Undergraduate Summer School

Choose modules that aim to inspire you academically and give you a study experience distinct to us and our location. Find our list of summer modules below.

Our curriculum

Our Undergraduate Summer School teaches over two sessions and you'll study one module per session. You can come for one or both sessions and choose from over 30 modules, designed, delivered and taught by Sussex faculty.

A module is a credit-bearing unit of study. Each module carries 15 Sussex credits and lasts for three weeks (one session).

Modules are taught at either Level 4 or 5 (first or second year University level) - most do not have specific academic pre-requisites, so you can choose to study something new if you wish. 

Find out more about teaching, assessment and credit transfer.

What can I study?

The University of Sussex reserves the right to cancel modules due to staff availability, student demand, minimum enrolment, or updates to our curriculum. We’ll make sure to let our applicants know of such changes to modules at the earliest opportunity.

Undergraduate Summer School

Session One: 29 June - 17 July 2020

Session Two: 20 July - 7 August 2020

English language classes

Take a language course at Sussex to improve your English, organised by the Sussex Centre for Language Studies. You can undertake this either before or after your Summer School studies. Courses last for between one to ten weeks across June, July and August.


I love sitting in class and having my professor quote a study that was done right here at this university.” ALYSSA RIEDER
Psychology Summer School student - University of Texas, Dallas

REGISTER YOUR INTEREST


You might also be interested in:

Managing Global Supply Chains (IS400)

Module description

Learning outcomes:

  • Demonstrate a clear understanding of the role of effective supply chain management in a global context.
  • Develop a critical awareness of the role that effective supply chain management plays in terms of achieving competitive advantage.
  • Differentiate between different types of supplier engagement options (including Partnering, Outsourcing and Offshoring etc).
  • Apply the tools, techniques and concepts of the module to a variety of case organisations.

Developing Negotiation Skills (Session Two - IS401)

Whether we're at work, school, or interacting with friends and family, we are constantly engaging in negotiations where we try to influence and persuade others.

This module offers you the opportunity to practice and develop your negotiating skills. Most workshops will feature engaging role play exercises where you can practice your negotiation skills, followed by a class discussion and mini-lecture to highlight important negotiation concepts. The module is therefore highly interactive. Through this module, you will develop your own natural negotiation style, and feel more confident engaging in future negotiations.

The module will begin with exploring simple negotiations between two parties over a single issue and will progress to negotiations featuring multiple parties negotiating over multiple issues. At the end of the module, you will have gained confidence in your negotiation abilities as well as a strong understanding of important negotiation concepts like BATNA: Best Alternative to a Negotiated Agreement, reservation price, and target price. The module will also focus on how culture and diversity influence negotiations so that you will be well equipped to negotiate across a variety of contexts.

Learning outcomes:

  • Develop a critical understanding of one’s own negotiating abilities.
  • Analyse the likely success of negotiation strategies and evaluate alternatives.
  • Understand the organisational, behavioural, and psychological issues relating to the negotiation process.
  • Develop an understanding of how culture and diversity influence negotiations.

Teaching method: Workshops
Assessment: 100% coursework
Contact hours: 40 hours

Managing Global Supply Chains (Session One - IS400)

This module explores the global dimensions associated with managing supply chains. It is suited for students who are interested in examining the emergence of global business, the nature and structure of global supply chain management and the emerging issues of supply chain sustainability and ethics in this rapidly transforming industry. You will have the opportunity to develop an understanding of the role and extent of supply chain management in modern organizations.

Critical awareness of supplier selection process, supply chain governance, outsourcing and offshoring. Through discussions and in-class simulations, you will gain a critical understanding of the key processes involved in global supply chain management including sourcing, procurement, warehousing, inventory management and logistics.

You will develop a clear understanding of the role of effective supply chain management and understand differentiation between different types of supplier engagement options (including partnering, outsourcing and offshoring etc.). You will demonstrate critical awareness of the role that effective supply chain management plays in terms of achieving competitive advantage and apply the tools, techniques and concepts of the module to a variety of case organisations. You will examine case studies that deliver products straight to the doorstep of consumers and customers.

A highlight of the module will be access to the University of Sussex Supply Chain 4.0 Research Hub, where you can explore key research themes such as how 3D printing is shortening global supply chains and bringing manufacturing closer to the consumer, and data analytics to enhance forecast accuracy and reduce inventory holding. Students will also be encouraged to look at local businesses based in Sussex.

Learning outcomes:

  • Demonstrate a clear understanding of the role of effective supply chain management in a global context.
  • Develop a critical awareness of the role that effective supply chain management plays in terms of achieving competitive advantage.
  • Differentiate between different types of supplier engagement options (including Partnering, Outsourcing and Offshoring etc).
  • Apply the tools, techniques and concepts of the module to a variety of case organisations.

Teaching method: Lectures and seminars
Assessment: 100% coursework
Contact hours: 48 hours

Mathematics of Data Science (Session Two - IS404)

This module is for you if you are currently enrolled on a Mathematics/Physics/Engineering/Chemistry degree or interested in Mathematics, Foundations of Data Science. You will need some background of calculus and analysis, and preferably some computing and programming experience. This module introduces you to data science in any global industry using large and small data sets.

During this module you will be introduced to probability theory and will have the opportunity to apply this in laboratory sessions.

You will gain experience in Monte Carlo Simulations applied to Data Science problem, as well as experience of using R for statistical and data science applications. You will examine data sets within a range of industries; apply goodness of fit methods and gain a basic understanding of statistics in data science and how analysis of problems leads to success

The School of Mathematics and Physical Sciences has a lively research group in Probability and Statistics within the Department of Mathematics and hosts the Data Intensive Science Centre at the University of Sussex (DISCUS), a research unit built to address real social and economic challenges by applying data interpretation techniques. The School also has notable alumni, with professional tennis player, Virginia Wade (OBE) winning the US open in 1968 and Wimbledon in 1977. A Nobel Prize in Physics in 2003, Anthony Leggett, has worked at Sussex for fifteen years since 1967.

Learning outcomes:

  • Explain the role of probability theory in statistics and data science.
  • Employ goodness of fit methods to simulated and real data.
  • Apply Bayesian inference for the estimate of parameters of a distribution.
  • Use R for statistics and data science applications.

Teaching method: Lectures and workshops
Assessment: 100% coursework
Contact hours: 40 hours

Video Games: Creative and Critical Writing (Session One - IS403)

In recent years the gaming industry has been transformed by the addition of auteur-driven indie games to those of AAA studios with Hollywood budgets, as well as by the diversity of technology on which games can be played. We will explore examples of successful imagined worlds (Zelda: Breath of the Wild), powerful storytelling (The Last of Us), literary games (Kentucky Route Zero), indie games (Braid), and classic adventure games (Monkey Island), amongst others.

We explore the imagined possibilities of play, world-building, narrative, character, game mechanics and game dynamics. This provides an array of opportunities for creative writing in video game design; including composing narratives and shooting-scripts, imagining avatars, and developing fictional worlds. You will be introduced to some game development software, though this module is not designed as a coding course, and is ideal for students looking beyond the surface of video games; wanting to engage with thoughtful critique of an emerging industry.

This module is a creative writing module, where you will develop a deeper understanding of creating narratives, branching narratives using Twine and essential game mechanics. You will reflect critically on the social implications of game design, taking into account discourses around gender, race and sexuality.

Local companies within the gaming industry are expected to contribute through guest lecture, and may include field excursions to industry professionals.

The School of English has been awarded 19th in the UK for English; The Independent Complete University Guide 2019.

Learning outcomes:

  • Understand and experiment with common practices of creative writing across multiple computer/video game genres.
  • Reflect critically on the social implications of game design, taking into account discourses around gender, race, and sexuality.
  • To communicate the results of critical reflection in a collegial group presentation.
  • To evaluate the appropriateness of different approaches to solving problems when relating the creative aspect of game design to critical reflection on the social aspects of games.

