3).

You learn how to provide services to a range of service-user groups.

Our placements build on our partnerships with social work agencies and our collaboration with groups of users and carers.

Find out more about placements and practice learning at Sussex

Support from the Department, talks from service users and placement experiences has fully prepared me for my current job.”Apryl Golding
Social Worker, Brighton & Hove Council 

Please note

If you’re receiving – or applying for – USA federal Direct Loan funds, you can’t transfer to the version of this program with an optional study abroad period or optional placement. Find out more about American Student Loans and Federal Student Aid

How will I study?

You combine writing a dissertation (under our supervision) with your final placement.

We support your preparation for job applications.

While on placement, you return to the University for group tutorials. These help you to link theory and practice.

Modules

These are the modules running in the academic year 2017. Modules running in 2018 may be subject to change.

Core modules

My own research focuses on the history of social work and social workers and I share all of my research with my students in my teaching.”Dr Russell Whiting
Lecturer in Social Work and Social Care

Fees

Fees are not yet set for entry in the academic year 2018. Note that your fees, once they’re set, may be subject to an increase on an annual basis.

The UK Government has confirmed that if you’re an EU student applying for entry in September 2018, you'll pay the same fee rate as UK students for the duration of your course, even if the UK leaves the EU before the end of your course. You'll also continue to have access to student loans and grants. Find out more on the UK Government website.

Find out about typical living costs for studying at Sussex

Scholarships

Details of our scholarships are not yet set for entry in the academic year 2018.

Careers

Graduate destinations

100% of Social Work BA students were in graduate-level work or further study six months after graduating. Recent graduates have started jobs as:

  • social worker, Brighton & Hove City Council
  • family support worker, Family Action
  • referral order officer, Croydon Council.

(HESA EPI, Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey 2015)

Your future career

Successful completion of the Social Work BA allows you to apply to register as a qualified social worker.

Working while you study

Our Careers and Employability Centre can help you find part-time work while you study. Find out more about career development and part-time work

“I enjoyed the teaching and research-based lectures. I’ve really taken my learning from university into my current practice.” Oliver TobuttSocial Worker, Duty and Assessment Team, East Sussex County Council

Contexts of Social Work

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

In this module, you learn about contemporary social work practice and examine the factors that influence the development of the profession. 

You examine the political and controversial aspects of the social work role, and learn from practicioners working in the profession. You also meet service users and carers.

Introduction to Professional Learning and Development - Part One

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

This module combines teaching and learning about the significance of identity in social work with opportunities to explore a wide range of professional and academic learning skills and techniques. The module will also introduce you to library and IT resources. You will be introduced to a range of approaches to collaborative and independent learning in preparation for work throughout the programme. This innovative course serves to bridge the transition from previous study or work into the specific type of learning required at HE level on a professionally qualifying social work programme. Face to face teaching is supplemented with carefully designed online learning tools and activities that have relevant content but that also introduce you to a range of skills and techniques in a fun and supportive way. The process orientation of this course will help develop positive relationships within the learning group in preparation for their work together during the rest of the degree.

Indicative portfolio contents include:

Summative summary of article from those detailed relating to professional identity (along with reflections upon feedback on the formative version of this); all completed e-learning tasks such as referencing, library catalogue use, small group tasks; self evaluation questionnaires completed at start of term and then at the end; referencing activities; extracts from reflective learning journal

Human Growth and Development

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn & Spring Teaching, Year 1

This module will provide you with an introduction to the key theories of human development. Concepts such as attachment, resilience, loss, change and identity will be explored in relation to their relevance to social work practice. You will explore the social and political contexts of these issues and the importance of making connections between individual and family development and disadvantage.

The impact of aspects of inequality such as class, race, gender and sexuality will be explored. Although not the main focus of this course, you will be introduced to the use and critique of statistics and data sets in order to foster the early appreciation of such information alongside that arising from qualitative research.

Teaching will take place via lectures, facilitated seminars and unfacilitated student led groups in which you will prepare your assessed presentations. In addition, specialist workshops will be run by members of the service user and carer network and by practitioner colleagues in relation to key areas.

