Accounting and Finance BSc

Accounting and Finance

Key information

Duration:
3 years full time
Typical A-level offer:
AAB-ABB
UCAS code:
NN43
Start date:
September 2018

If you want to get a headstart on your career in accounting and finance, Sussex is the place to do it.

You’ll gain a solid base of specialist accounting knowledge, and build on it by also studying finance, plus law, economics and business management.

Your course is accredited by the main accountancy bodies, so not only are you part-way to qualifying as an accountant but the topics you study relate directly to industry needs. This means that the knowledge you develop in your course will be directly relevant in your career.

I like the balance between the mathematical and theoretical sides of the course. I also like the seminars and that I am encouraged to voice my point of view.”Irati Michel Lucas Saute
Accounting and Finance BSc 

Entry requirements

A-level

Typical offer

AAB-ABB

GCSEs

You must have GCSE (or equivalent) Mathematics, with at least grade B (or grade 6 in the new grading scale).

You should also have a broad range of GCSEs (A*-C), including good grades in relevant subjects.

Other UK qualifications

Access to HE Diploma

Typical offer

Pass the Access to HE Diploma with 45 level 3 credits at Merit or above, including 24 at Distinction.

Subjects

The Access to HE Diploma would preferably be in Business Studies or include a Business pathway. If not it should be in the humanities or social sciences and you may be asked to write a Business-based essay as part of the selection process.

GCSEs

You must have GCSE (or equivalent) Mathematics, with at least grade B (or grade 6 in the new grading scale).

 

International Baccalaureate

Typical offer

32 points overall from the full IB Diploma.

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (formerly BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma)

Typical offer

DDD-DDM

Subjects

The BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma would normally be in Business.

GCSEs

You must have GCSE (or equivalent) Mathematics, with at least grade B (or grade 6 in the new grading scale).

You should also have a broad range of GCSEs (A*-C), including good grades in relevant subjects.

 

Scottish Highers

Typical offer

AABBB

GCSEs

You will also need Mathematics at Standard Grade, grade 1 or 2.

Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced

Typical offer

Grade B and AB in two A-levels.

GCSEs

You must have GCSE (or equivalent) Mathematics, with at least grade B (or grade 6 in the new grading scale).

You should also have a broad range of GCSEs (A*-C), including good grades in relevant subjects.

International baccalaureate

Typical offer

32 points overall from the full IB Diploma.

European baccalaureate

Typical offer

Overall result of at least 77%

Other international qualifications

Australia

Typical offer

Relevant state (Year 12) High School Certificate, and over 85% in the ATAR or UAI/TER/ENTER. Or a Queensland OP of 5 or below.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Austria

Typical offer

Reifeprüfung or Matura with an overall result of 2.2 or better for first-year entry. A result of 2.5 or better would be considered for Foundation Year entry.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Belgium

Typical offer

Certificat d'Enseignement Secondaire Supérieur (CESS) or Diploma van Hoger Secundair Onderwijs with a good overall average. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Bulgaria

Typical offer

Diploma za Sredno Obrazovanie with excellent final-year scores (normally 5.5 overall with 6 in key subjects).

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Canada

Typical offer

High School Graduation Diploma. Specific requirements vary between provinces.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

China

Typical offer

We usually do not accept Senior High School Graduation for direct entry to our undergraduate courses. However, we do consider applicants who have studied 1 or more years of Higher Education in China at a recognised degree awarding institution or who are following a recognised International Foundation Year.

If you are interested in applying for a course which requires an academic ability in Mathematics, such as a Business related course, you will normally also need a grade B in Mathematics from the Huikao or a score of 90 in Mathematics from the Gaokao.

Applicants who have the Senior High School Graduation may be eligible to apply to our International Foundation Year, which if you complete successfully you can progress on to a relevant undergraduate course at Sussex. You can find more information about the qualifications which are accepted by our International Study Centre at  http://isc.sussex.ac.uk/entry-requirements/international-foundation-year .

