Economics and Management Studies BSc

Economics

Key information

Duration:
3 years full time
Typical A-level offer:
AAB-ABB
UCAS code:
LN12
Start date:
September 2018

Combine practical management skills with analytical economics skills – and gain a skillset to help you succeed in a fast-paced business world.

With our Economics and Management Studies BSc, you explore different perspectives on similar issues, such as the role of investment within economy and its influence on the business cycle.

You gain important skills for a career in management and learn from experts with experience at every level of business.

“I was enthusiastic about exploring the different areas of economics, and Sussex is the ideal place to do this.” Mohammad HomoudEconomics BSc

Entry requirements

A-level

Typical offer

AAB-ABB

GCSEs

You will also need GCSE (or equivalent) Mathematics, with at least grade B (or grade 6 in the new grading scale).

You should also have a broad range of GCSEs (A*-C), including good grades in relevant subjects.

Other UK qualifications

Access to HE Diploma

Typical offer

Pass in the Access to HE Diploma with 45 level 3 credits at Merit or above, including 24 at Distinction.

Subjects

The Access to HE Diploma should be in the social sciences.

GCSEs

You will also need GCSE (or equivalent) Mathematics, with at least grade B (or grade 6 in the new grading scale).

International Baccalaureate

Typical offer

32 points overall from the full IB Diploma.       

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (formerly BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma)

Typical offer

DDD-DDM

Subjects

The BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma would normally be in a relevant subject.

GCSEs

You will also need GCSE (or equivalent) Mathematics, with at least grade B (or grade 6 in the new grading scale).

You should also have a broad range of GCSEs (A*-C), including good grades in relevant subjects.

Scottish Highers

Typical offer

AABBB

GCSEs

You will also need Mathematics at Standard Grade, grade 1 or 2.

Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced

Typical offer

Grade B and AB in two A-levels.

GCSEs

You will also need GCSE (or equivalent) Mathematics, with at least grade B (or grade 6 in the new grading scale).

You should also have a broad range of GCSEs (A*-C), including good grades in relevant subjects.

International baccalaureate

Typical offer

32 points overall from the full IB Diploma.       

European baccalaureate

Typical offer

Overall result of at least 77%

Other international qualifications

Australia

Typical offer

Relevant state (Year 12) High School Certificate, and over 85% in the ATAR or UAI/TER/ENTER. Or a Queensland OP of 5 or below.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Austria

Typical offer

Reifeprüfung or Matura with an overall result of 2.2 or better for first-year entry. A result of 2.5 or better would be considered for Foundation Year entry.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Belgium

Typical offer

Certificat d'Enseignement Secondaire Supérieur (CESS) or Diploma van Hoger Secundair Onderwijs with a good overall average. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Bulgaria

Typical offer

Diploma za Sredno Obrazovanie with excellent final-year scores (normally 5.5 overall with 6 in key subjects).

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Canada

Typical offer

High School Graduation Diploma. Specific requirements vary between provinces.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

China

Typical offer

We usually do not accept Senior High School Graduation for direct entry to our undergraduate courses. However, we do consider applicants who have studied 1 or more years of Higher Education in China at a recognised degree awarding institution or who are following a recognised International Foundation Year.

If you are interested in applying for a business related course which requires an academic ability in Mathematics, you will normally also need a grade B in Mathematics from the Huikao or a score of 90 in Mathematics from the Gaokao.

Applicants who have the Senior High School Graduation may be eligible to apply to our International Foundation Year, which if you complete successfully you can progress on to a relevant undergraduate course at Sussex. You can find more information about the qualifications which are accepted by our International Study Centre at  http://isc.sussex.ac.uk/entry-requirements/international-foundation-year .

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Croatia

Typical offer

Maturatna Svjedodžba with an overall score of at least 4-5 depending on your degree choice.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Cyprus

Typical offer

Apolytirion of Lykeion with an overall average of at least 18 or 19/20 will be considered for first-year entry.

A score of 15/20 in the Apolytirion would be suitable for Foundation Year entry. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Czech Republic

Typical offer

Maturita with a good overall average.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Denmark

Typical offer

Højere Forberedelseseksamen (HF) or studentereksamen with an overall average of at least 7 on the new grading scale.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Finland

Typical offer

Finnish Ylioppilastutkinto with an overall average result in the final matriculation examinations of at least 6.0.

France

Typical offer

French Baccalauréat with an overall final result of at least 13/20.

Germany

Typical offer

German Abitur with an overall result of 2.0 or better.

Greece

Typical offer

Apolytirion with an overall average of at least 18 or 19/20 will be considered for first-year entry.

