Mechanical Engineering (with an industrial placement year) BEng

Engineering

Key information

Duration:
4 years full time
Typical A-level offer:
ABB-BBB
UCAS code:
H32F
Start date:
September 2018

Mechanical Engineering at Sussex equips you with the skills to succeed in your future career. You also have the opportunity to apply for a year working in industry.

You are given specialist training to lead multi-disciplinary teams in the development of complex systems, such as sustainable power generation, power-trains for automotive vehicles, and jet engines for aircraft propulsion.

My third year project is to design a solar sail deployment mechanism, meaning I get to work with specialists in astronautic engineering.”Kieran Pointon
Mechanical Engineering BEng

MEng or BEng?

We also offer this course without the industrial placement year, as a four-year MEng, or as a five-year MEng with an industrial placement yearFind out about the benefits of an integrated Masters year.

Entry requirements

A-level

Typical offer

ABB-BBB

Subjects

A-levels must include Mathematics.

GCSEs

You should also have a broad range of GCSEs (A*-C), including good grades in relevant subjects.

 

Other UK qualifications

Access to HE Diploma

Typical offer

Pass in the Access to HE Diploma with 45 level 3 credits at Merit or above, including 24 at Distinction.

Subjects

You will normally need A-level Mathematics, grade B, in addition to the Access to HE Diploma.

International Baccalaureate

Typical offer

30 points overall from the full IB Diploma.     

Subjects

Higher Levels must include Mathematics, with a grade of 5.

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (formerly BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma)

Typical offer

DDD

Subjects

The BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma should be in Engineering, including Distinction in Key Mathematics units.

We also accept the former BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma (QCF) in Engineering with DDD, including Distinction in the Further Mathematics for Engineering Technicians unit.

GCSEs

GCSE (or equivalent) Mathematics with at least grade B is essential (or grade 6 in the new grading scale).

You should also have a broad range of GCSEs (A*-C), including good grades in relevant subjects.

 

Scottish Highers

Typical offer

ABBBB

Subjects

Highers must include Mathematics, grade A. You should also have an Advanced Higher in Mathematics (grade B).

Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced

Typical offer

Grade B and BB in two A-levels.

Subjects

A-levels must include Mathematics, grade B.

GCSEs

You should also have a broad range of GCSEs (A*-C), including good grades in relevant subjects.

International baccalaureate

Typical offer

30 points overall from the full IB Diploma.     

Subjects

Higher Levels must include Mathematics, with a grade of 5.

European baccalaureate

Typical offer

Overall result of at least 75%

Additional requirements

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential (normally with a final grade of at least 8.0).

Other international qualifications

Australia

Typical offer

Relevant state (Year 12) High School Certificate, and over 85% in the ATAR or UAI/TER/ENTER. Or a Queensland OP of 5 or below.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Austria

Typical offer

Reifeprüfung or Matura with an overall result of 2.2 or better for first-year entry. A result of 2.5 or better would be considered for Foundation Year entry.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Belgium

Typical offer

Certificat d'Enseignement Secondaire Supérieur (CESS) or Diploma van Hoger Secundair Onderwijs with a good overall average. 

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Bulgaria

Typical offer

Diploma za Sredno Obrazovanie with excellent final-year scores (normally 5.5 overall with 6 in key subjects).

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Canada

Typical offer

High School Graduation Diploma. Specific requirements vary between provinces.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

China

Typical offer

We usually do not accept Senior High School Graduation for direct entry to our undergraduate courses. However, we do consider applicants who have studied 1 or more years of Higher Education in China at a recognised degree awarding institution or who are following a recognised International Foundation Year.

If you are interested in applying for a business related course which requires an academic ability in Mathematics, you will normally also need a grade B in Mathematics from the Huikao or a score of 90 in Mathematics from the Gaokao.

Applicants who have the Senior High School Graduation may be eligible to apply to our International Foundation Year, which if you complete successfully you can progress on to a relevant undergraduate course at Sussex. You can find more information about the qualifications which are accepted by our International Study Centre at  http://isc.sussex.ac.uk/entry-requirements/international-foundation-year .

 

 

 

 

 

 

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Croatia

Typical offer

Maturatna Svjedodžba with an overall score of at least 4-5 depending on your degree choice.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Cyprus

Typical offer

Apolytirion of Lykeion with an overall average of at least 18 or 19/20 will be considered for first-year entry.

A score of 15/20 in the Apolytirion would be suitable for Foundation Year entry. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Czech Republic

Typical offer

Maturita with a good overall average.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Denmark

Typical offer

Højere Forberedelseseksamen (HF) or studentereksamen with an overall average of at least 7 on the new grading scale.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Finland

Typical offer

Finnish Ylioppilastutkinto with an overall average result in the final matriculation examinations of at least 5.5.

Additional requirements

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

France

Typical offer

French Baccalauréat with an overall final result of at least 13/20.

Additional requirements

You will need to be taking the science strand within the French Baccalaureat with a final result of at least 13/20 in Mathematics.