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Croatia

Typical offer

Maturatna Svjedodžba with an overall score of at least 4-5 depending on your degree choice.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Cyprus

Typical offer

Apolytirion of Lykeion with an overall average of at least 18 or 19/20 will be considered for first-year entry.

A score of 15/20 in the Apolytirion would be suitable for Foundation Year entry. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Czech Republic

Typical offer

Maturita with a good overall average.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Denmark

Typical offer

Højere Forberedelseseksamen (HF) or studentereksamen with an overall average of at least 7 on the new grading scale.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Finland

Typical offer

Finnish Ylioppilastutkinto with overall final result of at least 6.0 in the final matriculation examinations.

France

Typical offer

French Baccalauréat with overall final result of at least 13/20.

Germany

Typical offer

German Abitur with an overall result of 2.0 or better.

Greece

Typical offer

Apolytirion with an overall average of at least 18 or 19/20 will be considered for first-year entry.

A score of 15/20 in the Apolytirion would be suitable for Foundation Year entry. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Hong Kong

Typical offer

Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education (HKDSE) with grades of 5, 4, 4 from three subjects including two electives. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Hungary

Typical offer

Erettsegi/Matura with a good average.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

India

Typical offer

Standard XII results from Central and Metro Boards with an overall average of 75-80%. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Iran

Typical offer

High School Diploma and Pre-University Certificate.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Ireland

Typical offer

Irish Leaving Certificate (Higher Level) at H1,H2,H2,H3,H3.

Additional requirements

You must have at least grade O5 in Mathematics.

Israel

Typical offer

Bagrut, with at least 8/10 in at least six subjects, including one five-unit subject.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Italy

Typical offer

Italian Diploma Di Maturità or Diploma Pass Di Esame Di Stato with a final Diploma mark of at least 81/100.

Japan

Typical offer

Upper Secondary Leaving Certificate is suitable for entry to our Foundation Years. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Latvia

Typical offer

Atestats par Visparejo videjo Izglitibu with very good grades in state exams.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Lithuania

Typical offer

Brandos Atestatas including scores of 80-90% in at least three state examinations (other than English).

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Luxembourg

Typical offer

Diplôme de Fin d'Etudes Secondaires.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Malaysia

Typical offer

Sijil Tinggi Persekolahan Malaysia (STPM). As well as various two or three-year college or polytechnic certificates and diplomas.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Netherlands

Typical offer

Voorereidend Wetenschappelijk Onderwijs (VWO), normally with an average of at least 7.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Nigeria

Typical offer

You are expected to have one of the following:

  • Higher National Diploma
  • One year at a recognised Nigerian University
  • Professional Diploma (Part IV) from the Institute of Medical Laboratory Technology of Nigeria
  • Advanced Diploma

You must also have a score of C6 or above in WAEC/SSC English.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Norway

Typical offer

Norwegian Vitnemal Fra Den Videregaende Skole - Pass with an overall average of 4.

Pakistan

Typical offer

Bachelor (Pass) degree in arts, commerce or science.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Poland

Typical offer

Matura with three extended-level written examinations, normally scored within the 7th stanine.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Portugal

Typical offer

Diploma de Ensino Secundario normally with an overall mark of at least 16/20. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Romania

Typical offer

Diploma de Bacalaureat with an overall average of 8.5-9.5 depending on your degree choice.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Singapore

Typical offer

A-levels, as well as certain certificates and diplomas.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Slovakia

Typical offer

Maturitna Skuska or Maturita with honours, normally including scores of 1 in at least three subjects.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Slovenia

Typical offer

Secondary School Leaving Diploma or Matura with at least 23 points overall.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

South Africa

Typical offer

National Senior Certificate with very good grades. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Spain

Typical offer

Spanish Título de Bachillerato (LOGSE) with an overall average result of at least 8.0.

