Criminology BA

Criminology

Key information

Duration:
3 years full time
Typical A-level offer:
ABB-BBB
UCAS code:
L311
Start date:
September 2018
Studying Criminology at Sussex, you’ll apply key approaches to critical contemporary issues.
 
You’ll gain theoretical knowledge and learn to understand crime and the criminal justice system. On graduation, you’ll have the skills needed for a variety of careers.
 
You’re taught by experts who influence theoretical debates and inform policy and practice. They specialise on topics ranging from policing, terrorism, and victims of crime to capital punishment, and crimes against humanity – meaning that you'll focus on the real-world impact of criminology.
“The seminars are great. The tutors encourage constructive discussion and ask us to question our assumptions.” Jess KingCriminology BA

Entry requirements

A-level

Typical offer

ABB-BBB

GCSEs

You should also have a broad range of GCSEs (A*-C), including good grades in relevant subjects.

Extended Project Qualification

We take the EPQ into account when considering your application and it can be useful in the summer when your results are released if you have narrowly missed the conditions of your offer. We do not routinely include the EPQ in the conditions of your offer but we sometimes offer alternative conditions that include the EPQ. If you wish to discuss this further please contact Admissions at ug.enquiries@sussex.ac.uk

Other UK qualifications

Access to HE Diploma

Typical offer

Pass the Access to HE Diploma with 45 level 3 credits at Merit or above, including 24 at Distinction.

Subjects

The Access to HE Diploma should be in the humanities or social sciences.

GCSEs

You should also have a broad range of GCSEs (A*-C), including good grades in relevant subjects.

International Baccalaureate

Typical offer

30 points overall from the full IB Diploma.

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (formerly BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma)

Typical offer

DDM

Subjects

The BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma would normally be in Health & Social Care, IT or Public Services.

GCSEs

You should also have a broad range of GCSEs (A*-C), including good grades in relevant subjects.

Scottish Highers

Typical offer

ABBBB

Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced

Typical offer

Grade B and BB in two A-levels.

GCSEs

You should also have a broad range of GCSEs (A*-C), including good grades in relevant subjects.

International baccalaureate

Typical offer

30 points overall from the full IB Diploma.

European baccalaureate

Typical offer

Overall result of at least 75%

Other international qualifications

Australia

Typical offer

Relevant state (Year 12) High School Certificate, and over 85% in the ATAR or UAI/TER/ENTER. Or a Queensland OP of 5 or below.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Austria

Typical offer

Reifeprüfung or Matura with an overall result of 2.2 or better for first-year entry. A result of 2.5 or better would be considered for Foundation Year entry.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Belgium

Typical offer

Certificat d'Enseignement Secondaire Supérieur (CESS) or Diploma van Hoger Secundair Onderwijs with a good overall average. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Bulgaria

Typical offer

Diploma za Sredno Obrazovanie with excellent final-year scores (normally 5.5 overall with 6 in key subjects).

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Canada

Typical offer

High School Graduation Diploma. Specific requirements vary between provinces.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

China

Typical offer

We usually do not accept Senior High School Graduation for direct entry to our undergraduate courses. However, we do consider applicants who have studied 1 or more years of Higher Education in China at a recognised degree awarding institution or who are following a recognised International Foundation Year.

If you are interested in applying for a business related course which requires an academic ability in Mathematics, you will normally also need a grade B in Mathematics from the Huikao or a score of 90 in Mathematics from the Gaokao.

Applicants who have the Senior High School Graduation may be eligible to apply to our International Foundation Year, which if you complete successfully you can progress on to a relevant undergraduate course at Sussex. You can find more information about the qualifications which are accepted by our International Study Centre at  http://isc.sussex.ac.uk/entry-requirements/international-foundation-year .

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Croatia

Typical offer

Maturatna Svjedodžba with an overall score of at least 4-5 depending on your degree choice.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Cyprus

Typical offer

Apolytirion of Lykeion with an overall average of at least 18 or 19/20 will be considered for first-year entry.

A score of 15/20 in the Apolytirion would be suitable for Foundation Year entry. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Czech Republic

Typical offer

Maturita with a good overall average.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Denmark

Typical offer

Højere Forberedelseseksamen (HF) or studentereksamen with an overall average of at least 7 on the new grading scale.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Finland

Typical offer

Finnish Ylioppilastutkinto with an overall average result in the final matriculation examinations of at least 5.5.