A score of 15/20 in the Apolytirion would be suitable for Foundation Year entry. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Hong Kong

Typical offer

Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education (HKDSE) with grades of 5, 4, 4 from three subjects including two electives. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Hungary

Typical offer

Erettsegi/Matura with a good average.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

India

Typical offer

Standard XII results from Central and Metro Boards with an overall average of 75-80%. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Iran

Typical offer

High School Diploma and Pre-University Certificate.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Ireland

Typical offer

Irish Leaving Certificate (Higher Level) at H1,H2,H2,H3,H3.

Additional requirements

You must also have at least grade O5 in Mathematics.

Israel

Typical offer

Bagrut, with at least 8/10 in at least six subjects, including one five-unit subject.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Italy

Typical offer

Italian Diploma di Maturità or Diploma Pass di Esame di Stato with a Final Diploma mark of at least 81/100.

Japan

Typical offer

Upper Secondary Leaving Certificate is suitable for entry to our Foundation Years. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Latvia

Typical offer

Atestats par Visparejo videjo Izglitibu with very good grades in state exams.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Lithuania

Typical offer

Brandos Atestatas including scores of 80-90% in at least three state examinations (other than English).

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Luxembourg

Typical offer

Diplôme de Fin d'Etudes Secondaires.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Malaysia

Typical offer

Sijil Tinggi Persekolahan Malaysia (STPM). As well as various two or three-year college or polytechnic certificates and diplomas.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Netherlands

Typical offer

Voorereidend Wetenschappelijk Onderwijs (VWO), normally with an average of at least 7.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Nigeria

Typical offer

You are expected to have one of the following:

  • Higher National Diploma
  • One year at a recognised Nigerian University
  • Professional Diploma (Part IV) from the Institute of Medical Laboratory Technology of Nigeria
  • Advanced Diploma

You must also have a score of C6 or above in WAEC/SSC English.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Norway

Typical offer

Norwegian Vitnemal Fra Den Videregaende Skole - Pass with an overall average of at least 4.

Pakistan

Typical offer

Bachelor (Pass) degree in arts, commerce or science.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Poland

Typical offer

Matura with three extended-level written examinations, normally scored within the 7th stanine.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Portugal

Typical offer

Diploma de Ensino Secundario normally with an overall mark of at least 16/20. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Romania

Typical offer

Diploma de Bacalaureat with an overall average of 8.5-9.5 depending on your degree choice.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Singapore

Typical offer

A-levels, as well as certain certificates and diplomas.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Slovakia

Typical offer

Maturitna Skuska or Maturita with honours, normally including scores of 1 in at least three subjects.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Slovenia

Typical offer

Secondary School Leaving Diploma or Matura with at least 23 points overall.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

South Africa

Typical offer

National Senior Certificate with very good grades. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Spain

Typical offer

Spanish Título de Bachillerato (LOGSE) with an overall average result of at least 8.0.

Sri Lanka

Typical offer

Sri Lankan A-levels.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Sweden

Typical offer

Fullstandigt Slutbetyg with good grades.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Switzerland

Typical offer

Federal Maturity Certificate.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Turkey

Typical offer

Devlet Lise Diplomasi or Lise Bitirme is normally only suitable for Foundation Years, but very strong applicants may be considered for first year entry. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

USA

Typical offer

We look at your full profile taking into account everything you are studying. You must have your high school graduation diploma and we will be interested in your Grade 12 GPA. However, we will also want to see evidence of the external tests you have taken. Each application is looked at individually, but you should normally have one or two of the following:

  • APs (where we would expect at least three subject with 4/5 in each)
  • SAT Reasoning Tests (normally with a combined score of 1300) or ACT grades
  • and/or SAT Subject Tests (where generally we expect you to have scores of 600 or higher). 

We would normally require APs or SAT Subject Tests in areas relevant to your chosen degree course.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

My country is not listed

If your qualifications aren’t listed or you have a question about entry requirements, email ug.enquiries@sussex.ac.uk.

English language requirements

IELTS (Academic)

6.5 overall, including at least 6.0 in each component

IELTS scores are valid for two years from the test date. Your score must be valid when you begin your Sussex course. You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test.

If you are applying for degree-level study we can consider your IELTS test from any test centre, but if you require a Confirmation of Acceptance for Studies (CAS) for an English language or pre-sessional English course (not combined with a degree) the test must be taken at a UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI)-approved IELTS test centre.

Find out more about IELTS.