Sri Lanka

Typical offer

Sri Lankan A-levels.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Sweden

Typical offer

Fullstandigt Slutbetyg with good grades.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Switzerland

Typical offer

Federal Maturity Certificate.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Turkey

Typical offer

Devlet Lise Diplomasi or Lise Bitirme is normally only suitable for Foundation Years, but very strong applicants may be considered for first year entry. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

USA

Typical offer

We look at your full profile taking into account everything you are studying. You must have your high school graduation diploma and we will be interested in your Grade 12 GPA. However, we will also want to see evidence of the external tests you have taken. Each application is looked at individually, but you should normally have one or two of the following:

  • APs (where we would expect at least three subject with 4/5 in each)
  • SAT Reasoning Tests (normally with a combined score of 1300) or ACT grades
  • and/or SAT Subject Tests (where generally we expect you to have scores of 600 or higher). 

We would normally require APs or SAT Subject Tests in areas relevant to your chosen degree course.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

My country is not listed

If your qualifications aren’t listed or you have a question about entry requirements, email ug.enquiries@sussex.ac.uk.

English language requirements

IELTS (Academic)

6.5 overall, including at least 6.0 in each component

IELTS scores are valid for two years from the test date. Your score must be valid when you begin your Sussex course. You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test.

If you are applying for degree-level study we can consider your IELTS test from any test centre, but if you require a Confirmation of Acceptance for Studies (CAS) for an English language or pre-sessional English course (not combined with a degree) the test must be taken at a UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI)-approved IELTS test centre.

Find out more about IELTS.

Other English language requirements

Proficiency tests

Cambridge Advanced Certificate in English (CAE)

For tests taken before January 2015: Grade B or above

For tests taken after January 2015: 176 overall, including at least 169 in each skill

We would normally expect the CAE test to have been taken within two years before the start of your course.

You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Cambridge English: Advanced.

Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE)

For tests taken before January 2015: grade C or above

For tests taken after January 2015: 176 overall, including at least 169 in each skill

We would normally expect the CPE test to have been taken within two years before the start of your course.

You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Cambridge English: Proficiency.

Pearson (PTE Academic)

62 overall, including at least 56 in all four skills.

PTE (Academic) scores are valid for two years from the test date. Your score must be valid when you begin your Sussex course. You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Pearson (PTE Academic).

TOEFL (iBT)

88 overall, including at least 20 in Listening, 19 in Reading, 21 in Speaking, 23 in Writing.

TOEFL (iBT) scores are valid for two years from the test date. Your score must be valid when you begin your Sussex course. You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about TOEFL (iBT).

The TOEFL Institution Code for the University of Sussex is 9166.

English language qualifications

AS/A-level (GCE)

Grade C or above in English Language.

Hong Kong Advanced Level Examination (HKALE)/ AS or A Level: grade C or above in Use of English

French Baccalaureat

A score of 12 or above in English.

GCE O-level

Grade C or above in English.

Brunei/Cambridge GCE O-level in English: grades 1-6.

Singapore/Cambridge GCE O-level in English: grades 1-6.

GCSE or IGCSE

Grade C or above in English as a First Language.

Grade B or above in English as a Second Language

German Abitur

A score of 12 or above in English.

Ghana Senior Secondary School Certificate

If awarded before 1993: grades 1-6 in English language.

If awarded between 1993 and 2005: grades A-D in English language.

Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education (HKDSE)

 Level 4, including at least 3 in each component in English Language.

Indian School Certificate (Standard XII)

The Indian School Certificate is accepted at the grades below when awarded by the following examination boards:

Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) – English Core only: 70%

Council for Indian School Certificate Examinations (CISCE) - English: 70% 

International Baccalaureate Diploma (IB)

English A or English B at grade 5 or above.

Malaysian Certificate of Education (SPM) 119/GCE O-level

If taken before the end of 2008: grades 1-5 in English Language.

If taken from 2009 onwards: grade C or above in English Language.

The qualification must be jointly awarded by the University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES).

West African Senior School Certificate

Grades 1-6 in English language when awarded by the West African Examinations Council (WAEC) or the National Examinations Council (NECO).

Country exceptions

Select to see the list of exempt English-speaking countries

If you are a national of one of the countries below, or if you have recently completed a qualification equivalent to a UK Bachelors degree or higher in one of these countries, you will normally meet our English requirements. Note that qualifications obtained by distance learning or awarded by studying outside these countries cannot be accepted for English language purposes.