Learning will take place using a problem-based learning approach using a case study as the basis of the group work and assessed tasks. The group presentation will be in poster format so that you are able to demonstrate your skills in presenting material visually, albeit with accompanying text and brief oral explanations.

Introduction to Professional Learning and Development - Part Two

  • 15 credits
  • Spring & Summer Teaching, Year 1

This module builds upon IPLD part one taught in the autumn term and continues to provide a foundation to the rest of the degree. The module aims to introduce you to as many academic and professional learning skills as possible through a variety of means.

Taught by those committed to ensuring that the transition from the start of this year and into the next is both supportive and yet challenging, this module should not be regarded as simply another study skills module. The depth of learning from feedback, evaluation and small, as well as larger, group work encourages the linking of theory and practice (and the 'personal') from the start of the module.

This module begins with you being prepared for your five-day shadowing placement and concludes with you demonstrating, through individual presentations to panels including service users and carers, evidence of your readiness for professional practice next year. You will also include in your portfolio evidence of participation in skills workshops designed to refine communication and time management skills prior to placement in year two.

Indicative portfolio contents include:final self evaluation tool and planning for level 5; evidence of application of learning from referencing to other modules through the inclusion of two bibliographies; small group-produced annotated bibliographies evidencing ability to source different academic materials through the electronic library; reflections from shadowing placments; evidence of skills log completed during the year at first year level (communication skills as the main focus); and extracts from reflective leaning journals

Law for Social Work

  • 30 credits
  • Spring & Summer Teaching, Year 1

This module provides introductory knowledge of the legal rules that underpins social work practice, and (building on the Contexts of Social Work course) explores the ways in which law and social policy interact to provide a broad framework for assessment and intervention. You will also explore the relationship between law and social work values, and reflect on the ways in which legal rules support practice that is both lawful and ethical.

Lectures will introduce core knowledge, such as the workings of the English legal system, and the powers and duties of social work in relation to children and families, mental health and adult social care. You will pursue small group e-learning exercises and guided independent reading to consolidate your understanding, before applying the legal rules to case scenarios discussed in class under the guidance of the tutor.

Values, Ethics and Theories: preparing for complexity in Social Work Practice

  • 15 credits
  • Spring & Summer Teaching, Year 1

In this module you will build on the work you did earlier in the year but with a particular focus on professional formation through considerations of values, ethics and theories in social work.

The module brings social work theory to the fore and emphasises its importance for practice. A range of different social work theories are presented and analysed.

The module examines the historical development and contemporary expression of social work values and ethics. It also considers the use of codes of ethics and codes of practice as well as the ethical and value basis to theories.

The module will use case studies to tie the theoretical and ethical discussions to the reality of practice situations in order to better preapre students for future placements.

Module content will include: anti oppressive/anti discrimatory values in social work; ethics based on principles; ethics based on character; radical theories of social work; liberal/conservative theories of social work; psychodynamic theories and social work; attachment theory and social work; systems theories/ecological approaches; social work and postmodernism.

Social Work with Adults, their families and carers.

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

The module will be organised in a way that enables you to explore contemporary issues within the full spectrum of adult care. This will include study relating to people with learning disabilities, mental health difficulties, physical disabilities, adults vulnerable due to domestic abuse/substance misuse and homelessness, older people and their families and their carers. You will be expected to use reflective learning to consider your personal and professional values, developing an understanding of values-based practice and social care values and ethics.

You will consider the changing context of professional practice in adult care, including the challenges posed by developing effective inter-professional working. This module will be underpinned by an understanding of the application and importance of the relevant National Service Frameworks, National Occupational Standards, and evolving policy such as 'Our Health, Our Care, Our Say'.

Throughout, you will be expected to demonstrate a good understanding of issues relating to adult care, and the importance of promoting participation and inclusion.