Teaching method: Lectures and workshops
Assessment: 100% coursework
Contact hours: 40 hours

The Age of Adolescence: Reading 20th Century Youth Culture (Session One - IS407)

This module will explore representations of adolescence from the early 20th through to the early 21st Century in literature, film and popular culture. We will read texts that range across history, psychology, and writings about juvenile delinquency, but our focus will be on reading novels, short stories, films and graphic novels, that represent the paradoxes of adolescence from the turn of the 20th century: Back to the Future, Ghost World, Spring Breakers, The Hunger Games, and more. We’ll look at the ways in which the adolescent morphs into the teenage consumer in the 1950s in novels such as Colin MacInnes’s Absolute Beginners. We’ll consider the adolescent as a site of cultural fantasy and cultural fears in relation to class, race, gender, and sexuality and the adolescent’s relationship to radical politics, subculture, suburbia, and nostalgia.

If you are interested in literary figures and novels that have pushed boundaries on the representation of adolescence, then this module is for you. This module will provide a theoretical introduction for student’s wishing to explore a career in film production, youth literature & education sectors.

On this experiential module, we will explore how Brighton has been central for pushing boundaries and creating new waves, in the medium of literature and film. We will develop a deeper understanding of the construction of the categories of the adolescent and the teenagers in literature, film and theory. This module may include a field trip to Brighton, following the trail of cult movie Quadrophenia.

Learning outcomes:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the history of, and an ability to evaluate, 20th-21st century fiction, film and theory.
  • Develop an understanding of the construction of the categories of the adolescent and the teenager in literature, film and theory.
  • Analyse literature, film, and other discourses, and to dissect rhetoric and understand meanings.
  • Develop an argument from close reading and data interpretation.

Teaching method: Fieldwork, lectures and workshops
Assessment: 100% coursework
Contact hours: 40 hours

Holocaust Studies: Experience, Knowledge and Memory (Session Two - IS414)

In this module, we will explore the experience, knowledge and memory of the Holocaust through source materials from contemporaries, who experienced this devastating European event. his module is ideal for a wide audience, at introductory level with no pre-requisites, and is suited to students and interest in historical shifts and archival practices. The Holocaust represents a civilizational rupture, a European event with global reverberations that questioned the most dearly held assumptions about humanity. During the Summer School, we will investigate some of those through the eyes and experiences of contemporaries, Jews and non-Jews alike. How did life change for German Jews, the first to be exposed to Nazi brutality? How did Jews elsewhere in Europe experience German occupation and how did they react to the ever more murderous policies they were subjected to?

You will access The Keep, a state of the art archive facility and one of the foremost social archives in the world that documents these two life stories, and will shed light on questions around Jewish discrimination, antisemitism to all forms of racism. You will develop skills of primary source analysis and a deeper understanding of a particular archive and body of evidence in relation to Jewish history. This hands-on learning will provide students will the skills of primary source analysis and a deeper understanding of the history of Jewish discrimination, antisemitism to all forms of racism and the wider context of humanistic, democratic and liberal views in our modern society today.

Through life stories documented at The Keep, you will learn about the lives of Max Goldschmidt who escaped from Frankfurt to Britain before the war; and Arnold Daghani who was deported from Romania to a death camp in the Ukraine before he came to Brighton after the war.

This module may include a field excursion to the London Imperial War Museum - Holocaust Museum and Winer Museum.

Learning outcomes:

  • To understand a historical moment by reference to the particular context in which it occurred.
  • To relate the history of Jewish discrimination and antisemitism to all forms of racism and to the wider context of humanistic, democratic, and liberal values in modern society today.
  • To develop skills of primary source analysis and an understanding of a particular archive and body of evidence.
  • To supply evidence for these skills in assessments that distil information provided in the workshops.

Teaching method: Fieldwork, lectures and workshops
Assessment: 100% coursework
Contact hours: 35 hours

A People's History: British History From Below (Session One - IS415)

This module uses the archives to research a people’s history of Britain over the last eighty years and provides insight about the changing face of Britain. Through hands-on experience of archival materials, students will explore historical shifts through the eyes of ordinary people.

From 1937 onwards Mass Observation sought out the views and experiences of ordinary people asking them to write dairy entries about the key events of British history as well as family life, friendships and the everyday. In this module students will explore major historical shifts through the eyes of ordinary men, women and children and gain hands-on experience of working with archival material in The Keep, the Mass Observation Archive (MOA) – a state of the art archive facility and one of the foremost social archives in the world.

Students will develop historical research skills as well as a substantive knowledge of modern British history in the 20th century whilst simultaneously gaining archival and curatorial skills. Topics to be covered may include war, gender, sexuality, activism and digitalisation.

It is expected that this module may include field excursions to the Imperial War Museum and/or the National Archives in Kew Gardens.

This module is ideal for a wide audience, at introductory level with no pre-requisites, this module is aimed at those interested in historical shifts and archival practices.

University of Sussex BA English Literature and History graduate, Ella Beales volunteers at The Keep. She started cataloguing the University of Sussex’s Special Collection’s archive, and since explored tea drinking in the Second World War for her undergraduate dissertation and is helping to catalogue and digitise the Mass Observation archive.

Learning outcomes:

  • To understand a historical moment by reference to the particular context in which it occurred.
  • To develop skills of primary source analysis and an understanding of a particular archive and body of evidence.
  • To supply evidence for these skills in assessments that distil information provided in the workshops.

Teaching method: Fieldwork, lectures and workshops
Assessment: 100% coursework
Contact hours: 40 hours

Biodiversity, Ecology and Conservation (Session One - IS417)

This module introduces biodiversity of life of earth, and key principles of ecology and conservation. The emphasis is on learning through field classes which will take place in the South Downs National Park. The University is in the heart of the South Downs National Park so you will have the opportunity for experiential learning on the key themes: biodiversity, ecology and conservation. You will also learn survey and identification skills through these field trips.

This popular undergraduate study area is suited for students currently enrolled Biochemistry, Psychology and Biomedicine, at the minimum students should have some background in Biology.

You will develop and gain an understanding of conservation/applied ecology in relation to real world problems through topics including biodiversity, community ecology and practical land management for conservation; such as the mowing of Grasslands to help maintain grass cover, encourage re-growth and productivity.

The module may include the opportunity for you to hear how the University of Sussex LASI (Laboratory of Apiculture and Social Insects) performs vital research to help bee conservation.

The School of Life Science has leading research in Biodiversity, with Professor Mika Peck establishing and supporting The Tesoro Escondido Reserve, created to conserve the critically endangered Ecuadorian brown-headed spider monkey. The Department has other notable academics, such as emeritus professor Mike Land, who was awarded the 1994 Frink Medal of the Zoological Society of London, the ALCON Prize for vision research in 1996, and who is a Fellow of the Royal Society of London and Miller Fellow for University of California, Berkeley. Or Dave Goulson, founder of the Bumblebee Conservation Trust, who holds multiple awards, including the 2013 Zoological Society of London's Marsh Award for Conservation Biology.

Learning outcomes:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of phylogenies and how taxa are classified.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of basic theories and concepts in ecology and conservation.
  • Demonstrate understanding of conservation/applied ecology in relation to real world problems.
  • To interpret and present evidence from field work about biodiversity and the effects of different types of land management

Teaching method: Seminars, fieldwork, lectures and workshops
Assessment: 100% coursework (including in-class tests)
Contact hours: 39 hours

Organic Chemistry: Molecules and Mechanisms (Session One - IS418)

This module is a first year university module in organic chemistry, designed for students looking to gain practical experience in the laboratory. To be suitable to take this module you will need to have gained a semester of Chemistry studies at university (or equivalent).

The aim of the module is to introduce students to organic chemistry and develop the groundwork needed to understand the structures of organic molecules, bonding and an introduction to chemical transformations. You will be exposed to the chemical characterisation techniques needed to determine structures following reactions.