You will normally be expected to have completed the qualification within two years before starting your course at Sussex. If the qualification was obtained earlier than this we would expect you to be able to demonstrate that you have maintained a good level of English, for example by living in an English-speaking country or working in an occupation that required you to use English regularly and to a high level.

Please note that this list is determined by the UK’s Home Office, not by the University of Sussex.

List of exempt countries

  • Antigua and Barbuda
  • Australia
  • Bahamas
  • Barbados
  • Belize
  • Canada**
  • Dominica
  • Grenada
  • Guyana
  • Ireland
  • Jamaica
  • New Zealand
  • St Kitts and Nevis
  • St Lucia
  • St Vincent and the Grenadines
  • Trinidad and Tobago
  • United Kingdom
  • USA

** Canada: you must be a national of Canada; other nationals not on this list who have a degree from a Canadian institution will not normally be exempt from needing to provide evidence of English.

Admissions information for applicants

InterviewNo
Transfers into Year 2

No

If your qualifications aren’t listed or you have a question about entry requirements, email ug.enquiries@sussex.ac.uk.

Why choose this course?

  • 100% of our employed students were in graduate-level jobs six months after graduating (Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey 2015).
  • Achieve professional status faster with teaching recognised by leading accountancy bodies, and courses accredited by ACCA, CIMA, ICAEW and CIPFA.
  • Extensive career support and development opportunities, including the chance to boost your employability with an optional year-long professional placement or a year studying abroad.

Course information

How will I study?

You gain a solid grounding in the principles of accounting and finance and the theories of investments. This, along with introductions to statistics and mathematics for finance and economics, provides you with the understanding and techniques that you'll apply throughout your course.

You are introduced to business, management and financial accounting, and the economic foundations of finance.

Modules

These are the modules running in the academic year 2016. Modules running in 2018 may be subject to change.

Core modules


Customise your course

Our courses are designed to broaden your horizons and give you the skills and experience necessary to have the sort of career that has an impact.

Gain programming skills and apply them to areas such as digital media, business and interactive design. Find out about our Year in Computing

How will I study?

You focus on corporate finance, financial institutions and markets, as well as more specific aspects of accounting. You have the opportunity to explore your specialism in more depth.

Modules

These are the modules running in the academic year 2016. Modules running in 2018 may be subject to change.

Core modules

Options


Customise your course

Our courses are designed to broaden your horizons and give you the skills and experience necessary to have the sort of career that has an impact.

Gain programming skills and apply them to areas such as digital media, business and interactive design. Find out about our Year in Computing

Study abroad (optional)

Apply to study abroad – you’ll develop an international perspective and gain an edge when it comes to your career. Find out where your course could take you.

Professional placement (optional)

You can apply to take a paid professional placement in the third year of your degree. Recent students have gone on placement at:

  • IBM
  • GSK (GlaxoSmithKline)
  • Hewlett Packard.

All students receive dedicated support throughout their placement – from finding an employer to preparing for an interview.

For more details, visit Business and Management: Placements.

Employers, BMEc staff and students discuss the benefits of placements

My placement has given me perspective on where my degree is taking me in terms of career options, while improving my chances of employment.”Rachael Ferguson
Accounting and Finance BSc

How will I study?

The final year of your degree offers a wide range of modules and plenty of scope for independent study and research. Through your choice of options, you consolidate and extend your conceptual and practical knowledge of accounting and finance.

You draw on knowledge and skills developed throughout the course – including those learned throughout placement or study abroad experiences – for an in-depth investigation of topics in accounting and finance.

Modules

These are the modules running in the academic year 2016. Modules running in 2018 may be subject to change.

Core modules

Options

School and staff

Find out what it’s like to study business and management at Sussex, including finance, accounting and marketing

 

My research is in quantitative finance. I collaborate with power companies to tackle challenging risk-management and investment decisions.Dr Michael Coulon
Lecturer in Finance

Fees

Fees are not yet set for entry in the academic year 2018. Note that your fees, once they’re set, may be subject to an increase on an annual basis.

