Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence (with an industrial placement year) BSc

Computing and Digital Media

Key information

Duration:
4 years full time
Typical A-level offer:
AAB-ABB
UCAS code:
G42F
Start date:
September 2018

Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence at Sussex explores the scientific basis of intelligence in animals and machines.

The course covers the fundamentals of computer science, the principles of adaptive behaviour and intelligent systems, and their applications. You can also apply for a year working in industry.

You can shape your degree to suit your interests, specialising either in technology or in cognitive science – the interdisciplinary study of intelligence and mind.

The range of modules has offered an introduction to many areas of the subject, giving me confidence and skills.”Joshua Allwood
Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence BSc 

Entry requirements

A-level

Typical offer

AAB-ABB

GCSEs

You will also need GCSE (or equivalent) Mathematics, with at least grade B (or grade 6 in the new grading scale).

You should also have a broad range of GCSEs (A*-C), including good grades in relevant subjects.   

Additional requirements

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Other UK qualifications

Access to HE Diploma

Typical offer

Pass the Access to HE Diploma with 45 level 3 credits at Merit or above, including 24 at Distinction.

Subjects

The Access to HE Diploma should be in Computing or Science.

GCSEs

You will also need GCSE (or equivalent) Mathematics, with at least grade B (or grade 6 in the new grading scale).

Additional requirements

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

International Baccalaureate

Typical offer

32 points overall from the full IB Diploma.       

Additional requirements

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (formerly BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma)

Typical offer

DDD

Subjects

The BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma would normally be in Computing or Information Technology.

GCSEs

You will also need GCSE (or equivalent) Mathematics, with at least grade B (or grade 6 in the new grading scale).

You should also have a broad range of GCSEs (A*-C), including good grades in relevant subjects.   

Y

Additional requirements

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Scottish Highers

Typical offer

AABBB

GCSEs

You will also need Mathematics at Standard Grade, grade 1 or 2.

Additional requirements

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced

Typical offer

Grade B and AB in two A-levels.

GCSEs

You will also need GCSE (or equivalent) Mathematics, with at least grade B (or grade 6 in the new grading scale).

You should also have a broad range of GCSEs (A*-C), including good grades in relevant subjects.   

Additional requirements

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

International baccalaureate

Typical offer

32 points overall from the full IB Diploma.       

Additional requirements

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

European baccalaureate

Typical offer

Overall result of at least 77%

Additional requirements

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Other international qualifications

Australia

Typical offer

Relevant state (Year 12) High School Certificate, and over 85% in the ATAR or UAI/TER/ENTER. Or a Queensland OP of 5 or below.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Austria

Typical offer

Reifeprüfung or Matura with an overall result of 2.2 or better for first-year entry. A result of 2.5 or better would be considered for Foundation Year entry.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Belgium

Typical offer

Certificat d'Enseignement Secondaire Supérieur (CESS) or Diploma van Hoger Secundair Onderwijs with a good overall average. 

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Bulgaria

Typical offer

Diploma za Sredno Obrazovanie with excellent final-year scores (normally 5.5 overall with 6 in key subjects).

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Canada

Typical offer

High School Graduation Diploma. Specific requirements vary between provinces.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

China

Typical offer

We usually do not accept Senior High School Graduation for direct entry to our undergraduate courses. However, we do consider applicants who have studied 1 or more years of Higher Education in China at a recognised degree awarding institution or who are following a recognised International Foundation Year.

If you are interested in applying for a course which requires an academic ability in Mathematics, such as a Business related course, you will normally also need a grade B in Mathematics from the Huikao or a score of 90 in Mathematics from the Gaokao.

Applicants who have the Senior High School Graduation may be eligible to apply to our International Foundation Year, which if you complete successfully you can progress on to a relevant undergraduate course at Sussex. You can find more information about the qualifications which are accepted by our International Study Centre at  http://isc.sussex.ac.uk/entry-requirements/international-foundation-year .

 

 

 

 

 

 

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Croatia

Typical offer

Maturatna Svjedodžba with an overall score of at least 4-5 depending on your degree choice.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Cyprus

Typical offer

Apolytirion of Lykeion with an overall average of at least 18 or 19/20 will be considered for first-year entry.

A score of 15/20 in the Apolytirion would be suitable for Foundation Year entry. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Czech Republic

Typical offer

Maturita with a good overall average.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Denmark

Typical offer

Højere Forberedelseseksamen (HF) or studentereksamen with an overall average of at least 7 on the new grading scale.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Finland

Typical offer

Finnish Ylioppilastutkinto with an overall average result in the final matriculation examinations of at least 6.0.