Other English language requirements

Proficiency tests

Cambridge Advanced Certificate in English (CAE)

For tests taken before January 2015: Grade B or above

For tests taken after January 2015: 176 overall, including at least 169 in each skill

We would normally expect the CAE test to have been taken within two years before the start of your course.

You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Cambridge English: Advanced.

Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE)

For tests taken before January 2015: grade C or above

For tests taken after January 2015: 176 overall, including at least 169 in each skill

We would normally expect the CPE test to have been taken within two years before the start of your course.

You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Cambridge English: Proficiency.

Pearson (PTE Academic)

62 overall, including at least 56 in all four skills.

PTE (Academic) scores are valid for two years from the test date. Your score must be valid when you begin your Sussex course. You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Pearson (PTE Academic).

TOEFL (iBT)

88 overall, including at least 20 in Listening, 19 in Reading, 21 in Speaking, 23 in Writing.

TOEFL (iBT) scores are valid for two years from the test date. Your score must be valid when you begin your Sussex course. You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about TOEFL (iBT).

The TOEFL Institution Code for the University of Sussex is 9166.

English language qualifications

AS/A-level (GCE)

Grade C or above in English Language.

Hong Kong Advanced Level Examination (HKALE)/ AS or A Level: grade C or above in Use of English

French Baccalaureat

A score of 12 or above in English.

GCE O-level

Grade C or above in English.

Brunei/Cambridge GCE O-level in English: grades 1-6.

Singapore/Cambridge GCE O-level in English: grades 1-6.

GCSE or IGCSE

Grade C or above in English as a First Language.

Grade B or above in English as a Second Language

German Abitur

A score of 12 or above in English.

Ghana Senior Secondary School Certificate

If awarded before 1993: grades 1-6 in English language.

If awarded between 1993 and 2005: grades A-D in English language.

Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education (HKDSE)

 Level 4, including at least 3 in each component in English Language.

Indian School Certificate (Standard XII)

The Indian School Certificate is accepted at the grades below when awarded by the following examination boards:

Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) – English Core only: 70%

Council for Indian School Certificate Examinations (CISCE) - English: 70% 

International Baccalaureate Diploma (IB)

English A or English B at grade 5 or above.

Malaysian Certificate of Education (SPM) 119/GCE O-level

If taken before the end of 2008: grades 1-5 in English Language.

If taken from 2009 onwards: grade C or above in English Language.

The qualification must be jointly awarded by the University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES).

West African Senior School Certificate

Grades 1-6 in English language when awarded by the West African Examinations Council (WAEC) or the National Examinations Council (NECO).

Country exceptions

Select to see the list of exempt English-speaking countries

If you are a national of one of the countries below, or if you have recently completed a qualification equivalent to a UK Bachelors degree or higher in one of these countries, you will normally meet our English requirements. Note that qualifications obtained by distance learning or awarded by studying outside these countries cannot be accepted for English language purposes.

You will normally be expected to have completed the qualification within two years before starting your course at Sussex. If the qualification was obtained earlier than this we would expect you to be able to demonstrate that you have maintained a good level of English, for example by living in an English-speaking country or working in an occupation that required you to use English regularly and to a high level.

Please note that this list is determined by the UK’s Home Office, not by the University of Sussex.

List of exempt countries

  • Antigua and Barbuda
  • Australia
  • Bahamas
  • Barbados
  • Belize
  • Canada**
  • Dominica
  • Grenada
  • Guyana
  • Ireland
  • Jamaica
  • New Zealand
  • St Kitts and Nevis
  • St Lucia
  • St Vincent and the Grenadines
  • Trinidad and Tobago
  • United Kingdom
  • USA

** Canada: you must be a national of Canada; other nationals not on this list who have a degree from a Canadian institution will not normally be exempt from needing to provide evidence of English.

Admissions information for applicants

Transfers into Year 2

Yes. Find out more about transferring into Year 2 of this course. We don’t accept transfers into the third or final year.

If your qualifications aren’t listed or you have a question about entry requirements, email ug.enquiries@sussex.ac.uk.

Why choose this course?

  • 95% of our Department of Economics students were in work or further study six months after graduating (HESA EPI, Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey 2015).
  • Learn from experts shaping global policy – our staff are world-renowned leaders in development economics, international trade
    and environment and energy.
  • All courses have the option of a fully supported, year-long placement with companies such as PwC, IBM and Transport for London.

Course information

How will I study?

You are introduced to the principles of economics and their application to a range of practical and topical issues. The aim is not to look at economic theory in isolation, but to learn how it is used to analyse real issues.

You also study mathematics and statistics, gaining important quantitative skills.

Your first year provides a solid grounding in diverse aspects of management. You gain an essential understanding of the context within which modern business is conducted.

