Psychology with Criminology BSc

Psychology

Key information

Duration:
3 years full time
Typical A-level offer:
AAA-AAB
UCAS code:
C8LC
Start date:
September 2018

Study in one of the UK’s largest schools of psychology and choose from one of the most extensive range of psychology modules in the country.

Combine this with learning from criminology experts who influence UK public-sector policy on topics from radicalisation to international crime.

You'll benefit from some of the most advanced research facilities for studying psychology anywhere in the country, including a child development research suite and the Clinical Imaging Sciences Centre housing MRI and PET/CT.

This course is accredited by the British Psychological Society.

My time at Sussex has been an amazing journey. Gaining fascinating insights into the human mind from people so passionate about the subject has been truly inspiring.”Anna Scarlet
Psychology BSc

Entry requirements

A-level

Typical offer

AAA-AAB

GCSEs

You must have GCSE (or equivalent) Mathematics, with at least grade B (or grade 6 in the new grading scale).

You should also have a broad range of GCSEs (A*-C), including good grades in relevant subjects

 

Other UK qualifications

Access to HE Diploma

Typical offer

Pass the Access to HE Diploma with at least 45 Level 3 credits at Merit or above of which 30 credits must be at Distinction. 

 

Subjects

The Access course should normally be in Science or Social Science and/or contain Psychology units.

GCSEs

You must have GCSE (or equivalent) Mathematics, with at least grade B (or grade 6 in the new grading scale).

International Baccalaureate

Typical offer

34 points overall from the full IB Diploma.

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (formerly BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma)

Typical offer

DDD

Subjects

The BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma should be in Applied Science or Heath and Social Care.

GCSEs

You must have GCSE (or equivalent) Mathematics, with at least grade B (or grade 6 in the new grading scale).

You should also have a broad range of GCSEs (A*-C), including good grades in relevant subjects

 

Scottish Highers

Typical offer

AAABB

GCSEs

You will also need Mathematics at Standard Grade, grade 1 or 2.

Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced

Typical offer

Grade B and AA in two A-levels

GCSEs

You must have GCSE (or equivalent) Mathematics, with at least grade B (or grade 6 in the new grading scale).

You should also have a broad range of GCSEs (A*-C), including good grades in relevant subjects

 

International baccalaureate

Typical offer

34 points overall from the full IB Diploma.

European baccalaureate

Typical offer

Overall result of 80%

Other international qualifications

Australia

Typical offer

Relevant state (Year 12) High School Certificate, and over 85% in the ATAR or UAI/TER/ENTER. Or a Queensland OP of 5 or below.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Austria

Typical offer

Reifeprüfung or Matura with an overall result of 2.2 or better for first-year entry. A result of 2.5 or better would be considered for Foundation Year entry.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Belgium

Typical offer

Certificat d'Enseignement Secondaire Supérieur (CESS) or Diploma van Hoger Secundair Onderwijs with a good overall average. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Bulgaria

Typical offer

Diploma za Sredno Obrazovanie with excellent final-year scores (normally 5.5 overall with 6 in key subjects).

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Canada

Typical offer

High School Graduation Diploma. Specific requirements vary between provinces.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

China

Typical offer

We usually do not accept Senior High School Graduation for direct entry to our undergraduate courses. However, we do consider applicants who have studied 1 or more years of Higher Education in China at a recognised degree awarding institution or who are following a recognised International Foundation Year.

If you are interested in applying for a business related course which requires an academic ability in Mathematics, you will normally also need a grade B in Mathematics from the Huikao or a score of 90 in Mathematics from the Gaokao.

Applicants who have the Senior High School Graduation may be eligible to apply to our International Foundation Year, which if you complete successfully you can progress on to a relevant undergraduate course at Sussex. You can find more information about the qualifications which are accepted by our International Study Centre at  http://isc.sussex.ac.uk/entry-requirements/international-foundation-year .

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Croatia

Typical offer

Maturatna Svjedodžba with an overall score of at least 4-5 depending on your degree choice.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Cyprus

Typical offer

Apolytirion of Lykeion with an overall average of at least 18 or 19/20 will be considered for first-year entry.

A score of 15/20 in the Apolytirion would be suitable for Foundation Year entry. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Czech Republic

Typical offer

Maturita with a good overall average.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Denmark

Typical offer

Højere Forberedelseseksamen (HF) or studentereksamen with an overall average of at least 7 on the new grading scale.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Finland

Typical offer

Finnish Ylioppilastutkinto with an overall average result in the final matriculation examinations of at least 6.5.

France

Typical offer

French Baccalauréat with an overall final result of at least 14/20.

Germany

Typical offer

German Abitur with an overall result of 1.8 or better.

Greece

Typical offer

Apolytirion with an overall average of at least 18 or 19/20 will be considered for first-year entry.

A score of 15/20 in the Apolytirion would be suitable for Foundation Year entry. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Hong Kong

Typical offer

Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education (HKDSE) with grades of 5, 4, 4 from three subjects including two electives. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Hungary

Typical offer

Erettsegi/Matura with a good average.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

India

Typical offer

Standard XII results from Central and Metro Boards with an overall average of 75-80%. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Iran

Typical offer

High School Diploma and Pre-University Certificate.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Ireland

Typical offer

Irish Leaving Certificate (Higher Level) at H1 H1 H2 H2 H3.

Additional requirements

You must have at least grade O5 in Mathematics.

 

Israel

Typical offer

Bagrut, with at least 8/10 in at least six subjects, including one five-unit subject.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Italy

Typical offer

Italian Diploma di Maturità or Diploma Pass di Esame di Stato with a Final Diploma mark of at least 85/100.

Japan

Typical offer

Upper Secondary Leaving Certificate is suitable for entry to our Foundation Years. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Latvia

Typical offer

Atestats par Visparejo videjo Izglitibu with very good grades in state exams.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Lithuania

Typical offer

Brandos Atestatas including scores of 80-90% in at least three state examinations (other than English).