Additional requirements

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

France

Typical offer

French Baccalauréat with an overall final result of at least 13/20.

Additional requirements

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Germany

Typical offer

German Abitur with an overall result of 2.0 or better.

Additional requirements

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Greece

Typical offer

Apolytirion with an overall average of at least 18 or 19/20 will be considered for first-year entry.

A score of 15/20 in the Apolytirion would be suitable for Foundation Year entry. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Hong Kong

Typical offer

Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education (HKDSE) with grades of 5, 4, 4 from three subjects including two electives. 

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Hungary

Typical offer

Erettsegi/Matura with a good average.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

India

Typical offer

Standard XII results from Central and Metro Boards with an overall average of 75-80%. 

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Iran

Typical offer

High School Diploma and Pre-University Certificate.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Ireland

Typical offer

Irish Leaving Certificate (Higher Level) at H1,H2,H2,H3,H3.

Additional requirements

You must also have at least grade O5 in Mathematics.

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Israel

Typical offer

Bagrut, with at least 8/10 in at least six subjects, including one five-unit subject.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Italy

Typical offer

Italian Diploma di Maturità or Diploma Pass di Esame di Stato with a Final Diploma mark of at least 81/100.

Additional requirements

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Japan

Typical offer

Upper Secondary Leaving Certificate is suitable for entry to our Foundation Years. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Latvia

Typical offer

Atestats par Visparejo videjo Izglitibu with very good grades in state exams.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Lithuania

Typical offer

Brandos Atestatas including scores of 80-90% in at least three state examinations (other than English).

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Luxembourg

Typical offer

Diplôme de Fin d'Etudes Secondaires.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Malaysia

Typical offer

Sijil Tinggi Persekolahan Malaysia (STPM). As well as various two or three-year college or polytechnic certificates and diplomas.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Netherlands

Typical offer

Voorereidend Wetenschappelijk Onderwijs (VWO), normally with an average of at least 7.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Nigeria

Typical offer

You are expected to have one of the following:

  • Higher National Diploma
  • One year at a recognised Nigerian University
  • Professional Diploma (Part IV) from the Institute of Medical Laboratory Technology of Nigeria
  • Advanced Diploma

You must also have a score of C6 or above in WAEC/SSC English.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Norway

Typical offer

Norwegian Vitnemal Fra Den Videregaende Skole - Pass with an overall average of at least 4.

Additional requirements

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Pakistan

Typical offer

Bachelor (Pass) degree in arts, commerce or science.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Poland

Typical offer

Matura with three extended-level written examinations, normally scored within the 7th stanine.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Portugal

Typical offer

Diploma de Ensino Secundario normally with an overall mark of at least 16/20. 

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Romania

Typical offer

Diploma de Bacalaureat with an overall average of 8.5-9.5 depending on your degree choice.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Singapore

Typical offer

A-levels, as well as certain certificates and diplomas.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Slovakia

Typical offer

Maturitna Skuska or Maturita with honours, normally including scores of 1 in at least three subjects.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Slovenia

Typical offer

Secondary School Leaving Diploma or Matura with at least 23 points overall.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

South Africa

Typical offer

National Senior Certificate with very good grades. 

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Spain

Typical offer

Spanish Título de Bachillerato (LOGSE) with an overall average result of at least 8.0.

Additional requirements

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Sri Lanka

Typical offer

Sri Lankan A-levels.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Sweden

Typical offer

Fullstandigt Slutbetyg with good grades.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Switzerland

Typical offer

Federal Maturity Certificate.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Turkey

Typical offer

Devlet Lise Diplomasi or Lise Bitirme is normally only suitable for Foundation Years, but very strong applicants may be considered for first year entry. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

USA

Typical offer

We look at your full profile taking into account everything you are studying. You must have your high school graduation diploma and we will be interested in your Grade 12 GPA. However, we will also want to see evidence of the external tests you have taken. Each application is looked at individually, but you should normally have one or two of the following:

  • APs (where we would expect at least three subject with 4/5 in each)
  • SAT Reasoning Tests (normally with a combined score of 1300) or ACT grades
  • and/or SAT Subject Tests (where generally we expect you to have scores of 600 or higher). 

We would normally require APs or SAT Subject Tests in areas relevant to your chosen degree course.

Subject-specific knowledge

We do not expect applicants to have previous programming experience. We encourage applications from anyone who enjoys the challenges of problem-solving and relishes the potential of new technology.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

My country is not listed

If your qualifications aren’t listed or you have a question about entry requirements, email ug.enquiries@sussex.ac.uk.

English language requirements

IELTS (Academic)

6.5 overall, including at least 6.0 in each component

IELTS scores are valid for two years from the test date. Your score must be valid when you begin your Sussex course. You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test.

