Electrical and Electronic Engineering MEng

Engineering

Key information

Duration:
4 years full time
Typical A-level offer:
AAB
UCAS code:
H600
Start date:
September 2018

Study in a department renowned for its strong practical focus. You’ll learn to use industry-standard equipment, helping you become a professional engineer.

You’re given specialist training in a range of applications, from semiconductor devices and microprocessors to power generation and supply to electric motors.

As you progress, you can focus on your are of interest by specialising in either electrical or electronic engineering.

Accreditation

This course is accredited to the highest level by the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET).

Lecturers are always happy to see us if we’re stuck. The labs are very enjoyable and interesting, because I know I will use the theory in practice.”Robert Buler
Electrical and Electronic Engineering MEng

MEng or BEng?

We also offer this course as a five-year MEng with an industrial placement year, as a three-year BEng, or as a four-year BEng with an industrial placement yearFind out about the benefits of an integrated Masters year.

Entry requirements

A-level

Typical offer

AAB

Subjects

A-levels must include Mathematics.

GCSEs

You should also have a broad range of GCSEs (A*-C), including good grades in relevant subjects.

Extended Project Qualification

We take the EPQ into account when considering your application and it can be useful in the summer when your results are released if you have narrowly missed the conditions of your offer. We do not routinely include the EPQ in the conditions of your offer but we sometimes offer alternative conditions that include the EPQ. If you wish to discuss this further please contact Admissions at ug.enquiries@sussex.ac.uk

Other UK qualifications

Access to HE Diploma

Typical offer

Pass in the Access to HE Diploma with 45 level 3 credits at Merit or above, including 30 at Distinction.

Subjects

You will normally need A-level Mathematics, grade B, in addition to the Access to HE Diploma.

International Baccalaureate

Typical offer

34 points overall from the full IB Diploma.     

Subjects

Higher Levels must include Mathematics, with a grade of 5.

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (formerly BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma)

Typical offer

DDD

Subjects

The BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma should be in Engineering, including Distinction in Key Mathematics units.

We also accept the former BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma (QCF) in Engineering with DDD, including Distinction in the Further Mathematics for Engineering Technicians unit.

GCSEs

GCSE (or equivalent) Mathematics with at least grade B is essential (or grade 6 in the new grading scale).

You should also have a broad range of GCSEs (A*-C), including good grades in relevant subjects.

Scottish Highers

Typical offer

AAABB

Subjects

Highers must include Mathematics, grade A. You should also have an Advanced Higher in Mathematics (grade B).

Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced

Typical offer

Grade B and AA in two A-levels.

Subjects

A-levels must include Mathematics.

GCSEs

You should also have a broad range of GCSEs (A*-C), including good grades in relevant subjects.

International baccalaureate

Typical offer

34 points overall from the full IB Diploma.     

Subjects

Higher Levels must include Mathematics, with a grade of 5.

European baccalaureate

Typical offer

Overall result of 80%

Additional requirements

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential (normally with a final grade of at least 8.0).

Other international qualifications

Australia

Typical offer

Relevant state (Year 12) High School Certificate, and over 85% in the ATAR or UAI/TER/ENTER. Or a Queensland OP of 5 or below.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Austria

Typical offer

Reifeprüfung or Matura with an overall result of 2.2 or better for first-year entry. A result of 2.5 or better would be considered for Foundation Year entry.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Belgium

Typical offer

Certificat d'Enseignement Secondaire Supérieur (CESS) or Diploma van Hoger Secundair Onderwijs with a good overall average. 

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Bulgaria

Typical offer

Diploma za Sredno Obrazovanie with excellent final-year scores (normally 5.5 overall with 6 in key subjects).

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Canada

Typical offer

High School Graduation Diploma. Specific requirements vary between provinces.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

China

Typical offer

We usually do not accept Senior High School Graduation for direct entry to our undergraduate courses. However, we do consider applicants who have studied 1 or more years of Higher Education in China at a recognised degree awarding institution or who are following a recognised International Foundation Year.

If you are interested in applying for a business related course which requires an academic ability in Mathematics, you will normally also need a grade B in Mathematics from the Huikao or a score of 90 in Mathematics from the Gaokao.

Applicants who have the Senior High School Graduation may be eligible to apply to our International Foundation Year, which if you complete successfully you can progress on to a relevant undergraduate course at Sussex. You can find more information about the qualifications which are accepted by our International Study Centre at  http://isc.sussex.ac.uk/entry-requirements/international-foundation-year .

 

 

 

 

 

 

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Croatia

Typical offer

Maturatna Svjedodžba with an overall score of at least 4-5 depending on your degree choice.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Cyprus

Typical offer

Apolytirion of Lykeion with an overall average of at least 18 or 19/20 will be considered for first-year entry.

A score of 15/20 in the Apolytirion would be suitable for Foundation Year entry. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Czech Republic

Typical offer

Maturita with a good overall average.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Denmark

Typical offer

Højere Forberedelseseksamen (HF) or studentereksamen with an overall average of at least 7 on the new grading scale.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Finland

Typical offer

Finnish Ylioppilastutkinto with an overall average result in the final matriculation examinations of 6.5.

Additional requirements

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

France

Typical offer

Overall final result of 14/20

Additional requirements

Successful students will need to be taking the science strand within the French Baccalaureat with a final result of at least 13/20 in Mathematics.

Germany

Typical offer

German Abitur with an overall result of 1.8 or better.

Additional requirements

You will need a very good final result in Mathematics (at least 12/15).

Greece

Typical offer

Apolytirion with an overall average of at least 18 or 19/20 will be considered for first-year entry.

A score of 15/20 in the Apolytirion would be suitable for Foundation Year entry. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Hong Kong

Typical offer

Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education (HKDSE) with grades of 5, 4, 4 from three subjects including two electives. 

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Hungary

Typical offer

Erettsegi/Matura with a good average.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

India

Typical offer

Standard XII results from Central and Metro Boards with an overall average of 75-80%. 

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Iran

Typical offer

High School Diploma and Pre-University Certificate.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Ireland

Typical offer

Irish Leaving Certificate (Higher Level) at H1,H1,H2,H2,H3.

Additional requirements

Highers must include Mathematics, grade H1.