Modules

These are the modules running in the academic year 2017. Modules running in 2018 may be subject to change.

Core modules


Customise your course

Our courses are designed to broaden your horizons and give you the skills and experience necessary to have the sort of career that has an impact.

Gain programming skills and apply them to areas such as digital media, business and interactive design. Find out about our Year in Computing

How will I study?

You develop your knowledge by studying topics like trade and risk, core processes of management and discover how these processes shape organisations. You’ll focus on areas such as:

  • trade, global imbalances and the financial crisis
  • financial markets and institutions
  • corporate finance and risk management.

To help develop your analytical and quantitative skills, you receive training in:

  • econometrics, to extend your statistical techniques knowledge
  • research methods.

You can also get involved in research projects.

Modules

These are the modules running in the academic year 2017. Modules running in 2018 may be subject to change.

Core modules


Customise your course

Our courses are designed to broaden your horizons and give you the skills and experience necessary to have the sort of career that has an impact.

Gain programming skills and apply them to areas such as digital media, business and interactive design. Find out about our Year in Computing

Study abroad (optional)

Apply to study abroad – you’ll develop an international perspective and gain an edge when it comes to your career. Find out where your course could take you.

Placement (optional)

You can apply to take a paid professional placement in the third year of your degree. Recent students have gone on placements at:

  • First Equity Partners
  • PwC (PricewaterhouseCoopers)
  • Ernst & Young.

All students receive dedicated support throughout their placement – from finding an employer to preparing for an interview.

For more details, visit Department of Economics: Placements.

Employers, BMEc staff and students discuss the benefits of placements

Please note

If you’re receiving – or applying for – USA federal Direct Loan funds, you can’t transfer to the version of this program with an optional study abroad period in any country or optional placement in the USA. Find out more about American Student Loans and Federal Student Aid

How will I study?

In your final year, you investigate organisation-stakeholder relationships and explore business strategy. Through optional modules, you consolidate your conceptual and practical knowledge of management. 

You can also choose from a range of economics options, such as labour or development economics. There are also advanced quantitative modules – useful if you want to do a Masters.

In your final-year project, you draw on knowledge and skills developed throughout your course for an in-depth investigation into economics and management studies.

Modules

These are the modules running in the academic year 2017. Modules running in 2018 may be subject to change.

Core modules

Options

Find out what it's like to study Economics at the University of Sussex

I work with the World Bank and the World Trade Organization on projects analysing the international integration of services markets.”Dr Ingo Borchert
Lecturer in Economics, specialising in International Trade

Fees

Fees are not yet set for entry in the academic year 2018. Note that your fees, once they’re set, may be subject to an increase on an annual basis.

The UK Government has confirmed that if you’re an EU student applying for entry in September 2018, you'll pay the same fee rate as UK students for the duration of your course, even if the UK leaves the EU before the end of your course. You'll also continue to have access to student loans and grants. Find out more on the UK Government website.

Find out about typical living costs for studying at Sussex

Scholarships

Our focus is personal development and social mobility. To help you meet your ambitions to study at Sussex, we deliver one of the most generous scholarship programmes of any UK university.

Careers

Graduate destinations

95% of Department of Economics students were in work or further study six months after graduating. Recent Economics graduates have found jobs as:

  • business analyst, Santander
  • management consultant, Accenture
  • graduate intern in project delivery, UK Commission for Employment and Skills.

(HESA EPI, Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey 2015)

Your future career

Develop communication, analytical, management and numeracy skills with an Economics and Management Studies degree.

These skills mean you could go into jobs at organisations such as:

  • the Civil Service and government
  • banks and consultancies
  • marketing companies, and insurance and accounting firms.

You also benefit from career events where you can meet graduate employers and find out more about graduate schemes, selection tests and assessment centres.

And through our StartUp Sussex programme, you can get help developing your business ideas.

Working while you study

Our Careers and Employability Centre can help you find part-time work while you study. Find out more about career development and part-time work

Economics Principles 1

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

Introduction to Business and Management

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

Introduction to Business and Management is an introductory study of contemporary organisations and their management. It explores the types of purposes of organisations, their stakeholders (CSR) and changing environments together with their key managerial processes – entrepreneurship, organisational structure, leading, strategic planning and change.

The focus throughout is on helping you achieve a critical and reflective approach, and learning to apply relevant concepts, tools and models.

The coursework component of assessment requires you to choose an organisation that is of interest to you and to explore, critically, the way in which it handles a process of your choice. You are supported in this by the submission of a structured proposal on which formative feedback is given.