France

Typical offer

French Baccalauréat with an overall final result of at least 13/20.

Germany

Typical offer

German Abitur with an overall result of 2.2 or better.

Greece

Typical offer

Apolytirion with an overall average of at least 18 or 19/20 will be considered for first-year entry.

A score of 15/20 in the Apolytirion would be suitable for Foundation Year entry. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Hong Kong

Typical offer

Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education (HKDSE) with grades of 5, 4, 4 from three subjects including two electives. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Hungary

Typical offer

Erettsegi/Matura with a good average.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

India

Typical offer

Standard XII results from Central and Metro Boards with an overall average of 75-80%. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Iran

Typical offer

High School Diploma and Pre-University Certificate.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Ireland

Typical offer

Irish Leaving Certificate (Higher Level) at H2 H2 H2 H3 H3.

Israel

Typical offer

Bagrut, with at least 8/10 in at least six subjects, including one five-unit subject.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Italy

Typical offer

Italian Diploma di Maturità or Diploma Pass di Esame di Stato with a Final Diploma mark of at least 78/100.

Japan

Typical offer

Upper Secondary Leaving Certificate is suitable for entry to our Foundation Years. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Latvia

Typical offer

Atestats par Visparejo videjo Izglitibu with very good grades in state exams.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Lithuania

Typical offer

Brandos Atestatas including scores of 80-90% in at least three state examinations (other than English).

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Luxembourg

Typical offer

Diplôme de Fin d'Etudes Secondaires.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Malaysia

Typical offer

Sijil Tinggi Persekolahan Malaysia (STPM). As well as various two or three-year college or polytechnic certificates and diplomas.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Netherlands

Typical offer

Voorereidend Wetenschappelijk Onderwijs (VWO), normally with an average of at least 7.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Nigeria

Typical offer

You are expected to have one of the following:

  • Higher National Diploma
  • One year at a recognised Nigerian University
  • Professional Diploma (Part IV) from the Institute of Medical Laboratory Technology of Nigeria
  • Advanced Diploma

You must also have a score of C6 or above in WAEC/SSC English.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Norway

Typical offer

Norwegian Vitnemal Fra Den Videregaende Skole - Pass with an overall average of at least 4.

Pakistan

Typical offer

Bachelor (Pass) degree in arts, commerce or science.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Poland

Typical offer

Matura with three extended-level written examinations, normally scored within the 7th stanine.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Portugal

Typical offer

Diploma de Ensino Secundario normally with an overall mark of at least 16/20. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Romania

Typical offer

Diploma de Bacalaureat with an overall average of 8.5-9.5 depending on your degree choice.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Singapore

Typical offer

A-levels, as well as certain certificates and diplomas.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Slovakia

Typical offer

Maturitna Skuska or Maturita with honours, normally including scores of 1 in at least three subjects.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Slovenia

Typical offer

Secondary School Leaving Diploma or Matura with at least 23 points overall.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

South Africa

Typical offer

National Senior Certificate with very good grades. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Spain

Typical offer

Spanish Título de Bachillerato (LOGSE) with an overall average result of at least 7.5.

Sri Lanka

Typical offer

Sri Lankan A-levels.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Sweden

Typical offer

Fullstandigt Slutbetyg with good grades.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Switzerland

Typical offer

Federal Maturity Certificate.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Turkey

Typical offer

Devlet Lise Diplomasi or Lise Bitirme is normally only suitable for Foundation Years, but very strong applicants may be considered for first year entry. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

USA

Typical offer

We look at your full profile taking into account everything you are studying. You must have your high school graduation diploma and we will be interested in your Grade 12 GPA. However, we will also want to see evidence of the external tests you have taken. Each application is looked at individually, but you should normally have one or two of the following:

  • APs (where we would expect at least three subject with 4/5 in each)
  • SAT Reasoning Tests (normally with a combined score of 1300) or ACT grades
  • and/or SAT Subject Tests (where generally we expect you to have scores of 600 or higher). 

We would normally require APs or SAT Subject Tests in areas relevant to your chosen degree course.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

My country is not listed

If your qualifications aren’t listed or you have a question about entry requirements, email ug.enquiries@sussex.ac.uk.

English language requirements

IELTS (Academic)

6.5 overall, including at least 6.0 in each component

IELTS scores are valid for two years from the test date. Your score must be valid when you begin your Sussex course. You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test.

