Computer Science (with an industrial placement year) MComp

Computing and Digital Media

Key information

Duration:
5 years full time
Typical A-level offer:
AAB
UCAS code:
G41F
Start date:
September 2018

Computer Science at Sussex provides a rigorous professional education in computing. You can also apply for a year working in industry.

Our MComp covers the fundamental concepts of computing and their application, and includes advanced study in specialisms including artificial intelligence, digital media, IT management, and mobile systems.

You’ll graduate with deep knowledge and skills in areas that are in high demand in industry.

Accreditation

This course is accredited by BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT.

I met the enthusiastic tutors at Sussex, saw the great facilities on offer and knew this was the place for me.”Luke Whiting
Computer Science BSc 

MComp or BSc?

We also offer this course without the industrial placement year, as a three-year BSc, or as a four-year BSc with an industrial placement yearFind out about the benefits of an integrated Masters year.

Entry requirements

A-level

Typical offer

AAB

GCSEs

You will also need GCSE (or equivalent) Mathematics, with at least grade B (or grade 6 in the new grading scale).

You should also have a broad range of GCSEs (A*-C), including good grades in relevant subjects.   

Additional requirements

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Extended Project Qualification

We take the EPQ into account when considering your application and it can be useful in the summer when your results are released if you have narrowly missed the conditions of your offer. We do not routinely include the EPQ in the conditions of your offer but we sometimes offer alternative conditions that include the EPQ. If you wish to discuss this further please contact Admissions at ug.enquiries@sussex.ac.uk

Other UK qualifications

Access to HE Diploma

Typical offer

Pass the Access to HE Diploma with 45 level 3 credits at Merit or above, including 30 at Distinction.

Subjects

The Access to HE Diploma should be in Computing or Science.

GCSEs

You will also need GCSE (or equivalent) Mathematics, with at least grade B (or grade 6 in the new grading scale).

Additional requirements

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

International Baccalaureate

Typical offer

34 points overall from the full IB Diploma.

Additional requirements

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (formerly BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma)

Typical offer

DDD

Subjects

The BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma would normally be in Computing or Information Technology.

GCSEs

You will also need GCSE (or equivalent) Mathematics, with at least grade B (or grade 6 in the new grading scale).

You should also have a broad range of GCSEs (A*-C), including good grades in relevant subjects.   

Additional requirements

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Scottish Highers

Typical offer

AAABB

GCSEs

You will also need Mathematics at Standard Grade, grade 1 or 2.

Additional requirements

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced

Typical offer

Grade B and AA in two A-levels

GCSEs

You will also need GCSE (or equivalent) Mathematics, with at least grade B (or grade 6 in the new grading scale).

You should also have a broad range of GCSEs (A*-C), including good grades in relevant subjects.   

Additional requirements

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

International baccalaureate

Typical offer

34 points overall from the full IB Diploma.

Additional requirements

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

European baccalaureate

Typical offer

Overall result of at least 80%

Additional requirements

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

 

Other international qualifications

Australia

Typical offer

Relevant state (Year 12) High School Certificate, and over 85% in the ATAR or UAI/TER/ENTER. Or a Queensland OP of 5 or below.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Austria

Typical offer

Reifeprüfung or Matura with an overall result of 2.2 or better for first-year entry. A result of 2.5 or better would be considered for Foundation Year entry.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Belgium

Typical offer

Certificat d'Enseignement Secondaire Supérieur (CESS) or Diploma van Hoger Secundair Onderwijs with a good overall average. 

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Bulgaria

Typical offer

Diploma za Sredno Obrazovanie with excellent final-year scores (normally 5.5 overall with 6 in key subjects).

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Canada

Typical offer

High School Graduation Diploma. Specific requirements vary between provinces.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

China

Typical offer

We usually do not accept Senior High School Graduation for direct entry to our undergraduate courses.

However, we may consider you if you have studied one year or more of Higher Education in China at a recognised degree awarding institution, or if you are following a recognised International Foundation Year.

If you want to apply for a business-related course which requires an academic ability in Mathematics, you normally also need a grade B in Mathematics from the Huikao or a score of 90 in Mathematics from the Gaokao.

If you have the Senior High School Graduation, you may be eligible to apply for our International Foundation Year. If you successfully complete an International Foundation Year, you can progress on to a relevant undergraduate course at Sussex.

Check which qualifications the International Study Centre accepts for the International Foundation Year.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Croatia

Typical offer

Maturatna Svjedodžba with an overall score of at least 4-5 depending on your degree choice.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Cyprus

Typical offer

Apolytirion of Lykeion with an overall average of at least 18 or 19/20 will be considered for first-year entry.

A score of 15/20 in the Apolytirion would be suitable for Foundation Year entry. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Czech Republic

Typical offer

Maturita with a good overall average.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Denmark

Typical offer

Højere Forberedelseseksamen (HF) or studentereksamen with an overall average of at least 7 on the new grading scale.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Finland

Typical offer

Finnish Ylioppilastutkinto with an overall average result in the final matriculation examinations of at least 6.5.

Additional requirements

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

 

France

Typical offer

French Baccalauréat with an overall final result of at least 14/20.

Additional requirements

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

 

Germany

Typical offer

German Abitur with an overall result of 1.8 or better.

Additional requirements

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

 

Greece

Typical offer

Apolytirion with an overall average of at least 18 or 19/20 will be considered for first-year entry.

A score of 15/20 in the Apolytirion would be suitable for Foundation Year entry. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Hong Kong

Typical offer

Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education (HKDSE) with grades of 5, 4, 4 from three subjects including two electives. 

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Hungary

Typical offer

Erettsegi/Matura with a good average.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

India

Typical offer

Standard XII results from Central and Metro Boards with an overall average of 75-80%. 