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Luxembourg

Typical offer

Diplôme de Fin d'Etudes Secondaires.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Malaysia

Typical offer

Sijil Tinggi Persekolahan Malaysia (STPM). As well as various two or three-year college or polytechnic certificates and diplomas.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Netherlands

Typical offer

Voorereidend Wetenschappelijk Onderwijs (VWO), normally with an average of at least 7.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Nigeria

Typical offer

You are expected to have one of the following:

  • Higher National Diploma
  • One year at a recognised Nigerian University
  • Professional Diploma (Part IV) from the Institute of Medical Laboratory Technology of Nigeria
  • Advanced Diploma

You must also have a score of C6 or above in WAEC/SSC English.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Norway

Typical offer

Norwegian Vitnemal Fra Den Videregaende Skole- Pass with an overall average of at least 4.5.

Pakistan

Typical offer

Bachelor (Pass) degree in arts, commerce or science.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Poland

Typical offer

Matura with three extended-level written examinations, normally scored within the 7th stanine.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Portugal

Typical offer

Diploma de Ensino Secundario normally with an overall mark of at least 16/20. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Romania

Typical offer

Diploma de Bacalaureat with an overall average of 8.5-9.5 depending on your degree choice.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Singapore

Typical offer

A-levels, as well as certain certificates and diplomas.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Slovakia

Typical offer

Maturitna Skuska or Maturita with honours, normally including scores of 1 in at least three subjects.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Slovenia

Typical offer

Secondary School Leaving Diploma or Matura with at least 23 points overall.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

South Africa

Typical offer

National Senior Certificate with very good grades. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Spain

Typical offer

Spanish Título de Bachillerato (LOGSE) with an overall average result of at least 8.0

Sri Lanka

Typical offer

Sri Lankan A-levels.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Sweden

Typical offer

Fullstandigt Slutbetyg with good grades.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Switzerland

Typical offer

Federal Maturity Certificate.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Turkey

Typical offer

Devlet Lise Diplomasi or Lise Bitirme is normally only suitable for Foundation Years, but very strong applicants may be considered for first year entry. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

USA

Typical offer

We look at your full profile taking into account everything you are studying. You must have your high school graduation diploma and we will be interested in your Grade 12 GPA. However, we will also want to see evidence of the external tests you have taken. Each application is looked at individually, but you should normally have one or two of the following:

  • APs (where we would expect at least three subject with 4/5 in each)
  • SAT Reasoning Tests (normally with a combined score of 1300) or ACT grades
  • and/or SAT Subject Tests (where generally we expect you to have scores of 600 or higher). 

We would normally require APs or SAT Subject Tests in areas relevant to your chosen degree course.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

My country is not listed

If your qualifications aren’t listed or you have a question about entry requirements, email ug.enquiries@sussex.ac.uk.

English language requirements

IELTS (Academic)

6.5 overall, including at least 6.0 in each component

IELTS scores are valid for two years from the test date. Your score must be valid when you begin your Sussex course. You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test.

If you are applying for degree-level study we can consider your IELTS test from any test centre, but if you require a Confirmation of Acceptance for Studies (CAS) for an English language or pre-sessional English course (not combined with a degree) the test must be taken at a UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI)-approved IELTS test centre.

Find out more about IELTS.

Other English language requirements

Proficiency tests

Cambridge Advanced Certificate in English (CAE)

For tests taken before January 2015: Grade B or above

For tests taken after January 2015: 176 overall, including at least 169 in each skill

We would normally expect the CAE test to have been taken within two years before the start of your course.

You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Cambridge English: Advanced.

Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE)

For tests taken before January 2015: grade C or above

For tests taken after January 2015: 176 overall, including at least 169 in each skill

We would normally expect the CPE test to have been taken within two years before the start of your course.

You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Cambridge English: Proficiency.

Pearson (PTE Academic)

62 overall, including at least 56 in all four skills.

PTE (Academic) scores are valid for two years from the test date. Your score must be valid when you begin your Sussex course. You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Pearson (PTE Academic).

TOEFL (iBT)

88 overall, including at least 20 in Listening, 19 in Reading, 21 in Speaking, 23 in Writing.

TOEFL (iBT) scores are valid for two years from the test date. Your score must be valid when you begin your Sussex course. You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about TOEFL (iBT).

The TOEFL Institution Code for the University of Sussex is 9166.

English language qualifications

AS/A-level (GCE)

Grade C or above in English Language.

Hong Kong Advanced Level Examination (HKALE)/ AS or A Level: grade C or above in Use of English

French Baccalaureat

A score of 12 or above in English.

GCE O-level

Grade C or above in English.

Brunei/Cambridge GCE O-level in English: grades 1-6.

Singapore/Cambridge GCE O-level in English: grades 1-6.

GCSE or IGCSE

Grade C or above in English as a First Language.

Grade B or above in English as a Second Language

German Abitur

A score of 12 or above in English.

Ghana Senior Secondary School Certificate

If awarded before 1993: grades 1-6 in English language.

If awarded between 1993 and 2005: grades A-D in English language.

Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education (HKDSE)

 Level 4, including at least 3 in each component in English Language.

Indian School Certificate (Standard XII)

The Indian School Certificate is accepted at the grades below when awarded by the following examination boards:

Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) – English Core only: 70%

Council for Indian School Certificate Examinations (CISCE) - English: 70% 

International Baccalaureate Diploma (IB)

English A or English B at grade 5 or above.

Malaysian Certificate of Education (SPM) 119/GCE O-level

If taken before the end of 2008: grades 1-5 in English Language.

If taken from 2009 onwards: grade C or above in English Language.

The qualification must be jointly awarded by the University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES).

West African Senior School Certificate

Grades 1-6 in English language when awarded by the West African Examinations Council (WAEC) or the National Examinations Council (NECO).