Germany

Typical offer

German Abitur with an overall result of 2.2 or better.

Additional requirements

Successful applicants will need a very good final result in Mathematics (at least 12/15).

Greece

Typical offer

Apolytirion with an overall average of at least 18 or 19/20 will be considered for first-year entry.

A score of 15/20 in the Apolytirion would be suitable for Foundation Year entry. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Hong Kong

Typical offer

Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education (HKDSE) with grades of 5, 4, 4 from three subjects including two electives. 

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Hungary

Typical offer

Erettsegi/Matura with a good average.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

India

Typical offer

Standard XII results from Central and Metro Boards with an overall average of 75-80%. 

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Iran

Typical offer

High School Diploma and Pre-University Certificate.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Ireland

Typical offer

Irish Leaving Certificate (Higher Level) at H1,H2,H2,H3,H3.

Additional requirements

Highers must include Mathematics, grade H1.

Israel

Typical offer

Bagrut, with at least 8/10 in at least six subjects, including one five-unit subject.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Italy

Typical offer

Italian Diploma di Maturità or Diploma Pass di Esame di Stato with a Final Diploma mark of at least 78/100.

Additional requirements

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Japan

Typical offer

Upper Secondary Leaving Certificate is suitable for entry to our Foundation Years. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Latvia

Typical offer

Atestats par Visparejo videjo Izglitibu with very good grades in state exams.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Lithuania

Typical offer

Brandos Atestatas including scores of 80-90% in at least three state examinations (other than English).

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Luxembourg

Typical offer

Diplôme de Fin d'Etudes Secondaires.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Malaysia

Typical offer

Sijil Tinggi Persekolahan Malaysia (STPM). As well as various two or three-year college or polytechnic certificates and diplomas.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Netherlands

Typical offer

Voorereidend Wetenschappelijk Onderwijs (VWO), normally with an average of at least 7.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Nigeria

Typical offer

You are expected to have one of the following:

  • Higher National Diploma
  • One year at a recognised Nigerian University
  • Professional Diploma (Part IV) from the Institute of Medical Laboratory Technology of Nigeria
  • Advanced Diploma

You must also have a score of C6 or above in WAEC/SSC English.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Norway

Typical offer

Norwegian Vitnemal Fra Den Videregaende Skole- Pass with an overall average of at least 4.

Additional requirements

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Pakistan

Typical offer

Bachelor (Pass) degree in arts, commerce or science.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Poland

Typical offer

Matura with three extended-level written examinations, normally scored within the 7th stanine.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Portugal

Typical offer

Diploma de Ensino Secundario normally with an overall mark of at least 16/20. 

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Romania

Typical offer

Diploma de Bacalaureat with an overall average of 8.5-9.5 depending on your degree choice.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Singapore

Typical offer

A-levels, as well as certain certificates and diplomas.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Slovakia

Typical offer

Maturitna Skuska or Maturita with honours, normally including scores of 1 in at least three subjects.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Slovenia

Typical offer

Secondary School Leaving Diploma or Matura with at least 23 points overall.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

South Africa

Typical offer

National Senior Certificate with very good grades. 

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Spain

Typical offer

Spanish Título de Bachillerato (LOGSE) with an overall average result of at least 7.5.

Additional requirements

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Sri Lanka

Typical offer

Sri Lankan A-levels.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Sweden

Typical offer

Fullstandigt Slutbetyg with good grades.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Switzerland

Typical offer

Federal Maturity Certificate.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Turkey

Typical offer

Devlet Lise Diplomasi or Lise Bitirme is normally only suitable for Foundation Years, but very strong applicants may be considered for first year entry. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

USA

Typical offer

We look at your full profile taking into account everything you are studying. You must have your high school graduation diploma and we will be interested in your Grade 12 GPA. However, we will also want to see evidence of the external tests you have taken. Each application is looked at individually, but you should normally have one or two of the following:

  • APs (where we would expect at least three subject with 4/5 in each)
  • SAT Reasoning Tests (normally with a combined score of 1300) or ACT grades
  • and/or SAT Subject Tests (where generally we expect you to have scores of 600 or higher). 

We would normally require APs or SAT Subject Tests in areas relevant to your chosen degree course.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability at a high level in Mathematics is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

My country is not listed

If your qualifications aren’t listed or you have a question about entry requirements, email ug.enquiries@sussex.ac.uk.

English language requirements

IELTS (Academic)

6.5 overall, including at least 6.0 in each component

IELTS scores are valid for two years from the test date. Your score must be valid when you begin your Sussex course. You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test.

If you are applying for degree-level study we can consider your IELTS test from any test centre, but if you require a Confirmation of Acceptance for Studies (CAS) for an English language or pre-sessional English course (not combined with a degree) the test must be taken at a UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI)-approved IELTS test centre.

Find out more about IELTS.