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Iran

Typical offer

High School Diploma and Pre-University Certificate.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Ireland

Typical offer

Irish Leaving Certificate (Higher Level) at H1,H1,H2,H2,H3.

Additional requirements

You must also have at least grade O5 in Mathematics.

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

 

Israel

Typical offer

Bagrut, with at least 8/10 in at least six subjects, including one five-unit subject.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Italy

Typical offer

Italian Diploma di Maturità or Diploma Pass di Esame di Stato with a Final Diploma mark of at least 85/100.

Additional requirements

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Japan

Typical offer

Upper Secondary Leaving Certificate is suitable for entry to our Foundation Years. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Latvia

Typical offer

Atestats par Visparejo videjo Izglitibu with very good grades in state exams.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Lithuania

Typical offer

Brandos Atestatas including scores of 80-90% in at least three state examinations (other than English).

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Luxembourg

Typical offer

Diplôme de Fin d'Etudes Secondaires.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Malaysia

Typical offer

Sijil Tinggi Persekolahan Malaysia (STPM). As well as various two or three-year college or polytechnic certificates and diplomas.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Netherlands

Typical offer

Voorereidend Wetenschappelijk Onderwijs (VWO), normally with an average of at least 7.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Nigeria

Typical offer

You are expected to have one of the following:

  • Higher National Diploma
  • One year at a recognised Nigerian University
  • Professional Diploma (Part IV) from the Institute of Medical Laboratory Technology of Nigeria
  • Advanced Diploma

You must also have a score of C6 or above in WAEC/SSC English.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Norway

Typical offer

Norwegian Vitnemal Fra Den Videregaende Skole - Pass with an overall average of at least 4.5

Additional requirements

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Pakistan

Typical offer

Bachelor (Pass) degree in arts, commerce or science.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Poland

Typical offer

Matura with three extended-level written examinations, normally scored within the 7th stanine.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Portugal

Typical offer

Diploma de Ensino Secundario normally with an overall mark of at least 16/20. 

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Romania

Typical offer

Diploma de Bacalaureat with an overall average of 8.5-9.5 depending on your degree choice.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Singapore

Typical offer

A-levels, as well as certain certificates and diplomas.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Slovakia

Typical offer

Maturitna Skuska or Maturita with honours, normally including scores of 1 in at least three subjects.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Slovenia

Typical offer

Secondary School Leaving Diploma or Matura with at least 23 points overall.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

South Africa

Typical offer

National Senior Certificate with very good grades. 

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Spain

Typical offer

Spanish Título de Bachillerato (LOGSE) with an overall average result of at least 8.0.

Additional requirements

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Sri Lanka

Typical offer

Sri Lankan A-levels.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Sweden

Typical offer

Fullstandigt Slutbetyg with good grades.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Switzerland

Typical offer

Federal Maturity Certificate.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Turkey

Typical offer

Devlet Lise Diplomasi or Lise Bitirme is normally only suitable for Foundation Years, but very strong applicants may be considered for first year entry. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

USA

Typical offer

We look at your full profile taking into account everything you are studying. You must have your high school graduation diploma and we will be interested in your Grade 12 GPA. However, we will also want to see evidence of the external tests you have taken. Each application is looked at individually, but you should normally have one or two of the following:

  • APs (where we would expect at least three subject with 4/5 in each)
  • SAT Reasoning Tests (normally with a combined score of 1300) or ACT grades
  • and/or SAT Subject Tests (where generally we expect you to have scores of 600 or higher). 

We would normally require APs or SAT Subject Tests in areas relevant to your chosen degree course.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

My country is not listed

If your qualifications aren’t listed or you have a question about entry requirements, email ug.enquiries@sussex.ac.uk.

English language requirements

IELTS (Academic)

6.5 overall, including at least 6.0 in each component

IELTS scores are valid for two years from the test date. Your score must be valid when you begin your Sussex course. You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test.

If you are applying for degree-level study we can consider your IELTS test from any test centre, but if you require a Confirmation of Acceptance for Studies (CAS) for an English language or pre-sessional English course (not combined with a degree) the test must be taken at a UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI)-approved IELTS test centre.

Find out more about IELTS.

Other English language requirements

Proficiency tests

Cambridge Advanced Certificate in English (CAE)

For tests taken before January 2015: Grade B or above

For tests taken after January 2015: 176 overall, including at least 169 in each skill

We would normally expect the CAE test to have been taken within two years before the start of your course.

You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Cambridge English: Advanced.

Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE)

For tests taken before January 2015: grade C or above

For tests taken after January 2015: 176 overall, including at least 169 in each skill

We would normally expect the CPE test to have been taken within two years before the start of your course.

You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Cambridge English: Proficiency.

Pearson (PTE Academic)

62 overall, including at least 56 in all four skills.

PTE (Academic) scores are valid for two years from the test date. Your score must be valid when you begin your Sussex course. You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Pearson (PTE Academic).

TOEFL (iBT)

88 overall, including at least 20 in Listening, 19 in Reading, 21 in Speaking, 23 in Writing.

TOEFL (iBT) scores are valid for two years from the test date. Your score must be valid when you begin your Sussex course. You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about TOEFL (iBT).

The TOEFL Institution Code for the University of Sussex is 9166.

English language qualifications

AS/A-level (GCE)

Grade C or above in English Language.

Hong Kong Advanced Level Examination (HKALE)/ AS or A Level: grade C or above in Use of English

French Baccalaureat

A score of 12 or above in English.

GCE O-level

Grade C or above in English.

Brunei/Cambridge GCE O-level in English: grades 1-6.

Singapore/Cambridge GCE O-level in English: grades 1-6.

GCSE or IGCSE

Grade C or above in English as a First Language.

Grade B or above in English as a Second Language

German Abitur

A score of 12 or above in English.