Israel

Typical offer

Bagrut, with at least 8/10 in at least six subjects, including one five-unit subject.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Italy

Typical offer

Italian Diploma di Maturità or Diploma Pass di Esame di Stato with a Final Diploma mark of at least 85/100.

Additional requirements

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Japan

Typical offer

Upper Secondary Leaving Certificate is suitable for entry to our Foundation Years. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Latvia

Typical offer

Atestats par Visparejo videjo Izglitibu with very good grades in state exams.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Lithuania

Typical offer

Brandos Atestatas including scores of 80-90% in at least three state examinations (other than English).

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Luxembourg

Typical offer

Diplôme de Fin d'Etudes Secondaires.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Malaysia

Typical offer

Sijil Tinggi Persekolahan Malaysia (STPM). As well as various two or three-year college or polytechnic certificates and diplomas.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Netherlands

Typical offer

Voorereidend Wetenschappelijk Onderwijs (VWO), normally with an average of at least 7.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Nigeria

Typical offer

You are expected to have one of the following:

  • Higher National Diploma
  • One year at a recognised Nigerian University
  • Professional Diploma (Part IV) from the Institute of Medical Laboratory Technology of Nigeria
  • Advanced Diploma

You must also have a score of C6 or above in WAEC/SSC English.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Norway

Typical offer

Norwegian Vitnemal Fra Den Videregaende Skole - Pass with an overall average of at least 4.5

Additional requirements

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Pakistan

Typical offer

Bachelor (Pass) degree in arts, commerce or science.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Poland

Typical offer

Matura with three extended-level written examinations, normally scored within the 7th stanine.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Portugal

Typical offer

Diploma de Ensino Secundario normally with an overall mark of at least 16/20. 

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Romania

Typical offer

Diploma de Bacalaureat with an overall average of 8.5-9.5 depending on your degree choice.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Singapore

Typical offer

A-levels, as well as certain certificates and diplomas.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Slovakia

Typical offer

Maturitna Skuska or Maturita with honours, normally including scores of 1 in at least three subjects.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Slovenia

Typical offer

Secondary School Leaving Diploma or Matura with at least 23 points overall.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

South Africa

Typical offer

National Senior Certificate with very good grades. 

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Spain

Typical offer

Spanish Título de Bachillerato (LOGSE) with an overall average result of at least 8.0.

Additional requirements

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Sri Lanka

Typical offer

Sri Lankan A-levels.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Sweden

Typical offer

Fullstandigt Slutbetyg with good grades.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Switzerland

Typical offer

Federal Maturity Certificate.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Turkey

Typical offer

Devlet Lise Diplomasi or Lise Bitirme is normally only suitable for Foundation Years, but very strong applicants may be considered for first year entry. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

USA

Typical offer

We look at your full profile taking into account everything you are studying. You must have your high school graduation diploma and we will be interested in your Grade 12 GPA. However, we will also want to see evidence of the external tests you have taken. Each application is looked at individually, but you should normally have one or two of the following:

  • APs (where we would expect at least three subject with 4/5 in each)
  • SAT Reasoning Tests (normally with a combined score of 1300) or ACT grades
  • and/or SAT Subject Tests (where generally we expect you to have scores of 600 or higher). 

We would normally require APs or SAT Subject Tests in areas relevant to your chosen degree course.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

My country is not listed

If your qualifications aren’t listed or you have a question about entry requirements, email ug.enquiries@sussex.ac.uk.

English language requirements

IELTS (Academic)

6.5 overall, including at least 6.0 in each component

IELTS scores are valid for two years from the test date. Your score must be valid when you begin your Sussex course. You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test.

If you are applying for degree-level study we can consider your IELTS test from any test centre, but if you require a Confirmation of Acceptance for Studies (CAS) for an English language or pre-sessional English course (not combined with a degree) the test must be taken at a UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI)-approved IELTS test centre.

Find out more about IELTS.

Other English language requirements

Proficiency tests

Cambridge Advanced Certificate in English (CAE)

For tests taken before January 2015: Grade B or above

For tests taken after January 2015: 176 overall, including at least 169 in each skill

We would normally expect the CAE test to have been taken within two years before the start of your course.

You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Cambridge English: Advanced.

Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE)

For tests taken before January 2015: grade C or above

For tests taken after January 2015: 176 overall, including at least 169 in each skill

We would normally expect the CPE test to have been taken within two years before the start of your course.

You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Cambridge English: Proficiency.

Pearson (PTE Academic)

62 overall, including at least 56 in all four skills.

PTE (Academic) scores are valid for two years from the test date. Your score must be valid when you begin your Sussex course. You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Pearson (PTE Academic).

TOEFL (iBT)

88 overall, including at least 20 in Listening, 19 in Reading, 21 in Speaking, 23 in Writing.

TOEFL (iBT) scores are valid for two years from the test date. Your score must be valid when you begin your Sussex course. You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about TOEFL (iBT).

The TOEFL Institution Code for the University of Sussex is 9166.

English language qualifications

AS/A-level (GCE)

Grade C or above in English Language.

Hong Kong Advanced Level Examination (HKALE)/ AS or A Level: grade C or above in Use of English

French Baccalaureat

A score of 12 or above in English.

GCE O-level

Grade C or above in English.

Brunei/Cambridge GCE O-level in English: grades 1-6.

Singapore/Cambridge GCE O-level in English: grades 1-6.

GCSE or IGCSE

Grade C or above in English as a First Language.

Grade B or above in English as a Second Language

German Abitur

A score of 12 or above in English.

Ghana Senior Secondary School Certificate

If awarded before 1993: grades 1-6 in English language.

If awarded between 1993 and 2005: grades A-D in English language.

Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education (HKDSE)

 Level 4, including at least 3 in each component in English Language.

Indian School Certificate (Standard XII)

The Indian School Certificate is accepted at the grades below when awarded by the following examination boards:

Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) – English Core only: 70%

Council for Indian School Certificate Examinations (CISCE) - English: 70% 

International Baccalaureate Diploma (IB)

English A or English B at grade 5 or above.

Malaysian Certificate of Education (SPM) 119/GCE O-level

If taken before the end of 2008: grades 1-5 in English Language.

If taken from 2009 onwards: grade C or above in English Language.