Seminar activities are participative and require preparatory work which is signposted though downloads and links on Study Direct well in advance.

Lectures are interactive, employing the use of quizzes and featuring clips from YouTube, such as Dragons' Den excerpts.

An unseen examination completes the assessment profile and you tackle a case study (which revisits keys concepts) in the final seminar as a formative exercise.

The module provides a platform for later study by encouraging skills in critical thinking, academic writing, concept acquisition and research. Introduction to Business and Management aims to facilitate the transition to university-level learning smoothly, meaningfully and enjoyably.

Introduction to Business Law

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

This module aims to develop knowledge and skills in the understanding of the general legal framework, and of specific legal areas relating to business.

The module is divided into four parts:

  1. the English legal system
  2. contractual obligations
  3. tortious liability; and
  4. the contract of employment.

Introduction to Mathematics for Finance and Economics

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

This module introduces you to the basic mathematical methods and techniques used in economic analysis, and will enable you to use these skills independently and with confident. These skills also have a transferable content and are useful in other disciplines and applications.

Introduction to Accounting

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

This module is designed as an introduction to accounting and financial management for managers.

The module introduces accounting and financial management topics gradually, examining basic principles and underlying concepts before demonstrating how accounting statements and financial information can be used to improve business decision-making.

The module focus is for students of business and management as decision-makers and users of financial information.

Macroeconomics 1

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

This module introduces core short-run and medium-run macroeconomics.

First you will consider what determines demand for goods and services in the short run. You will be introduced to financial markets, and outline the links between financial markets and demand for goods. The Keynesian ISLM model encapsulates these linkages. Second, you will turn to medium-term supply. You will bring together the market for labour and the price-setting decisions of firms in order to build an understanding of how inflation and unemployment are determined. Finally, you will look at supply and the ISLM together to produce a full medium-term macroeconomic model.

Microeconomics 1

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

This module develops consumer and producer theory, examining such topics as consumer surplus, labour supply, production and costs of the firm, alternative market structures and factor markets. It explores the application of these concepts to public policy, making use of real-world examples to illustrate the usefulness of the theory.

Principles of Organisational Behaviour and Human Resource Management

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

This module explores the causes and effects of human interaction in an organisation and how humans at individual, group and organisational level influence organisations. Organisational performance depends on appropriate incentives to individuals, developing effective teams, designing an attractive job environment and managing organisational structure.

Focusing on these issues, the module is divided into four themes based on the level of analysis:

  • individual – we will look at the individual's contribution to organisation and the factors affecting their behaviour
  • group – the nature and significance of groups in organisations will be discussed and the range of skills required for effective team work and factors affecting working in groups will also be explored
  • organisational – organisational design and culture, inspiring workers through norms, beliefs and behaviour, and management in the work place will be explained
  • human resource management – we will examine the aspects of developing human capital through recruitment, training, development and reward, which will create a sustainable commitment to organisational goals and to ensure high performance.

There will be two forms of assessment for this module with an equal weighting for coursework and an unseen exam. The coursework component will invovle a Group Report analysing concepts of human resource management and organisational behaviour in a chosen organisation. Formative feedback for this assessment will be provided by peers and tutors on the work-in-progress presentation of this report in seminars.

An unseen exam at the end of the term will cover the remaining assessment. You will participate in a role playing game in your final seminar analysing and discussing the concepts taught during the lecture as a formative exercise.

Macroeconomics 2

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

The module is concerned with two main topics:

The Long Run is an introduction to how economies grow, gradually raising the standard of living, decade by decade. Once we have the basic analysis in place, we can begin to explain why there are such huge disparities in living standards around the world.

Expectations is a deepening of the behavioural background to modelling saving and investment decisions, emphasising the intrinsically forward-looking nature of saving and investment decisions and analysing the financial markets which coordinate these decisions.

Managing Operations

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

This module provides you with an understanding of how the fundamental principles of operations management can support the improvement of management performance in both public and private organisations.

During the module, you apply these principles to both manufacturing and service operations.

The module provides you with an understanding of the systemic and interactive nature of operations management problems and their relationship to the external environment.

You develop quantitative and qualitative analytical skills, through guided problem-based activities and case study analysis.

The content of the module covers:

  • operations strategy
  • designing operations
  • organisation design
  • planning and control
  • lean operations
  • project management
  • managing quality and continous process/product improvement
  • managing the supply chain
  • future direction of travel for operations management.

Microeconomics 2

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

This module develops the economics principles learned in the first year (Microeconomics 1).

Alternative market structures, such as oligopoly and monopolistic competition are studied and comparisons drawn with perfect competition and monopoly.