Ghana Senior Secondary School Certificate

If awarded before 1993: grades 1-6 in English language.

If awarded between 1993 and 2005: grades A-D in English language.

Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education (HKDSE)

 Level 4, including at least 3 in each component in English Language.

Indian School Certificate (Standard XII)

The Indian School Certificate is accepted at the grades below when awarded by the following examination boards:

Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) – English Core only: 70%

Council for Indian School Certificate Examinations (CISCE) - English: 70% 

International Baccalaureate Diploma (IB)

English A or English B at grade 5 or above.

Malaysian Certificate of Education (SPM) 119/GCE O-level

If taken before the end of 2008: grades 1-5 in English Language.

If taken from 2009 onwards: grade C or above in English Language.

The qualification must be jointly awarded by the University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES).

West African Senior School Certificate

Grades 1-6 in English language when awarded by the West African Examinations Council (WAEC) or the National Examinations Council (NECO).

Country exceptions

Select to see the list of exempt English-speaking countries

If you are a national of one of the countries below, or if you have recently completed a qualification equivalent to a UK Bachelors degree or higher in one of these countries, you will normally meet our English requirements. Note that qualifications obtained by distance learning or awarded by studying outside these countries cannot be accepted for English language purposes.

You will normally be expected to have completed the qualification within two years before starting your course at Sussex. If the qualification was obtained earlier than this we would expect you to be able to demonstrate that you have maintained a good level of English, for example by living in an English-speaking country or working in an occupation that required you to use English regularly and to a high level.

Please note that this list is determined by the UK’s Home Office, not by the University of Sussex.

List of exempt countries

  • Antigua and Barbuda
  • Australia
  • Bahamas
  • Barbados
  • Belize
  • Canada**
  • Dominica
  • Grenada
  • Guyana
  • Ireland
  • Jamaica
  • New Zealand
  • St Kitts and Nevis
  • St Lucia
  • St Vincent and the Grenadines
  • Trinidad and Tobago
  • United Kingdom
  • USA

** Canada: you must be a national of Canada; other nationals not on this list who have a degree from a Canadian institution will not normally be exempt from needing to provide evidence of English.

Admissions information for applicants

Transfers into Year 2

Yes. Find out more about transferring into Year 2 of this course. We don’t accept transfers into the third or final year.

If your qualifications aren’t listed or you have a question about entry requirements, email ug.enquiries@sussex.ac.uk.

Why choose this course?

  • Focus your study on your own area of interest as our courses cover topics from artificial intelligence to human-computer interaction.
  • Make use of state-of-the-art software packages and equipment, including professional workstation-grade PCs, an HD video-editing suite and robotics hardware.
  • Study in our £12-million centre for teaching in the areas of computing, robotics, electronics and mechatronics. You'll benefit from a new student-focused hub, a suite of high-spec computers and new project workspaces.

Course information

How will I study?

Teaching is through lectures, seminars, individual and small-group supervision and computer-based practical work.

Group projects introduce you to the challenges of working in multi-person teams and carrying out large-scale technical development and implementation. We also run a peer-assisted learning scheme.

Assessment is by a combination of exams, coursework, group projects and an individual project.

You learn core skills in:

  • programming
  • algorithm design
  • mathematical foundations
  • technical communication
  • professional conduct.

Modules

These are the modules running in the academic year 2017. Modules running in 2018 may be subject to change.

Core modules

Options

How will I study?

Building on skills developed in Year 1, you focus on larger-scale technical implementation and working in a team.

You learn about the main software systems and computational tools in computing platforms. You also explore concepts such as abstraction, communication and security.

You then use these tools to design and implement application and systems software as well as digital media content.

Modules

These are the modules running in the academic year 2017. Modules running in 2018 may be subject to change.

Core modules

An industrial placement gives you the chance to spend a year working with an organisation, in an area relevant to your course, while being paid. It’s a proven way to fast-track your career.

Recent students have gone on placements at:

  • Curo Talent
  • Master of Malt
  • Feral Interactive.

You develop your technical, team-working and transferable skills, and apply what you have learnt in your studies to a business environment.

Our six-week preparation scheme helps you find, secure and succeed in your placement. Find out more about placements and internships.

“My placement’s helped me broaden my skill-set even further and given me an experience I'll never forget.” Bryan TurnerComputer Science (with an industrial placement year) BSc Software Engineer, Reed Business Information

Please note

If you’re receiving – or applying for – USA federal Direct Loan funds, you can’t undertake your placement in the USA. Find out more about American Student Loans and Federal Student Aid

How will I study?

You study a range of advanced topics in which you apply the concepts and tools you have learnt to more challenging problems, involving one or more of:

  • incomplete or uncertain knowledge about a problem
  • human users and unpredictable real-world settings
  • inconsistent or imperfect data.

You also work on an individual project of your choice, showcasing your skills, and adding to your portfolio of work.

Modules

These are the modules running in the academic year 2017. Modules running in 2018 may be subject to change.

Core modules

Options

How will I study?

In this year, you undertake a group project based on advanced study in software engineering.

You broaden and deepen your knowledge and skills through a choice of options in the areas of:

  • artificial intelligence
  • digital media
  • IT management
  • mobile systems.

Modules

These are the modules running in the academic year 2017. Modules running in 2018 may be subject to change.

Core modules

Options

“One of the great challenges in making future technologies work for society is creating interfaces that allow humans to understand and interact with complex data and processes.” Dr Kate HowlandLecturer in Interaction Design

Fees

UK/EU students:
Fees are not yet set for entry in the academic year 2018. The University intends to set fees at the maximum permitted by the UK Government (subject to continued satisfaction of the Teaching Excellence Framework). For the academic year 2017, fees were £9,250 per year.