Real-life issues will be explored, including an "introduction to drug action" during lectures, exploring the chemical; structures, bonding and transformations of simple anti-cancer drugs. Through these theoretical and practical studies, you will expand your knowledge of structure molecules and bonding; analysis of modules and will learn how to identify organic structure of drugs.

You will gain an understanding of the structure and function of organic molecules, including nomenclature and stereochemistry. This module will provides you with practical experience in the laboratory, with at least 1 day a week spent in the laboratory. You will demonstrate an awareness of organic chemistry laboratory skills including competent and safe use of equipment such as rotary evaporators and reflux condensers. You will develop presentation skills as part of a group poster presentation.

Sussex is a research-intensive university. The School of Life Sciences specialises in Organic & Medical Chemistry, Materials & Catalysis and Fundamental chemical processes and Interactions. The Departments has received two Nobel Prizes in the field of Chemistry.

Learning outcomes:

  • Have an understanding of the structure and function of organic molecules, including nomenclature and stereochemistry and have a general understanding of the acid and base properties of organic.
  • Be able to describe the bonding of simple organic molecules and the polarisation of different atoms in molecules, to predict the reactivity of basic functional groups.
  • Use the curved arrow notation to show how a chemical transformation has taken place.
  • Demonstrate an awareness of organic chemistry laboratory skills.

Teaching method: Laboratory, lectures and workshops
Assessment: 100% coursework
Contact hours: 42 hours

Cell Communication and Neuroscience (Session Two - IS419)

The cells of multi-cellular organisms constantly receive and respond to signals. The signals can come from the environment (light, sound, heat, touch) or from other cells. The communication between cells is crucial for survival, both for individual cells and for the organism as a whole.

Signalling involves many steps, and signals can result in a myriad of responses. However, a key feature is how many signalling systems have similar pathways and/or similar steps in different pathways. One of the key ways in which cells in animals, such as ourselves, communicate is via nervous systems. This module is aimed at students with some background in Biology, Biochemistry or Psychology, as we will explore the fundamentals of neuronal cells, the way they communicate as well as the architecture and connectivity of mammalian nervous systems.

This module will provide you with practical experience in the laboratory, interactive simulations and demonstrations; which may include using model invertebrate systems as examples, such as analysing how neurons work in cockroach legs. You will develop a deeper understanding of complex intracellular pathways, exploring how cells communicate inside the cells and together.

This module may involve engagement with guest speakers from the Sussex Neuroscience group, including from the Kemenes Lab; where much research focuses on studies involving Lymnaea Stagnalis (pond snails). These are used as model organisms, due to their large neurons. This has enabled the study of the details of central pattern generators, among other things.

Biology, in the School of Life Sciences was awarded 100% for providing students with opportunities to explore ideas and concepts in depth (National Student Survey 2017). The School of Life Sciences' building is named after John Maynard Smith (another Fellow of the Royal Society of London), who was influential in research collaboration between Life Sciences fields, and went on to serve as the Dean of Life Sciences twice during his time at the University of Sussex.

Learning outcomes:

  • Understand the principles of signal transduction mechanisms; in particular, the concepts of response specifically signal amplitude and duration, signal integration and intracellular location.
  • Describe the mechanisms by which some different receptors may be activated by their respective ligands.
  • Demonstrate understanding of neuroanatomy and nervous system function on a cellular and physiological level.
  • Perform analysis of data relevant to techniques in neuroscience and communicate the results in written form.

Teaching method: Classes, laboratory, lectures, seminars, workshops, tutorial and workshop.
Assessment: 100% coursework (including in-class tests)
Contact hours: 40 hours

English Skills for Academic and Professional Environments 1 (Session One - IS410)

Available to students where English is not their first language. This module is for students with an interest in Business and who are looking to develop and apply key academic skills to help them progress in this area of study. This module offers training in research and communication skills necessary for further academic study.

The distinctive focal point of the module is the personal & academic development you will gain, developing subject specific skills in essay writing, critical reading and researching.

There will be guided research projects from expertise on topics such as Corporate Social Responsibility, Globalisation and Digital Media Marketing. Through these projects, you will learn how to use and apply key academic skills such as critical reading, researching and essay writing to produce a portfolio of work that centres on one of these specific business themes. You will engage with audio and text based content, in order to help carry out your independent research projects using the library resources.

You will also be trained in, and will practise, the listening and speaking skills required to understand and contribute to seminars, lectures and tutorials typically found in higher education settings.

Learning outcomes:

  • Identify, interpret and analyse the key arguments of relevant subject specific sources to support the communication of the student’s own well-structured coherent arguments.
  • Produce oral discourse and genres typically found in subject specific academic and professional environments (at B2 level or above).
  • Create texts containing discipline specific language, form and rhetorical features that communicate arguments effectively (at B2 level or above).

Teaching method: Seminars and tutorials.
Assessment: 100% coursework
Contact hours: 40 hours

English Skills for Academic and Professional Environments 2 (Session Two - IS411)

Available to students where English is not their first language. This module is for students with an interest in Business and who are looking to develop and apply key academic skills to help them progress in this area of study. This module offers training in research and communication skills necessary for further academic study.

The distinctive focal point of the module is the personal & academic development you will gain, developing subject specific skills in essay writing, critical reading and researching.

There will be guided research projects from expertise on topics such as Corporate Social Responsibility, Globalisation and Digital Media Marketing. Through these projects, you will learn how to use and apply key academic skills such as critical reading, researching and essay writing to produce a portfolio of work that centres on one of these specific business themes. You will engage with audio and text based content, in order to help carry out your independent research projects using the library resources.

You will also be trained in, and will practise, the listening and speaking skills required to understand and contribute to seminars, lectures and tutorials typically found in higher education settings.

Learning outcomes:

  • Identify, interpret and analyse the key arguments of relevant subject specific sources to support the communication of the student’s own well-structured coherent arguments.
  • Produce oral discourse and genres typically found in subject specific academic and professional environments (at B2 level or above).
  • Create texts containing discipline specific language, form and rhetorical features that communicate arguments effectively (at B2 level or above)

Teaching method: Seminars and tutorials.
Assessment: 100% coursework
Contact hours: 40 hours

Intercultural Skills for Effective Workplace Communication 1 (Session One - IS412)

This module is suited for students who are looking at careers in global industries, as they will foster flexibility in thinking, encourage empathy, and have an awareness of others.

This module will provide you with the opportunity to explore your intercultural awareness and develop your ability to communicate effectively across cultures. The module will introduce theories regarding intercultural communication and focus on different aspects of working in multicultural contexts where cultural knowledge and assumptions influence effective communication.

The study of intercultural communication is a growing field of inter-disciplinary research, spanning a number of disciplines including Linguistics, Sociology, Psychology and Business. You will have a global insight into the workplace, identifying and reflecting on how aspects of cultural diversity may influence communication in workplace scenarios. Throughout this module, you will examine a wide range of workplace communicative situations (e.g. email correspondence with clients; service encounters; negotiating with potential clients; managing relationships with colleagues) and business case studies (e.g. how business adapts advertisements for different markets). The theoretical analysis of local and global business case studies, will support your intercultural skills needed for successful communication in diverse professional environments.

Through participation in discussions, simulations, presentations and research projects, you will reflect and develop on your own communication. You will be expected to research and critically engage with the theories and apply the knowledge gained to small-scale practical project(s).

Learning outcomes:

  • Examine and analyse concepts of culture and intercultural communication in relation to diverse professional contexts.
  • Identify and reflect on workplace situations where aspects of cultural diversity may impact on communication.
  • Apply theoretical knowledge to gain a deeper understanding of diverse workplace scenarios.
  • Demonstrate self-awareness and other-awareness when analysing intercultural encounters and examining the impact of cultural backgrounds on different communication styles.