If you are applying for degree-level study we can consider your IELTS test from any test centre, but if you require a Confirmation of Acceptance for Studies (CAS) for an English language or pre-sessional English course (not combined with a degree) the test must be taken at a UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI)-approved IELTS test centre.

Find out more about IELTS.

Other English language requirements

Proficiency tests

Cambridge Advanced Certificate in English (CAE)

For tests taken before January 2015: Grade B or above

For tests taken after January 2015: 176 overall, including at least 169 in each skill

We would normally expect the CAE test to have been taken within two years before the start of your course.

You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Cambridge English: Advanced.

Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE)

For tests taken before January 2015: grade C or above

For tests taken after January 2015: 176 overall, including at least 169 in each skill

We would normally expect the CPE test to have been taken within two years before the start of your course.

You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Cambridge English: Proficiency.

Pearson (PTE Academic)

62 overall, including at least 56 in all four skills.

PTE (Academic) scores are valid for two years from the test date. Your score must be valid when you begin your Sussex course. You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Pearson (PTE Academic).

TOEFL (iBT)

88 overall, including at least 20 in Listening, 19 in Reading, 21 in Speaking, 23 in Writing.

TOEFL (iBT) scores are valid for two years from the test date. Your score must be valid when you begin your Sussex course. You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about TOEFL (iBT).

The TOEFL Institution Code for the University of Sussex is 9166.

English language qualifications

AS/A-level (GCE)

Grade C or above in English Language.

Hong Kong Advanced Level Examination (HKALE)/ AS or A Level: grade C or above in Use of English

French Baccalaureat

A score of 12 or above in English.

GCE O-level

Grade C or above in English.

Brunei/Cambridge GCE O-level in English: grades 1-6.

Singapore/Cambridge GCE O-level in English: grades 1-6.

GCSE or IGCSE

Grade C or above in English as a First Language.

Grade B or above in English as a Second Language

German Abitur

A score of 12 or above in English.

Ghana Senior Secondary School Certificate

If awarded before 1993: grades 1-6 in English language.

If awarded between 1993 and 2005: grades A-D in English language.

Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education (HKDSE)

 Level 4, including at least 3 in each component in English Language.

Indian School Certificate (Standard XII)

The Indian School Certificate is accepted at the grades below when awarded by the following examination boards:

Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) – English Core only: 70%

Council for Indian School Certificate Examinations (CISCE) - English: 70% 

International Baccalaureate Diploma (IB)

English A or English B at grade 5 or above.

Malaysian Certificate of Education (SPM) 119/GCE O-level

If taken before the end of 2008: grades 1-5 in English Language.

If taken from 2009 onwards: grade C or above in English Language.

The qualification must be jointly awarded by the University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES).

West African Senior School Certificate

Grades 1-6 in English language when awarded by the West African Examinations Council (WAEC) or the National Examinations Council (NECO).

Country exceptions

Select to see the list of exempt English-speaking countries

If you are a national of one of the countries below, or if you have recently completed a qualification equivalent to a UK Bachelors degree or higher in one of these countries, you will normally meet our English requirements. Note that qualifications obtained by distance learning or awarded by studying outside these countries cannot be accepted for English language purposes.

You will normally be expected to have completed the qualification within two years before starting your course at Sussex. If the qualification was obtained earlier than this we would expect you to be able to demonstrate that you have maintained a good level of English, for example by living in an English-speaking country or working in an occupation that required you to use English regularly and to a high level.

Please note that this list is determined by the UK’s Home Office, not by the University of Sussex.

List of exempt countries

  • Antigua and Barbuda
  • Australia
  • Bahamas
  • Barbados
  • Belize
  • Canada**
  • Dominica
  • Grenada
  • Guyana
  • Ireland
  • Jamaica
  • New Zealand
  • St Kitts and Nevis
  • St Lucia
  • St Vincent and the Grenadines
  • Trinidad and Tobago
  • United Kingdom
  • USA

** Canada: you must be a national of Canada; other nationals not on this list who have a degree from a Canadian institution will not normally be exempt from needing to provide evidence of English.

Admissions information for applicants

Transfers into Year 2

Yes. Find out more about transferring into Year 2 of this course. We don’t accept transfers into the third or final year.

If your qualifications aren’t listed or you have a question about entry requirements, email ug.enquiries@sussex.ac.uk.

Why choose this course?