The UK Government has confirmed that if you’re an EU student applying for entry in September 2018, you’ll pay the same fee rate as UK students for the duration of your course, even if the UK leaves the EU before the end of your course. You’ll also continue to have access to student loans and grants. Find out more on the UK Government website

Channel Islands and Isle of Man students:
The University aligns fees for Channel Islands and Isle of Man students with fees for UK/EU students. These fees are not yet set for entry in the academic year 2018. We intend to set fees at the maximum permitted by the UK Government (subject to continued satisfaction of the Teaching Excellence Framework). For the academic year 2017, fees were £9,250 per year.
International students:
£19,200 per year
Placement:
Find out about tuition fees for placements

Note that your fees may be subject to an increase on an annual basis.

Find out about typical living costs for studying at Sussex

Scholarships

Our focus is personal development and social mobility. To help you meet your ambitions to study at Sussex, we deliver one of the most generous scholarship programmes of any UK university.

Careers

Graduate destinations

92% of Informatics students were in work or further study six months after graduating. Our students have started jobs as:

  • associate designer, The Guardian
  • technical consultant, IBM
  • junior Java developer, Brandwatch.

(HESA EPI, The Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey 2015)

Your future career

IT skills are highly valued in many sectors. Your degree also provides skills in flexibility, critical thinking, problem solving and attention to detail.

Our graduates find employment in a diverse range of fields, including:

  • advertising, marketing and PR
  • banking
  • telecommunications and media production.

You benefit from our links with industry, which are as diverse as American Express, Demos (the think-tank) and the V&A Museum. Our curriculum is informed by sector experts who sit on an advisory board, ensuring that what we teach is what industry needs.

Leading companies such as Creative Assembly, IBM, Microsoft and Thales have visited recently to talk to our students.

Working while you study

Our Careers and Employability Centre can help you find part-time work while you study. Find out more about career development and part-time work

Introduction to Programming

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

The module introduces you to a collection of basic programming concepts and techniques, including:

  • designing
  • testing
  • debugging
  • documenting programmes.  

The module introduces the programming language Java, and is for both absolute beginners and those with prior computing experience. Java is a language used for other components of undergraduate modules. It will be the primary language used for programming assignments in nearly all first year modules taught by the Department of Informatics.

Mathematical Concepts

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

In this introductory mathematics module, you explore the fundamental mathematical concepts and skills needed for all Informatics degrees. You cover topics such as:

  • basic set theory
  • number systems
  • regular expressions
  • finite state automata
  • functions
  • basic calculus
  • basic linear algebra
  • proof by induction
  • an introduction to the concepts of probability theory and statistics.

Programming Concepts

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

In this module, you are introduced to algorithmic problem solving. Your studies in this module will answer the following questions:

  • what is a problem specification, an algorithm, a computation?
  • what are their properties?
  • how does one develop an algorithm?
  • how can one rigorously argue that an algorithm computes correct solutions to a given problem?
  • how can one measure the efficiency of an algorithm and the complexity of a problem?

As part of the module, you use a simple algorithmic language (pseudo code) for the sake of writing algorithms - the focus of this module is on algorithmic thinking, not coding.

In the module, you specify and develop searching, sorting and other simple (and intuitive) algorithms. You apply and explore principles like divide-and-conquer and recursive programming.

You also look at two important properties of algorithms - 'correctness' and 'complexity'.

Algorithms should only compute correct solutions of a problem. To establish correctness, you are introduced to some relevant (propositional and predicate) logic, in an informal style (focusing on logical reasoning principles rather than logical calculi).

Finally, you discuss asymptotic complexity classes and explore the concept of time complexity of an algorithm.

As part of this module, you undertake exercise classes and coursework, based on a series of examples.

The algorithms you develop in this module should be implemented in Java concurrently or at a later stage in the further programming module.

Data Structures & Algorithms

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

This module provides an introduction to data structures and algorithms for computer scientists. The module introduces a number of fundamental data structures, including arrays linked lists, stacks, queues, trees, hash tables and graphs. These are presented both abstractly, via the notion Abstract Data Types, and concretely in terms of their implementation in an object-oriented framework. The data structures are discussed and analysed in terms of efficiency of the basic operations they support and their application to program design problems. Consideration is given to important, fundamental algorithms for searching and sorting data.

Further Programming

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

This module follows on from "Introduction to Programming". It provides an introduction to more advanced programming concepts and techniques.

You cover Java programming, including:

  • use of subclasses and library classes to create well-organised programs
  • choice and implementation of appropriate algorithms and data structures (e.g. arrays, lists, trees, graphs, depth- and breadth-first search, the minimax and A* algorithms)
  • construction of graphical user interfaces for Java programs.

Global Design Challenge

  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

In this module you can participate in the Engineers without Borders (EwB) Challenge. Interdisciplinary teams of 5 or 6 students develop design solutions from project briefs provided by EwB.

Project briefs address real-world, sustainable development projects proposed by EwB partner organisations, who are embedded in communities around the world. In this way, you are brought into contact with novel problems from real communities. You must consider both the technical and cultural dimensions of a design problem in arriving at an appropriate solution.

The module is project-based with weekly, facilitated workshop sessions and further support from EwB UK. As part of the 'Challenge', teams attend dedicated, weekly 2 hour workshop classes. During these they are expected to work through a range of structured activities, including:

  • initial choice of project brief
  • appropriate research
  • development of a design concept fulfilling the brief.

Trained project mentors facilitate the workshops to help teams through the process, ensuring they meet progress goals. Assessment is based on a short, group presentation and group portfolio put together during the workshops. The best projects may be put forward to the national EwB Challenge final.

The module is pass-fail and does not contribute to student credit.