Teaching method: Fieldwork, seminars and workshops.
Assessment: 100% coursework
Contact hours: 42 hours

Intercultural Skills for Effective Workplace Communication 2 (Session Two - IS413)

This module is suited for students who are looking at careers in global industries, as they will foster flexibility in thinking, encourage empathy, and have an awareness of others.

This module will provide you with the opportunity to explore your intercultural awareness and develop your ability to communicate effectively across cultures. The module will introduce theories regarding intercultural communication and focus on different aspects of working in multicultural contexts where cultural knowledge and assumptions influence effective communication.

The study of intercultural communication is a growing field of inter-disciplinary research, spanning a number of disciplines including Linguistics, Sociology, Psychology and Business. You will have a global insight into the workplace, identifying and reflecting on how aspects of cultural diversity may influence communication in workplace scenarios. Throughout this module, you will examine a wide range of workplace communicative situations (e.g. email correspondence with clients; service encounters; negotiating with potential clients; managing relationships with colleagues) and business case studies (e.g. how business adapts advertisements for different markets). The theoretical analysis of local and global business case studies, will support your intercultural skills needed for successful communication in diverse professional environments.

Through participation in discussions, simulations, presentations and research projects, you will reflect and develop on your own communication. You will be expected to research and critically engage with the theories and apply the knowledge gained to small-scale practical project(s).

Learning outcomes:

  • Examine and analyse concepts of culture and intercultural communication in relation to diverse professional contexts.
  • Identify and reflect on workplace situations where aspects of cultural diversity may impact on communication.
  • Apply theoretical knowledge to gain a deeper understanding of diverse workplace scenarios.
  • Demonstrate self-awareness and other-awareness when analysing intercultural encounters and examining the impact of cultural backgrounds on different communication styles

Teaching method: Fieldwork, seminars and workshops.
Assessment: 100% coursework
Contact hours: 42 hours

British Film (Session One - IS426)

This module provides a historical survey of British cinema as well as an introduction to critical and theoretical debates associated with national British cinema. Specifically, we cover the relationship between British cinema and British culture, history and identity. This module is ideal for students looking to further their studies and careers in Film Studies, Cinematic Arts and Film Production.

You will examine how British cinema has represented other dimensions of identity such as class, ethnicity and sexuality.

You will consider a range of films in order to explore how British cinema:

  • Responds to the Second World War and the decline of the British Empire.
  • Reflects transformations of society associated with multiculturalism.
  • Functions in a transnational or even post-national era.

Through group discussion in seminars, you will demonstrate an understanding of the changing political and cultural context in which some representations are produced, including the change in British cinema's representation of ‘Britishness’ and how specific genres such as the crime film, and the period drama have functioned in the national and international marketplace. This module provide you with a critical awareness of how British Cinema responded to the Second World War and the decline of the British Empire.

This module is open to all, and no prior knowledge is necessary. You will just need an open mind and an interest in historical shifts within cinema!

The Department of Media and Film has 94% of students in work or further study six months after graduating (Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey 2017).

Learning outcomes:

  • Demonstrate an awareness of the problems involved in constituting a 'history' of a British national cinema.
  • Demonstrate a critical understanding of British cinema's representations of Britishness.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the changing political and cultural context in which such representations have been produced.
  • Critically analyse specific film texts in the light of these understandings.

Teaching method: Lectures and seminars.
Assessment: 100% coursework
Contact hours: 42 hours

Digital Landscapes (Session Two - IS428)

This module will appeal to students who have an online presence and would like a deeper understanding of the digital environment; explored through the different uses of digital media, with social media platforms used as case studies. You will explore digital media through its saturation of everyday life, and learn how it re-organises cultural production and re-mediates learning environments.

The module aims to:

  • Examine this digital environment through both practical and theoretical perspectives.
  • Examine developments in new media with a particular emphasis on different uses of digital media, enabling students to make distinctions between kinds of material, genres and platforms.
  • Deliver practical approach to help equip students to use digital media to understand the digital environment as media and cultural forms.

Through practical workshops, you will explore word clouds or Google's N-gram viewer, cover digital ethnography by researching Twitter comments and examine simple ways to track our digital selves via social networks ads and tracking software such as Ghostery. You will demonstrate use of digital tools to enhance your study and to take a critically informed stance on existing practices, evaluating the social, cultural and political consequences of networked media technologies. The module may include a possible field trip to The Science Museum in London and guest lectures on digital media tools.

The Department of Media and Film publish critical research and engage with exciting media projects, including creative writing and drawing workshops for the Brighton Digital Festival; Algorithmic Autobiographies explores writing with your digital self.

Learning outcomes:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of underlying concepts involved in critically analysing and using digital media systems of all kinds.
  • Apply sound judgements in how to treat, develop and create with digital resources and digital tools.
  • Understand and differentiate between principle theories and concepts of digital media and of innovation processes in media systems.
  • Demonstrate the ability to think critically and evaluate social, cultural and political consequences of networked media technologies.

Teaching method: Lectures, seminars and workshops.
Assessment: 100% coursework
Contact hours: 40 hours

Experience Prototyping (Session One - IS402)

Prototyping is a key activity in the design process, which informs both the process and design decisions. This is a hands-on module, introducing you to the process of making prototypes, starting with basics of card/foam/paper and progressing through different levels, to 3D Printing.

It enables you to gain a first-hand appreciation of active engagement with developing prototypes. This module illustrates the value of prototypes in three critical design activities: understanding materials, exploring design ideas and in communicating design concepts. This module will also ensure correct methods are utilised and understood as far as health and safety is concerned.

This module is for those interested in art, technology & development and product design, and will develop transferable skills for the marketing, product design, graphics industries. This is a practice module with 70% of time spent in workshops, you will be actively engaged in this prototyping, as the module is topical and innovative, with students developing a deeper understanding of the process of 3D Printing.

This module is extremely hands- on, with every aspect of theory that students learn being put into practical work; these sessions are linked to the assessment where students will showcase their prototypes towards the end of the session.

As this is an introduction to Prototyping, this module is open to students of any academic background. An example of the module structure is outlined below:

  • Week 1 - An introduction to prototyping, looking at form and surface design using subtractive and additive prototyping methods
  • Week 2 - Investigating structural properties with prototypes
  • Week 3 - We look at further developing prototypes and adding detail

The Product Design degree are accredited by the Institution of Engineering Designers (iED) providing graduates with further opportunities. Graduate, Lucy Hughes has been named this year’s UK national James Dyson Award winner for her innovative solution to single-use plastics and inefficient waste streams by harnessing fish offcuts to create a unique bioplastic alternative called MarinaTex.

Learning outcomes:

  • Demonstrate a systematic understanding of different materials and the ability to plan and source relevant materials and technologies for the creation of models and prototypes.
  • Demonstrate the ability to use prototyping to create, explore, illustrate and develop and design idea.
  • Demonstrate practical modelling and presentation skills to both specialist and non-specialist audiences.
  • Demonstrate how to use prototyping as not only a tool for creativity but for communication, reflection and dialogue.

Teaching method: Lectures, seminars and workshops.
Assessment: 100% coursework
Contact hours: 40 hours

Digital Media Concepts and Applications (Session Two - IS429)

In our changing digital world, this module will provide a deeper understanding behind human perception of multimedia such as colour and sound; how perception relates to the capture, display, storage and transmission of media. This module offers the grounding into digital media of computer science and will interest students looking for an isnight into digital multimedia production and distribution.

You will be introduced to the technical principles and fundamental concepts of digital media. This will include human visual and aural perception, pixel-based and vector graphics, graphics formats, networked multimedia, web development concepts, digital video, mobile-based digital media and digital audio concepts including compression.

You will develop core practical skills and theory, by exploring the challenges with digital video, mobile-based media, and through interactive lab sessions, you will develop your understanding of building code-driven webpages using html, CSS, JavaScript.