  • Criminology at Sussex is ranked 2nd in the UK (The Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2018).
  • Social sciences at Sussex is ranked 39th in the world (Times Higher Education World University Rankings 2018).
  • Learn from faculty who work on innovative research in topics such as hate crime, terrorism, cultural criminology, and the death penalty.

Course information

How will I study?

You are introduced to criminology as a subject area and you learn how to ‘think like a criminologist’.

You study how criminal justice works, and read and discuss some classic criminological studies.

You also learn about sociological theories and perspectives. These are highly relevant for understanding the social contexts of crime.

Modules

These are the modules running in the academic year 2017. Modules running in 2018 may be subject to change.

Core modules


Customise your course

At Sussex, you can choose to customise your course to build the sort of degree that will give you the knowledge, skills and experience that could take you in any direction you choose.

Explore subjects different to your course – electives and pathways allow you to complement your main subject. Find out what opportunities your course offers

Gain programming skills and apply them to areas such as digital media, business and interactive design. Find out about our Year in Computing

How will I study?

You study a range of criminological topics from historical perspectives to recent theories and approaches.

You analyse issues associated with different forms of punishment, such as why they are used and what they are meant to achieve.

You have the opportunity to focus on specific areas of criminology, such as victims of crime and society, and policing. You learn how to apply research methods to criminological issues. You also choose from a variety of options. These range from punishment and penology to policing in modern British society.

Modules

These are the modules running in the academic year 2017. Modules running in 2018 may be subject to change.

Core modules

Options


Customise your course

At Sussex, you can choose to customise your course to build the sort of degree that will give you the knowledge, skills and experience that could take you in any direction you choose.

Explore subjects different to your course – electives and pathways allow you to complement your main subject. Find out what opportunities your course offers

Gain programming skills and apply them to areas such as digital media, business and interactive design. Find out about our Year in Computing

Study abroad (optional)

Apply to study abroad – you’ll develop an international perspective and gain an edge when it comes to your career. Find out where your course could take you.

Placement (optional)

A placement is a great way to network and gain practical skills. When you leave Sussex, you’ll benefit from having the experience employers are looking for. Find out more about placements and internships.

Please note

If you’re receiving – or applying for – USA federal Direct Loan funds, you can’t transfer to the version of this program with an optional study abroad period in any country or optional placement in the USA. Find out more about American Student Loans and Federal Student Aid

How will I study?

You deepen your knowledge and critical understanding by focusing on specialist topics. 

You choose from criminology options in topics ranging from crimes against humanity to the sociology of terrorism.

You carry out your own piece of research in the form of a supervised project.

Modules

These are the modules running in the academic year 2017. Modules running in 2018 may be subject to change.

Core modules

Options

“My research promotes alternatives to imprisonment – asking why we’re so wedded to imprisonment, and what the barriers to decarceration are.” Dr Paul McGuinnessLecturer in Criminology and Sociology

Fees

UK/EU students:
Fees are not yet set for entry in the academic year 2018. The University intends to set fees at the maximum permitted by the UK Government (subject to continued satisfaction of the Teaching Excellence Framework). For the academic year 2017, fees were £9,250 per year.

The UK Government has confirmed that if you’re an EU student applying for entry in September 2018, you’ll pay the same fee rate as UK students for the duration of your course, even if the UK leaves the EU before the end of your course. You’ll also continue to have access to student loans and grants. Find out more on the UK Government website

Channel Islands and Isle of Man students:
The University aligns fees for Channel Islands and Isle of Man students with fees for UK/EU students. These fees are not yet set for entry in the academic year 2018. We intend to set fees at the maximum permitted by the UK Government (subject to continued satisfaction of the Teaching Excellence Framework). For the academic year 2017, fees were £9,250 per year.
International students:
£15,500 per year
Study abroad:
Find out about grants and funding, tuition fees and insurance costs for studying abroad
Placement:
Find out about tuition fees for placements

Note that your fees may be subject to an increase on an annual basis.

Find out about typical living costs for studying at Sussex

Scholarships

Our focus is personal development and social mobility. To help you meet your ambitions to study at Sussex, we deliver one of the most generous scholarship programmes of any UK university.

Careers

Graduate destinations

96% of our Department of Sociology graduates were in work or further study six months after graduating (HESA EPI, Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey 2015).

Your future career

With a Criminology BA, you get the perfect training and knowledge for graduate careers in policing, the prison service or youth justice.

You’ll gain skills in communication, critical thinking and data analysis. So you’ll be also prepared to go into research and policy-related roles in a range of fields.