The UK Government has confirmed that, if you’re an EU student applying for entry in the academic year 2018, you'll remain eligible for financial support. This applies even if your course ends after the UK’s exit from the EU. Find out more on the UK Government website.

Find out about typical living costs for studying at Sussex

Scholarships

Details of our scholarships are not yet set for entry in the academic year 2018.

Careers

Graduate destinations

Our graduates are highly employable – 100% of Accounting and Finance students were in graduate-level jobs six months after being awarded their degrees. Recent students have started work as:

  • associate in financial services assurance, PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC)
  • auditor, BDO
  • trainee accountant, Sloane & Co.

(Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey 2015)

Your future career

You develop ethical awareness, independent thinking, leadership, self-confidence, and problem-solving and teamwork skills. You could work in: 

  • corporate or public-sector accounting and finance
  • management, consultancy and human resources
  • advertising, marketing and PR.

At Sussex, you can attend specialist careers talks and workshops. Recent events have included a recruitment presentation by Constantin (a member firm of Deloitte), an interview skills session with PwC and tips on landing your dream job from Brandwatch.

Working while you study

Our Careers and Employability Centre can help you find part-time work while you study. Find out more about career development and part-time work

My modules and the placement taught me so much more about working in a financial services industry.”Andrea Kilaris
Accounting and Finance (with a professional placement year) BSc 

Introduction to Business and Management

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

Introduction to Business and Management is an introductory study of contemporary organisations and their management. It explores the types of purposes of organisations, their stakeholders (CSR) and changing environments together with their key managerial processes – entrepreneurship, organisational structure, leading, strategic planning and change.

The focus throughout is on helping you achieve a critical and reflective approach, and learning to apply relevant concepts, tools and models.

The coursework component of assessment requires you to choose an organisation that is of interest to you and to explore, critically, the way in which it handles a process of your choice. You are supported in this by the submission of a structured proposal on which formative feedback is given.

Seminar activities are participative and require preparatory work which is signposted though downloads and links on Study Direct well in advance.

Lectures are interactive, employing the use of quizzes and featuring clips from YouTube, such as Dragons' Den excerpts.

An unseen examination completes the assessment profile and you tackle a case study (which revisits keys concepts) in the final seminar as a formative exercise.

The module provides a platform for later study by encouraging skills in critical thinking, academic writing, concept acquisition and research. Introduction to Business and Management aims to facilitate the transition to university-level learning smoothly, meaningfully and enjoyably.

Introduction to Economics

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

This module provides an introduction to the fundamental principles of economics. The first half of the module deals with micro-economic issues, including the behaviour of individuals and firms, their interaction in markets and the role of government. The second half of the module is devoted to macroeconomics and examines the determinants of aggregate economic variables, such as national income, inflation, and the balance of payments, and the relationships between them.

Introduction to Financial Accounting

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

Accounting is the 'language for all business', which translates information about organisations to users for the purposes of control, financial performance assessment and valuation.

This module is designed to teach you how to understand this language and be able to communicate in it. It will equip you with an understanding of the major accounting concepts, the necessary skills, knowledge and insights to understand how and why financial statements are created and how they have developed.

You will be exposed to how financial transactions and events are recorded, and will learn how to compile rudimentary financial statements for various business entities.

Introduction to Management Accounting

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

You study the role and content of management accounting systems and learn computational and evaluative techniques for information analysis, organisational planning and problem solving. 

You learn how management accounting systems help organisations identify, measure and communicate information for valuation purposes and enable managers and employees in an organisation to make informed judgements and decisions.

Introduction to Mathematics for Finance and Economics

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

This module introduces you to the basic mathematical methods and techniques used in economic analysis, and will enable you to use these skills independently and with confident. These skills also have a transferable content and are useful in other disciplines and applications.

Introduction to Statistics

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

You study the statistical techniques used in economics, and computer-based applications.

You study topics including:

  • summarising and plotting data
  • basic probability theory
  • hypothesis testing
  • correlation analysis
  • bivariate and multiple regression analysis.

You learn how to use EXCEL,which you will use for your assessed module work.