Country exceptions

Select to see the list of exempt English-speaking countries

If you are a national of one of the countries below, or if you have recently completed a qualification equivalent to a UK Bachelors degree or higher in one of these countries, you will normally meet our English requirements. Note that qualifications obtained by distance learning or awarded by studying outside these countries cannot be accepted for English language purposes.

You will normally be expected to have completed the qualification within two years before starting your course at Sussex. If the qualification was obtained earlier than this we would expect you to be able to demonstrate that you have maintained a good level of English, for example by living in an English-speaking country or working in an occupation that required you to use English regularly and to a high level.

Please note that this list is determined by the UK’s Home Office, not by the University of Sussex.

List of exempt countries

  • Antigua and Barbuda
  • Australia
  • Bahamas
  • Barbados
  • Belize
  • Canada**
  • Dominica
  • Grenada
  • Guyana
  • Ireland
  • Jamaica
  • New Zealand
  • St Kitts and Nevis
  • St Lucia
  • St Vincent and the Grenadines
  • Trinidad and Tobago
  • United Kingdom
  • USA

** Canada: you must be a national of Canada; other nationals not on this list who have a degree from a Canadian institution will not normally be exempt from needing to provide evidence of English.

Admissions information for applicants

Transfers into Year 2

No

If your qualifications aren’t listed or you have a question about entry requirements, email ug.enquiries@sussex.ac.uk.

Why choose this course?

  • Ranked 12th in the UK for Psychology, and joint 1st for graduate prospects (The Complete University Guide 2018).
  • Whatever your area of interest – clinical, cognitive, forensic, health, social psychology, child development or neuroscience – we have the expertise to support you.
  • Benefit from interdisciplinary expertise in crime and criminal justice in the School of Law, Politics and Sociology.

Course information

How will I study?

You spend 75% of your time studying Psychology. You are introduced to topics such as:

  • the psychology of childhood and adolescence
  • cognition in clinical contexts
  • psychobiology.

You also start to acquire the essential research skills needed to be an effective psychologist.

You spend 25% of your time studying Criminology and learn how to ‘think like a criminologist’. You study how criminal justice works, and read and discuss some classic criminological studies.

Modules

These are the modules running in the academic year 2017. Modules running in 2018 may be subject to change.

Core modules


Customise your course

Our courses are designed to broaden your horizons and give you the skills and experience necessary to have the sort of career that has an impact.

Gain programming skills and apply them to areas such as digital media, business and interactive design. Find out about our Year in Computing

How will I study?

You spend 75% of your time studying Psychology. You cover a full range of psychology topics, including:

  • brain and behaviour
  • social and cognitive psychology
  • developmental psychology.

You also further develop your research skills and acquire a familiarity with statistical and analytical methods.

You spend 25% of your time studying Criminology. You study a range of criminological topics from historical perspectives to recent theories and approaches.

Modules

These are the modules running in the academic year 2017. Modules running in 2018 may be subject to change.

Core modules


Customise your course

Our courses are designed to broaden your horizons and give you the skills and experience necessary to have the sort of career that has an impact.

Gain programming skills and apply them to areas such as digital media, business and interactive design. Find out about our Year in Computing

Study abroad (optional)

Apply to study abroad – you’ll develop an international perspective and gain an edge when it comes to your career. Find out where your course could take you.

Placement (optional)

A placement is a great way to network and gain practical skills. When you leave Sussex, you’ll benefit from having the experience employers are looking for.

Recent students have gone on placements at institutions including:

  • Sussex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust
  • Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS)
  • The Office for National Statistics.

Find out more about placements and internships.

“My placement has elevated my employability and given me the confidence and motivation to exploit my full potential.” Lauren MaddockPsychology (with a professional placement year) BSc
HR Associate, GlaxoSmithKline

Please note

If you’re receiving – or applying for – USA federal Direct Loan funds, you can’t transfer to the version of this program with an optional study abroad period or optional placement. Find out more about American Student Loans and Federal Student Aid

How will I study?

75% of your time is spent studying Psychology. Choosing from a range of specialised modules taught by leading researchers, you focus on an area to suit your personal interests and career goals. You work on an original research project, benefiting from one-on-one supervision.

Topics offered include:

  • addiction
  • prejudice
  • perception.

You spend 25% of your time studying Criminology. You choose from specialist criminology options in topics ranging from crimes against humanity to the sociology of terrorism.

Modules

These are the modules running in the academic year 2017. Modules running in 2018 may be subject to change.

Core modules

Options

Find out about studying Psychology at Sussex, including clinical, cognitive, social, health, forensic, neuroscience and child development psychology

My research explores the limits of unconscious learning and has been applied, among other things, to devise a method of testing awareness in brain injured patients.Dr Ryan Scott
Lecturer in Psychology

Fees

Fees are not yet set for entry in the academic year 2018. Note that your fees, once they’re set, may be subject to an increase on an annual basis.

The UK Government has confirmed that if you’re an EU student applying for entry in September 2018, you'll pay the same fee rate as UK students for the duration of your course, even if the UK leaves the EU before the end of your course. You'll also continue to have access to student loans and grants. Find out more on the UK Government website.

Find out about typical living costs for studying at Sussex

Scholarships

Details of our scholarships are not yet set for entry in the academic year 2018.

Careers

Graduate destinations

Psychology at Sussex is ranked joint 1st in the UK for graduate prospects (The Complete University Guide 2018)96% of students from the School of Psychology were in work or further study six months after graduating. Recent graduates have gone into jobs such as:

  • rehabilitation officer, NHS
  • prison officer, National Offender Management Service
  • adjudicator, Financial Ombudsman.

(HESA EPI, Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey 2015)

Your future career

You’ll develop skills in critical thinking, research and data analysis for careers in professional psychology or research. And you can use the skills you’ve learned in criminology for jobs in policing, the prison service and youth justice.