Introduction to Computer Systems

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

In this module, you are introduced to three key aspects of computer systems – storage, processing and transmission of information. You study topics including:

Storage

  • transistors and chips
  • memory architecture
  • primary and secondary storage
  • file systems.

Processing

  • logic circuits
  • CPU operation
  • machine language
  • compilers and high level languages
  • the role of operating systems.

Transmission

  • serial and parallel buses
  • interrupts
  • network layers and protocols
  • the internet.

Professional Skills

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

This module covers important professional skills in four categories: technical communication, technical and academic writing, professional conduct, and IT law. Topics include:

Technical communication skills (two lectures)

  • giving effective oral presentations
  • graphical aids for oral presentations.

Writing skills (12 lectures)

  • report writing
  • reviewing
  • correct attribution of credit and referencing.

Professional conduct (six lectures)

  • codes of professional conduct
  • computers and society, including the workplace and education
  • ethical implications of the internet, artificial intelligence, virtual reality, and emerging new technologies.

IT law (four lectures)

  • digital evidence: Information retrieval, retention and protection
  • privacy and data protection
  • contract law and employment law for IT
  • intellectual property in the IT sector.

Introduction to Multimedia

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

In this module, you develop a basic understanding of human perception and how this relates to the capture, display, storage and transmission of multimedia.

You are introduced to the technical principles and hardware underlying the capture, display, storage and transmission of:

  • sound
  • video
  • image
  • graphical-based multimedia.

The Ghost in the Machine?

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

What is mind? How can our view of ourselves as subjects with a mental life be reconciled with the non-mental, scientific accounts we have of our brains and bodies?

We will look at a number of different physicalist theories, concentrating on variants of the view that cognition is computation, and on neurophysiologically-based accounts of mind.

In doing so, we will examine some of the basic issues underlying cognitive science as an interdisciplinary study of the mind, taking in topics from psychology, neuroscience, linguistics, computing, artificial intelligence, robotics, evolutionary theory, biology and philosophy along the way.

Compilers and Computer Architecture

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

Topics on this module include:

  • low­-level versus high-­level languages
  • an introduction to language implementation techniques, compilers and interpreters, grammars and parsing
  • hardware implications, instruction set design and implementation
  • lexical analysis
  • the relevance of finite­state automata and regular grammars
  • implementation techniques
  • problems for particular languages, syntax analysis ­ overview of grammars and parsing techniques
  • top­-down and bottom­-up parsing
  • predictive parsing, shift-­reduce parsing
  • implementing hand­-coded top­-down predictive parsers
  • semantic analysis and code generation­ from trees and from flat intermediate codes
  • symbol tables
  • type checking
  • handling of specific high­-level language constructs
  • runtime storage allocation and scoping
  • instruction set consequences
  • hardware aspects of performance enhancement ­ caches, pipelining and parallelism
  • recent developments in processor design
  • code optimisation
  • introduction to flow analysis.

Databases

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

This module provides an introduction to the concepts of database software, database design, management, and programming. This includes conceptual database design (using the entity-relationship approach), logical database design and physical database design.

The module focuses on the relational data model. You will learn how to design and implement a relational database using SQL. You will also learn how to retrieve and manipulate data via SQL queries, as well as how to normalize relational databases, what normal forms there are, and how this eliminates certain anomalies based on redundancy. Security via permission rights and indexes for tuning database queries are addressed. You will learn how to write stored procedures and triggers using procedural SQL and how use Java Database Connectivity libraries (JDBC) to access databases in Java programs.

The exercise classes and coursework are based on a series of examples that help you understand the theoretical principles. Practical experience is acquired by implementing these examples in a database management system and a graphical query browser.

Natural Language Engineering

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

In this module, you are introduced to techniques and concepts involved in the analysing of text by machine - with particular emphases on various practical applications that this technology drives.

You study core, generic text processing models, such as:

  • segmentation
  • stemming
  • part-of-speech tagging
  • named entity recognition
  • phrasal chunking
  • dependency parsing.

You also cover related problems and application areas, such as:

  • document classification
  • information retrieval
  • information extraction.

As part of this, you make extensive use of the Natural Language Toolkit, which is a collection of natural language processing tools written in the Python programming language.

Program Analysis

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

This module is split into two parts:

Foundations
In the first part of the module, you are introduced to the idea of the asymptotic analysis of algorithms. In particular, you consider the following:

  • specifying a problem
  • the notion of an algorithm and what it means for an algorithm to solve a problem
  • the upper, lower and tight asymptotic bounds associated with an algorithm
  • the best-, worst- and expected-case analysis of an algorithm
  • the lower bound for a problem.

You also consider a number of important data structures, with particular emphasis on priority queues and the generic graph data structure. You look at several basic graph algorithms, in particular:

  • depth-first search of graphs
  • breadth-first search of graphs
  • topological sorting of directed acyclic graphs.

Generic Design Paradigms
In the second part of the module, you consider four of the most important methods used as the basis for algorithm design:

  • greedy methods
  • divide and conquer approaches
  • dynamic programming
  • network flow.

In considering these generic design paradigms, you look at a number of well-known problems, including:

  • interval scheduling
  • single source shortest path
  • minimum spanning tree
  • Huffman codes construction
  • weighted interval scheduling
  • subset sum
  • sequence alignment
  • network flow
  • bipartite matching.

Computer Networks

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

This module provides an introduction to the basics of packet switching technologies as used in the internet. Emphasis is placed on core Internet protocols such as IP and TCP.

Subjects covered include:

  • network access technologies
  • design of network protocols using layering
  • local area networks
  • TCP/IP routing and switching
  • and congestion control.

This module introduces the internet with a top-down view: the accent is on layer abstractions and the associated protocols (and how to program with them). Particular attention is paid to questions of network security.

Fundamentals of Machine Learning

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

In this module, you are introduced to the important field of machine learning.