Principles of Finance

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

You are introduced to financial markets, instruments and concepts. 

You are given an overview of the roles of different financial institutions, and the products they most commonly provide and trade.

During the module you discuss historical events in the financial markets and how this illustrates their importance in the wider economy. 

You focus on finance concepts related to equity and bond markets, beginning with:

  • interest rates
  • returns
  • time value of money
  • discounting
  • present value.

Other topics include:

  • LIBID and LIBOR
  • cost of capital
  • bid ask spreads
  • no-arbitrage relationships, for example between stocks and futures or forwards.

You are also given an insight into the idea of hedging with derivative products.

Theory of Investments

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

You explore the common types of investment and gain a thorough grounding in the analysis of investment portfolios.

You learn about:

  • the investment environment
  • the investment process
  • mutual funds and other investment companies
  • risk-return-based asset allocation methods
  • popular index models
  • theoretical and empirical asset pricing models and their applications to investment analysis
  • security analysis
  • performance measurement.

Accounting Information Systems

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

You study accounting information systems, and cover three specific areas:

  • the role of accounting systems in the context of business processes, transaction cycles, and internal controls
  • core data management concepts that are fundamental to the design of modern accounting systems
  • recent developments in accounting information systems and the impact this has on the accounting profession.

Throughout the module, you are given practical examples using a leading enterprise system.

Corporate and International Finance

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

During this module you: 

  • learn the important ideas and analytical tools used in corporate financial decision making
  • explore the challenges of implementing these ideas and tools through reading corporate finance literature and events in the financial press.

Topics include:

  • the nature of financial decision making
  • interest rates
  • investment decision rules
  • capital budgeting
  • valuing stocks
  • capital markets and the pricing of risk.

Financial Institutions and Markets

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

This module introduces the various types of financial institutions and their role in society including banks, insurance companies and investment managers. It then provides an overview of the major financial markets and products and how these are related to each other and to the institutions introduced earlier. Finally, behaviour of financial institutions and ethical principles of finance are discussed. A provisional outline of lectures, including one revision lecture at the end, is as follows:

  1. Introduction and purpose of module: overview of lectures, textbook, interplay with other courses, finance as an occupation, philanthropy and origins of finance
  2. Commercial banks: origins, adverse selection and moral hazard, operational risks, capital adequacy, regulation, deposit insurance and Sharia/Islamic finance
  3. Investment banks: importance in markets and society, secret of high profit, divisional analysis, shadow finance and leasing
  4. Insurance: origins, life and health, principal-agent problem, AIG blow-up and regulations
  5. Investment managers: 40 Act, mutual funds, hedge funds, private equity and venture capital
  6. Debt markets: term structure, leverage cycle, rating agencies, usury and consumer finance protection
  7. Equity markets: corporations, stock exchanges and capital raising
  8. Real estate:REITs, mortgages, securitisation, boom and bust cycles and specialty finance
  9. Derivatives:options, forwards, futures, arbitrage and hedging risks
  10. Crises and regulation: recent financial crisis, historical perspectives and attempts at regulatory reform
  11. Capitalism and ethics: morality of finance, 'doing God's work' and different political frameworks
  12. Revision

Law for Accounting and Finance

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

This module aims to develop your knowledge and skills in the understanding of the general legal framework, and of specific legal areas relating to business as well as recognising the need to seek further specialist legal advice where necessary.

The module is divided into four parts:

  • the English legal system
  • contractual obligations
  • tortious liability
  • the contract of employment.

The structure of the module is informed by:

  • ACCA Qualification Exam F4 (Eng) – Corporate and Business Law
  • ICAEW Certificate in Finance Accounting and Business (CFAB)
  • CIMA Paper CO5 – Fundamentals of Ethics, Corporate Governance and Business Law.

Management Accounting

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

This module, whilst considering contemporary debates and controversies, will equip you with an appreication of the traditional management accounting techniques and consider their applicability, strengths and weaknesses.

Through an exploration of ‘new’ techniques including those employing Information Technology, develop an understanding of current and future directions in the field.