Other English language requirements

Proficiency tests

Cambridge Advanced Certificate in English (CAE)

For tests taken before January 2015: Grade B or above

For tests taken after January 2015: 176 overall, including at least 169 in each skill

We would normally expect the CAE test to have been taken within two years before the start of your course.

You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Cambridge English: Advanced.

Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE)

For tests taken before January 2015: grade C or above

For tests taken after January 2015: 176 overall, including at least 169 in each skill

We would normally expect the CPE test to have been taken within two years before the start of your course.

You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Cambridge English: Proficiency.

Pearson (PTE Academic)

62 overall, including at least 56 in all four skills.

PTE (Academic) scores are valid for two years from the test date. Your score must be valid when you begin your Sussex course. You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Pearson (PTE Academic).

TOEFL (iBT)

88 overall, including at least 20 in Listening, 19 in Reading, 21 in Speaking, 23 in Writing.

TOEFL (iBT) scores are valid for two years from the test date. Your score must be valid when you begin your Sussex course. You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about TOEFL (iBT).

The TOEFL Institution Code for the University of Sussex is 9166.

English language qualifications

AS/A-level (GCE)

Grade C or above in English Language.

Hong Kong Advanced Level Examination (HKALE)/ AS or A Level: grade C or above in Use of English

French Baccalaureat

A score of 12 or above in English.

GCE O-level

Grade C or above in English.

Brunei/Cambridge GCE O-level in English: grades 1-6.

Singapore/Cambridge GCE O-level in English: grades 1-6.

GCSE or IGCSE

Grade C or above in English as a First Language.

Grade B or above in English as a Second Language

German Abitur

A score of 12 or above in English.

Ghana Senior Secondary School Certificate

If awarded before 1993: grades 1-6 in English language.

If awarded between 1993 and 2005: grades A-D in English language.

Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education (HKDSE)

 Level 4, including at least 3 in each component in English Language.

Indian School Certificate (Standard XII)

The Indian School Certificate is accepted at the grades below when awarded by the following examination boards:

Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) – English Core only: 70%

Council for Indian School Certificate Examinations (CISCE) - English: 70% 

International Baccalaureate Diploma (IB)

English A or English B at grade 5 or above.

Malaysian Certificate of Education (SPM) 119/GCE O-level

If taken before the end of 2008: grades 1-5 in English Language.

If taken from 2009 onwards: grade C or above in English Language.

The qualification must be jointly awarded by the University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES).

West African Senior School Certificate

Grades 1-6 in English language when awarded by the West African Examinations Council (WAEC) or the National Examinations Council (NECO).

Country exceptions

Select to see the list of exempt English-speaking countries

If you are a national of one of the countries below, or if you have recently completed a qualification equivalent to a UK Bachelors degree or higher in one of these countries, you will normally meet our English requirements. Note that qualifications obtained by distance learning or awarded by studying outside these countries cannot be accepted for English language purposes.

You will normally be expected to have completed the qualification within two years before starting your course at Sussex. If the qualification was obtained earlier than this we would expect you to be able to demonstrate that you have maintained a good level of English, for example by living in an English-speaking country or working in an occupation that required you to use English regularly and to a high level.

Please note that this list is determined by the UK’s Home Office, not by the University of Sussex.

List of exempt countries

  • Antigua and Barbuda
  • Australia
  • Bahamas
  • Barbados
  • Belize
  • Canada**
  • Dominica
  • Grenada
  • Guyana
  • Ireland
  • Jamaica
  • New Zealand
  • St Kitts and Nevis
  • St Lucia
  • St Vincent and the Grenadines
  • Trinidad and Tobago
  • United Kingdom
  • USA

** Canada: you must be a national of Canada; other nationals not on this list who have a degree from a Canadian institution will not normally be exempt from needing to provide evidence of English.

Admissions information for applicants

Transfers into Year 2

Yes. Find out more about transferring into Year 2 of this course. We don’t accept transfers into the third or final year.

If your qualifications aren’t listed or you have a question about entry requirements, email ug.enquiries@sussex.ac.uk.

Why choose this course?

  • 97% of our employed students were in graduate-level work six months after graduating (Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey 2015).
  • All our courses are accredited by professional institutions under licence from the UK regulator, the Engineering Council.
  • Study in our £12-million centre for teaching in the areas of computing, robotics, electronics and mechatronics. You'll benefit from a new student-focused hub, as well as a suite of high-spec computers, and new project workspaces.

Course information

How will I study?

You gain a good grounding in the fundamentals of engineering, looking at topics including engineering thermodynamics, engineering mathematics, and material and manufacturing processes. 

Global Design Challenge

You join all first-year students in the School of Engineering and Informatics in a team-based, week-long activity, the Global Design Challenge. Each team designs a solution to a problem faced by a community in the developing world. You develop transferable skills, benefiting both your studies and your future employability.

Modules

These are the modules running in the academic year 2017. Modules running in 2018 may be subject to change.

Core modules


Customise your course

Our courses are designed to broaden your horizons and give you the skills and experience necessary to have the sort of career that has an impact.