Working while you study

Our Careers and Employability Centre can help you find part-time work while you study. Find out more about career development and part-time work

Critical Reading and Writing for Criminologists

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

This module provides you a chance to practice and reflect on approaches to reading and writing that give you an excellent foundation for the rest of your criminology degree. You will read contemporary published criminological work and will engage in critical discussion with your peers. You will focus in depth on one text in particular, such as Venkatesh's Gang Leader for a Day (2008). You will draft a book review, commenting on the methodology, data and conclusions presented. You will be given detailed feedback on the writing style and academic content of a draft of this review before making the final submission.

Themes and Perspectives in Sociology I

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

Modern sociology developed in the 19th century in tandem with the rise of industrial capitalist society. It had a number of key concerns that reflected the structure of – and changes in – society at the time. These concerns have continued to preoccupy sociologists in the context of contemporary societies, which have redefined key categories and experiences.

This module looks at such themes and at sociological perspectives on them as they have developed in both classical and contemporary forms of the discipline.

Thinking Like a Criminologist

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

This modules introduces you to the key skills involved in thinking like a criminologist. The module places a joint emphasis on gaining both a theoretical and practical understanding of criminology as a discipline. You will develop skills in interpreting crime statistics, critically assessing definitions of crime and engaging with media debates about crime and justice. These will be informed by introductory criminological theory to provide a foundation including positivism and classicism, Durkheim and the Chicago School.

Key topics will include:

  • what is crime?
  • who is a criminal?
  • how can we use crime statistics?
  • the history of crime
  • media representations of crime
  • the use of official reports and policy documents.

Criminological Classics

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

This module is based on four classic criminological research monographs and aims to provide you not only with an in-depth appreciation and understanding of these studies and their wider context, but also the skills necessary to critically analyse primary texts.

The monographs selected have been particularly influential within the discipline and would be widely recognised by criminologists as key studies. The books studied will be The Jack Roller (Shaw, 1930), Society of Captives (Sykes, 1958), Hooligan: A History of Respectable Fears (Pearson, 1983) and Criminal Women (Carlen, 1985) (although it should be noted that the specific texts may change in different years).

You will read these monographs in their entirety, and lectures and seminars will explore the historical and intellectual context of the texts' inception.

Themes and Perspectives in Sociology II

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

Modern sociology developed in the 19th century in tandem with the rise of industrial capitalist society. It had a number of key concerns that reflected the structure of – and changes in – society at the time. These concerns have continued to preoccupy sociologists in the context of contemporary societies, which have redefined key categories and experiences.

This module looks at such themes and at sociological perspectives on them as they have developed in both classical and contemporary forms of the discipline.

Understanding the Criminal Justice System

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

This module provides an introduction to the criminal justice system focusing on key debates around social control and the historic development of institutions. This involves assessing the development of key components of the justice system including:

  • prisons
  • the police
  • probation
  • the courts
  • community justice.

You will also critically examine contemporary debates including race and crime, gender, power and punishment, issues of overpolicing and criminalisation, youth justice and crime prevention. The module also aims to situate the British justice system within an international context to allow for a comparative understanding.

Criminology in Theory and Perspective

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

This module will acquaint you with the main theories, perspectives and concepts associated with major traditions in sociological criminology. It builds on two first year modules, Thinking Like a Criminologist and Criminological Classics, which are prerequisites. You will examine a range of criminological perspectives from those prevalent in the mid-20th century to contemporary, cutting edge theories. You will be encouraged to take a critical approach to these perspectives and to situate them within their wider social and political contexts. In particular, the module will cover the following: strain theory, labelling theory, radical and critical criminology, left realism, right realism, feminist criminology, masculinities and crime, psycho-social approaches, cultural criminology and green criminology.

Doing Social Research: working with quantitative data

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

The aim of this module is to introduce students to different ways of designing and doing social research. In this part we focus on basic features of quantitative survey research, both analysing other people's research (using secondary data) and creating your own. In Part II we focus on different methods of qualitative data collection and analysis. The aim of the module is to give you important skills for life as well as the labour market, and more prosaically to prepare you to carry out project work in the third year. In both halves of this module you build up activities week by week to carry out a kind of 'pilot' or 'mini-project' on a topic of your choice. This is more closely supported than in year 3: you will discuss ideas for the project in your workshops; you will be helped to apply for ethical review; you will have formative feedback on your proposals and your research instruments (in this case surveys) and lots of help in workshops to bring it all together.