Principles of Organisational Behaviour/Human Resource Management for Accounting and Finance

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

You explore the causes and effects of human interaction in an organisation. This includes examining how humans acting individually or in a group influence the organisation.

You learn how organisational performance depends on appropriate incentives to individuals, effective teams, an attractive job environment and a managed organisational structure.

Focusing on these issues, the module is divided into four themes based on the level of analysis:

  • individual
  • group
  • organisational and human resource management.

At the individual level you look at the individual's contribution to the organisation and the factors affecting their behaviour.

At group level, the nature and significance of groups in organisations is discussed. The range of skills required for effective team work and factors affecting working in group are also explored.

At organisational level, organisational design and culture, inspiring workers through norms, beliefs and behaviour or management at work place, is explained.

Finally, in the human resource section of the module you learn about the aspects of developing human capital through recruitment, training and development and reward, which create a sustainable commitment to organisational goals and ensure high performance.

Introduction to Econometrics (level 5)

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

You study the application of statistical methods to economic data and focus on regression analysis based on the ordinary least squares (OLS) principle. 

You look at model specification and the analysis of regression disturbance problems, such as autocorrelation and heteroscedasticity.

Taxation

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

You will develop the skills to compute taxes for individuals, single companies and groups of companies. Issues involved in preparing taxes for corporations engaged in International Trade and for Multinational Corporations will also be covered.

Advanced Management Accounting

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

You build on the technical knowledge and skills you have developed in your management accounting modules.

You examine the socio-economic and organisational contexts that underpin management accounting, and look at the modern issues that influence and shape management accounting practice.

You critically evaluate academic research, looking at key themes in contemporary management accounting practice. You also examine how and why management accounting has changed. 

Alternative Investment Funds

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

You study investment funds and the investment management industry. You examine the process involved in creating and investing in funds, focusing on alternative investment funds such as hedge funds and private equity. 

During the module you look at the parties involved, processes required and key documentation that is entered into, during the creation of a fund and during a typical investment.

You gain an insight into how various parts of a financial institution (such as a bank or asset/fund manager) work together and the roles different departments and functions serve along the lifecycle of any investment. 

Applied Econometrics

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

This module examines in greater depth topics covered in the Introduction to Econometrics module. The module explores the analysis of time series data with particular reference to unit root testing, cointegration and dynamic modelling, and also examines the use of models with limited dependent variables (eg the probit model).

Business Strategy Report

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

This module provides the opportunity for you to prepare a report on the strategic position of a business or organisation (governmental or not-for-profit) of your choice. You will have the chance to integrate the skills you have developed in your previous modules into one extended research project.

The project requires you to research the strategic position (including market environment, resources and cababilities) of an organisation. Based on this analysis, you will propose a strategy for the organisation over the next five years.

The final report should reflect your research skills and understanding of previous course material. During the first two weeks of the module, you will receive research methods training, supplementing the Research Methods module in the second year.

Financial Derivatives

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

You examine the markets and look at the trading and valuation of common derivative products such as forwards/futures, swaps and options, as well as equity and interest rate markets.

You look at practical applications of derivatives for hedging or investment purposes, including risk-return profiles, advantages and limitations.

You also explore fundamental concepts of no arbitage and risk neutral pricing and examine the Black Scholes formula. 

Financial Econometrics

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

Financial Risk Management

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

You learn about a wide range of market risks including currency, interest rate, equity and commodity. You also look at credit risks. 

During the module, you learn to map portfolios to risk factors, compute risk metrics (value-at-risk, and credit value adjustments), and look at rudimentary model validation and stress testing.

Topics include: 

  • credit risk, credit derivatives and other mitigation
  • financial risks and hedging principles
  • hedging with forwards, futures and swaps
  • market risk, volatility and correlation.

Innovation Systems

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

Science, technology and innovation (STI) play fundamental roles in our societies. STI are pervasive in our lifestyles and our social organisation and crucial for economic growth. However, until a few years ago science and technology had been regarded as external factors that social actors used at convenience without inquiring how they were created. 