Working while you study

Our Careers and Employability Centre can help you find part-time work while you study. Find out more about career development and part-time work

Cognition in Clinical Contexts

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

This module will introduce you to the aims, methods, theories and empirical findings associated with a scientific approach to studying the human mind. You will learn how psychologists develop models of cognitive function that are tested against data from behavioural studies of healthy individuals, as well as from individuals with brain damage or psychopathology.

After an introductory lecture covering the historical background to cognitive psychology and the main methodological approaches taken, the module will proceed to cover five core topics: perception, attention, thinking, memory, and language.

Each topic will begin with one or two background lectures that introduce key concepts and experimental approaches. The background lectures are then typically followed by a lecture which addresses the topic from a neuropsychological approach, considering how that aspect of cognition is affected by brain injury; covering material such as agnosia, neglect, and amnesia.

Additional lectures will address the topics from a more psychopathological approach, for example examining the role of attentional biases in anxiety. The module concludes with four lectures considering cognition in the broader context of behaviour and behavioural control.

Individuals and Groups

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

Introduces students to the central ideas and findings of social psychology. All psychology undergraduates at Sussex take this module. Students will learn about theories, methods, empirical findings and applications of social psychology. The module does not require any prior knowledge of psychology.

Research Skills in Psychology 1

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

The aim of this module is to introduce students to some of the skills necessary for conducting psychological research. This module focuses on the skills required for analysing the data obtained from non-experimental studies in psychology, such as surveys, questionnaires and observational studies. It is therefore complementary to Research Skills 2, which focuses more on experimental methods in psychology.
(a) Students will learn about the strengths and weaknesses of the methods that psychologists use in order to obtain data on behaviour (eg the advantages and disadvantages of techniques such as experiments, questionnaires and psychometric tests)
(b) Students will be taught how to analyse data quantitatively, using statistical techniques. This will include learning about the logic behind statistical methods (eg sampling theory and hypothesis testing), as well as learning under what circumstances various statistical tests are appropriate. Students will be taught how to use SPSS and Excel to produce descriptive and inferential statistics and graphs. Various statistical tests will be taught, such as Pearsons and Spearmans correlation tests, linear regresssion and Chi-Square
(c) Students will be shown how to produce written reports of their findings and conclusions, using the discipline's presentation conventions, as set out by the American Psychological Association
(d) Students will be taught various research-related IT skills, including how to make web searches, and how to use Excel and SPSS
(e) Students will be given some insight into the ethical issues that surround experimentation on human beings.

By the end of the module, students should be familiar with the techniques that most psychologists use in order to conduct research; be able to perform various statistical tests by hand and by the use of SPSS; be able to produce lab-reports that conform to the conventions for published psychology journal articles; and they should have started to be able to understand and critically evaluate the methodological aspects of published research.

Thinking Like a Criminologist

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

This modules aims to introduce students to the key skills involved in thinking like a criminologist. It places a joint emphasis on gaining both a theoretical and practical understanding of criminology as a discipline.

You will develop skills in interpreting crime statistics, critically assessing definitions of crime and engaging with media debates about crime and justice. These will be informed by introductory criminological theory to provide a foundation, including positivism and classicism, Durkheim and the Chicago School.

Key topics will include:

  • What is crime?
  • Who is a criminal?
  • How can we use crime statistics?
  • The history of crime
  • Media representations of crime
  • The use of official reports and policy documents.

Psychobiology

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

'Psychobiology' is a first year, core module that gives you a first overview of the various topic-areas relevant to understanding human and non-human animal behaviour from a biological and/or evolutionary perspective.

You begin by discussing the basic anatomy of the peripheral- and central nervous systems (brain and spinal cord), as well as the structure and physiological function of nervous cells (neurons), including synaptic neurotransmission, hormonal actions, and intracellular electrical processes.

Additionally, you are given an introduction to systems neuropsychology and the effects of drugs on neuronal functioning are discussed.

Next, you discuss brain-behaviour relations in greater detail focusing on three broad topic areas:

  • you consider the biological basis of emotions, from a hormonal- and brain systems perspective
  • you consider essential motivated behaviours, by exploring both homeostatic and non-homeostatic peripheral and central mechanisms underlying drinking and eating behaviour
  • you discuss the brain mechanisms that allow organisms to acquire, store and retrieve new information and alter their behaviours, focussing on historical and recent experimental findings from studies on human- and non-human learning & memory.

In the final section of this module, you take a more evolutionary perspective, exploring how many components and aspects of human behaviour have been shaped by adaptation and selection, relying on field studies into the foundations of animal behaviour.

Psychology of Childhood and Adolescence

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

This module examines the historical origins, perspectives, theories, methods, and empirical findings of research in the area of developmental psychology, with attention to cognitive, perceptual, language, social, emotional, and atypical development. A core emphasis on major theories and research findings in the field of developmental psychology will be complemented by presentations by various members of the Psychology faculty that address a wide range of psychological processes, from the antenatal period through to young adulthood. The module does not require any prior knowledge of psychology.

Research Skills in Psychology 2

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

The aim of this module is to introduce you to some of the skills necessary for conducting psychological research. This module focuses on the skills required for analysing the data obtained from experimental and quasi-experimental studies in psychology. It is therefore complementary to Research Skills 1, which focuses more on observational methods in psychology.

  • You will learn about the strengths and weaknesses of experimental and quasi-experimental methods used by psychologists, and will learn how to design methodologically-sound experimental studies.
  • You will be taught how to analyse data quantitatively, using statistical techniques. This will include learning about the logic behind statistical methods (eg probability, sampling distributions, sampling theory and hypothesis testing), as well as learning under what circumstances various statistical tests are appropriate. Various statistical tests will be taught, such as z-score based hypothesis testing; single and two-sample t-tests including independent measures and repeated measures t-tests; independent and repeated measures analysis of variance, ANOVA. You will be taught how to use SPSS and Excel to produce descriptive statistics and graphs, and do inferential statistics.
  • You will be shown how to produce a graphic poster and written reports of their findings and conclusions, using the discipline's presentation conventions, as set out by the American Psychological Association.
  • You will be taught various research-related IT skills, including how to make web searches, and how to use Excel and SPSS to perform statistical tests and display data.
  • You will be given some insight into the ethical issues that surround experimentation on human beings.