This module will provide you with a theoretical understanding of the capture, display, storage and transmission of digital multimedia and introduce the technical principles and hardware underlying these concepts. You will put this theory into motion when in the labs, with access to Double Screen Computers and high-spec software to enable you to synthesise multimedia and web-based content.

The Department of Informatics plays a major role in interdisciplinary research centres at University of Sussex, including the Centre for Computational Neuroscience and Robotics (CCNR), the Centre for Research in Cognitive Science (COGS), the Sackler Centre for Consciousness Science (SCSS) and Sussex Neuroscience.

Learning outcomes:

  • Describe the principles behind human perception of media such as colour and sound and how perception relates to the capture, display, storage and transmission of this media.
  • Recognise the wider issues involved with multimedia production and distribution.
  • Identify and summarise the technological basis of the capture, display, storage and transmission of sound, video, image and graphical based multimedia.
  • Synthesise multimedia and web-based content.

Teaching method: Laboratory and lectures.
Assessment: 100% coursework.
Contact hours: 40 hours

Natural Language Engineering with Python (Session Two - IS430)

This module teaches students how a computer processes and ideally understands the English language. It explores how computers mirror human behaviour: “What we can do with the English language? How do we find certain words in documents? How do we find positive/negative words in the same document?”

Through this module, you will acquire a deeper understanding of how large quantities of data are ranked in search engines to coincide with search terms. This module will provide you with a theoretical and practical understanding of how generic Natural Language Processing (NLP) technologies can be deployed to large quantities of realistic data. This will include technologies for text pre-processing, text classification, sequence labelling (e.g. part-of-speech tagging and named entity recognition), those that make use of manually curated linguistic resources (e.g., WordNet) and those where meaning is acquired through statistical patterns (distributional semantics). You will be introduced to the Python programming language including many of the core Data Science libraries including NumPy, SciPy, PANDAS and SCIKIT-Learn, all accessed on Double Screen Computers and high-spec software.

Distinctive to Sussex, this module has an applied nature, with access to Double Screen Computers and high-spec software in the Laboratory, so will appeal to students looking for a more practical module. You will ideally have a background in computer science and be familiar with machine learning, and/or with some academic background in computing, engineering and business. This module explores the idea of humans versus robotics – therefore, if you are interested in Artificial Intelligence, then this module is for you.

The Department of Informatics plays a major role in interdisciplinary research centres at University of Sussex, including the Centre for Computational Neuroscience and Robotics (CCNR), the Centre for Research in Cognitive Science (COGS), the Sackler Centre for Consciousness Science (SCSS) and Sussex Neuroscience.

Learning outcomes:

  • Describe applications and summarise the underlying principles of current NLP technology.
  • Recognise the wider and ongoing challenges in using NLP technology.
  • Deploy generic NLP technologies to large quantities of realistic data.
  • Design and run an empirical investigation to determine which language processing technologies are effective in a given scenario.

Teaching method: Lectures and seminars.
Assessment: 100% coursework.
Contact hours: 40 hours

Principles of Data Science in Python (Session Two - IS431)

This module will provide students with the practical tools and techniques required to build, analyse and interpret 'big data' datasets. We will cover all aspects of the Data Science process including collection, munging or wrangling, cleaning, exploratory data analysis, visualization, statistical inference, model building and implications for applications in the real world.

We will look at data manipulating both politically and in the global business industry. We will design testable hypotheses, exploring how data is analysed in meaningful ways by applying suitable experimental methods to determine whether these hypotheses are supported by robust and reliable data. An example of the testable hypotheses that students will be asked to conclude on is: “Do male actors get paid more than females actors?” Students actively analysed medium-large datasets from IMDB statistics to prove/disprove the hypothesis.

During the module, you will work with real world datasets and apply tecnqiues learnt in practical sessions and lectures, to scrape data from the Internet, develop and test hypotheses and present findings. In the laboratory, students will be introduced to the Python programming language including a number of fundamental standard Python libraries/toolkits for Data Scientists including NumPy, SciPy, PANDAS and SCIKIT-Learn, all accessed on Double Screen Computers and high-spec software.

This an introduction course aimed for students wanting to develop a deeper understanding of Python, students should have some mathematical background and an interest in code programming.

The Department of Informatics plays a major role in interdisciplinary research centres at University of Sussex, including the Centre for Computational Neuroscience and Robotics (CCNR), the Centre for Research in Cognitive Science (COGS), the Sackler Centre for Consciousness Science (SCSS) and Sussex Neuroscience.

Learning outcomes:

  • Analyse real-world `big data’ datasets using appropriate tools and techniques.
  • Design testable hypotheses and apply suitable experimental methods to determine whether those hypotheses are supported by the data.
  • Evaluate the applicability of different tools and techniques for data analysis and visualisation in different scenarios.
  • Summarise an analysis of big data and present data in an appropriate format.

Teaching method: Laboratory and lectures.
Assessment: 100% coursework.
Contact hours: 40 hours

Gender Equality and the Law (Session One - IS433)

This module introduces the relationship between law and gender. You will explore different areas where law interacts with, and regulates, gender relations while also introducing feminist legal theory. You will acquire a deeper understanding of current affairs and the substantive areas of study may include issues such as reproductive rights (abortion, surrogacy, and new reproductive technologies), sexual violence, body image and pornography, prostitution, parity democracy, and maternity rights. The module is framed around feminist theory; therefore, you will gain a basic understanding of how this can be applied to law, and the impact of laws upon gender equality.

This is a first year module, therefore you will not be required to have a background in Law or Politics. Students on this module will benefit from the research expertise in the School of Law, Politics and Sociology University of Sussex; due to the School’s research centres of:

  • Centre of Gender Studies
  • Centre for Human Rights Research
  • Centre for the Study of Sexual Dissidence

Learning outcomes:

  • Acquire an understanding of the relationship between gender, law and society.
  • Evaluate the impact of laws upon gender equality.
  • Have a basic knowledge of the ways in which feminist theory can apply to the law.

Teaching method: Lectures, seminars and tutorials.
Assessment: 100% coursework.
Contact hours: 40 hours

Human Rights Law (Session One - IS434)

This module explores how rights are protected within different human rights systems at a regional and international level. Contemporary human rights issues (e.g. religious dress, minority and indigenous rights and LGBT rights) and current challenges facing the human rights community are considered; focusing on the interpretation of rights in contemporary issues, the effectiveness of mechanisms and whether rights are universal. You will focus in particular on the core UN human rights treaties and the role of regional human rights courts such as the European Court of Human Rights.

You will consider key critiques such as feminism and cultural relativism, and with this theoretical knowledge you will demonstrate the ability to develop arguments, and critically understand and engage with contemporary challenges and debates within the field of human rights law. This module will interest those with a background in Law, International Relations, and Global and Development studies.

This module benefits from teaching and research expertise through the Sussex Centre for Human Rights Research; a recognised centre of excellence in human rights research. The School of Law, Politics and Sociology is ranked 23rd in the UK for Law in the Guardian University League Table 2018.

Learning outcomes:

  • Evidence a coherent and detailed knowledge of major human rights institutions and frameworks.
  • Critically understand the protection of rights within these institutions and frameworks and the implications of this for the universality of rights.
  • Critically understand and engage with contemporary challenges and debates within the field of human rights law.
  • Demonstrate the ability to develop arguments.

Teaching method: Lectures, seminars and tutorials.
Assessment: 100% coursework.
Contact hours: 40 hours

Global Migration Law (Session Two - IS435)

This module covers the legal and policy frameworks governing migration at international, regional and domestic levels. This will include understanding how the United Nations, European Union, Council of Europe, and UK authorities govern migration, through a range of tools. The module will interest students with a background in Law, International Relations, Global Studies, Politics and Sociology.

The module will combine the legal analysis of legislation and case law, on the one hand, with the contextual analysis of migratory trends at a global level on the other. You will explore broader theoretical, ethical, normative and political debates regarding human rights, security and solidarity.