Decision-making under uncertainty and over multiple time periods is introduced, relaxing some of the restrictive assumptions made in the first year module.

The knowledge gained is applied to such issues as investment in human capital (e.g. education), saving and investment decisions, insurance and criminal deterrence.

Advanced Macroeconomics

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

The module completes the macroeconomics sequence, starting with a consideration of the policy implications of rational expectations. The macroeconomy is then opened up to international trade and capital movements: the operation of monetary and fiscal policies and the international transmission of disturbances under fixed and flexible exchange rates are contrasted, and the issues bearing on the choice of exchange-rate regime are explored. The major macroeconomic problems of hyperinflation, persistent unemployment and exchange-rate crises are examined. The module concludes by drawing together the implications of the analysis for the design and operation of macroeconomic policy.

 

Advanced Microeconomics

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

This module covers the topics of general equilibrium and welfare economics, including the important issue of market failure. General equilibrium is illustrated using Sen's entitlement approach to famines and also international trade. Welfare economics covers concepts of efficiency and their relationship to the market mechanism. Market failure includes issues such as adverse selection and moral hazard, and applications are drawn from health insurance, environmental economics and the second-hand car market.

 

Introduction to Marketing

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

Introduction to Marketing explores various aspects of the marketing process, including environmental scanning (assessing strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threat analysis, and competitor analysis), strategic development options, marketing mix (traditional and new media), customer relationship management (CRM), sales management and supplier management.

Through case study analysis and practical application, you will develop an appreciation of the practical applications of various marketing concepts and techniques, and learn to critically evaluate and select strategic and operational options available to marketing decision-makers to build a sustainable competitive position.

The objective of this module is to provide you with a clear and comprehensive understanding of the key foundational principles of marketing.

Management of Innovation

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

This module aims to equip you with the knowledge to understand and the skills to manage innovation at the operational level.

The management of innovation is inherently interdisciplinary and multi-functional, so we will provide an integrative approach to the management of innovation, and how this influnces and is influnced by business models and value propositions. Specifically, we aim to integrate the management of market, technological and organizational change to improve the competitiveness of firms and effectiveness of other organizations.

You will see that the process of innovation management is essentially generic, although organizational, technological and market-specific factors will constrain choices and actions. The module explores:

  • process-, product/service-, postion- and pradigm-based innovations
  • the management of innovation and the management required for innovation to happen in the first place
  • new product- and service-based approaches
  • social and green innovation
  • innovation commericalistion, diffusion and networks and innovation forcasting from a managerial and organisational perspective.

Statistics and Introductory Econometrics

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

This module provides an introduction to the statistical techniques used in economics, and includes computer-based applications.

Topics covered include:

  • summarising and plotting data
  • basic probability theory
  • hypothesis testing
  • correlation analysis; and
  • bivariate and multiple regression analysis.

You are introduced in greater detail to the EXCEL spreadsheet package, which you will use for your assessed modulework.

Strategy

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

This is a final-year integrative module in strategy, which develops your understanding and skills as a prospective future manager, specifically for formulating an organisation's overall strategic direction.

The module will help you to develop an understanding of the different approaches to strategy: how choices are made between different possible approaches; the content in which choices are made; and how strategies and structures are designed and implemented.

This module will complement and build on the various management skills already developed through earlier business and management modules.

Statistics Project

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

This module provides an opportunity for you to make use of the statistical techniques you may have learnt on the Statistics for Economists module. You will be required to submit a project based on your own research, having gathered your own data (either from primary or secondary sources). You will be able to choose a topic of interest to yourselves and will receive supervision during the course of the term.

Developing Leadership (LEAD)

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

Organisations have traditionally conceived of leadership as a heroic attribute, appointing the few 'real' leaders to high-level senior positions in order to get them through the hard times. Many observers within organisations are questioning this approach and are beginning to think about the need to recognise and utilise a wider range of leadership practices. Leadership, they argue, needs to be conceived of as something that happens across functions and levels, and that is closely connected with social, cognitive and communicative skills such as those employed in negotiation and decision-making. New concepts and frameworks are needed in order to embrace this more inclusive understanding. This module adopts a systems approach, which focuses on method, people, context, and need. As such, the module offers a perspective that links the two dimensions of people and situation with two additional dimensions of process and content (methods and outcomes).

Economics of European Integration

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

The aim of this module is to cover economic and institutional aspects of the European integration process, focusing on the economic and also legal aspects of the European Union, internally and in its relations with partners, including prospective members. Customs union theory, the theory of monetary union, fiscal federalism and regional economics will be covered. You will be expected to understand the basic economics of integration, and also the interrelationship between economics, law and politics, as well as knowing how to track down up to date policy materials on the web.