By the end of the module, you should be familiar with the techniques that most psychologists use in order to conduct research, be able to perform various statistical tests by hand and by the use of SPSS, be able to produce a poster and lab-reports that conform to the conventions for published psychology journal articles, and you should have started to be able to understand and critically evaluate the methodological aspects of published research.

Understanding the Criminal Justice System

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

Gain an introduction to the criminal justice system by focusing on key debates around social control and the historic development of institutions.

You study the development of key components of the justice system including:

  • prisons
  • the police
  • probation
  • the courts and community justice.

You also examine contemporary debates including:

  • race and crime
  • gender
  • power and punishment
  • issues of overpolicing and criminalisation
  • youth justice and crime prevention.

You will study the British justice system within an international context (to allow for a comparative understanding).

Cognitive Psychology

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

On this module you will attend 23 one-hour lectures, a two hour practical, and one hour seminar.

You’ll be introduced to Cognitive Psychology topics, from basic perception to thinking.

This includes:

  • sensory systems and visual perception
  • sound and speech perception
  • language
  • attention
  • memory
  • thinking.

The two-hour practical will be a memory experiment. 

Criminology in Theory and Perspective

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

This module will familiarise you with the main theories, perspectives and concepts associated with major traditions in sociological criminology. It builds on two first year modules, Thinking Like a Criminologist and Criminological Classics, which are prerequisites.

You will examine a range of criminological perspectives, from those prevalent in the mid twentieth-century to contemporary, cutting edge theories. You will be encouraged to take a critical approach to these perspectives and to situate them within their wider social and political contexts.

In particular, the module will cover the following:

  • Strain Theory
  • Labelling Theory
  • Radical and Critical Criminology
  • Left Realism
  • Right Realism
  • Feminist Criminology
  • Masculinities and Crime
  • Psycho-Social Approaches
  • Cultural Criminology, and
  • Green Criminology.

Developmental Psychology

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

This module provides you with a basic grounding in developmental psychology from the prenatal period through adolescence.

Topics that are covered include:

  • developmental research methods
  • theories of child development
  • prenatal development; behavioural
  • genetics and individual differences
  • perceptual development
  • early cognitive development
  • attachment
  • temperament
  • categorisation
  • language acquisition
  • motor development
  • children’s understanding of mathematics
  • gender development
  • adolescent development.

Discovering Statistics

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

Discovering statistics has two components: (1) statistical analysis and (2) empirical research. The empirical project enables you to carry out independent research that will develop skills in experimental research. This project helps to prepare you for your final empirical research project. The statistical analysis parts of the module build upon existing knowledge of statistical theory to enable you to analyse more complex data structures through understanding the general linear model (regression, ANOVA etc.). Practical classes compliment the lectures by providing guidance on applying the general linear model using SPSS, advice on designing and executing projects, and conducting experimental research

Brain and Behaviour

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

This module provides an introduction to brain mechanisms and behaviour. Topics covered will normally include:

  • Ionic mechanisms underlying the nerve action potential
  • Synapses and neurotransmission
  • Neuropharmacology of commonly used antidepressant and anxiolytic drugs
  • Functional neuroanatomy of the human brain
  • Brain development and neurogenetics
  • Neural mechanisms in motor behaviour
  • Initiation of voluntary actions
  • Neural mechanisms underlying plasticity and learning
  • Individual differences

The module consists of a series of 22 lectures, two seminars and two practical classes. The weekly schedule is as follows:

  • Lecture 1: Introduction

  • Lectures 2 and 3: Neurodevelopment 

  • Lectures 4 and 5: Neurogenetics
    Practical: Neuroanatomy

  • Lectures 6 and 7: Sensory systems 

  • Lectures 8 and 9: Motor systems 
    Seminar: Behavioural genetics

  • Lectures 10 and 11: Neurotransmission 

  • Lectures 12 and 13: Excitation 

  • Lectures 14 and 15: Inhibition 
    Practical: Action potentials

  • Lectures 16 and 17: Neuromodulation

  • Lectures 18 and 19: Emotion

  • Lectures 20 and 21: Cognition and reward 
    Seminar: Exploring human conditions

  • Lecture 22: Summary and revision

Personality and individual difference will be highlighted and focused on at various points in the module through: gene-environment interactions; biomarkers/endophenotypes; and pharmacogenetics – individualised medicine.

Punishment and Penology

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

This module will examine both the theory and practice of punishment, and will encourage you to take a critical approach to analysing these. The focus will mainly be on England and Wales, but comparison will be drawn with other countries, such as those in Europe, North America and Australasia, where relevant.

After exploring a range of theoretical approaches in relation to the justifications for and purposes of punishment, you will consider a range of empirical examples. The latter will be largely contemporary, but historical examples will also be used.

Topics will include:

  • justifications for punishment
  • Durkhemian, Marxist and Foucauldian perspectives on punishment
  • Garland's (2001) culture of control and the new penology (Feeley and Simon, 1992)
  • contemporary imprisonment
  • women in prison
  • children and young people in custody
  • immigration detention centres
  • alternatives to imprisonment
  • radical critiques, such as abolitionism and feminist jurisprudence.

Social Psychology

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

This module will provide an overview of major theories, methods, research findings and debates in social psychology. Students will examine classic studies and current findings and evaluate published research reports. The first half of the module focuses on micro-social phenomena and examines key areas of social cognition, including attitudes and attributions, the cognitive construction of self and others as well as identity and self-esteem. The second half of the module will cover basic intergroup and intragroup processes, such as social influence, group membership and identity, prejudice and collective behaviour, and the psychology of culture.