The qualification must be jointly awarded by the University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES).

West African Senior School Certificate

Grades 1-6 in English language when awarded by the West African Examinations Council (WAEC) or the National Examinations Council (NECO).

Country exceptions

Select to see the list of exempt English-speaking countries

If you are a national of one of the countries below, or if you have recently completed a qualification equivalent to a UK Bachelors degree or higher in one of these countries, you will normally meet our English requirements. Note that qualifications obtained by distance learning or awarded by studying outside these countries cannot be accepted for English language purposes.

You will normally be expected to have completed the qualification within two years before starting your course at Sussex. If the qualification was obtained earlier than this we would expect you to be able to demonstrate that you have maintained a good level of English, for example by living in an English-speaking country or working in an occupation that required you to use English regularly and to a high level.

Please note that this list is determined by the UK’s Home Office, not by the University of Sussex.

List of exempt countries

  • Antigua and Barbuda
  • Australia
  • Bahamas
  • Barbados
  • Belize
  • Canada**
  • Dominica
  • Grenada
  • Guyana
  • Ireland
  • Jamaica
  • New Zealand
  • St Kitts and Nevis
  • St Lucia
  • St Vincent and the Grenadines
  • Trinidad and Tobago
  • United Kingdom
  • USA

** Canada: you must be a national of Canada; other nationals not on this list who have a degree from a Canadian institution will not normally be exempt from needing to provide evidence of English.

Admissions information for applicants

Transfers into Year 2

Yes. Find out more about transferring into Year 2 of this course. We don’t accept transfers into the third or final year.

If your qualifications aren’t listed or you have a question about entry requirements, email ug.enquiries@sussex.ac.uk.

Why choose this course?

  • 97% of our employed students were in graduate-level work six months after graduating (Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey 2015).
  • Study in our £12-million Future Technologies Labs, dedicated to teaching and research in computing, robotics, electronics and mechatronics.
  • You’ll benefit from a new student-focused hub, suites of high-spec computers and new project workspaces.

Course information

How will I study?

You gain a good grounding in the fundamentals of engineering, looking at topics including electrical circuits and devices, engineering mathematics, and programming for engineers.

Global Design Challenge

You join all first-year students in the School of Engineering and Informatics in a team-based, week-long activity, the Global Design Challenge. Each team designs a solution to a problem faced by a community in the developing world. You develop transferable skills, benefiting both your studies and your future employability.

Modules

These are the modules running in the academic year 2017. Modules running in 2018 may be subject to change.

Core modules


Customise your course

Our courses are designed to broaden your horizons and give you the skills and experience necessary to have the sort of career that has an impact.

Gain programming skills and apply them to areas such as digital media, business and interactive design. Find out about our Year in Computing

How will I study?

You cover topics such as digital systems, microprocessor design and high-frequency communications. 

A group project introduces you to the techniques of design for manufacture. You continue to develop your mathematics knowledge and are introduced to the principles of signal processing and feedback. 

You also study the key professional skills required for accreditation – project management, technical communication and professional ethics.

Modules

These are the modules running in the academic year 2017. Modules running in 2018 may be subject to change.

Core modules


Customise your course

Our courses are designed to broaden your horizons and give you the skills and experience necessary to have the sort of career that has an impact.

Gain programming skills and apply them to areas such as digital media, business and interactive design. Find out about our Year in Computing

Study abroad (optional)

Apply to study abroad – you’ll develop an international perspective and gain an edge when it comes to your career. Find out where your course could take you.

Industrial placement (optional)

An industrial placement gives you the chance to spend a year working with an organisation, in an area relevant to your course, while being paid. It’s a proven way to fast-track your career.

Recent Engineering students have gone on placements at:

  • EDF Energy
  • GE Aviation
  • Vauxhall Motors.

You develop your technical, team-working and transferable skills, and apply what you have learnt in your studies to a business environment.

There is guided preparation early in your course to help you find, secure and succeed in your placement. Find out more about placements and internships.

Please note

If you’re receiving – or applying for – USA federal Direct Loan funds, you can’t transfer to the version of this program with an optional study abroad period in any country or optional placement in the USA. Find out more about American Student Loans and Federal Student Aid

How will I study?

Topics include control engineering and sensor systems.

You work on an individual project over two terms, with training in project planning and management. Examples of previous student projects include:

  • an electric car
  • a GPS-guided robot
  • neural network face detection.

Modules

These are the modules running in the academic year 2017. Modules running in 2018 may be subject to change.

Core modules

Options

How will I study?

You study advanced Masters-level modules and choose from a number of options, allowing you to specialise in your own areas of interest. 

You join an interdisciplinary team of fellow students to undertake a substantial group project. Recent projects include:

  • the design and completion of a race car for entry in the Formula Student competition
  • a remote-controlled home automation system
  • design of an evaporative cooler, in collaboration with Daewoo.

Modules

These are the modules running in the academic year 2017. Modules running in 2018 may be subject to change.

Core modules

Options

I conduct research into computer vision and image processing. I’ve published more than 450 international articles in these areas and created a spin-out company using image processing for cancer detection.”Professor Chris Chatwin
Professor in Engineering

Fees

UK/EU students:
Fees are not yet set for entry in the academic year 2018. The University intends to set fees at the maximum permitted by the UK Government (subject to continued satisfaction of the Teaching Excellence Framework). For the academic year 2017, fees were £9,250 per year.

The UK Government has confirmed that if you’re an EU student applying for entry in September 2018, you’ll pay the same fee rate as UK students for the duration of your course, even if the UK leaves the EU before the end of your course. You’ll also continue to have access to student loans and grants. Find out more on the UK Government website

Channel Islands and Isle of Man students:
The University aligns fees for Channel Islands and Isle of Man students with fees for UK/EU students. These fees are not yet set for entry in the academic year 2018. We intend to set fees at the maximum permitted by the UK Government (subject to continued satisfaction of the Teaching Excellence Framework). For the academic year 2017, fees were £9,250 per year.
International students:
£19,200 per year
Study abroad:
Find out about grants and funding, tuition fees and insurance costs for studying abroad
Placement:
Find out about tuition fees for placements

Note that your fees may be subject to an increase on an annual basis.