Gain programming skills and apply them to areas such as digital media, business and interactive design. Find out about our Year in Computing

How will I study?

You cover topics such as fluid mechanics, and thermal power cycles.

A group project introduces you to the techniques of design for manufacture. You continue to develop your mathematics knowledge and are introduced to the principles of signal processing and feedback.

You also study the key professional skills required for accreditation – project management, technical communication and professional ethics.

Modules

These are the modules running in the academic year 2017. Modules running in 2018 may be subject to change.

Core modules


Customise your course

Our courses are designed to broaden your horizons and give you the skills and experience necessary to have the sort of career that has an impact.

Gain programming skills and apply them to areas such as digital media, business and interactive design. Find out about our Year in Computing

An industrial placement gives you the chance to spend a year working with an organisation, in an area relevant to your course, while being paid. It’s a proven way to fast-track your career. Recent students have gone on placements at:

  • EDF Energy
  • GE Aviation
  • YASA Motors.

You develop your technical, team-working and transferable skills, and apply what you have learnt in your studies to a business environment.

There is guided preparation early in your course to help you find, secure and succeed in your placement. Find out more about placements and internships.

Find out about the latest award-winning design from one of our placement students.

I owe my current academic and career progress to the opportunities that my placement gave me.”Thomas Westwood
Mechanical Engineering (with an industrial placement year) MEng
Product Support Engineer, Eschmann Equipment

Please note

If you’re receiving – or applying for – USA federal Direct Loan funds, you can’t undertake your placement in the USA. Find out more about American Student Loans and Federal Student Aid

How will I study?

Topics include vehicle technology, and heat transfer. 

You work on an individual project over two terms. Examples of previous student projects include: 

  • cooler housing for hot climates
  • CFD analysis of flow in rotating cavities with protrusions
  • particle image velocimetry vehicle flow field.

Modules

These are the modules running in the academic year 2017. Modules running in 2018 may be subject to change.

Core modules

Options

How will I study?

You study advanced Masters-level modules and choose from a number of options, allowing you to specialise in your own areas of interest. 

You join an interdisciplinary team of fellow students to undertake a substantial group project. Recent projects include:

  • the design and completion of a race car for entry in the Formula Student competition
  • modification of a 'quadcopter' into an aerial vehicle for video reconnaissance
  • the installation of a Gem gas turbine in a Jaguar and design of associated systems.
My focus is on automotive applications. In 2014, I joined the Secretary of State for Business Innovation and Skills and lectured at the Automotive Research Association of India.”Dr Julian F Dunne
Reader in Engineering Dynamics

Fees

Fees are not yet set for entry in the academic year 2018. Note that your fees, once they’re set, may be subject to an increase on an annual basis.

The UK Government has confirmed that if you’re an EU student applying for entry in September 2018, you'll pay the same fee rate as UK students for the duration of your course, even if the UK leaves the EU before the end of your course. You'll also continue to have access to student loans and grants. Find out more on the UK Government website.

Find out about typical living costs for studying at Sussex

Scholarships

Our focus is personal development and social mobility. To help you meet your ambitions to study at Sussex, we deliver one of the most generous scholarship programmes of any UK university.

Careers

Graduate destinations

Recent Engineering graduates have gone on to jobs as:

  • mechanical engineer, Bryden Wood Ltd
  • graduate engineer, Jaguar
  • simulation engineer, Semcon.

(Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey 2015)

Your future career

Gain the skills for a career in engineering, and benefit from our industry links with companies like Jaguar, IBM, Siemens and Thales. The technical, team-working and design skills you develop on this course mean you can go into graduate jobs in sectors including:

  • aerospace and energy
  • construction and manufacturing
  • automotive.

You can also meet graduate employers at careers events. Recent sessions have included talks by IBM and Atkins, and advice on applying for graduate schemes.

Working while you study

Our Careers and Employability Centre can help you find part-time work while you study. Find out more about career development and part-time work

Electrical Circuits & Devices

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

Topics covered on this module include:

  • DC circuits: Ohm's law
  • Kirchhoff's laws, node and mesh analysis
  • Thvenin's theorem, Norton's theorem, superposition principle
  • AC circuits: inductance (L) and Capacitance (C)
  • sinusoidal steady-state, phasors
  • energy dissipation and storage
  • frequency response of R-L, R-C and R-L-C circuits, resonance
  • transient response of R-L, R-C and R-L-C circuits
  • operational amplifiers: inverting, non-inverting and differential amplifiers
  • integrators and differentiators
  • simple filters
  • semiconductor devices: diodes, junction transistor as a switch, Boolean algebra, Karnaugh maps, Combinational logic
  • simple circuit applications: rectifiers.

Engineering Maths 1A

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

The module will be taught using the Helping Engineers Learn Mathematics (HELM) resource.

Thorough revision of A-Level Maths topics, particularly:

  • differential calculus
  • integral calculus
  • algebraic manipulation of functions
  • vectors
  • matrix algebra including determinants
  • Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors.