Social Research Methods in Psychology

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

This module complements the term 1 module 'Discovering Statistics'. It has three components:
(a) statistical analysis for questionnaire construction and interpretation;
(b) observational methods;
(c) qualitative data-gathering and analysis.

There are two assessed empirical reports using some of these techniques, which will enable students to develop skills in research design, data-gathering and analysis and which will therefore prepare students for their final-year empirical research project. The statistical analysis parts of the module build upon existing knowledge of statistical theory (in both Year 1 and the term 1 module of year 2). Practical workshops complement the lectures by providing hands-on experience and guidance in using the methods, both with SPSS, and through small group work on relevant tasks. This module builds on knowledge gained in the core psychology modules C8511: Research Skills in Psychology 1 and C8891: Research Skills in Psychology 2. Students who are not enrolled on the BSc Psychology course at Sussex are expected to be familiar with the material covered in these modules.

Critiquing Criminology

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

In this module, you identify a specific area of criminological study and write a critique of current research and debates in the field.

You work with a supervisor and attend seminars designed to give you the analytic skills required to complete your critique.

Topics covered include: systematic literature searching, critical thinking and epistemological reflection. 

Research Dissertation

  • 45 credits
  • Autumn & Spring Teaching, Year 3

The empirical project taken by students in their final year is an opportunity for you to gain first-hand experience of carrying out a piece of psychological research under the supervision of a member of faculty. The empirical project consolidates and extends the research skills acquired in you in the second year and involves the conducting, analysing and writing up of a piece of empirical research. As part of this, you will experience and solve a range of the practical, methodological, conceptual and ethical problems which are typical within the research process.

Attention: An individual differences perspective

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

This module offers you an overview of attention research and theory, from an individual differences perceptive. You will learn about a wide range of factors that can influence the ability to focus and maintain attention.

Topics covered may include:

  • The relationship betweeen IQ, cognitive control and attention
  • Attentional effects of individual differences in perception
  • Age-related changes in attention
  • Mind wandering
  • Attentional biases associated with depression, addiction and anxiety
  • Clinical syndromes associated with attention problems (eg Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder).

The module will also cover key measures and methods used, and provide training in the critical analysis of research studies in the field.

Biological Bases of Mental Disorders

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

The module examines the biochemical and anatomical bases of selected clinical disorders. It considers drug models (both animal and human) developed to understand the clinical condition and approaches to treatment, and examines the relationship between biochemical effects and behavioural and cognitive changes. Topics covered include anxiety, depression and schizophrenia.

This module builds on knowledge gained in the core psychology modules Psychobiology, and Brain and Behaviour. Students not enrolled on the BSc in Psychology are expected to be familiar with the material covered in these modules.

 

Caring and Helping: the Psychology of Concern and Commitment

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

This module seeks to foster understanding of humans' concern for the positive welfare of others. Within psychology, such concern is usually called 'altruism'. Key antecedents of altruism include sympathy and morality. Key consequences of altruism include helping and other prosocial behaviours, although altruism can also evoke aggression and violence.

This module investigates the processes mediating altruism and its antecedents and consequences, as well as the conditions that moderate those relationships. All main subdisciplines of psychology are extensively represented in the module, eg biological, cognitive, developmental, personality, and social psychology, as are contributions from other disciplines including anthropology, economics, geography, marketing, and sociology.

The module pays special attention to critically examining how successfully psychological knowledge may be used to promote altruism.

Cognitive Neuroscience

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

The module aims to provide you with an understanding of how research in cognitive neuroscience has informed our understanding of cognitive processes in the brain. Sussex has an excellent reputation of research in cognitive neuroscience and the module is taught by an expert in the field. Evidence is drawn from a wide variety of methods.

These include case studies of brain-damaged individuals (similar to those featured in The Man who Mistook his Wife for a Hat), electrical recordings of ‘brainwave’ (EEG), and neuroimaging using fMRI. These methods provide unprecedented clues about the organization of cognition in the living human brain.

Following a discussion of the main methods, the remaining lectures will be organised around a series of different cognitive processes such as:

  • recognising objects and faces
  • space and action
  • memory and amnesia
  • brain development
  • the musical brain
  • executive control of behaviour
  • understanding numbers.

Health Psychology

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

This module provides a thorough grounding in relevant psychological theory in the domain of Health Psychology along with a familiarity with basic and applied research in this domain. The aim of this module is to provide an introduction to Health Psychology and to fundamental theoretical and empirical issues that require attention and consideration by researchers working in this field. Since Health Psychology as a discipline often has an explicit orientation towards the promotion of health, several aspects of health promotion are explored in some detail; particular emphasis is placed on communication issues. Limitations of, and alternatives to, communication-based health promotion strategies are also examined, as are the ethical issues raised by health promotion practices.

Topics covered are likely to include ways of thinking about health, health inequalities, personality and health, gender and health, social support, stress, coping, risk perceptions, levels of intervention, fear appeals, self-affirmation interventions, ethical issues in health promotion, and domain applications (for example in relation to alcohol consumption and exercise).

How Children Learn to Communicate

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

Intelligence in Animals and Machines

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

The module will develop your understanding of what it means for an animal or a machine to behave intelligently, and how brain and behavioural systems are adapted to enable an animal to cope effectively within its environment. You will consider diverse aspects of intelligence, including navigation and motor control, numerical, language, memory and social skills. You will explore how these are related to one another and how they are matched to the particular needs of animals and machines.

People and Planet: Psychology and Climate Change

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

Perspectives on Psychology

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

This module is designed to help students reflect on their studies of psychology in three ways. First, they will examine the philosophical underpinnings of psychology, tackling questions about the nature of scientific investigation and other fundamental debates through the history of psychology. Second, the ethics of psychological research will be scrutinised, with attention to issues that arise in the course of various methodologies employed by psychologists. Finally, students will be supported in identifying and critically reflecting on the transferrable employability skills that they have gained from their studies of psychology.