Doing Social Research: working with qualitative data

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

You will be introduced to thinking about how to conduct sociological research using different methods. In this part you will focus on qualitative approaches. You will be introduced to debates in the social sciences related to research design, epistemology and studying sensitive and ethical issues, and will get practical experience in key methods for gathering and analysing qualitative data including interviewing, participant observation and textual analysis. Assessment will include a mini- or 'pilot' project carried out using one method.

Beyond the Vote: Citizenship and Participation in Sociology

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

Citizenship and participation is a module looking at the sociology of political involvement beyond the vote. It introduces different forms and sites of citizenship in the contemporary state - in relation to welfare, health, work, consumption, family life and the city or urban community - and also considers different expressions of social or civic activism, from volunteering to violent protest. The use and limitations of direct democratic experiments is examined, through analysis of various types of deliberative forum and citizen polling, and we consider the appeal of notions of 'responsibility' and 'choice'. You will learn through examining specific cases each week.

Policing and Society (Aut)

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

Examine policing in contemporary British society through:

  • a historical exploration of how policing has evolved since the inception of the Metropolitan Police in 1829
  • studying modern day policing through the analysis of relevant theories, practices and policy considerations.

You focus on different types of approaches, contexts and situations. This includes those relating to counter-terrorism, community, political protest, gender, and hate crime.

The police in the UK are often thought of as a monolithic institution. You therefore look at how different policing practices shape media and public perceptions, and how they affect political response.

Resistance Movements in Conflict & War

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

In this module, you examine the sociology of war by investigating the intersection between violence, politics, social and economic issues, and human rights.

You undertake a sociological and criminological exploration of various groups throughout history who have 'broken the law' in order to achieve some type of positive social change.

You explore a range of interesting academic theories and concepts, including social movement theory, resistance theory, and other related issues around collective behaviour, rational choice theory, and framing, for example.

You put these theories into context by studying various groups who achieved what is now generally deemed to be positive social change throughout history. These may include various resistance movements against the Third Reich during World War II, and Nelson Mandela and the African National Congress, for example.

You also examine changing political and social values, ideologies and goals of resistance movements, where support and condemnation have been attached to
the same group over a relatively short period of time, including the Khmer Rouge in Cambodia and the Taliban in Afghanistan.

Victims of Crime and Society (Aut)

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

This module will introduce students to the study of victimology and the ways in which victims are increasingly becoming central to the workings of the criminal justice system.

This module will consider the emergence of victimology and the role of the victims of crime movement in shaping theoretical and practical developments.

You will also learn about the role of the victim within the criminal justice system by examining case studies. This is an emerging area of interest in criminology, and so you will be involved in current debates.

The module provides a critical approach to victims of crime and society. Topics will include rates of victimisation, the 'harm' of victimhood, the role of victims in determining punishment, miscarriages of justice and victim memorials.

You will also have the opportunity to hear from external speakers who have close experience of the criminal justice process.

Identity, Crisis and Transgression (Spr)

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

How do we understand ourselves? How closely is our sense of self related to other people? What happens to a person’s self-conception when their sense of self is systematically attacked and undermined? How do people respond to experiences of trauma and personal loss and what kind of psychological strategies of survival do people rely on in order to continue living a meaningful life? The module starts by considering some of the main social psychological theories of the self and self-awareness before moving on to contemplate the darker side of the self specifically addressed in the work of Erich Fromm and David Riesman.

The lectures cover a range of influential social theorists and examine a diverse range of contemporary perspectives on the formation and maintenance of self-identity in contemporary society. We will examine why some individuals deliberately choose to engage in behaviour that transgresses everyday boundaries and also consider how people respond when their sense of identity is systematically attacked and undermined. This module draws on a wide range of up-to-date research and introduces you to a variety of theoretical perspectives.

This module assumes no prior knowledge of the literature and will be of relevance to anyone interested in studying the nature of identity in modern society.

Punishment and Penology (Spr)

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

This module will will examine both the theory and practice of punishment and will encourage you to take a critical approach to analysing these. The focus will mainly be on England and Wales, but where relevant comparison will be drawn with other countries such as those in Europe, North America and Australasia. After exploring a range of theoretical approaches in relation to the justifications for and purposes of punishment, you will consider a range of empirical examples. The latter will be largely contemporary with some historical examples also used.