Entrepreneurship and Small Firms (ENT)

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

The module provides you with a comprehensive understanding of the entrepreneurial process and the development of new ventures.

Entrepreneurship is viewed as a process to provide sustainable economic, social and institutional change. Module content is limited to entrepreneurship in a small business context.

Environmental Economics

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

The module Environmental Economics gives an introduction to the economics of the environment and environmental policy.The module discusses externalities, optimality, sustainability, cost-benefit analysis and their ethical foundations; methods for valuing environmental goods and services; policy instruments for pollution control; environment and development; environment and trade; and environmental accounting for countries and corporations. In the seminars the concepts of the lectures will be applied to environmental problems such as air pollution, climate change, acidification and eutrophication.

Financial Econometrics

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

Labour Economics

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

The module explores how labour economics informs the discussion of many social issues such as the causes of unemployment; how technological change is shifting the distribution of jobs and wages; the impact of immigration on wages and employment; the impact of social security on the incentive to work; and the causes of gender and racial wage and employment gaps.

Monetary Theory and Policy

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

The module begins with Keynes's reformulation of monetary theory and the application of Keynes's ideas to economic depressions.

The bulk of the module deals with monetary policy in practice, and considers:

  • the role of medium-term macroeconomic targets in policymaking
  • how policy should respond to new information in the short-term
  • money demand
  • the money supply process; and
  • how financial market imperfections should affect policymaking.

The last part of the module deals with banks, financial crises and financial regulation.

Non-Profit Management and Social Entrepreneurship

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

In this module, you are introduced to management and organisation in the non-profit sector.

You examine the diversity of the non-profit sectors and types of organisations (e.g. foundations, non-governmental organisations, and social enterprises) across different countries and institutional settings - in a comparative and international perspective.

Your studies in this module draw on research, policy and practice to critically explore the management challenges of non-profit organisations and new ventures, and the relation between non-profit, public and business sectors, and civil society.

In the module, you discuss key theoretical perspectives and approaches of how non-profit organisations operate and are managed. You also explore how to utilise social entrepreneurship to generate social change and impact through the creation of new ventures and mobilisation of resources across organisation and sector boundaries.

You cover key issues in starting, growing, leading, managing, and governing non-profit organisations and new non-profit ventures.

Your major topics in this module include:

  • governance and accountability
  • strategy and strategic planning
  • non-profit financing and financial management
  • leadership and managing people
  • volunteering and civic engagement
  • alliances and networks
  • venturing and impact
  • technology and new media.

Public Economics

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

This module provides you with a broad understanding of the scope of public economics – the role played by the government in the economy. The focus is on the rationale for government intervention and the existence of the public sector. The module will address questions such as when should health or education be provided by the state or privately, should the government intervene in individuals pension and savings decisions.

The module will combine theoretical and empirical approaches. The first part of the module will begin by introducing the welfare-theoretic foundations of government intervention, the theory of externalities, sources of market failure, public goods, information failure and incomplete markets.

The module will then develop the theory of public choice and political economy, the theory of taxation and social insurance. The final part of the module will examine specific examples of government interventions, eg healthcare, education, pensions, savings etc. In each field the module will also consider new behavioural considerations in understanding individual responses.

Understanding Global Markets

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

The aim of this module is to give you an understanding of key features of the newly emerging globalised world economy. The module therefore comprises four components. The first of these analyses the conceptual background to understanding global markets, as well as examining the underlying changes in technology, which has transformed economic relations between regions and nation states. The subsequent components then use that background in order to focus on the key characteristics and changes in trade, goods and services, capital flow, and movement of people.

The module structure is as follows:

  1. The context
    1. The emergence/development of global markets and understanding what can be meant by globalisation.
    2. The impact of technological change on global markets (information technology, transport costs, etc).

  2. Goods and services
    1. Why do countries trade and why do countries integrate into regional blocs?
    2. The evolution of patterns of trade:
      • Trade volumes
      • Geographical patterns of trade (North-North, North-South, South-South, regional groupings etc)
      • Vertical spcialisation and value chains, outsourcing, offshoring, supply chaining
    3. The role of services in the global economy ad the evolution of services trade.

  3. International Capital flows: multinationals and foreign direct investment – theory and data.
    1. Short run capital flows: global capital markets and origins of financial and exchange rate crises.

  4. Labour Migration
    1. Why workers migrate: individual and family motives.
    2. The impact of migration on the home market and on the host market.