Find out about typical living costs for studying at Sussex

Scholarships

Our focus is personal development and social mobility. To help you meet your ambitions to study at Sussex, we deliver one of the most generous scholarship programmes of any UK university.

Careers

Graduate destinations

Recent Engineering graduates have gone on to jobs as:

  • electronic engineer, Apollo Fire Detectors
  • graduate engineer, Ricardo
  • graduate electronic engineer, Babcock International.

(Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey 2015)

Your future career

Gain the skills for a career in engineering, and benefit from our links with companies like Jaguar, Siemens and IBM. The skills you develop on this course enable you to go into graduate jobs in sectors including:

  • aerospace and electrical energy
  • IT and telecommunications
  • robotics.

You can also meet employers at careers events. Recent sessions have included an event about the NHS Scientist Training Programme, talks by IBM and Atkins, and advice on applying for graduate schemes. 

Working while you study

Our Careers and Employability Centre can help you find part-time work while you study. Find out more about career development and part-time work

Electrical Circuits & Devices

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

Topics covered on this module include:

  • DC circuits: Ohm's law
  • Kirchhoff's laws, node and mesh analysis
  • Thvenin's theorem, Norton's theorem, superposition principle
  • AC circuits: inductance (L) and Capacitance (C)
  • sinusoidal steady-state, phasors
  • energy dissipation and storage
  • frequency response of R-L, R-C and R-L-C circuits, resonance
  • transient response of R-L, R-C and R-L-C circuits
  • operational amplifiers: inverting, non-inverting and differential amplifiers
  • integrators and differentiators
  • simple filters
  • semiconductor devices: diodes, junction transistor as a switch, Boolean algebra, Karnaugh maps, Combinational logic
  • simple circuit applications: rectifiers.

Engineering Maths 1A

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

The module will be taught using the Helping Engineers Learn Mathematics (HELM) resource.

Thorough revision of A-Level Maths topics, particularly:

  • differential calculus
  • integral calculus
  • algebraic manipulation of functions
  • vectors
  • matrix algebra including determinants
  • Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors.

Then new material:

  • complex numbers
  • further differentiation
  • integration
  • partial differentiation
  • curves and functions.

Materials and Manufacturing Processes

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

This module will cover topics including:

  • approaching engineering problems from first principles
  • the practice of formulating and modelling a problem and applying relevant concepts to describe and study system behaviour
  • critical evaluation of solutions to engineering and design problems
  • introduction to materials and material science: principal characteristics and applications of plastics, metals, composites, ceramics and natural materials
  • historical and recent developments in material science with respect to design and engineering applications
  • introduction to atomic and macroscopic level properties of materials
  • key chemical, electrical, mechanical, thermal, environmental and manufacturing properties of materials
  • how material properties arise from atomic level interactions
  • atomic bonding
  • the basic force/separation curve and the development of the stress/strain relationship
  • introduction to behaviour of materials under load, introduction to forces and basic types of loading cases
  • stress and strain curves
  • mechanics of materials under axial tensile and compressive forces
  • stress concentrations
  • introduction to design stresses and factors of safety
  • selection of materials: basic methods of material selection, use of software in material selection
  • engineering failures: typical failure mechanisms of materials such as fatigue, creep, crack growth, and corrosion
  • case studies of engineering failures with respect to material selection and design
  • introduction to manufacturing processes: casting, moulding, forming, machining, joining, rapid manufacturing and 3D printing
  • correct machine shop working practice and related health and safety considerations
  • practical lathe or milling exercise to understand feeds and speeds, operation, parting off, surface finish, tool selection, and cutting fluids/coolants
  • engineering tolerances
  • cost of manufacture and materials, and related design considerations.

Programming for Engineers

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

This module introduces you to the following topics:

  • compiling and linking
  • constants, variables, data types and conversion
  • operators and expressions
  • program structure and pseudocode
  • selection and repetitive statements
  • functions
  • recursion
  • pointers 
  • arrays
  • characters and strings
  • data structures
  • file input/output
  • well-designed programs and testing (software engineering)
  • introduction to programming paradigms
  • C and MATLAB (procedural)
  • MATLAB - Simulink
  • LabVIEW (graphical programming)
  • concept of object-orientated programming (C++, Java).

Electromechanics

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

Topics covered by this module will include:

  • magnetic fields of currents and coils
  • magnetic materials
  • magnetic circuits
  • induced EMF
  • inductance
  • transformers
  • magnetic forces, permanent magnets and electromagnets
  • moving-coil devices
  • DC motors and AC machines
  • 3-phase systems.

Electronic Devices and Circuit Prototyping

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

Your studies in this module include:

  • semiconductor devices - diodes, junction transistors, field-effect transistors (FETs)
  • simple circuit applications - rectifiers and amplifiers
  • component specifications and selection
  • use of data sheets and applications notes
  • production of circuit diagrams
  • circuit simulation
  • circuit prototyping
  • development and testing
  • printed circuit board (PCB) production
  • final construction and testing
  • project team management
  • recording of work
  • technical report writing.

Engineering Maths 1B

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

Your studies in this module include:

  • line, surface and volume integrals
  • power series expansions
  • first-order and second-order ODEs with constant coefficients
  • differential vector calculus – div, grad, curl, other coordinate systems
  • multiple integrals.

Engineering Thermodynamics

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

Topics covered in this module include:

  • fundamental concepts: fluid properties, work, heat, temperature, properties of a gas from the ideal gas law
  • 1st Law of Thermodynamics – the equivalence of work and heat, concepts of thermodynamic systems and boundaries, internal energy, enthalpy
  • and applications to non-flow and steady flow processes, an introduction to thermodynamic cycles, Bernoulli's equation
  • 2nd Law of Thermodynamics, entropy and the concept of reversibility and the Carnot cycle
  • General Thermodynamic relations (Maxwell)
  • application of thermodynamic principles to simple engine cycles (Otto, Diesel & Joule)
  • properties of vapours with specific reference to the use of the steam tables and application to simple Rankine and refrigeration cycles
  • properties of mixtures with specific reference to the measurement of humidity
  • dimensional analysis, Buckingham's theorem and derivation of some basic dimensional groups (e.g. Reynolds number and skin friction coefficient)
  • heat transfer – use of the basic laws for simple problems in conduction, convection and radiation.

