University of Sussex Business School

Whose Histories Matter? (007GRD)

Whose Histories Matter? Doing Decolonial Heritage and National Identities

Module 007GRD

Module details for 2022/23.

30 credits

FHEQ Level 6

Module Outline

This module aims to develop in students a set of tools to critically evaluate geographies of landscape, heritage and identities and to develop a postcolonial and decolonial perspective on issues of national identity, national heritage, memory and issues of place identity. The focus here is to examine the ways in which memory, spaces and identities intersect to form narratives of national, regional and community identities. The course addresses case-study sites that include spaces of heritage such as World Heritage Sites, National Parks, Cities and spaces of the Museum. Through these case-studies there is a focus on issues of who controls authorised or formal accounts of places, histories and national identities and thus who controls accounts of belonging, inclusion and exclusion. Core to the module is the critique of formalised heritage narratives and the exploration of counter-discourses such as postcolonial, decolonial contestations and counter memories and histories from below. Cultural geographies of landscape, national identity and the moral geographies of heritage are addressed through the role of museums, national parks, visual culture, art history, landscape aesthetics and the affective and emotional senses in preserving memories and intangible heritage narratives. The module engages with memory, space and place identities at different geographical scales including ‘bodies’ and ‘place’ at international, transnational, post-national communities.

Full Module Description

This module aims to develop in students a set of tools to critically evaluate geographies of landscape, heritage and identities and to develop a postcolonial and decolonial perspective on issues of national identity, national heritage, memory and issues of place identity. The focus here is to examine the ways in which memory, spaces and identities intersect to form narratives of national, regional and community identities. The course addresses case-study sites that include spaces of heritage such as World Heritage Sites, National Parks, Cities and spaces of the Museum. Through these case-studies there is a focus on issues of who controls authorised or formal accounts of places, histories and national identities and thus who controls accounts of belonging, inclusion and exclusion. Core to the module is the critique of formalised heritage narratives and the exploration of counter-discourses such as postcolonial, decolonial contestations and counter memories and histories from below. Cultural geographies of landscape, national identity and the moral geographies of heritage are addressed through the role of museums, national parks, visual culture, art history, landscape aesthetics and the affective and emotional senses in preserving memories and intangible heritage narratives. The module engages with memory, space and place identities at different geographical scales including ‘bodies’ and ‘place’ at international, transnational, post-national communities.

TermMethodDurationWeek pattern
Spring SemesterWorkshop1 hour111111111110
Spring SemesterFieldwork1 hour111111111110

How to read the week pattern

The numbers indicate the weeks of the term and how many events take place each week.

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