In this module we will explore how science and technology are shaped by social forces and how science and technology shape social phenomena. The processes by which socio-economic and technological phenomena shape each other are complex and dependent on historical circumstances. In order to try to see through this complexity we will adopt systemic approaches taking on economic and sociological perspectives.

Innovation system and network approaches look into how various socio-economic actors (university, small spin-off firms, large corporations, governmental agencies, activist organisations and the wider public) interact with each other. For example, these interactions may lead to knowledge transfer, may result in the construction of new regulatory regimes or may lead to political conflicts. 

This module aims to 'open up' the black box of how science, technology and innovation (STI) to understand their emergence and show that STI can be created, directed and managed for diverse purposes, encouraging critical views on past and current STI uses.

Knowledge, Work and Organisations

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

This module looks at the pivotal role that knowledge workers play in the creation, application and diffusion of knowledge within and between firms.

You will consider new approaches to managing learning processes in the firm, including developments such as knowledge management and communities of practice, and the novel organisational structures that have emerged to coordinate knowledge-­work activity.

You will explore the diffusion of knowledge between firms through different types of knowledge-worker communities and networks, as well as the role of labour mobility. You will also consider how certain skills are emerging to play a critical role in the knowledge economy - for example, consulting services and knowledge brokering. Finally, you will consider how labour market institutions that impact careers, skills and training of knowledge workers, shape different approaches to knowledge generation. 

Law of Business Organisations

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

This module aims to develop knowledge and skills in relation to the law of business organisations including the formation and constitution of business organisations, the financing of companies and the management, administration and regulation of companies.

New Venture Development and Planning

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

In this module, you develop a business plan for a new business idea of your choice, which you individually write and submit.

If you are choosing this module, you will need to demonstrate the ability to exercise independent analytical, research and reasoning skills, and excellent levels of clarity in written English.

For this module's project, you need to research the strategic and competitive position of your new business idea. Based on this analysis, you will propose strategies for your new business idea over the next three to five years.

The quality of your final business plan will depend on a thorough understanding of previous course material, specifically strategy, marketing and operations.

Principles of Banking

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

This module is an introduction to both theoretical and practical issues related to the modern banking business.The module begins with an overview of the role and genesis of the financial system and the nature of financial intermediation.

It covers the main characteristics and types of banks (e.g., commercial and mutual; retail and wholesale; role of central banks) and analyses recent trends and developments in banking markets.

The module also explores the main items contained in banks' financial statements and explains how to assess bank performance by using basic financial ratios.

The second part of the module focuses on the main risks of banking, with particular reference to credit risk and liquidity risk, and outlines elementary risk management and asset and liability management techniques.

It examines the rationale for bank regulation and distinguishes between the different types of regulation, especially in relation to the recent financial crisis. Particular reference is made to the latest development on Basel III and Dodd–Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act.

The following topics will be covered:

  1. Banking Activities and the type of banking
  2. Theory of central bank and monetary policy
  3. Banks' balance sheet and income structure
  4. Managing Banks
  5. Banking Industry: Structure and Competition
  6. Banking risk management
  7. Banking crisis in 2008
  8. Bank regulation and supervision

Research Project

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn & Spring Teaching, Year 3

This module provides the opportunity for you to undertake a significant and independent research project. This may be a dissertation in the form of a literature-based analysis of a research problem, or a dissertation in which some primary empirical data is collected and synthesised by you. In BOTH cases, the dissertation is expected to address clear research questions. The research project provides you with the opportunity to integrate and apply knowledge from the degree programme, and to develop research skills. During the first four weeks of the course you will receive research methods training, supplementing the research skills acquired in their first year. Thereafter, you will meet twice a term with an assigned project supervisor.

Strategy for Finance

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

In this module, you use the knowledge and experience gained in your previous finance modules to look at the broader issues relating to the strategic direction of organisations.

You develop the skills and tools to analyse the competitive position and resources and capabilities of organisations, and use this analysis to make strategic recommendations. 

You learn: 

  • the different approaches to strategy
  • how choices are made between different approaches 
  • how strategies and structures are designed and implemented.
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