Then new material:

  • complex numbers
  • further differentiation
  • integration
  • partial differentiation
  • curves and functions.

Materials and Manufacturing Processes

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

This module will cover topics including:

  • approaching engineering problems from first principles
  • the practice of formulating and modelling a problem and applying relevant concepts to describe and study system behaviour
  • critical evaluation of solutions to engineering and design problems
  • introduction to materials and material science: principal characteristics and applications of plastics, metals, composites, ceramics and natural materials
  • historical and recent developments in material science with respect to design and engineering applications
  • introduction to atomic and macroscopic level properties of materials
  • key chemical, electrical, mechanical, thermal, environmental and manufacturing properties of materials
  • how material properties arise from atomic level interactions
  • atomic bonding
  • the basic force/separation curve and the development of the stress/strain relationship
  • introduction to behaviour of materials under load, introduction to forces and basic types of loading cases
  • stress and strain curves
  • mechanics of materials under axial tensile and compressive forces
  • stress concentrations
  • introduction to design stresses and factors of safety
  • selection of materials: basic methods of material selection, use of software in material selection
  • engineering failures: typical failure mechanisms of materials such as fatigue, creep, crack growth, and corrosion
  • case studies of engineering failures with respect to material selection and design
  • introduction to manufacturing processes: casting, moulding, forming, machining, joining, rapid manufacturing and 3D printing
  • correct machine shop working practice and related health and safety considerations
  • practical lathe or milling exercise to understand feeds and speeds, operation, parting off, surface finish, tool selection, and cutting fluids/coolants
  • engineering tolerances
  • cost of manufacture and materials, and related design considerations.

Programming for Engineers

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

This module introduces you to the following topics:

  • compiling and linking
  • constants, variables, data types and conversion
  • operators and expressions
  • program structure and pseudocode
  • selection and repetitive statements
  • functions
  • recursion
  • pointers 
  • arrays
  • characters and strings
  • data structures
  • file input/output
  • well-designed programs and testing (software engineering)
  • introduction to programming paradigms
  • C and MATLAB (procedural)
  • MATLAB - Simulink
  • LabVIEW (graphical programming)
  • concept of object-orientated programming (C++, Java).

Electromechanics

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

Topics covered by this module will include:

  • magnetic fields of currents and coils
  • magnetic materials
  • magnetic circuits
  • induced EMF
  • inductance
  • transformers
  • magnetic forces, permanent magnets and electromagnets
  • moving-coil devices
  • DC motors and AC machines
  • 3-phase systems.

Engineering Maths 1B

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

Your studies in this module include:

  • line, surface and volume integrals
  • power series expansions
  • first-order and second-order ODEs with constant coefficients
  • differential vector calculus – div, grad, curl, other coordinate systems
  • multiple integrals.

Engineering Mechanics

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

This module will cover:

  • Static equilibrium
  • Introduction to statically indeterminate systems
  • Superposition
  • Introduction to buckling
  • Kinematics of particles: linear motion of a particle, curvilinear motion, characteristics of the motion in various systems of reference
  • Kinematics of rigid bodies, translation, rotation about a fixed axis, plane motion, characteristics of a general motion
  • Kinetics of particles and rigid bodies
  • Application of Newton's second law
  • Moments of inertia
  • Impulse-momentum equation
  • Angular momentum
  • Impact
  • Work-energy equation
  • Dynamics of a rigid rotating about a fixed axis
  • Dynamics of a rigid in plane motion
  • Vibrations of single degree of freedom systems
  • Force, moment of a force: static equilibrium, plane trusses, centroid, friction, introduction to statically indeterminate systems, superposition and introduction to buckling
  • Kinematics of particles: linear motion of a particle, curvilinear motion and characteristics of the motion in various systems of reference
  • Kinematics of rigid bodies: translation, rotation about a fixed axis, plane motion and characteristics of a general motion
  • Kinetics of particles and rigid bodies: application of Newton's second law, moments of inertia, impulse-momentum equation, angular momentum, impact, work-energy equation, dynamics of a rigid rotating about a fixed axis and dynamics of a rigid in plane motion
  • Vibrations of single degree of freedom systems.

Engineering Thermodynamics

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

Topics covered in this module include:

  • fundamental concepts: fluid properties, work, heat, temperature, properties of a gas from the ideal gas law
  • 1st Law of Thermodynamics – the equivalence of work and heat, concepts of thermodynamic systems and boundaries, internal energy, enthalpy
  • and applications to non-flow and steady flow processes, an introduction to thermodynamic cycles, Bernoulli's equation
  • 2nd Law of Thermodynamics, entropy and the concept of reversibility and the Carnot cycle
  • General Thermodynamic relations (Maxwell)
  • application of thermodynamic principles to simple engine cycles (Otto, Diesel & Joule)
  • properties of vapours with specific reference to the use of the steam tables and application to simple Rankine and refrigeration cycles
  • properties of mixtures with specific reference to the measurement of humidity
  • dimensional analysis, Buckingham's theorem and derivation of some basic dimensional groups (e.g. Reynolds number and skin friction coefficient)
  • heat transfer – use of the basic laws for simple problems in conduction, convection and radiation.