Topics will include:

  • justifications for punishment
  • Durkhemian, Marxist and Foucauldian perspectives on punishment
  • Garland's The Culture of Control (2001) and The New Penology (Feeley and Simon, 1992)
  • contemporary imprisonment
  • women in prison
  • children and young people in custody
  • immigration detention centres
  • alternatives to imprisonment
  • radical critiques such as abolitionism and feminist jurisprudence.

Race: Conflict and Change

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

This module will examine and explore the issues of race, racism, racial conflict and race relations in contemporary Britain (Please note: although we will mainly refer to Britain, examples from other countries in Europe and the West will be frequently used). Beginning with colonial discourses of the racial 'other', the post-1945 period following the start of mass colonial immigration to Britain, through to the present day you will examine the various historical, social, political, economic and cultural forces and processes through which the concept of race and the racialised subject have been constructed, shaped and changed over time.

The module is taught through lectures and seminars, each focusing on a particular historical, social, political, cultural or theoretical topic, issue and problem related to race in Britain. These range from: the construction and status of race through various discourses and contexts of colonialism, immigration and multiculturalism, issues of identity, representation, power, equality and difference, the relationship between race and other social-political identifications, categories and divisions such as nationality, class, gender, ethnicity and religion, the relationship between race and the law, crime and civil unrest, the history of racial conflict and the development of anti-racist activism, policies and legislation, forms of cultural politics, expression and resistance and, finally, current issues and debates concerning the status of race in Britain.

Resistance Movements in Conflict & War

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

The module will examine the sociology of war by investigating the intersection between violence, politics, social and economic issues, and human rights. It will be a sociological and criminological exploration of various groups throughout history who have 'broken the law' in order to achieve some type of positive social change.

The module will explore a range of interesting academic theories and concepts, including social movement theory, resistance theory, and other related issues around collective behaviour, rational choice theory, and framing, for example.

These theories will be put into context by studying various groups who achieved what is now generally deemed to be positive social change throughout history, including various resistance movements against the Third Reich during the second world war, and Nelson Mandela and the African National Congress.

The module will also examine changing political and social values, ideologies and goals of resistance movements, where support and condemnation have been attached to the same group over a relatively short period of time, including the Khmer Rouge in Cambodia and the Taliban in Afghanistan.

Restorative Justice and Desistance

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

Criminology Research Proposal

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

This module is one of two third year Criminology modules that give you the experience of carrying out a small scale research project, from the initial stages of design to the final stages of presenting your findings. It consolidates and builds upon the knowledge and skills gained from the second year Doing Social Research modules. You will produce a research proposal that demonstrates your ability to design a small research project and to apply relevant methodological issues to your research. You will also gain ethical approval for your research via the University's ethical approval process. You will commence your research during this module with guided supervision and will give a presentation based on your preliminary findings.

You are required to pass both L3078 Doing Social Research: working with quantitative data and L3079 Doing Social Research: working with qualitative data in the second year in order to take this module in the final year. 

Criminology Project

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

This modules gives you direct experience of carrying out a small scale research project and follows directly on from the Criminlogy Research Proposal module. You will continue with your empirical and background research under the guidance of a supervisor and will produce an 8,000-word report on your findings, which relates your research to criminological theory and concepts.

You are required to pass both L3078 Doing Social Research: working with quantitative data and L3079 Doing Social Research: working with qualitative data in the second year in order to take this module in the final year. 

Alternatives to Incarceration

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

The penal imagination is dominated by the prison, yet it is but the tip of the criminal justice iceberg. This module traverses the keel.

In this module, you develop a critical understanding of the contexts, critical arguments and theories behind processing offenders outwith the prison.

You focus on real world practice, covering topics that are drawn from such interrelated areas of:

  • offender supervision
  • community payback
  • managing sex offenders
  • managing drug offenders
  • boot camps
  • electronic tagging
  • problem solving justice
  • desistance
  • compliance
  • architectural and performative regimes.

You engage in discussions that are grounded in philosophical conversation around the rationales and impacts of punishing through these means:

  • rehabilitation?
  • reduced risk?
  • reparations?
  • retribution?

Themes of the new punitiveness and breaking out of prison (thinking), emotional versus intelligent justice, will run through the module.

Crimes against Humanity (Aut)

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

Why are human beings capable of extreme forms of cruelty and violence? The module takes an interdisciplinary approach to reflect on how, in times of conflict, it is possible for previously law abiding people to commit the most atrocious acts of cruelty and violence.