Global Design Challenge

  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

In this module you can participate in the Engineers without Borders (EwB) Challenge. Interdisciplinary teams of 5 or 6 students develop design solutions from project briefs provided by EwB.

Project briefs address real-world, sustainable development projects proposed by EwB partner organisations, who are embedded in communities around the world. In this way, you are brought into contact with novel problems from real communities. You must consider both the technical and cultural dimensions of a design problem in arriving at an appropriate solution.

The module is project-based with weekly, facilitated workshop sessions and further support from EwB UK. As part of the 'Challenge', teams attend dedicated, weekly 2 hour workshop classes. During these they are expected to work through a range of structured activities, including:

  • initial choice of project brief
  • appropriate research
  • development of a design concept fulfilling the brief.

Trained project mentors facilitate the workshops to help teams through the process, ensuring they meet progress goals. Assessment is based on a short, group presentation and group portfolio put together during the workshops. The best projects may be put forward to the national EwB Challenge final.

The module is pass-fail and does not contribute to student credit.

Digital Systems and Microprocessor Design

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

This module introduces students to the following topics:

  • digital basics and combinational logic design
  • Boolean algebra
  • design of combinational circuits
  • standard combinational components
  • implementation technologies
  • introduction to VHDL
  • basic language elements
  • combinational & sequential coding
  • levels of abstraction
  • simulation
  • design flow to target device
  • sequential logic
  • bistable
  • latches & flip-flops
  • Finite State Machines (FSM) models, State diagrams
  • analysis and synthesis of sequential circuits
  • standard sequential components
  • Register Transfer-Level design
  • datapaths
  • control units
  • microprocessor systems
  • computer arithmetic
  • central processing unit, ALU, memory, I/O
  • architecture, busses
  • instruction set
  • assembly language programming

In addition, laboratory work will involve computer-aided design of digital systems using elements learnt in lectures. Project includes design entry in hardware description language (VHDL) for simulation and synthesis. Designs are then realised using a target FPGA development hardware allowing circuit testing and verification.

Electrical Machines & Power Electronics

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

Topics covered on this module include:

  • DC machines and transformers
  • AC machines and rotating magnetic fields
  • synchronous machines
  • induction machines
  • variable­ frequency control of AC motors
  • power electronics technology, devices and applications
  • DC choppers and switched­-mode regulators
  • AC controllers and cyclo­-converters
  • DC link DC-AC inverters
  • quasi­-square wave and PWM operation
  • electronic drive circuits.

Electronic Circuit & Systems Design

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

Topics include:

  • filters: frequency domain analysis, gain and phase and use of the s variable
  • types of filter response, low-pass, band-pass and relation to the transfer function
  • design of low-order active filters from pole-zero locations
  • Butterworth, Chebyshev and Elliptic responses with design from tables and computer programs
  • small-signal analysis with matrix-based nodal analysis for circuits using operational amplifiers
  • computer-based analysis in the frequency domain and time domain
  • circuits: instrumentation amplifiers, logarithmic amplifiers, oscillators, mixers and other communication circuits
  • analysis and design considering temperature compensation and stability
  • coursework: design project of a small analogue circuit, computer-aided printed circuit layout, building and testing, computer-aided analysis.

Engineering Mathematics 2

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

Topics include:

  • second order differential equations, linear homogeneous, and non-homogeneous
  • initial and boundary value problems
  • laplace transforms and associated theorems
  • convolution
  • solution of ODEs via Laplace Transforms
  • the numerical solution of ODEs
  • partial differential equations
  • line, surface and volume integrals
  • theorems of Gauss and Stokes
  • Laplace's equation
  • Poisson's equation
  • wave equation
  • probability: random variables, distribution and density functions, expectations and rms
  • Central Limit Theorem
  • estimation of parameters: moment and maximum likelihood methods, confidence intervals
  • regression: least squares fit, correlation
  • quality control: acceptance sampling, reliability, failure rates, Weibull distribution.

Analogue Communication and Propagation

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

In this module, you are introduced to key physical and engineering concepts in high frequency propagation that underpin the transmission and reception of analogue electromagnetic signals.

Your studies in this module cover:

  • Maxwell's equations, the electromagnetic wave equation, the Poynting vector
  • plane waves, phase and group velocity, skin depth
  • propagation along transmission lines, attenuation and distortion, characteristic impedance, reflections and standing waves
  • electromagnetic propagation in free space, line of sight communications and design using Fresnel zone, power budget in satellite links, tropospheric and ionospheric propagation
  • introduction to antennas and aerials (including dipole, Yagi-Ueda, arrays, dish, planar, patch, antennas for CP) radiation pattern, reciprocity theorem, antenna gain
  • analogue communication systems, modulation and demodulation systems (AM/FM/pulse), phase lock loops
  • physical sources and statistical properties of electrical noise, signal-to-noise ratio, noise figure, noise temperature
  • spectrum management and EMC, radio transmitter and receiver architecture.

Embedded Systems

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

This module introduces you to the following topics:

  • microprocessor and microcontroller systems
  • architecture, organisation, operation and memory
  • assembly language programming
  • C and the development environment
  • embedded algorithmics (flowcharts and pseudocode)
  • introduction to PIC18F
  • digital I/O port programming and data manipulation
  • timing generation and measurement (capture, compare, PWM)
  • interrupt programming and real-time systems
  • serial I/O (RS232, SPI, I2C, USB, CAN, Wireless)
  • parallel port interfaces (LCD, electrical devices, stepper & servo motors)
  • analogue signal interfacing (OP-Amps, ADC, DAC and Introduction to DSP)
  • control systems

In addition, laboratory work will cover computer-aided development environment applications of a PIC microcontroller based robotic system. This platform will be used to apply the interfacing and measurement topics introduced as well as implement smart algorithmic programming.

Professional and Managerial Skills

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

This module covers the technical communication, project and financial management skills, and the understanding of the importance of ethics required of professional engineers. In addition, it encourages a holistic view of the engineering degree programme and how it fits the graduate for their future career.

Teaching and learning methods include specialist lectures on technical communication and careers planning (supported by Study Direct resources and online exercises), lectures and workshops leading to a management group project based on a computer based simulation, and lectures and seminars based around case studies on the application of ethical principles.