You use a systematic approach, based on the following three key ingredients:

  • tasks
  • models
  • features.

You are introduced to both regression and classification, and your studies emphasise concepts such as model performance and learnability.

As part of this module, you learn techniques such as:

  • linear regression
  • single and multiple layer perceptron classification
  • kernel-based models (including RBF and SVM)
  • decision tree models and random forest
  • Naïve Bayes classification and k-means clustering.

You are also introduced to techniques for pre-processing the data (including PCA).

In this module, you adopt an example-based approach throughout.

Operating Systems

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

This module studies the system-level structures that underpin operating systems and networks.

The primary focus is on processes, showing how they contain dynamic threads and address spaces, and on understanding how both shared memory and messages can be used to communicate between processes.

Concepts covered will include:

  • process management
  • memory management
  • file systems
  • synchronisation primitives
  • communication abstractions and their implementation over packets switched networks, using TCP and IP as examples.

Particular emphasis will be on showing how to make these structures secure.

Software Engineering

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

In this module, you study large-scale software production.

Your studies emphasise the whole life-cycle of a software product, including:

  • requirement analysis
  • software architecture and design
  • implementation
  • quality assurance
  • maintenance activities.

As part of the module, you investigate social issues in software engineering such as team-structures and conflict management.

You also cover other issues, including:

  • agile software engineering methods
  • testing
  • test-driven development
  • coding practice and standards
  • design and code reviews
  • version control.

In this module, you undertake team-based coursework, which involves the production of a significant software deliverable such as an interactive gaming application

Comparative Programming

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 4

This module introduces you to the basic techniques of declarative and functional programming, using languages such as Prolog and Haskel as a practical basis. You will consider the suitability of these paradigms - and those already learnt on the course - in addressing various problems; in AI, data processing, mathematical reasoning, etc. You will consider issues including data representation, algorithm design, efficiency, clarity and tool support in comparisons between the declarative, functional and imperative paradigms. This module introduces you to the basic techniques of functional programming, using a language such as Haskell as a practical basis. Additional paradigms, such as declarative programming, are briefly introduced. The process of learning a new language and paradigm will allow you to explore the process of choosing a language based on its fit to issues and of the learning of languages. Alongside the particular issues in Haskell, we will discuss more general issues in programming languages through illustrations of various languages including Java, C, assembler, Haskell, PHP and SQL.

Human-Computer Interaction

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 4

Human computer interaction (HCI) is concerned with designing, evaluating and deploying usable, effective and enjoyable technologies in a range of contexts.

The aim of this module is to give an introduction to the key areas, approaches and developments in the field.

Topics include:

  • principles of design
  • methods for evaluating interfaces with or without user involvement
  • techniques for prototyping and implementing graphical user interfaces.

Ultimately you will be reflective practitioners, able to understand the 'tools' that you have in your user-centred design toolkit and to think constructively and analytically about the best uses, limitations and implications of using these tools to design and evaluate interactive technologies.

Web Computing

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 4

In this module, you are introduced to the models and technologies used to provide services over the Internet and, in particular, the World Wide Web.

You cover topics including:

  • XML – DTD, Schema, DOM, XPATH and XSLT
  • client-side programming – embedded scripting languages, style sheets
  • server-side programming – Java Servlets, JSP
  • applications.

Computer Science Project

  • 45 credits
  • Autumn & Spring Teaching, Year 4

This module will give you the opportunity to complete an extensive piece system design and implementation work under the supervision of a member of faculty. You will be able to chose from a range of project topics or offer a project of your own. All topics will require the application of skills and knowledge gained through previous modules of study and will you will be involved in the design and build of a technological solution to a computer science related problem (using programming, modelling, simulation tools as appropriate).

Some project topics will be available in collaboration with commerce and industry, and will enable you to experience the methods and approaches of non-academic institutions. There will be no formal lectures to attend. The teaching methods used will simply be weekly individual/small-group meetings to discuss progress.

The final year Computer Science projects should be viewed as the culmination of the degree – it gives you a chance to demonstrate all that you have learned. It will be the most demanding part of the undergraduate degree.

It is very different from most other modules as although you will be supervised, you will have to work independently to a large extent. It will be your responsibility to define the problem boundaries, to investigate possible solutions, and to present the results verbally, in writing, and to demonstrate them in action.

The results of the project will be submitted in two parts: a final report and the code of (the parts of) the produced system. You will be expected to give a presentation and demonstration of your work. The project report and presentation/demonstration are examined.

To ensure that you are on the right track, you will need to submit an interim report that describes the early phase of your project, involving a debate on professional issues, requirements analysis, and planning. This interim report is also assessed.

Limits of Computation

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 4

This module is all about fundamental questions like 'what is computable?' and 'what is feasibly computable?'. The following topics are covered: what is a universal program? What is program specialisation? (partial evaluation, also known as s-m-n theorem). What is self-application? (boot-strapping). How can it be used to speed-up programs? How can an unsolvable problem be defined using WHILE? How can this be generalised? (Rice's theorem). Are there decidable but unfeasible problems? What are typical examples? What does feasible mean? How can one measure resource-usage of (time, space, non-determinism) of WHILE programs? What are asymptotic complexity classes and what are their limitations? What do we know about existence of optimal solutions?

Advanced Natural Language Engineering

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 4

Advanced Natural Language Engineering builds on the foundations provided by the Natural Language Engineering module. You will develop your knowledge and understanding of key topics including word sense disambiguation, vector space models of semantics, named entity recognition, topic modelling and machine translation. 

Seminars will provide an opportunity to discuss research papers related to the key topics and also general issues that arise when developing natural language processing tools, including:

  • hypothesis testing
  • data smoothing techniques
  • domain adaptation
  • generative versus discriminative learning
  • semi-supervised learning 

Labs will provide the opportunity for you to improve your python programming skills, experiment with some off-the-shelf technology and develop research skills.