Global Design Challenge

  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

In this module you can participate in the Engineers without Borders (EwB) Challenge. Interdisciplinary teams of 5 or 6 students develop design solutions from project briefs provided by EwB.

Project briefs address real-world, sustainable development projects proposed by EwB partner organisations, who are embedded in communities around the world. In this way, you are brought into contact with novel problems from real communities. You must consider both the technical and cultural dimensions of a design problem in arriving at an appropriate solution.

The module is project-based with weekly, facilitated workshop sessions and further support from EwB UK. As part of the 'Challenge', teams attend dedicated, weekly 2 hour workshop classes. During these they are expected to work through a range of structured activities, including:

  • initial choice of project brief
  • appropriate research
  • development of a design concept fulfilling the brief.

Trained project mentors facilitate the workshops to help teams through the process, ensuring they meet progress goals. Assessment is based on a short, group presentation and group portfolio put together during the workshops. The best projects may be put forward to the national EwB Challenge final.

The module is pass-fail and does not contribute to student credit.

Design for Manufacture

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

Engineers and designers alike need to think creatively in the design of solutions, often in teams, and ensure the solution:

  • can be presented 'sold' to a customer external or internal;
  • complies with any specified constraints;
  • can be manufactured, and the requirements of those manufacturing the parts/assembly can be communicated in a form that is universally understood, ie to international standards;
  • has a known cost, specifiable as a sum of all the contributing elements from design to deployment, and delivery time.

Thus the module includes:

  • the generation of design concepts, ranking and concept selection;
  • the conversion of a concept into a full specification, including detailed design, manufacturing processes and the associated tolerances (process capability);
  • full solution costing (concept to implementation) for one-off and mass production.

Implemented through:

  • combining mechanical, product design and customer requirements and brand, the project is both baanced and encourages an inter-disciplinary approach;
  • team work and project management;
  • CAD based drawings and models via CAD tools;
  • critical skills are developed by design review and evaluation.

Assessment components reflect the needs of real industrial environment, and include individual logbooks, which are to be submitted for individual assessment with the group project.

Engineering Fluid Mechanics

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2
This module covers:
  • Fundamentals: historical perspectives, fluid properties, concept of pressure
  • fluid statics: force on submerged surfaces, buoyancy
  • concepts in fluid flow behaviour:
    • motion of a fluid particle, mass continuity, laminar and turbulent flow
    • momentum equation, Navier Stokes equations for simple 2D fluid flow
    • turbulence and the time averaged equations
    • steady flow energy equation and its application
    • applications of the momentum equation to the impingement of a jet on a surface
    • application to simple wind turbine theory
  • boundary-layer theory and applications:
    • velocity profile, skin friction and form drag, dimensionless groups
    • pipe flow networks, frictional resistance of moving bodies, lift and drag on aerofoil sections
  • potential flow: stream lines and the stream function for various simple flows (and combinations), the Kutta Joukowski law
  • compressible flow: 
    • isentropic flow behaviour, total and static quantities, the speed of sound
    • normal shock wave theory
    • flow in a convergent-divergent nozzle, compressible flow in a uniform duct with friction, isothermal flow with friction, compressible flow with heat transfer
  • flow-measuring devices
  • bulk flow:
    • Venturi meter, orifice plate, rotameter, vortex and turbine flowmeters
    • Point measurement: Pitot static tube, hot wire, LDA and PIV.

Engineering Mathematics 2

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

Topics include:

  • second order differential equations, linear homogeneous, and non-homogeneous
  • initial and boundary value problems
  • laplace transforms and associated theorems
  • convolution
  • solution of ODEs via Laplace Transforms
  • the numerical solution of ODEs
  • partial differential equations
  • line, surface and volume integrals
  • theorems of Gauss and Stokes
  • Laplace's equation
  • Poisson's equation
  • wave equation
  • probability: random variables, distribution and density functions, expectations and rms
  • Central Limit Theorem
  • estimation of parameters: moment and maximum likelihood methods, confidence intervals
  • regression: least squares fit, correlation
  • quality control: acceptance sampling, reliability, failure rates, Weibull distribution.

Principles and Applications of Strength of Materials

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

This module will cover:

  • Internal forces in solids and stress and strain 
  • Biaxial stress and thin-walled pressure vessels 
  • Plane stress and the relationship between stress and strain 
  • Elastic failure criteria
  • Stress measurement
  • Beam bending theory, shear force and bending moment diagrams, stresses and deflections in bending, strain energy in bending, indeterminate beams and fundamentals of stiffness method
  • Buckling
  • Springs and strain energy in torsion 
  • Dynamic loading 
  • Thick wall cylinders and rotating discs 
  • Elementary plastic design

Computer Aided Design and Modelling

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

This module covers:

  • computer-aided design: construction of geometry in two dimensions and three dimensions and solid models
  • solid model creation, including parts thro' to assembly and engineering drawing creation
  • projection onto 2D display screen or paper hard-copy
  • tools for standard features
  • solid modelling: basic (primitive) features, combinations and modifications of features
  • production of drawings to relevant drawing standard, BS 8888 2006
  • a group design project.
  • 3D modelling and analysis
  • communication between CAD software
  • meshing
  • solvers
  • verification and validation of solutions
  • structural modelling
  • introduction to finite element analysis
  • finite element analysis software
  • case studies and application studies.