Throughout this module you will develop through the following areas:

  • Expand understanding and acquire new competencies in evaluating legal and policy frameworks relating to migration, and a critique and appreciation of broader ethical, normative and political debates.
  • Think critically and demonstrate theoretical knowledge of key trends in migration law and policy at a global level.
  • Devise and sustain arguments in assessing the governance tools used to regulate migration by international, regional and domestic actors.

This is a second year university-level module, and you will be expected to demonstrate coherent and theoretical knowledge, show critical skills develop arguments in assessing the governance tools, and evaluate legal and policy frameworks. This module benefits from the teaching and research expertise from the University of Sussex Centre for Human Rights Research; a recognised centre of excellence in human rights research. The School of Law, Politics and Sociology is ranked 23rd in the UK for Law in the Guardian University League Table 2018.

Learning outcomes:

  • Demonstrate a coherent and detailed theoretical knowledge of the key trends in migration law and policy at a global level.
  • Critically understand and appreciate the key traits of the international, regional and UK laws and practices governing the regulation of migration.
  • Develop arguments in assessing the governance tools used to regulate migration by international, regional and domestic actors.
  • Acquire new competencies in evaluating the legal and policy frameworks regulating migration, including from the perspective of broader ethical, normative and political debates.

Teaching method: Lectures, seminars and tutorials.
Assessment: 100% coursework.
Contact hours: 40 hours

Global Antitrust in a Digital World (Session Two - IS436)

This module explores the importance of the role of Antitrust (Competition) Law in a global and digital context. We will consider whether the role of antitrust is to protect consumers; or to protect the market? We will focus upon the biggest challenge for governments, regulators and consumers. How should antitrust law used to regulate “Big Tech”? The growth of large cross-border power and digital companies, allegedly wield an outsized influence over intellectual property rights, democracy, human rights and our data. Can, and should, antitrust law be used to regulate this power?

Through interactive lectures, you will demonstrate an awareness of the major contemporary issues involved in the use of antitrust law, particularly in the Big Tech industry - Facebook, Apple, Amazon, Netflix, Google and Uber may be used as case studies. You will need to demonstrate engagement with up-to-date knowledge of the common features of global antitrust law including cartels, monopolies, dominant positions, mergers, state intervention in markets and intellectual property rights.

This is a second year module, so whilst no specific academic background is required, students will be expected to analyse and evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of using antitrust law. In particular, how antitrust deals with emerging contemporary issues involving intellectual property and alleged power of digital platforms. This module will interest students from academic backgrounds in Business, Law, Marketing, Digital Technology and Politics.

This module benefits from the teaching and research expertise from a range of fields, including EU Market Law, Free movement provisions and Competition Law. School of Law, Politics and Sociology was recognised as a Top Uni in the UK for best politics scene (Which? University 2018).

Learning outcomes:

  • Demonstrate an up-to-date knowledge of the common features of global antitrust law. This involves cartels, monopolies and dominant positions, mergers, state intervention in markets and intellectual property rights.
  • Demonstrate an awareness of the major contemporary issues involved in the use of antitrust law by governments and regulators.
  • Analyse and evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of using antitrust law to deal with emerging contemporary issues involving intellectual property and the alleged power of digital platforms. This will include an understanding of the business model of digital platforms.
  • Interact effectively with different policy approaches towards the use of antitrust law and policy as a regulatory tool at the national and international level.

Teaching method: Lectures and tutorials.
Assessment: 100% coursework.
Contact hours: 40 hours

Health Psychology (Session One - IS420)

This module will interest students currently/progressing onto further study in Psychology, Public Health, and Occupational therapy, with the focus on the history and scope of health psychology.

The aim of this module is for you to acquire the knowledge, understanding and skills to recognise the role health psychology can play in health. You will explore how broader social factors can affect health and discuss health care in global contexts. You will draw on your own experiences to evaluate the role of health cognitions, behaviours, systems and health promoting campaigns in different cultures, and demographic populations.

You will consider a range of psychological theories and methodologies used within the discipline. This module covers the history and scope of health psychology from origin to virtual clinics; and you will have the opportunity to contribute to and design interactive activitie recognising the complex roles that psychology plays in human health.

Topics on this module may include:

  • How do dispositional factors influence our health (e.g. emotion, mental health, positivity), and exploring the relationship between stress & illness.
  • Health inequalities; analysing in what ways certain demographic populations might be disadvantaged.
  • How can we explain people’s health behaviours?
  • What factors are important for people accessing appropriate healthcare when they need it?

Teaching will be delivered in small groups, with more frequent seminars and workshops than lectures, providing students with the opportunity to engage in discussion and explore different perspectives of the content covered. You will reflect and analyse the wider processes affecting health, both in terms of own and others experiences. This module will enable you to think critically and build confidence in talking about academic research, theory and methodologies.

The School of Psychology has been ranked 12th in the Independent Complete University Guide 2018, and has leading research expertise in four research groups: Behavioural and Clinical Neuroscience, Cognitive Psychology, Developmental and Clinical Psychology, and Social and Applied Psychology.

Learning outcomes:

  • Design a hypothetical study, drawing upon a published study.
  • Describe potential interactive pathways for psychological states on physiological health using prepared reading.
  • Reflect upon the wider processes affecting health, both in terms of own and others experiences.
  • Evaluate the potential impact of an intervention on subsequent health.

Teaching method: Lectures and seminars.
Assessment: 100% coursework.
Contact hours: 42 hours

Psychology and Social Issues (Session Two - IS421)

This module offers students an interdisciplinary exploration of contemporary social issues (e.g. current affairs, abortions, body image) from a psychological and sociological perspective. Each session aims to introduce you a specific societal concern to provide a platform for debate and interactive activities.

There are no specific pre-requisites for this module, however it is suitable for students who have studied first year of Psychology and are familiar with the academic approaches. You will be expected to demonstrate an understanding of psychological and sociological approaches to studying social issues, and will need to analyse and evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of competing theoretical perspectives and research.

Areas covered typically include: bullying and ostracism; prejudice and discrimination; body image and the media’ rape and victim blaming; social media and relationships; inequality and materialism; and critical perspectives on addiction.

Throughout the module you will explore these contemporary social issues from a psychological and sociological perspective, engaging in small group discussions and activities with a focus on applying relevant readings and theory to real world situations.

The School of Psychology has been ranked 12th in the Independent Complete University Guide 2018, and has leading research expertise in four research groups: Behavioural and Clinical Neuroscience, Cognitive Psychology, Developmental and Clinical Psychology, and Social and Applied Psychology.

Learning outcomes:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of psychological and sociological approaches to studying social issues.
  • Demonstrate an awareness of the major contemporary debates in psychology theory applied to explore social issues and identify areas where the knowledge base is most/least secure.
  • Analyse and evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of competing theoretical perspectives and/or research evidence.
  • Interact effectively within a team, giving and receiving information and ideas and modifying responses where appropriate.

Teaching method: Lectures, seminars and tutorials.
Assessment: 100% coursework.
Contact hours: 40 hours

Clinical Psychology and Mental Health (Session Two - IS422)

This module will appeal to students who are currently in/progressing onto psychology, biology and public health. You will be introduced to the most common psychological disorders, explore contemporary issues with regard to both diagnosis and treatment. You will receive a basic understanding of the causation, diagnosis and treatment of mental health disorders.

Teaching involves a blend of lecture and seminar methods, and you will have the opportunity for small group work, interacting effectively within a team, exploring key societal issues and debates pertaining to the conceptualisation and treatment of mental health. For each group of psychological disorders, you will learn about diagnostic criteria, key theories of causation across a range of models (such as biomedical, cognitive and psychological models), and the efficacy of therapies and/or treatments available.

Typically (but this can change from year-to-year) students will explore anxiety disorders (e.g., social anxiety), mood disorders (e.g., depression), and psychotic disorders (e.g., schizophrenia), but coverage of disorders is not limited to these groups. You will also have the opportunity to consider the societal consequences of medicalising mental health and explore contrasting non-mainstream approaches.