Topics covered include:

  • technical reports and presentations
  • project planning and management
  • Gantt charts
  • financial management and control, cost management, application to projects
  • financial models and return on investment
  • risk management
  • professional ethics
  • health and safety
  • preparing CVs and career development.

Systems Analysis and Control

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

Topics include:

  • step and impulse response of first and second-order systems via Laplace transforms
  • transfer functions, block diagrams
  • polynomial and pole zero representations
  • frequency response, modelling of simple mechanical and electrical systems, simple filters
  • control objectives and feedback systems, open loop and closed loop transfer functions, use of Matlab
  • error transfer functions, steady state errors, errors to inputs and disturbances
  • pole-zero diagrams, root locus methods, bode and Nyquist diagrams
  • stability via Routh-Hurwitz and simplified Nyquist criterion, gain and phase margins
  • introduction to PID.

Business and Project Management

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

This module addresses wider business and project management issues that affect the technological and engineering environment. Some of these issues include:

  • principles of strategic management
  • project management and planning
  • the business environment
  • auditing and control
  • organisational structure
  • business legislation
  • resource management
  • global markets and supply
  • forecasting.

Control Engineering

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

Using Matlab/Simulink as tools, this module teaches you some theoretical concepts, design methods and practical topics in control engineering.

After reviewing feedback control techniques and concepts, a number of lectures are given on five most commonly used design methods and on good engineering practice. You are assigned a unique design case study to complete.

Electrical Power Systems

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3
This module covers:
  • power system structure, important aspects of power system operation, operating states, complex power, the symmetrical three-phase system, per unit system
  • power system components, synchronous generators, power and control transformers, transmission lines, the characteristics of the loads, network analysis, voltages, currents and powers at sending and receiving ends
  • load flow analysis, power flow equations, numerical techniques, decoupled power flow algorithm
  • fault analysis, systematic short-circuit computations, unbalanced system analysis, symmetrical component theory
  • voltage and reactive power control, load frequency control, power system stability, economic dispatch 
  • power system economics, embedded or dispersed generation, issues and technical impacts of embedded generation
  • introduction to smart grids and future power systems.

Individual Project

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn & Spring Teaching, Year 3

The Individual Project in Year 3 is a major component of your degree. It builds upon all of your previous modules to explore an engineering problem in depth, in the area of your degree.

It is designed to give you experience of the full cycle of an engineering project, from initial planning to final presentation. It involves management, resourcing, planning, scheduling, documentation, and communication.

You will interact with a range of skilled people, complete work within budget and available resources, and by an agreed deadline. Your project will involve the design, development and testing of a system. It will include construction and measurement (for hardware projects) and code development and testing (for software projects). It will demand creative thinking, self-organisation and research skills.

You will typically spend 18 hours per week for two terms on the project and it is assessed by an interim report at the mid-way point, a final technical report (dissertation) and a 20-minute oral presentation. You must keep a record of your work throughout the project in a dated logbook, which is handed-in with the final report. Your project is supervised by a member of faculty, who takes on the role of technical director along with a second (minor) supervisor who provides occasional guidance and, in some cases, complimentary expertise.

Electrical Drive Systems

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

Topics will normally include the following:

  • electrical drive systems: fundamentals (translational and rotational motion, power rating and classes of duty, 4-quadrant operation, torque/power limits, a note on closed-loop control of drives, electrical and mechanical transformers)
  • DC drives: brushed and brushless, and introduction to their control issues
  • AC motors: examples of motor drives (e.g. induction motors), and introduction to their control issues (emphasise model-based control characteristics, involving nonlinearity)
  • servomotors and stepper motors: principles and their control
  • examples of modern electrical drives in engineering applications.

Digital Communications

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

The aim of the module is to introduce the basic principles of digital communications and provide the students with knowledge and skills required in the design and performance analysis of digital communication systems.

The following topics will be covered:

  • introduction
  • digital versus analogue
  • main components of digital communication systems
  • digital baseband transmission
  • sampling
  • quantisation
  • PCM/DPCM
  • data transmission fundamentals
  • line coding
  • binary and multilevel signalling
  • multiplexing
  • detection of digital signals
  • noise in communication systems
  • inter-symbol interference
  • decision theory
  • digital modulation and demodulation
  • ASK/FSK/PSK/DPSK
  • probability of error performance and bandwidth efficiency
  • fundamentals of information theory and channel coding
  • research project and simulation work using MATLAB software tools.

Digital Signal Processing

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

The module covers DSP topics, including digital signals and sampling requirements, dasic types of digital signals and quantisation error.

It is followed by the topics:

  • time-domain analysis – linear-time-invariant system, Block Diagram for LTI systems, impulse response, convolution sum, difference equations.
  • frequency-domain analysis – the discrete Fourier Series, Fourier transform of aperiodic digital sequences, frequency responses.


The z transform topic includes:

  • z-transform and inverse z-transform
  • z-transform properties
  • z-plane pole-zero representations
  • stability of a system
  • evaluation of the Fourier Transform in Z-Plane
  • characteristics of 1st and 2nd order systems. 


For Filter design topic, it includes:

  • non-recursive (FIR) filters
  • Fourier technique of designing non-recursive filters
  • truncation and windowing
  • recursive (IIR) filter design
  • bilinear transformation methods.


You will also cover Discrete Fourier transform (DFT) and its relation to CFT, Fast Fourier transform (FFT), Basic Spectral Analysis, Spectra of Harmonics, Spectral leakage, Windowing, and Effects of Windows and an introduction to random digital signals.

Radio to Optical Frequency Engineering

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

This module introduces established high frequency circuit design techniques. It also extends the coverage of electromagnetic transmission to millimetre wave and optical frequencies.

Topics covered by this module will include:

  • high frequency devices and equivalent circuit models, S-parameters, biasing, linearity, stability and matching
  • the Smith chart
  • Microstrip and its use in coupled line structures and matching network design 
  • microwave circuit materials and their characterisation
  • high frequency measurements using vector network analyser and measurement of microstrip transmission-line components
  • further electromagnetic wave equation and TEM waves
  • propagation through various media, reflection and refraction and waveguides
  • optical fibres, optodevices and couplers and optical communications.