Professional and Managerial Skills

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

This module covers the technical communication, project and financial management skills, and the understanding of the importance of ethics required of professional engineers. In addition, it encourages a holistic view of the engineering degree programme and how it fits the graduate for their future career.

Teaching and learning methods include specialist lectures on technical communication and careers planning (supported by Study Direct resources and online exercises), lectures and workshops leading to a management group project based on a computer based simulation, and lectures and seminars based around case studies on the application of ethical principles.

Topics covered include:

  • technical reports and presentations
  • project planning and management
  • Gantt charts
  • financial management and control, cost management, application to projects
  • financial models and return on investment
  • risk management
  • professional ethics
  • health and safety
  • preparing CVs and career development.

Systems Analysis and Control

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

Topics include:

  • step and impulse response of first and second-order systems via Laplace transforms
  • transfer functions, block diagrams
  • polynomial and pole zero representations
  • frequency response, modelling of simple mechanical and electrical systems, simple filters
  • control objectives and feedback systems, open loop and closed loop transfer functions, use of Matlab
  • error transfer functions, steady state errors, errors to inputs and disturbances
  • pole-zero diagrams, root locus methods, bode and Nyquist diagrams
  • stability via Routh-Hurwitz and simplified Nyquist criterion, gain and phase margins
  • introduction to PID.

Thermal Power Cycles

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

The module will focus on developing the skills required to analyse heat engine performance (e.g. efficiency, power output, work and heat input) from cycle data.

  • Steam Power (Rankine) Cycle: beginning with a simple cycle and adding more refinements (feedheating, economiser etc.). Application to electrical power generation where the heat source is supplied by: i) fossil fuel and ii) nuclear fuel.
  • Reciprocating (Internal Combustion) Engine Cycles: beginning with the ideal Otto and ideal Diesel cycle and then considering the actual cycles that real engines use. The use of engine test beds to generate data for research and development.
  • Gas Turbine (Joule or Brayton) Cycle: simple, then add intercooler, heat exchanger and reheater. The use of gas turbines for aircraft propulsion (turbojet and turbofan) also the application of gas turbines to electrical power generation. Latest developments with concentrated solar energy as a heat source.
  • Cooling towers and air conditioning systems.
  • Refrigeration and heat pump analysis.
  • Hybrid systems: CHP, steam turbine with gas turbine

Business and Project Management

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 4

This module addresses wider business and project management issues that affect the technological and engineering environment. Some of these issues include:

  • principles of strategic management
  • project management and planning
  • the business environment
  • auditing and control
  • organisational structure
  • business legislation
  • resource management
  • global markets and supply
  • forecasting.

Dynamics of Machines & Vehicles

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 4

Topics include:

  • kinematic analysis in two and three dimensions
  • dynamic equations of motion for rigid bodies in two dimensions (applications toplane mechanisms)
  • equations of motion for a rigid-body in 3D
  • gyrodynamic effects on rotors
  • balancing of rotating and reciprocating machinery
  • response of linear SDOF systems to general loading (superposition)
  • discrete model types; model construction via Equilibrium/Alembert's Principle, virtual work, and Lagrange equations; discrete dynamic equations for linear MDOF systems
  • orthogonality relations for normal modes; principal coordinates
  • forced vibration analysis of systems with proportional damping
  • superposition principles and frequency response functions for damped 2-DOF systems
  • Rayleigh's principle
  • vehicle axes systems
  • basic tyre mechanics
  • vehicle traction: acceleration and braking
  • ride and handling principles
  • steering and steady-state cornering: stability and control of vehicle roll
  • crash dynamics.

Individual Project

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn & Spring Teaching, Year 4

The Individual Project in Year 3 is a major component of your degree. It builds upon all of your previous modules to explore an engineering problem in depth, in the area of your degree.

It is designed to give you experience of the full cycle of an engineering project, from initial planning to final presentation. It involves management, resourcing, planning, scheduling, documentation, and communication.

You will interact with a range of skilled people, complete work within budget and available resources, and by an agreed deadline. Your project will involve the design, development and testing of a system. It will include construction and measurement (for hardware projects) and code development and testing (for software projects). It will demand creative thinking, self-organisation and research skills.