The School of Psychology has been ranked 12th in the Independent Complete University Guide 2018, and is No.1 for employability at the University of Sussex. The School has leading research expertise in Clinical Psychology, includes the Dementia Research Group which investigates Alzheimer’s and Dementia.

Learning outcomes:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the theories applied to explain the causation, maintenance and treatment of the most common mental health disorders.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of key societal issues and debates pertaining to the conceptualisation and treatment of mental health.
  • Analyse and evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of competing theoretical perspectives and/or research evidence.
  • Interact effectively within a team, giving and receiving information and ideas and modifying responses where appropriate.

Teaching method: Lectures, seminars and tutorials.
Assessment: 100% coursework.
Contact hours: 40 hours

Forensic and Investigative Psychology (Session One - IS423)

This module is suited for students who have studied first year of Psychology and are familiar with the academic background. The module examines current affairs, real-world situations and explores perception, memory and cognitive bias supported by psychological theory to criminological and forensic contexts. You will be expected to demonstrate the ability to evaluate conceptual and methodological issues involved in applying theories to real-life contexts.

This module is concerned with the application of psychological theory and research to answer crucial questions in criminological and forensic contexts. Questions typically explored include (this may change year-on-year): How reliable are eyewitnesses’ accounts of what they have seen, and their identifications of faces they have encountered? Why is it that faces of other races are more likely to be misidentified in police line-ups? Can people be recognised reliably from ID cards, passports and CCTV? What is wrong with current face recall systems? Do children make reliable witnesses? How is memory affected by stress? How can we tell whether or not someone is lying? Why do some people become criminals but not others? What is the relationship between mental illness and crime?

This module integrates lecturing and small group teaching, to support you in taking a critical perspective on contemporary and applied cognitive psychology. You will develop the ability to evaluate the adequacy of empirical research on the topics covered and communicate theoretical ideas through group discussions and assignments.

This module is unique to Sussex as some of the psychological theory and empirical research to forensic and investigative psychology that you will engage with, is based on interviewing techniques devised by former Head of School, Tom Ormerod.

Learning outcomes:

  • Demonstrate a sound knowledge of contemporary theories and research on cognitive psychology in real-world contexts.
  • Evaluate the conceptual and methodological issues involved in applying these theories to real life situations.
  • Demonstrate an ability to evaluate the adequacy of empirical research on the topics covered.
  • Communicate theoretical ideas and practical information through group assignments in class.

Teaching method: Lectures, seminars and tutorials.
Assessment: 100% coursework.
Contact hours: 40 hours

Developmental Psychology (Session Two - IS424)

This module explores the psychology of child development from birth through childhood. The emphasis is on exploring major theories and research in the field of developmental psychology and you will examine contemporary research in five key areas of development: biological, emotional, communicative, cognitive and social.

There are no specific requirements for this module, however we encourage enrolment for students with a background or interest in Education Psychology. The module will offer team-based learning to encourage group interactions and student cantered-learning. You will explore major theories and research in the field of developmental psychology and their application to the real world.

Topics covered typically include (this may change from year-to-year): attachment and temperament; emotional development and regulation of affect; language acquisition; constructivist and socio-cultural perspectives to cognitive development, social-cognitive development, and peer relations.

Through innovative teaching methods, you will be challenged to unpack contributions of nature and nurture, explore why individual differences exist in development, and develop an appreciation of the methodological constraints on developmental psychology research.

Teaching will be delivered in small groups providing students with the opportunity to engage in discussion and explore different perspectives of the content covered. There are no specific requirements for this module, as it has been designed to meet the requirements for accreditation as a core module for psychology majors and those interested in education psychology.

The School of Psychology has established The Developmental and Clinical Psychology research group; aiming to advance theoretical approaches to human development and clinical psychology in order to inform practical interventions to support cognitive, emotional and social growth.

Learning outcomes:

  • Demonstrate an up-to-date detailed knowledge of developmental psychology theories and concepts.
  • Demonstrate an awareness of the major contemporary issues in developmental psychology and identify areas where the knowledge base is most/least secure.
  • Analyse and evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of competing theoretical perspectives and/or research evidence.
  • Interact effectively within a team, giving and receiving information and ideas and modifying responses where appropriate.

Teaching method: Lectures, seminars and tutorials.
Assessment: 100% coursework.
Contact hours: 40 hours

Brain and Behaviour (Session One - IS425)

This module explores how knowledge of the brain structure and function help us to understand the production of behaviour. This module has been designed to meet the requirements for accreditation as a core module for psychology majors. Throughout the module, you will develop you understanding of the structure and the functioning of fundamental units of the brain. Topics covered typically include (this may change from year-to-year):

  • ionic mechanisms underlying the nerve action potential;
  • synapses and neurotransmission;
  • neuropharmacology of commonly used anxiolytic drugs;
  • functional neuroanatomy of the human brain;
  • brain development and neurogenetics;
  • behavioural genetics;
  • sensory and motor systems;
  • neural mechanisms in cognition, reward, learning and memory;
  • Neuroplasticity.

Module delivery incorporates lectures with small group seminars and practical classes to facilitate a diverse and immersive learning experience. You will be expected to demonstrate an understanding of the relevance of biological phenomena to the explanation of behaviour. Through in-class simulations, you will describe ways commonly used anxiolytic and psychoactive drugs effect brain function and how the nervous system contributes to adaptive behaviour.

The School of Psychology has been recognised as 30th for European Teaching Rankings (Times Higher Education Wold University Rankings 2019); with academic and research expertise in areas including the Behavioural and Clinical Research Group. Within this research, there is a close inter-relationship between animal, human and clinical work, and an emphasis on translational research.

Learning outcomes:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the relevance of underlying biological phenomena to the explanation of behaviour.
  • Describe ways in which commonly used anxiolytic and psychoactive drugs effect brain function and should appreciate how the nervous system contributes to adaptive behaviour.
  • Demonstrate and understanding of the structure and the functioning of fundamental units of the brain.
  • Describe and evaluate the role of an individual difference in at least one area of biological psychology.

Teaching method: Lectures, seminars and tutorials.
Assessment: 100% coursework.
Contact hours: 40 hours

Sexual Dissidence: Non-normative Cultural Identities (Session Two - IS405)

The University of Sussex has been a pioneer in the study of gender and sexuality for over thirty years. Throughout this module, you will reflect on individuals and cultures that have at one time been considered (and are sometimes happy to be considered) aberrant, not “normal”. The module balances questions of identity (who we are, who we think we are, who others think we are) with questions of desire and sexual aim (who – or what – we are attracted to, if anything). This module asks you to focus on one question throughout: should we understand ourselves, and be understood in turn, as sexual and gendered identities; “straight”, “queer”, “female”, “heterosexual”, etc., or by our attachments; who we love, who we desire?

Emphasis will be placed on works from Britain or from the British post-colonial diaspora and you will examine mediums including literature, art and film. You do not need any knowledge of theories of gender and sexuality in advance, only an open mind.

You will reflect critically in group presentations on cultural phenomena that challenges normative notions of sexual and gender identities. The module is thought provoking and you will explore questions of identity by developing your knowledge of the history of sexual identities from close readings.

The module may include a field-trip to the home of filmmaker, theatre practitioner, and writer Derek Jarman (1942 – 1994) at Dungeness. This module also takes place at the same time as Brighton LGBT Pride-weekend the most popular and largest Gay Pride event in the UK.

University of Sussex was a pioneer in the study of Gender and Sexuality for over 30 years. Including the first graduate course in the 1960s by Alan Sinfield & Jonathan Dolimore; who were radical intellectuals and hugely influential in the development of queer studies in the UK. This Sexual Dissidence module stems from this and the University of Sussex Centre of Sexual Dissidence which explores progression from the 60s.