Psychology in Education

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

In this module, you address the role that psychological research can play in understanding and supporting educational processes.

In your lectures, you are introduced to material on broad theoretical perspectives concerning children's learning (e.g. cognitive development, socio-motivational factors) as well as specific aspects of children's academic development (e.g. key curriculum areas such as reading and mathematics; special educational needs).

You have an opportunity to share your evaluations of empirical research with other students in seminars, and submit a portfolio of engaging assignments on a variety of topics.

Throughout the module, you are encouraged to consider the implications of psychological research for designing and implementing practical strategies to support learning and socio-emotional development in the educational context.

Psychology of Appetite

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

Taking a psychobiological perspective, the module explores issues in our relationship with food. The initial focus will be on appetite control, and constructs of hunger and satiety. Discussion of flavour perception and hedonics then allows evaluation of concepts of food craving and addiction, and food choice and preference. Examination of non-nutritive effects of foods (including nutriceuticals) links food to mood and cognition. Finally, we explore the basis of the rise of obesity and disordered eating from a psychobiological perspective.

Psychology of Crowds and Collective Action

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

This module is about crowd behaviour - in particular riots, 'disorderly' protests, and other (conflictual) forms of collective action.

In this module, your first aim is to develop an understanding of the context within which psychological theories of crowd behaviour first emerged, and hence to analyse the historical and social determinants of these theories of the crowd.

You then analyse these psychological theories of the crowd and consider the criteria for an adequate crowd psychology.

You also examine the interrelationship between collective (intergroup) dynamics and psychological change in crowd contexts.

In this module, you build on knowledge gained in the core psychology module 'Social Psychology' (C8035). If you are not enrolled on our Psychology BSc, you are expected to be familiar with the material covered in that module.

Psychology of the Family: Beyond Attachment

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

The module will cover psychological aspects and consequences of the main familial relationships: marital, mother-child, father-child, and sibling. In particular, individual-, dyadic-, family-, and cultural-level factors influencing the development and functioning of these familial relationships will be covered, along with their consequences. 

In addition, the impact of non-traditional family forms (e.g., single-parent and stepfamilies) on children's development will be addressed. The module will include coverage of theoretical approaches to the study of the family (e.g., family systems theory, life-course approaches, socialisation) but will emphasise recent empirical work.

This module builds on knowledge gained in the core psychology module C8546: Developmental Psychology. If you are not enrolled on the BSc Psychology course at Sussex, you are expected to be familiar with the material covered in that module.

Social Cognitive Development

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

This module considers aspects of development that reflect the social nature of humans. The module covers three broad areas: social cognition (eg normal development of theory of mind and its apparent absence in autism), self-reflection (eg the growth of self-consciousness and shyness) and self-regulation and agency (eg development of emotion regulation, cross-cultural and historical concepts of the person). The underlying theme is the role of cognitive development and social context in children's developing understanding of themselves and others.

The module is structured to enable participants to study a chosen topic in depth, while also viewing it from the theoretical contexts of the other topics addressed. This module builds on knowledge gained in the core psychology module C8546: Developmental Psychology. Students who are not enrolled on the BSc Psychology course at Sussex are expected to have knowledge of developmental theory and of social, cognitive, and language development at Year 2 level. Helpful overviews of these topics can be found in many textbooks on child development.

The Psychology of Exercise and Wellbeing

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

Clinical Psychology

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

This module will give you an insight into aetiology, assessment, treatment, and service provision in clinical psychology in the UK. Selected topics covering adult psychological disorders, child and adolescent problems, the neuropsychology of psychological disorders, and learning disabilities are presented mainly by practising clinical psychologists with expertise in these areas. At the end of the module you should be able to describe theories of the aetiology of a selected range of disorders, and compare treatment used across a range of disorders and client groups.

Conflict & Cooperation in Social Groups

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

Conflict and cooperation cuts across the whole of biology and can be studied among genes or among organisms, in societies of micro-organisms, animals and humans, and also in multi-species mutualisms. It is relevant both in the origin of life and in modern-day organisms and societies. The module focuses on factors affecting the balance between conflict and cooperation in human society, vertebrate societies including primates and cooperative breeders, mutualism partners, and genes within organisms. There are eight lectures followed by six two-hour seminars covering research papers in a single area. In the first of these seminars the research papers are presented by the faculty, and in the others by you and your coursemates.

Conscious and Unconscious Mental Processes

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

In this module, you explore the existence and nature of conscious and unconscious mental processes in the domains of learning, memory, perception, and volition.

Drugs, Brain and Behaviour

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

Drugs, Brain and Behaviour offers you an overview to the psychological, pharmacological, neurobiological and neurophysiological bases of drug use, abuse and contemporary understanding of addiction (and some mental conditions), and has a strong natural science (neuroscience) orientation. The acute and long-term effects of selected drugs of abuse on behaviour, mood, cognition and neuronal function are discussed using empirical findings and theoretical developments from both human and non-human subject studies on the neurobiological and psychological basis of drug action and addiction.

The module will discuss the anatomical, neurochemical and cell-molecular mechanisms targeted by psychoactive drugs and their distribution, regulation and integration in the broader central nervous system. The focus is on potentially addictive drugs, and the major classes are discussed, including opiates (heroin and morphine), psychomotor stimulants (amphetamine and cocaine), sedative-hypnotics (alcohol, barbiturates and chloral hydrate), anxiolytics (benzodiazepines), marijuana, hallucinogens (LSD, mescaline) and hallucinogenic-stimulants (MDA, MDMA). Critically, with the knowledge of the basic neurobiological and behavioural pharmacology of these drugs 'in hand', contemporary theories and understanding of mental conditions, substance abuse and addiction are considered, focusing on key concepts related to (drug) experience-dependent neuroplasticity, drug-induced neurotoxicity, associative learning, neuronal ensembles and the synaptic basis of learning and plasticity, habit formation and impulse-control.