You will typically spend 18 hours per week for two terms on the project and it is assessed by an interim report at the mid-way point, a final technical report (dissertation) and a 20-minute oral presentation. You must keep a record of your work throughout the project in a dated logbook, which is handed-in with the final report. Your project is supervised by a member of faculty, who takes on the role of technical director along with a second (minor) supervisor who provides occasional guidance and, in some cases, complimentary expertise.

Design of Mechanisms and Machines

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 4

This module covers the principles of design of machine components commonly used in mechanical engineering applications. It emphasises the role of statics, stress analysis, and materials choice in the design process.

The main types of mechanical components failure - as well as methods of prevention or prediction of such failures - are also covered.

The main aims of the module are:

  • to help you understand how stress and strain affect design of mechanical components
  • place mechanical design in the context of manufacturing processes
  • make you aware of failure, reliability and safety issues and the implications on costs of mechanical components
  • make you aware of how efficiency of machine components and environmental problems can be approached at the design stage

Heat Transfer

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 4

Fundamentals
Revision of the basic laws of and simple concepts in, conduction, convection and radiation.

Conduction
1-D steady state conduction in plane and radial geometries, heat transfer from extended surfaces. Simple time-dependent heat conduction.

Numerical Methods in Conduction
Finite difference approximations, implementation of boundary conditions, 2D steady state and 1D time dependent problems, direct and indirect solution methods.

Principles of Convection
Modes of convection, the convection coefficient and how to obtain it. Dimensionless groups, the average Nusselt number, the Reynolds analogy.

Applications of Convection
Flat plate laminar and turbulent flow, pipe flow, free convection from vertical and horizontal surfaces.

Radiation
The Stefan-Boltzmann law, radiative properties, view factors, black body and grey body analysis. Combined radiation and convection.

Engine Technology

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 4

The aims of this module are to introduce the operating principles and new technologies of various combustion engines, such as piston engine and gas turbine engine with emphasis on gasoline and diesel engines for driving road vehicles. The main contents comprise:

Introduction to the operating process including gas exchange, fuel delivery, combustion and energy release processes, pollutant formation and control, heat transfer and friction.

Analysis of engine performances including volumetric efficiency, combustion efficiency, thermal efficiency, mechanical efficiency, power output, fuel consumption and emissions.

Demonstration to subsystems (valvetrain, fuel injection, combustion system, cooling system, lubrication, turbocharging and supercharging system, ERG and aftertreatment) and their design and operating parameters.

Briefly introduction to other power plant systems for road vehicles, such as power plants for Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV), plug-in Electric Vehicle (EV), Fuel Cell Vehicle (FCV), etc.

Fundamental Computational Fluid Dynamics

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 4

Topics covered on this module include:

  • Flow governing equations
  • spatial discretisation
  • temporal discretisation
  • boundary conditions
  • turbulence modelling
  • grid generation
  • analysis of flow problems using the commercial software package ANSYS Workbench.

Electrical Drive Systems

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 4

Topics will normally include the following:

  • electrical drive systems: fundamentals (translational and rotational motion, power rating and classes of duty, 4-quadrant operation, torque/power limits, a note on closed-loop control of drives, electrical and mechanical transformers)
  • DC drives: brushed and brushless, and introduction to their control issues
  • AC motors: examples of motor drives (e.g. induction motors), and introduction to their control issues (emphasise model-based control characteristics, involving nonlinearity)
  • servomotors and stepper motors: principles and their control
  • examples of modern electrical drives in engineering applications.

Sensor Systems & Applications

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 4

Sensor technologies are evolving at a rapid pace and are core to the drive for increased energy efficiency.

You will gain a systems-level understanding of a range of technologies and the knowledge and skills required to specify and design sensor systems. You will discuss specific sensor technologies in the context of their application to a range of areas including healthcare, security, control, materials characterisation and HCI.

You will cover the following topics:

  • transducers and sensors
  • operating principles
  • low noise systems
  • signal processing, hardware & DSP
  • intelligent sensors
  • wireless sensors
  • specific sensor technologies
  • hall effect
  • magneto-resistance
  • piezoelectrics
  • electromagnetic
  • ultrasonic
  • microwave
  • solid state
  • MEMS
  • radiation sensors
  • gas, chemical and biological sensors.

Vehicle Technology

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 4

This module aims to address the current and future demand for engineers in the automotive sector to have a holistic understanding of vehicles as systems which deliver a range of capabilities from transport to safety to information to entertainment. The delivery mode will make use of hands-on interactive design/analysis/virtual engineering in computer clusters with prepared electronic worksheets/projects.

Topics to be covered will include:

  • Functional requirements (including safety, regulations, NVH, recyclability and cost) for varying segments, eg light duty, public transport (PSV), trucks, agriculture, off-highway and motor sport.
  • Subsystems: body, interior, chassis, closures, chassis, electrical, propulsion, ride and handling, NVH, ergonomics, manufacturing/supply, product planning.
  • Topical issues: hybridization (incl. PSV and not only electric), HEV energy and power management, composite materials, alternative fuels, vehicle control development and integration technologies, ICT standards and protocols.
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