Multimedia Design and Applications

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 4

In this module, you develop a basic understanding of human perception and how this relates to the capture, display, storage and transmission of digital media.

Your studies in this module cover the theory and the software and hardware required for the capture, display, storage and transmission of:

  • audio
  • video
  • image
  • graphical-based digital media.

Neural Networks

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 4

To take this module you must already be able to write software in one appropriate programming language such as Java, C, Python, or Matlab. Basic knowledge of formal computational skills is also a prerequisite.

In recent years neural computing has emerged as a practical technology with applications in many fields. The majority of these applications are concerned with problems in pattern recognition, and make use of feed-­forward network architectures such as the multi­layer perceptron and the radial basis function network.

It is widely acknowledged that the successful application of neural computing requires a principled approach, and this module will use the recent advances in neural computing to explore neural networks in-depth. By concentrating on the pattern-recognition aspects of neural networks, the module will cover many important topics such as:

  • spiking neural networks
  • multi­layer perception
  • radial basis function network
  • support vector machines
  • competitive learning
  • independent component analysis.

You will also learn to use neural networks in solving real world problems.

Technology-Enhanced Learning Environments

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 4

This module aims to develop your understanding of how digital technologies can be used to facilitate learning. It covers established methods of using computers for learning before covering innovative and cutting edge applications. It focuses on theories of how people learn and looks at how these theories influence the design of learning environments.

Web 3D Applications

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 4

Through laboratory-based tuition and utilising Study Direct-based online teaching and learning materials (including slides, video, audio, demonstrations), this module will explore how 3D can be integrated into mobile web-based applications.

Technologies covered include but are not limited to:

  • 3D modelling methods for real-time rendering and associated authoring packages (e.g. 3ds Max)
  • implementation of efficient navigation and interaction methods
  • responsive web design applied to the implementation of mobile web-based 3D applications.

The main focus of this module is:

  • to gain practical experience on 3D modelling and programming (e.g. 3ds Max, X3D/VRML, X3DOM, HTML, CSS3, XML, JavaScript and associated frameworks and libraries, AJAX, JSON, PHP and SQLite)
  • to build a web mobile 3D application (an interactive 3D application that will render across desktop, tablet and mobile devices based on an MVC design pattern).

Example web mobile 3D applications may include a virtual museum, product configurator, vehicle visualisation, burglary simulation, or simple web game.

Topics in Computer Science

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 5

An introduction to some key ideas in various areas in computer science, with particular reference to research in Informatics. Discussion of appropriate research methods will arise from this, including literature search, survey and prcis; use of proofs, simulation, experiments, user studies and discussion; presentation of results with appropriate statistical measures and analysis of variables, controls. Assessment will be via a literature review and research proposal which will discuss a relevant research question for the programme, a proposed approach for investigating it and the most suitable form for the answers to take - noting any comparison with prior work. The literature review and research proposal may form an input to your dissertation, but there is no obligation in this respect.
The module will start with some generic research methods and course guidance; and a diagnostic programming exercise to assess ability (and refer students who may benefit to additional programming help) and familiarise you with Sussex's systems.

Engineering Scalable and Reliable Software Project

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn & Spring Teaching, Year 5

You study modern approaches to large-scale software production.

After a review of the key concepts in the whole life-cycle of a software product (requirement analysis, software architecture and design, implementation, quality assurance and maintenance activities), you investigate modern software engineering technology and processes, including:

  • agile project management techniques
  • version control
  • build automation
  • use of design patterns and refactoring of code to improve designs as part of an improvement process
  • testing including unit testing, system testing and continuous integration
  • design for reliability and scalability, including the use of cloud computing
  • design of systems to support mobile devices, in particular the adaptation to a range of devices
  • evolution of software products, including measurement of customer response and technical improvements
  • A/B testing
  • managing upgrades.

You will be allocated to teams of 4-5, developing a software product to an evolving brief that requires you to manage the work as a team. 

Managing Complex Projects, Products and Systems

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 5

During this module you will address three central issues:

Organisational capabilities: how organisational forms and capabilities in project management, systems integration and software engineering are essential in the design and production of CoPS. Special emphasis is given to project management capabilities.

Models of innovation: how industrial structures, product life cycles and innovation management in CoPS differ from the conventional model of innovation often based on the mass production of consumer goods.

Firm strategy: how firms are changing their strategic positions, building new service capabilities and creating customer-centric organisations to provide bundles of products and services as integrated solutions to their customer's needs.

Web Applications and Services

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 5

This module provides an introduction to the models and technologies used to provide distributed applications and services over the Internet.

You will study the features and problems of building distributed applications, such as naming, security, synchronisation, replication, object persistence and content distribution.

You will use the framework provided by the Java Enterprise Edition to build distributed web applications.

Cryptography

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 5

You will cover the following areas: 

  • symmetric-key cryptosystems
  • hash functions and message authentication codes
  • public-key cryptosystems
  • complexity theory and one-way functions
  • primality and randomised algorithms
  • random number generation
  • elliptic curve cryptography
  • attacks on cryptosystems
  • quantum cryptography
  • cryptographic standards.

E-Business and E-Commerce Systems

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 5

The module provides a theoretical and technical understanding of the major issues for existing large-scale E-Business and E-Commerce systems. Theoretical aspects include alternative E-Business strategies, marketing, branding, customer relationship issues and commercial website management. The technical part covers the standard methods for large-scale data storage, data movement, transformation, and application integration, together with the fundamentals of application architecture. Examples focus on the most recent developments in E-Business and E-Commerce distributed systems. Critical analysis of current and emerging technologies for E-Business and E-Commerce is carried out during seminars.