If you are applying for degree-level study we can consider your IELTS test from any test centre, but if you require a Confirmation of Acceptance for Studies (CAS) for an English language or pre-sessional English course (not combined with a degree) the test must be taken at a UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI)-approved IELTS test centre.

Find out more about IELTS.

Other English language requirements

Proficiency tests

Cambridge Advanced Certificate in English (CAE)

For tests taken before January 2015: Grade B or above

For tests taken after January 2015: 176 overall, including at least 169 in each skill

We would normally expect the CAE test to have been taken within two years before the start of your course.

You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Cambridge English: Advanced.

Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE)

For tests taken before January 2015: grade C or above

For tests taken after January 2015: 176 overall, including at least 169 in each skill

We would normally expect the CPE test to have been taken within two years before the start of your course.

You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Cambridge English: Proficiency.

Pearson (PTE Academic)

62 overall, including at least 56 in all four skills.

PTE (Academic) scores are valid for two years from the test date. Your score must be valid when you begin your Sussex course. You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Pearson (PTE Academic).

TOEFL (iBT)

88 overall, including at least 20 in Listening, 19 in Reading, 21 in Speaking, 23 in Writing.

TOEFL (iBT) scores are valid for two years from the test date. Your score must be valid when you begin your Sussex course. You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about TOEFL (iBT).

The TOEFL Institution Code for the University of Sussex is 9166.

English language qualifications

AS/A-level (GCE)

Grade C or above in English Language.

Hong Kong Advanced Level Examination (HKALE)/ AS or A Level: grade C or above in Use of English

French Baccalaureat

A score of 12 or above in English.

GCE O-level

Grade C or above in English.

Brunei/Cambridge GCE O-level in English: grades 1-6.

Singapore/Cambridge GCE O-level in English: grades 1-6.

GCSE or IGCSE

Grade C or above in English as a First Language.

Grade B or above in English as a Second Language

German Abitur

A score of 12 or above in English.

Ghana Senior Secondary School Certificate

If awarded before 1993: grades 1-6 in English language.

If awarded between 1993 and 2005: grades A-D in English language.

Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education (HKDSE)

 Level 4, including at least 3 in each component in English Language.

Indian School Certificate (Standard XII)

The Indian School Certificate is accepted at the grades below when awarded by the following examination boards:

Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) – English Core only: 70%

Council for Indian School Certificate Examinations (CISCE) - English: 70% 

International Baccalaureate Diploma (IB)

English A or English B at grade 5 or above.

Malaysian Certificate of Education (SPM) 119/GCE O-level

If taken before the end of 2008: grades 1-5 in English Language.

If taken from 2009 onwards: grade C or above in English Language.

The qualification must be jointly awarded by the University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES).

West African Senior School Certificate

Grades 1-6 in English language when awarded by the West African Examinations Council (WAEC) or the National Examinations Council (NECO).

Country exceptions

Select to see the list of exempt English-speaking countries

If you are a national of one of the countries below, or if you have recently completed a qualification equivalent to a UK Bachelors degree or higher in one of these countries, you will normally meet our English requirements. Note that qualifications obtained by distance learning or awarded by studying outside these countries cannot be accepted for English language purposes.

You will normally be expected to have completed the qualification within two years before starting your course at Sussex. If the qualification was obtained earlier than this we would expect you to be able to demonstrate that you have maintained a good level of English, for example by living in an English-speaking country or working in an occupation that required you to use English regularly and to a high level.

Please note that this list is determined by the UK’s Home Office, not by the University of Sussex.

List of exempt countries

  • Antigua and Barbuda
  • Australia
  • Bahamas
  • Barbados
  • Belize
  • Canada**
  • Dominica
  • Grenada
  • Guyana
  • Ireland
  • Jamaica
  • New Zealand
  • St Kitts and Nevis
  • St Lucia
  • St Vincent and the Grenadines
  • Trinidad and Tobago
  • United Kingdom
  • USA

** Canada: you must be a national of Canada; other nationals not on this list who have a degree from a Canadian institution will not normally be exempt from needing to provide evidence of English.

Admissions information for applicants

Transfers into Year 2

Yes. Find out more about transferring into Year 2 of this course. We don’t accept transfers into the third or final year.

If your qualifications aren’t listed or you have a question about entry requirements, email ug.enquiries@sussex.ac.uk.

Why choose this course?

  • Focus your study on your own area of interest as our courses – accredited by BCS, the Chartered Institute for IT – cover topics from artificial intelligence to human-computer interaction.
  • Make use of state-of-the-art software packages and equipment, including professional workstation-grade PCs, an HD video-editing suite and robotics hardware.
  • Study in our £12-million centre for teaching in the areas of computing, robotics, electronics and mechatronics. You'll benefit from a new student-focused hub, a suite of high-spec computers and new project workspaces.