This module builds on knowledge gained in the core psychology modules C8003: Psychobiology and C8518: Brain and Behaviour. If you are not enrolled on the BSc Psychology course at Sussex you are expected to be familiar with the material covered in these modules.

Dynamic Approach to Understanding Child Development

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

In this module, you cover current topics in developmental psychology.

Your instructor provides a brief introduction to dynamic systems theory during your lectures in the first two weeks.

During the rest of the module, you read and discuss recent research from this perspective.

You cover topics including:

  • motor development
  • categorisation
  • language acquisition
  • spatial cognition.

In this module, you build on knowledge you gained in the core psychology module - 'Developmental Psychology' (C8546).
If you are not enrolled on our Psychology BSc, you are expected to be familiar with the material covered in that module.

Economic and Consumer Psychology

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

Consumer culture has become such a pervasive aspect of everyday life that it has profound psychological effects. This third year option investigates psychological processes underlying specific behaviours in economic and consumer contexts, such as money bargaining, getting into debt, and buying consumer goods (ordinary and 'compulsive'). You also examine the influence of selected mass consumer aspects on individuals' stereotypes and well-being, including wealth, materialistic values, and the impact of advertising on stereotyping and body image.

Evolution of Communication: from animal signals to human speech

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

In this module, you explore the evolution of communication, progressing from the vocal signals that animals produce and the functions they serve, to then consider the differences between animal and human communications - to evaluate theories of language evolution and discover the unique properties of human speech. In the course of this, you also examine ape language studies and gestural theories of language origins.

You are exposed to tools and skills that will allow you to conduct research in this area yourself - through lectures, interactive research workshop sessions and practical demonstrations.

This module should very much appeal to both psychologists and biologists who are interested in how vocal signals provide the basis for animal sexual and social behaviour, the evolution of communication, the question of whether any animal can be said to have a language, and the production and perception of human speech.

Nature and Nurture of Mental Health

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

This module introduces you to the research of nature and nurture of mental health, a highly interdisciplinary and fast-moving field.

You learn key principles as well as historical aspects of research of nature and nurture of mental health. You also explore more recent developments in this field, focusing on a broad range of mental health phenotypes across the life span.

For example, you have the opportunity to learn about nature and nurture of neurodevelopmental psychopathology (e.g. autism), common mental health problems (e.g. depression, anxiety), and mental ageing (e.g. dementia).

You also discuss ethical issues related to genetically informative human and animal studies of mental health.

Organisational Psychology

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

The module explores the application of psychology to a wide range of issues relating to work organisations. Theories from mainstream psychology regarding issues such as social identity, group decision-making, stereotyping, leadership and motivation will inform detailed discussion of key topics in organisational psychology. These include: work motivation and work behaviour; group processes, teamwork and leadership; organisational structure and culture; organisational change and development; and gender and cultural diversity in the workplace.

Positive Psychology

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

Positive Psychology examines the psychology of strength and virtue, with a focus on positive subjective experience (such as happiness and optimism), positive individual traits (such as the capacity for love) and positive institutions.

The positive psychology movement emerged at the beginning of this century as a deliberate attempt to counterbalance what its protagonists perceived to be a distortion in the field arising from prevailing concerns in psychology with pathology and dysfunction. The goal was to rebalance the field.

In this module we will explore topics within the field of positive psychology, such as happiness, optimism, mindfulness, and love, and do so with a critical eye.

The aim will be to examine the evidence for the claims made in each case. It will not be possible to present a comprehensive coverage of the area, but we will cover positive emotions, positive thinking, the positive self, positive relationships, and positive health.

Our choice of topics will naturally be selective but you should, through your studies on the course, acquire an informed understanding of the principal strengths and weaknesses of this area of research.

Psychobiology of Cognitive Ageing and Dementia

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

This module will examine cognitive processes in older adulthood, and the neuropharmacology and neuroanatomy of normal and abnormal changes that are observed. It will describe the clinical and functional consequences of age-related changes in cognitive performance, and it will describe the risk and protective factors associated with the most common organic dementias. It will examine current treatment options and future treatment possibilities, considering both drug and psychotherapeutic options.

Psychological Perspectives on Self and Identity

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

Psychological research has shown that in many ways our thoughts, feelings, motives and actions depend on who we think we are: our self-concepts or identities. This module explores classic and contemporary psychological accounts of self and identity processes. Coverage is broad, encompassing a thorough and critical examination of key theories and debates in social psychology, drawing also on developmental, cross-cultural, social constructionist and philosophical perspectives as well as considering the implications of these theories for real-world issues, such as subjective well-being, health behaviours, personal relationships, prejudice and politics. The module is designed to encourage and reward independent and critical thinking about these issues.

Psychology of Art

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

Structure and Function in the Brain

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

The aim of the module is to reveal the anatomical substrates on which the processing of sensory information and the generation of motor commands depend. Specific attention will be paid to the relationship between structure and function. The module will cover the development of the anatomical features of the nervous system and will give a comparative interpretation of the anatomy of brain regions and their cellular components using a variety of examples including vertebrate and invertebrate models. The module will provide basic knowledge of the main techniques used to study the functional anatomy of the brain at systems, cellular and molecular levels.

The Psychology of Inequality: From Poverty to Power

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

In this module, you discuss the psychological consequences of living in an unequal society, and how a person's position within a status hierarchy affects how they think, behave, feel, and interact with others.

You discuss the individual consequences of social class, education, poverty, wealth, and power, before moving on to discuss more collective forms of inequality, such as how people deal with the stigma associated with being a member of a low status group, the various forms and consequences of gender inequality, and how the way inequality is structured in a society alters how people and groups react to it.

You also discuss how psychological theories relate to real-world events, and evaluate several interventions that have been designed to alleviate some of the negative consequences associated with low status.

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