Sensor Systems & Applications

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

Sensor technologies are evolving at a rapid pace and are core to the drive for increased energy efficiency.

You will gain a systems-level understanding of a range of technologies and the knowledge and skills required to specify and design sensor systems. You will discuss specific sensor technologies in the context of their application to a range of areas including healthcare, security, control, materials characterisation and HCI.

You will cover the following topics:

  • transducers and sensors
  • operating principles
  • low noise systems
  • signal processing, hardware & DSP
  • intelligent sensors
  • wireless sensors
  • specific sensor technologies
  • hall effect
  • magneto-resistance
  • piezoelectrics
  • electromagnetic
  • ultrasonic
  • microwave
  • solid state
  • MEMS
  • radiation sensors
  • gas, chemical and biological sensors.

Advanced Electronic Systems

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 4

Topics include:

  • internal operation of analogue integrated circuits including noise
  • operation of switched-capacitor circuits including comparator, filters and convertors
  • sample and hold circuits
  • DAC and ADC oversampling convertors
  • phase-locked loop circuits.

Marketing Analysis and Financial Strategic Planning

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 4

This module will cover:

  • developing marketing strategy, market planning and control
  • marketing research
  • behavioural concepts, marketing decision making
  • marketing communication and sales strategy
  • environmental consideration
  • marketing ethics
  • legal control and European/International influences costs of funds
  • source of funds
  • capital structures and CAPM
  • business expansion
  • working capital management including cash management
  • dividends and dividend decisions
  • corporate planning and financial control
  • investment appraisal
  • the stock exchange and its efficiency
  • preparing a project and being able to persuade company managers of how marketing and financial planning assist strategic decisions.

MEng Group Project

  • 45 credits
  • Autumn & Spring Teaching, Year 4

The MEng Group Project involves 3–6 students of different engineering disciplines forming a team. Teams address a multi-disciplinary project of industrial interest. We designed the group project to help you develop a range of skills, including a good understanding of system design and experience of team-working.

You exercise original thought and judgement, making use of published literature and recent technological developments. Your team specifies, designs, constructs, manufactures, tests and commissions an engineering system, product or process. The challenge is to meet specifications – targets, milestones and delivery deadlines – within a set budget. This is achieved through good project management, and by applying proven principles to a real engineering problem.

Each member has a distinct role with responsibilities to others. Early in the project teams appoint a team leader and a secretary. At meetings, the secretary records formal minutes.  An academic supervisor steers the project, sometimes with the help of an industrial advisor.

You are assessed on group contribution (40%) and your individual contribution (60%). Teams submit two formal reports and give a formal project presentation. The final report contains a project profile as an appendix, including a full transcript of the formal minutes. You will keep an individual, dated logbook that is also handed-in with the final report.

Advanced Topics in Control of Electromechanical Systems

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 4

This module aims to provide a thorough introduction to key concepts underlying advanced topics in control of electomechanical systems' analysis and design. Your learning experience is reinforced by using typical engineering applications (electromechanical), and examples stemming from both the macro- and micro-world to emphasise particular difference in the design procedure. 

Topics will normally include the following:

  • classical to advanced control – a systems perspective, uncertainty, sensitivity and robustness and motivation for robust control, robust stability and performance, advanced loop-shaping control approaches, the role of model-based estimation and reliability
  • the need for nonlinear control – nonlinearities in control design problems, nonlinear control stability and the role of Lyapunov functions, introduction to nonlinear control design methods
  • application examples – electrical drives, active suspensions and electrostatic micro-actuators (control issues in the microworld).

Advanced Digital Signal Processing

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 4

This module will provide an overview of the applications of digital signal processing techniques.
It will include revision of:

  • Fourier series, complex notation, linear systems theory, discretisation, transform techniques, Fourier series to Fourier integral, Fourier transform properties
  • Complex frequency, Laplace transform, the Dirac delta functional, sampled data systems, z-transform, the inverse z-transform, the relationship between z and s planes, stability, poles and zero locations; Nyquist sampling theorem, aliasing, signal reconstruction from sampled data.

Detailed discussion of:

  • system response and convolution 
  • correlation and convolution theorems, the matched filter
  • digital filtering, system discrete transfer function, filter types, IIR and FIR, impulse response, methods of digital filter realisation
  • IIR digital filter design, impulse invariant and bilinear transformation methods, designed from prototype normalised Butterworth and Chebychev analogue prototype filters
  • FIR filters, the discrete Fourier transform and its properties
  • FIR filter design, spectral leakage, window functions, sources of error in digital filter implementations, filter stability
  • the fast Fourier transform
  • extension of discrete Fourier transform and convolution theorem to two dimensions
  • numerical computation of two dimensional frequency spectrum as a sequence of one dimensional discrete Fourier transforms. 
  • two dimensional filtering and impulse response, two dimensional convolution and correlation in the space and the frequency domains, applications to image and video processing
  • discrete cosine transform in two dimensions, applications to image compression
  • overview of the architecture of modern DSP hardware.

Matlab DSP Laboratory, overview of Matlab modelling: 

1) Generation of a complex exponential sequence
2) Use of a moving average filter to smooth signal corrupted by noise
3) Convolution and correlation of two sequences
4) Computation of 1-D DFT 
5) Computation of DFT using decimation in time FFT
6) IIR filter design using Matlab DSP filter design toolbox
7) FIR filter design using Matlab DSP filter design toolbox

Problem Section:

  • Four problems of increasing difficulty (up-dated each year) solved by documented Matlab code for final report.

Advanced Networks

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 4

This module follows a top-down approach with respect to the OSI reference model. It covers:

  • introduction to networks: historical developments, OSI 7 layer architecture, TCP/IP architecture, standards
  • application layer: client-server and peer-to-peer architectures, principles of network applications, the web and HTTP, cookies, web caching, FTP, DNS, email, POP3, SMTP, IMAP, P2P applications, sockets
  • transport layer: multiplexing and demultiplexing, connection-less transport UDP, principles of reliable data transfer, connection-oriented transport TCP, flow control, congestion control
  • network layer: forwarding and routing, routing algorithms, distance vector, link state, hierarchical, broadcast, multicast. Construction of tables, minimum spanning trees, IP protocol and routers 
  • data link layer and medium access control: error detection and correction, multiple access protocols: ALOHA, Slotted ALOHA, CSMA, CSMA/CD, Ethernet, switches
  • wireless and mobile networks: CDMA/CA, WiFi, WiMax, Mobile IP.
  • network management.