Social Work with Children, Young People and Families (BASW)

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

This module takes place immediately prior to placement and is clearly focused on preparing students for placement in children and family settings. The module uses a vignette for the assessment and follows the principles of problem-based learning in order: (a) to help prepare BASW students for the placement; and (b) to help BAWCYP students reflect on critical connections between material covered in the module and their observations and experiences in the observational placement.

The assessment is focused on assessment and decision-making in practice, and allows you to draw on knowledge that you have gathered not only in this module but to build on what you did in the first year of the course.

This module is designed to enable you to consolidate and develop understanding of the social work role and task in relation to practice in the field of children's services. Through detailed and critical scrutiny of role and task in a range of policy and practice contexts and settings, you will gain a level of knowledge and understanding sufficient to provide you with a foundation for safe practice, under appropriate supervision, in subsequent agency placements.

You will be required to pay particular attention to the nature of the emotional and political dynamics in those contexts of ambiguity and conflict that characterise this field of work, and to the impact these have on decision-making and intervention.

Module content will include:

  • the history and current context of children's services
  • overview of developments in policy in relation to children's services
  • early and preventive intervention with vulnerable children in community settings
  • needs and risk assessment and protective intervention where specific questions of harm arise
  • care planning for children and young people in public care
  • work with young offenders.

The syllabus is constructed in a rapidly changing policy and practice environment and therefore is indicative, designed to respond to local and national changes.

Group Reflection on Practice 1

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

In this module, you discuss, analyse and evaluate direct practice and examine communication with service users and carers. 

This includes:

  • an analysis of the assessment, planning, intervention and review methods undertaken in direct practice. You will draw on your social work knowledge, theory, and law.
  • an analysis of risk factors and management
  • examining the challenges of working in a environment of change and uncertainty
  • demonstrating the ability to practice in accordance with social work values.

Understanding Organisations, Management and Interprofessional Practice

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

In this module, you learn about partnership with service users and carers, and collaboration between professions.
You do this through examining the policy context, theory and research evidence on partnership and interprofessional practice, and applying these to a piece of work undertaken on your placement (which runs concurrently).

You work in student-led learning groups, in which, week by week, you identify, research and share the knowledge you need in order to critically evaluate your own partnership practice - which helps to enhance your experience of team-working.

Your weekly lectures in this module introduce relevant themes. You then meet with your study group (10-12 students) to examine the weekly theme in the context of formally presented examples of your own practice.

As part of the module, you give a final student-led presentation, which will identify common themes emerging from the successes and challenges of partnership work in your practice, as well as your reflections on team roles and processes in your study group work.

Research Minded Project

  • 45 credits
  • Autumn & Spring Teaching, Year 3

You focus on a topic of your choice, which is relevant to social work practice or theory.

You learn in small discussion groups and benefit from additional supervision for your dissertation.

You are encouraged to make links between research and professional practice, and to develop your research knowledge and skills by planning, conducting and writing up a piece of literature based research.

On this module, you learn how to:

  • frame research questions and plan a literature based research project
  • write a review of relevant literature and research evidence
  • review the research methodologies, methods and ethics used in your enquiry and write an analysis in a critical report
  • draw conclusions from research results
  • critically locate within appropriate theoretical, conceptual and evidential contexts, a topic relevant to social work as a professional and/or discipline
  • develop your knowledge of and ability to apply research mindedness, understanding and skills of critical appraisal, as both consumers and practitioners of social work research
  • plan, conduct and write up an informed, ethically sound and well-argued piece of literature-based, research in the form of an undergraduate dissertation.




Group Reflection on Practice 2

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

In this module, you discuss, analyse and evaluate direct practice and examine communication with service users and carers. 

This includes:

  • an analysis of the assessment, planning, intervention and review methods undertaken in direct practice. You will draw on your social work knowledge, theory, and law.
  • an analysis of risk factors and management
  • examining the challenges of working in a environment of change and uncertainty
  • demonstrating the ability to practice in accordance with social work values.

All candidates offered a place on the course will be required to satisfactorily complete an Enhanced Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) check (formerly known as a CRB check), including a check of all cautions and warnings as well as convictions, before their place on the course is confirmed.

You will be required to have a satisfactory Health Check.

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