The module requires no background; however it would be helpful for those going on to study literature, film, media, art history, history, amongst other academic disciplines and would appeal to those interested in Gender Theory.

Learning outcomes:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the history of sexual identities through readings of culture and theory, and to understand the distinction between theories of identity and theories of sexual aim.
  • To reflect critically on cultural phenomena that challenge normative notions of sexual and gender identities, and that provide evidence of non-normative sexual aims.
  • To communicate the results of critical reflection in a collegial group presentation.
  • Develop an argument from close reading and historical context.

Teaching method: Fieldwork, seminars and workshops.
Assessment: 100% coursework.
Contact hours: 40 hours

Literature and the Sussex Environment: Joseph Conrad to Virginia Woolf (Session Two - IS406)

It is urgent that we question the relationship between ourselves and the natural environment. In this module we will explore the relationship between writing and our urban, cultural, and natural environments.

The environmental humanities pay particular attention to the relationship between the arts and ecology (including questions of climate change), and challenge the centrality of the human. Questions of the environment provide this module with a framework to explore just some of the places and landscapes habited or imagined by writers and artists.

The module uses fieldwork to help us locate the literary imagination in real places. This may include (but will vary each year) Henry James and Joseph Conrad in Rye, Virginia Woolf in Newhaven and at Monk’s House, Graham Greene in Brighton, and Raymond Williams in Seaford. These literary figures are known for taking inspiration from the local environment, including Rye, Newhaven, Brighton and Seaford. You will engage with these immediate surroundings, writing on location and drawing inspiration from places infamous in Locative Literature. These will be presented in both a portfolio and report, as wither a creative writing or critical piece.

Throughout this module, you will develop critical knowledge and awareness of the “inextricable” relations between literature and the environment and will acquire a critical and conceptual vocabulary for analysis of contemporary and traditional forms of literature, from an ecological perspective. This module may include guest lecture from novelists and writers based at the University of Sussex and local area.

This is ideal for critical and creative writing students, particularly students with an interest in literature in the environment. Students will be asked to consider questions surrounding climate change, and therefore this module may also appeal to eco-conscious students.

Learning outcomes:

  • Develop critical knowledge and awareness of the inextricable relations between literature and the environment.
  • Develop an enhanced understanding and appreciation of specific literary works in the context of contemporary environmental questions and problems.
  • Acquire a critical and conceptual vocabulary for the analysis and interrogation of contemporary literature, and of more traditional forms of literary criticism, from an ecological perspective.
  • Develop an understanding of the possibilities of creative writing vis-à-vis ecology and the environment.

Teaching method: Fieldwork, lectures and seminars.
Assessment: 100% coursework.
Contact hours: 40 hours

Children's Literature (Session Two - IS408)

Our most loved books are often those we read in childhood, and these stay with us through later life – this module will provide a space to think differently when addressing these key texts by analysing the relationships between children’s literature and contemporary culture.

This module challenges previous notions and sentiments of our most loved books, students will thoughtfully critique and question the politics of best loved works in children’s literature.

George Orwell commented “the worst books are often the most important, because they are usually the ones that are read earliest in life.” How, then, should we read the books we love? Can we be critical and remain enthusiastic? Students on this module will read some of the best-loved works of children’s literature and ask in what ways they are utopian, and in what ways toxic? What are the politics of even the simplest of stories? Are they liberating or conservative? What about terms of race, class, and gender?

This module is ideal for students with a background in English, Art and History as we look at a variety of mediums. We will consider the role of illustration, watch classic film adaptations, and read seminal works by authors including Lewis Carroll, Neil Gaiman, C. S. Lewis, Beatrix Potter, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and J. K. Rowling. Through small group seminars, you will discuss the key themes addressed apply these to your own written and spoken analysis of texts studied during the module.

Learning outcomes:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the relationships between contemporary cultural contexts and children’s literature.
  • Participate in seminar discussions on themes addressed by the module.
  • Display an ability to discuss relationships between texts studied during the module.
  • Develop and demonstrate original written and spoken analysis of texts studied during the module.

Teaching method: Fieldwork, seminars and tutorials.
Assessment: 100% coursework.
Contact hours: 40 hours

Approaches to Contemporary Performance (Session One - IS409)

This module is ideal for students looking to develop a career in the performing arts industry. This module provides a greater understanding of techniques and methods used for developing contemporary performances and you will have the opportunity to develop your own practical work by applying the techniques learnt.

You will be introduced to a range of approaches to making collaborative and solo theatre performances that have emerged since 1970. Through readings, field trips, and discussion focused on a range of groups/artists who will be used as case studies, we will investigate the ways theatre performance has responded to (and often resisted) the huge social and cultural shifts in the contemporary period. Together we will consider some of the issues and challenges these new approaches raise and the way they have expanded our understanding of the theatre event. We pay attention to the opportunities afforded by theatre and theatricality in an increasingly uncertain world where precariousness has become a way of life. We will consider how this is reflected in a range of approaches to performance, and through more practical based classroom exercise, you will build confidence and enhance your ability to articulate, analyse and apply material studied together to your own work in and beyond the module.

The module is open to anyone keen to devise performance works, as well as those wishing to work in the performing arts more widely. You do not need any theatrical training to join in, only an open mind.

The School of English has been awarded 19th in the UK for English; The Independent Complete University Guide 2019.

Learning outcomes:

  • An understanding of approaches to contemporary performance and the ability to apply these in your own work, critically and creatively.
  • Knowledge of a number of significant contemporary theatre practitioners/groups and a range of techniques and methods developed for making performance.
  • The ability to articulate, analyse and apply material studied together to the development of your own work in and beyond the module.
  • An enhanced critical vocabulary for discussing contemporary performance practices generally and with which to evaluate your own and others’ practice.

Teaching method: Fieldwork, seminars and workshops.
Assessment: 100% coursework.
Contact hours: 40 hours

Global Development Challenges (Session One - IS416)

This module is designed to teach you about the different dimensions of key global development challenges and possible solutions. You will learn how problems are defined, measured and recorded- looking at international development processes to understand how responses are determined across scale, from the global to the local.

Experts in the field will present interactive lectures and workshops on each challenge and corresponding innovations. Challenges examined might include: Poverty and Inequality, Climate & Environment, Migration & Refugee and Global Health Challenges.

You will work in groups to develop an in-depth understanding of specific countries' responses to the development challenges. In these groups, you will draw on multi-media resources and your own creativity to explore: (1) how responses are developed and by whom; (2) how they are financed and communicated; (3) how support is mobilised; and, (4) different ways to measure their success or failure.

This module is solution focused, in your groups, - you will be asked to reflect on how you would address the challenge and work creatively to identify innovative responses. You will have the opportunity to present this work at the end the module in a conference. You will also be asked to demonstrate critical reflection on the politics and processes that respond to development challenges. To do this, you will be guided to read academic and policy literature, and reflect and engage with this in your own writing.

This module is ideal for those with a Geography, Politics, Anthropology, Social Science, International Relations and Law background - or indeed anyone with an interest in social sciences and a passion for key issues facing our world today.

The University of Sussex is ranked first in the world for Development Studies – (QS World University Rankings by Subject 2019) -The ranking reflects the quality, impact and range of international development research and courses offered across the Sussex campus – including in the School of Global Studies, the Institute of Development Studies (IDS), the Science Policy Research Unit (SPRU) and Centre for International Education (CIE).

Learning outcomes:

  • Develop a critical understanding of key development challenges.
  • Demonstrate a capacity to critically reflect on the politics and processes that underpin responses to development challenges.
  • Engage effectively and creatively in collaborative activities with others to achieve common goals that reflect the potential needs of future employers.
  • Demonstrate good writing skills that showcase the student’s ability to be reflexive and to engage with academic and policy literature.

Teaching method: Lectures and workshops.
Assessment: 100% coursework.
Contact hours: 44 hours