Cybernetics and Neural Networks

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 4

A cybernetic device responds and adapts to a changing environment in a sensible way. Neural network systems permit the construction of such devices exploiting information, feedback and control to achieve intelligent interaction and behaviour from autonomous devices such as robots.

In this module the utilisation of artificial intelligence techniques and neural networks are explored in detail. Software implementation of theoretical concepts will solve genuine engineering problems in dynamic feedback control systems, pattern recognition and scheduling problems. In many instances solutions must be computed in response to data arriving in real-time (e.g. video data). The implications of high speed decision making will be explored.

The module will explore:

  • neuron models
  • network architectures
  • perceptron and perceptron learning rule
  • synaptic vector spaces
  • linear transformations for neural networks
  • supervised hebbian learning
  • performance optimisation
  • widrow-hoff learning
  • associative learning
  • competitive networks.

Learning will be supported by laboratories using the Matlab Neural Network Toolbox.

Mobile Communications

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 4

The aim of the module is to introduce the fundamental principles of mobile communications and provide you with up-to-date knowledge and skills that are important in the design of mobile communication systems.

The following topics will be covered:

  • overview of mobile communication systems
  • cellular mobile communications concept
  • mobile radio channel and mitigation
  • digital modulation
  • spread spectrum
  • multicarrier
  • diversity, Multiple-input Multiple-output (MIMO)
  • multiple access techniques
  • wireless Local Area Network (WLAN)
  • medium access control
  • research project and simulation work using MATLAB software tools.

Real Time Embedded Systems

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 4

The module covers:

  • microcontroller-based real-time systems
  • architectures and structures
  • task structures and synchronisation
  • real-time, deterministic applications
  • multitasking management
  • communications between tasks
  • examples of 8-bit and 16-bit controllers
  • examples and case study of CAN/FlexRay/TTP.

Advanced Digital Communications

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 4

The aim of the module is to introduce you to advanced topics in digital communications, and to provide you with up-to-date knowledge and skills required in the design and performance evaluation of wireless digital communication systems.

The following topics will be covered:

  • overview of digital communications
  • aims and constraints of the digital communication system designer
  • wireless communication fading channels
  • digital modulation
  • probability of error performance
  • bandwidth efficiency
  • adaptive modulation
  • error control coding
  • block coding
  • convolutional coding
  • interleaving
  • trellis coded modulation
  • spread spectrum
  • orthogonal frequency division multiplexing
  • multiuser communications
  • research project and simulation work using MATLAB software tools.

Digital Signal Processing Laboratory

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 4

The module will introduce you to programming digital signal processors to perform digital filtering of signals in one or two dimensions.

You will learn to use the appropriate toolchain in order to code, compile, execute and debug your own software running on a modern ARM DSP core.

You will implement FIR and IIR filters on one dimensional signals and frame based processing of two dimensional signals such as images.

Fibre Optic Communications

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 4

Topics covered in this module include:

  • analysis of slab wave-guide
  • analysis of step index fibre
  • dispersion in the step index fibre
  • mono-mode fibre
  • propagation of light rays in multi-mode graded index fibres
  • dispersion in graded index fibres
  • light sources and detectors
  • modulation of semiconductor light sources
  • transfer characteristic and impulse response of fibre communication systems
  • power launching and coupling efficiency
  • receiver principles and signal-to noise ratio in analogue receivers
  • receivers for digital optical fibre communication systems
  • system noise
  • system components and aspects of system design
  • coherent optical fibre communication
  • network systems.

Image Processing

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 4
You will cover topics including:
  • introduction to machine vision and relation to image processing
  • camera technologies, lenses for machine vision, image formation and resolution, display technologies
  • image acquisition hardware
  • histogram manipulations
  • linear invariant systems in two dimensions
  • the convolution operation and its discrete implementation as mask operators
  • first and second order differential edge detection operators, edge-filling techniques, Hough transform
  • the 2D Fourier transform and frequency domain filters, 2D correlation 
  • scene segmentation methods and region filling
  • pattern recognition techniques, shape descriptors, Fourier descriptors, template matching
  • examples of machine vision systems in industry.

Reconfigurable System on Chip

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 4

This module introduces reconfigurable electronics, such as FPGAs, and their use to realise 'Systems on Chip'. These are digital circuits that comprise a multitude of functions such as processors, memories, digital logic and peripheral interfaces, all realised on a single silicon chip.

The module will show for what types of applications a System on Chip approach is beneficial.

You will learn the methodoloy used to design a system in, for example, VHDL or Verilog (industry standard hardware description languages) and translate it to a functional circuit on an FPGA, including testing using state-of-the-art industrial electronic design automation (EDA) tools.

This module require prior knowledge of digital electronics.

Satellite and Space Systems

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 4

Fundamentals of space missions:

  • Evolution of space activities
  • launch vehicles
  • orbital dynamics.

Spacecraft systems:

  • attitude control of spacecraft
  • telemetry and telecommand
  • spacecraft thermal control
  • spacecraft power systems. 

Mission environmental and engineering requirements:

  • hostile environment
  • system reliability
  • space and ground segments. 

Applications of Satellite Space Technology:

  • communication satellites
  • navigation satellites
  • GPS and tracking systems
  • remote sensing from space for environmental security
  • the role of satellite imagery for monitoring international arms control treaties and in the control of nuclear proliferation
  • the role of space systems for border security and systems.

Wearable Technologies

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 4

In this module you will learn about the fundamentals of wearable technologies, including:

  • technological (computing, communication, sensing, energy
  • algorithmic (signal processing and machine learning)
  • applicative aspects through a combination of theoretical analysis and hands-on experimentation.

You will learn what the unique characteristics offered by wearable technologies are. For example: accurate sensing of body and physiological parameters, which enables a "smart assistant" capable of reacting to the user's activities and needs. You will also learn about the unique challenges posed by their development alongside choice of technologies and human factors.

Throughout the module you will apply the theory in experimental laboratories using one of our custom wearable platforms.

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