Managing Innovation

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 5

This module equips you with the knowledge to understand, and the skills to manage, innovation at operational and strategic levels. The management of innovation is inherently interdisciplinary and multi-functional, so we aim here to provide you with an integrative approach to the management of innovation. Specifically, we aim to integrate the management of market, technological and organisational change to improve the competitiveness of firms and effectiveness of other organisations. You will explore the argument that the process of innovation management is essentially generic, although organisation, technological and market specific factors will constrain choices and actions.

Marketing Analysis and Financial Strategic Planning

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 5

This module will cover:

  • developing marketing strategy, market planning and control
  • marketing research
  • behavioural concepts, marketing decision making
  • marketing communication and sales strategy
  • environmental consideration
  • marketing ethics
  • legal control and European/International influences costs of funds
  • source of funds
  • capital structures and CAPM
  • business expansion
  • working capital management including cash management
  • dividends and dividend decisions
  • corporate planning and financial control
  • investment appraisal
  • the stock exchange and its efficiency
  • preparing a project and being able to persuade company managers of how marketing and financial planning assist strategic decisions.

Mathematics and Computational Methods for Complex Systems

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 5

This module provides a foundation in mathematical and scientific computing techniques used widely in artificial intelligence, artificial life and related fields. The material covered in this module will facilitate the study of a number of options on other MSc courses at a deeper level than would be possible without it. In particular, it is a prerequisite for the Neural Networks and Computational Neuroscience modules. Coursework is based around Matlab packages.

Topics include:

  • vectors and matrices
  • differential calculus
  • numerical integration
  • probability and hypothesis testing
  • dynamical systems theory.

Mobile Communications

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 5

The aim of the module is to introduce the fundamental principles of mobile communications and provide you with up-to-date knowledge and skills that are important in the design of mobile communication systems.

The following topics will be covered:

  • overview of mobile communication systems
  • cellular mobile communications concept
  • mobile radio channel and mitigation
  • digital modulation
  • spread spectrum
  • multicarrier
  • diversity, Multiple-input Multiple-output (MIMO)
  • multiple access techniques
  • wireless Local Area Network (WLAN)
  • medium access control
  • research project and simulation work using MATLAB software tools.

Real Time Embedded Systems

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 5

The module covers:

  • microcontroller-based real-time systems
  • architectures and structures
  • task structures and synchronisation
  • real-time, deterministic applications
  • multitasking management
  • communications between tasks
  • examples of 8-bit and 16-bit controllers
  • examples and case study of CAN/FlexRay/TTP.

Adaptive Systems

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 5

You gain an understanding of various adaptive processes occurring in both the animal and physical worlds and are equipped with the theoretical and practical tools to study and develop such adaptive mechanisms.

You study key concepts including:

  • cybernetics
  • control theory
  • self-organisation
  • autonomous robotics
  • evolutionary and developmental robotics
  • dynamical systems approaches to embodied cognition.

It provides you with an opportunity to gain implementation-level familiarity with a variety of adaptive algorithms and techniques and how to apply them in problem solving and biological modelling.

You will gain sufficient experience of using such techniques in a programming project containing structural elements of a research project (hypotheses, extension of previous work, or novel applications).

Image Processing

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 5
You will cover topics including:
  • introduction to machine vision and relation to image processing
  • camera technologies, lenses for machine vision, image formation and resolution, display technologies
  • image acquisition hardware
  • histogram manipulations
  • linear invariant systems in two dimensions
  • the convolution operation and its discrete implementation as mask operators
  • first and second order differential edge detection operators, edge-filling techniques, Hough transform
  • the 2D Fourier transform and frequency domain filters, 2D correlation 
  • scene segmentation methods and region filling
  • pattern recognition techniques, shape descriptors, Fourier descriptors, template matching
  • examples of machine vision systems in industry.

Intelligent Systems Techniques

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 5

This module will introduce you to the range of knowledge representation techniques used in contemporary Artificial Intelligence, and give you an understanding of their various strengths and weaknesses.

Mobile 3D Applications

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 5

Through laboratory-based tuition and utilising Study Direct-based online teaching and learning materials (including slides, video, audio, demonstrations), this module will explore how 3D can be integrated into mobile web-based applications.

Technologies covered include but are not limited to:

  • 3D modelling methods for real-time rendering and associated authoring packages (e.g. 3ds Max)
  • implementation of efficient navigation and interaction methods
  • responsive web design applied to the implementation of mobile web-based 3D applications.

The main focus of this module is to gain practical experience on 3D modelling and programming (e.g. 3ds Max, X3D/VRML, X3DOM, HTML, CSS3, XML, JavaScript (and associated frameworks and libraries), AJAX, JSON, PHP and SQLite) to build a web mobile 3D application (an interactive 3D application that will render across desktop, tablet and mobile devices based on an MVC design pattern).

Example web mobile 3D applications may include: a virtual museum, product configurator, vehicle visualisation, burglary simulation, or a simple web game.

Multimedia Design and Applications

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 5

You will examine how modern computing systems manage, deliver and present multimedia such as audio, video, and interactive grapics. Topics that you will study include:

  • information coding
  • multimedia hardware
  • networked multimedia
  • ergonomics
  • interface design
  • multimedia applications.

Technology-Enhanced Learning Environments

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 5

This module emphasises learner-centred approaches to the design of educational and training systems. The module content will reflect current developments in learning theory, skill development, information representation and how individuals differ in terms of learning style. There is a practical component, which will relate theories of learning and knowledge representation to design and evaluation.

You will explore the history of educational systems, as well as issues relating to:

  • intelligent tutoring systems
  • computer-based training
  • simulation and modelling environments
  • programming languages for learners
  • virtual reality in education and training
  • training agents
  • computer-supported collaborative learning.
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