Behavioural Economics

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

During this module you will examine the psychological underpinnings of economic behaviour and examine recent theories and empirical results in behavioural economics. This forms the starting point in core economics modules and the dominant model of choice in economics, in which agents maximize expected utility given the information they possess and the choice set they have.

A growing body of empirical evidence has sought to challenge the assumption of individuals as rational economic agents; you will analyse this recent empirical evidence across a range of fields of economics and examine the new theories of economic behaviour.

Climate Change Economics

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

This module will deal with the economics of anthropogenic climate change, which apart from being the international policy issue of the present time will be a vehicle for the illustration of a wide range of ideas and techniques from economic analysis.

Corporate Social Responsibility and Ethics

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

The module aims to provide an investigation of the relationship between organisations and their stakeholder groups, and the social accountability and responsibilities that a corporation holds towards different stakeholders.

The module will introduce you to concepts of corporate governance, socially responsible investment and ethical issues relevant to contemporary business. It will be contemporary, interesting, stretching and relevant, and should build on and integrate with other modules that you have taken and/or are taking.

Economics of Education

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

Financial Economics

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

You are given an advanced perspective on the microeconomic principles underlying financial markets and financial decision-making.

You learn key concepts including:

  • risk and return
  • asset pricing
  • asset allocation
  • portfolio optimisation
  • financial market equilibrium
  • efficient market hypothesis. 

You also look at arbitrage pricing and pricing of options and futures, and how these can be used to understand investment decisions, and trends in financial markets. 

You must have knowledge of microeconomics, basic calculus, and statistics - and be familiar with using spreadsheet packages such as Microsoft Excel. This is for solving problem sets and developing your analytical techniques in valuation and portfolio optimisation.

Global Economic History

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

In this module, you address the big questions in history.

The fundamental question most famously addressed by Adam Smith, is central to this module - why are some countries rich while others are poor?

You examine this central question via sub-questions like:

  • what caused the British Industrial Revolution? 
  • when and why did China fall behind?
  • what is the role of India and what challenges arise from being a late developer?
  • has Africa always been poor and will it stay so?

In this module, you discuss and assess some of the most important economic growth models.

You examine the fundamental causes that drove the differences in economic performance: geography, trade, institutions, and culture.

Or has chance played a pivotal role in the divergence?

International Human Resource Management (HRM)

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

In this module, you are introduced to an analytical and critical approach to international aspects of Human Resource Managment.

You examine:

  • how power and politics are implicated in the internal dynamics of multinational corporations
  • how the 'ideal worker' as construed by strategic International Human Resource Management practices informs the expectations from workers
  • if corporate social responsibility can possibly suffice to ensure a fair employment relationship in the absence of a transnational regulator.

International Trade

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

This module develops the theory of international trade and explores contemporary developments in the international trading system; in particular, it examines the underlying causes and welfare effects of trade on countries and their residents, and the implications of these results for international trade policy and institutions.

Knowledge, Work and Organisations

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

This module looks at the pivotal role that knowledge workers play in the creation, application and diffusion of knowledge within and between firms.

You will consider new approaches to managing learning processes in the firm, including developments such as knowledge management and communities of practice, and the novel organisational structures that have emerged to coordinate knowledge-­work activity.

You will explore the diffusion of knowledge between firms through different types of knowledge-worker communities and networks, as well as the role of labour mobility. You will also consider how certain skills are emerging to play a critical role in the knowledge economy - for example, consulting services and knowledge brokering. Finally, you will consider how labour market institutions that impact careers, skills and training of knowledge workers, shape different approaches to knowledge generation. 

Public Management

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

In this module, you are introduced to management and organisation in the public sector.

You examine key perspectives, theories and approaches to public management.

Furthermore, you discuss relevant aspects of the transformation of the public sector over time and across many countries in the world.

In this module, you cover key issues in organising, leading, managing, and governing in the public sector and how different types of public organisations operate and are managed.

Your major topics in this module include:

  • governance and accountability
  • strategy and strategic planning
  • public financing and financial management
  • leadership and managing people
  • technology and new media
  • public policy.

The Economics of Development

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

This module addresses some of the major problems of economic development in low- and middle-income economies: the relationship between poverty, inequality and economic growth; long-run growth and structural change; microeconomic issues in agricultural development, including theories of peasant resource allocation and farm size and efficiency; market performance in the rural and informal sectors of less developed countries (LDCs); industrialisation and trade policy; the roles of monetary policy and foreign aid in resource mobilisation; stabilisation and structural adjustment; and investment in human capital.

Return to top of page