Crimes against humanity have only recently caught the attention of criminologists and the module provides you with in-depth information on the origins and dynamics of such crimes.

During the module, you will discuss the work of influential social theorists, psychologists, criminologists, psychoanalysts and philosophers and particular attention will be focused on the work of Erich Fromm (Escape from Freedom), Hannah Arendt (Eichmann in Jerusalem), Zygmunt Bauman (Modernity and the Holocaust) and Ernest Becker (Escape from Evil).

In addition to contemplating the driving force of aggression, conflict and mass violence, you also address the psychological trauma experienced by victims as well as considering the role of both internal and external bystanders.

The overall aim of this module is to introduce you to a range of psychoanalytical, psychological, sociological and criminological reflections on mass violence, psychological trauma and atrocity. 

Critical Perspectives on Terrorism

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

The Cultural Life of Capital Punishment (Aut)

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

In this module, you look at sociological, criminological, socio-legal and cultural approaches in order to study capital punishment.

You will engage with a 'cultures of punishment' perspective on the death penalty, drawing on capital punishment scholars such as David Garland (2010), Austin Sarat (2001) and Franklin Zimring (2003).

This perspective emphasises the need to understand the symbolic meanings generated by punishment and how these relate to social change.

You also study capital punishment in its historical and contemporary contexts. After establishing this theoretical framework, you study a broadly chronological approach from the nineteenth-century to the present.

You explore the following topics:

  • spectacle and public execution
  • the campaign to end public executions
  • mid twentieth-century abolitionism
  • public views on capital punishment in England
  • American reinstatement of the death penalty
  • cultural portrayals of capital punishment
  • women and the death penalty
  • 'new abolitionism' and the innocence movement in the United States
  • European cosmopolitan identity and the campaign for worldwide abolition
  • current use of the death penalty worldwide with a focus on Singapore, Japan and China.

You mainly focus on European countries and the United States, although the final topic includes a wider international dimension.

Crimes of Hate and Violence (Spr)

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

The module examines a variety of violent crimes. Specifically, it focuses on hate crime, state violence/terrorism and murder. The underlying aim of the module is to understand motivations for violent crime and to critically assess appropriate criminal justice responses.

The module will focus on three key areas of violent crime: hate crime, state violence/ terrorism and serial murder, which are areas of increasing topical and policy concern. Each will be examined in relation to policy and the lived reality for victims and offenders. The module examines different victim groups, which might include ethnic minorities, the disabled or women, situating them within the wider field of victimology. The aetiology of offenders will be examined, which spans people who commit 'everyday' violent crime to those who are passionately committed to extremism. Finally, you will evaluate cultural and media representations of violent crime. 

On completion of the module you will have a more critical overview of crimes of hate and their policy responses.

Critical Perspectives on Terrorism

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

In this module, you take an interdisciplinary approach to investigate the sociology of terrorism.

In order to achieve this, you draw upon a variety of critical sociology, criminology and social psychology theories, interspersed with empirical evidence.

You begin by discussing and debating the definitions of certain key terms, such as 'terrorism', 'extremism', and 'violent extremism'; providing a platform to engage with the module's core arguments and enabling you to develop an appreciation of the implications for policy and practice.

Some of the core topics you cover in this module include:

  • exploring how and why some people become interested in ideologies and/or groups considered to be extreme
  • the value of culture, subculture, and masculinity within extreme movements
  • how group bonds and influence facilitates deeper commitment to groups
  • how complex methods of persuasion and wrap-around social control enables the potential for the mortification and reconstruction of people's perceptions of self and social identity
  • how through processes of conversion, some people go on to change their worldviews and begin to internalise extremist ideologies.

In addition, you also cover the sociology of violence.

You conclude this module by bringing together the various political, religious, social, cultural, and subcultural arguments and using them to look at the political environment of counter-terrorism - with a specific focus on policy influence, construction, and implications.

Surveillance, Security and Control

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

In this module, you examine key developments and controversies in surveillance and security.

You focus on the deployment of surveillance in diverse contexts including:

  • crime control
  • national security
  • welfare
  • border control
  • consumption.

You are introduced to a range of historical, theoretical and empirical contexts that advance your understanding and the critical analysis of surveillance in society.

Through specific case studies - including DNA databases; the Snowden Affair; the 'internet of things' and military surveillance - you are encouraged to analyse contemporary surveillance trends in the light of shifting constellations of power, politics, resistance and control.

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