Course information

How will I study?

Teaching is through lectures, seminars, individual and small-group supervision and computer-based practical work.

Group projects introduce you to the challenges of working in multi-person teams and carrying out large-scale technical development and implementation. We also run a peer-assisted learning scheme.

Assessment is by a combination of exams, coursework, group projects and an individual project.

You learn core skills in:

  • programming
  • algorithm design
  • mathematical foundations
  • technical communication
  • professional conduct.

Modules

These are the modules running in the academic year 2016. Modules running in 2018 may be subject to change.

Core modules

Options


Customise your course

Our courses are designed to broaden your horizons and give you the skills and experience necessary to have the sort of career that has an impact.

Gain programming skills and apply them to areas such as digital media, business and interactive design. Find out about our Year in Computing

How will I study?

Building on skills developed in Year 1, you focus on larger-scale technical implementation and working in a team.

You learn about the main software systems and computational tools in computing platforms, and about concepts such as abstraction, communication and security.

You then use these tools to design and implement application and systems software as well as digital media content.

Modules

These are the modules running in the academic year 2016. Modules running in 2018 may be subject to change.

Core modules

Options


Customise your course

Our courses are designed to broaden your horizons and give you the skills and experience necessary to have the sort of career that has an impact.

Gain programming skills and apply them to areas such as digital media, business and interactive design. Find out about our Year in Computing

An industrial placement gives you the chance to spend a year working with an organisation, in an area relevant to your course, while being paid. It’s a proven way to fast-track your career.

Recent students have gone on placements at:

  • Crunch
  • BMW Group – Rolls Royce Motor Cars
  • Brandwatch.

You develop your technical, team-working and transferable skills, and apply what you have learnt in your studies to a business environment.

Our six-week preparation scheme helps you find, secure and succeed in your placement. Find out more about placements and internships.

“After one year I was already up to date with most practices and technologies used in the web development universe.” Radu LupescuComputer Science and Artificial Intelligence BSc
Associate Developer, Estates Gazette (RBI Group)

How will I study?

You study a range of advanced topics in which you apply the concepts and tools you have learnt to more challenging problems, involving one or more of:

  • incomplete or uncertain knowledge about a problem
  • human users and unpredictable real-world settings
  • inconsistent or imperfect data.

You also work on an individual project of your choice, showcasing your skills, and adding to your portfolio of work.

Modules

These are the modules running in the academic year 2016. Modules running in 2018 may be subject to change.

Core modules

Options

 

“The world we live in is governed by automated systems run by software. This is as fascinating as it is challenging.” Bernhard ReusSenior Lecturer in Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence

Fees

Fees are not yet set for entry in the academic year 2018. Note that your fees, once they’re set, may be subject to an increase on an annual basis.

The UK Government has confirmed that, if you’re an EU student applying for entry in the academic year 2018, you'll remain eligible for financial support. This applies even if your course ends after the UK’s exit from the EU. Find out more on the UK Government website.

Find out about typical living costs for studying at Sussex

Scholarships

Details of our scholarships are not yet set for entry in the academic year 2018.

Careers

Graduate destinations

92% of Informatics students were in work or further study six months after graduating. Recent graduates have started jobs as:

  • IT consultant, Automation Consultants Ltd
  • software engineer, L3 
  • web developer, Analog Republic.

(HESA EPI, The Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey 2015)

Your future career

IT skills are highly valued in many sectors. Your degree also provides skills in flexibility, critical thinking, problem solving and attention to detail.

Our graduates find employment in a diverse range of fields, including:

  • advertising, marketing and PR
  • banking
  • telecommunications and media production.

You benefit from our links with industry, which are as diverse as American Express, Demos (the think-tank) and the V&A Museum. Our curriculum is informed by sector experts who sit on an advisory board, ensuring that what we teach is what industry needs.

Leading companies such as Creative Assembly, IBM, Microsoft and Thales have visited recently to talk to our students.

Working while you study

Our Careers and Employability Centre can help you find part-time work while you study. Find out more about career development and part-time work

I developed a strong technical understanding, which helped me to secure a place on the American Express Technologies Graduate Programme.”Chris Young
Senior Programmer Analyst, American Express 

Data Structures & Algorithms

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

This module provides an introduction to data structures and algorithms for computer scientists. The module introduces a number of fundamental data structures, including arrays linked lists, stacks, queues, trees, hash tables and graphs. These are presented both abstractly, via the notion Abstract Data Types, and concretely in terms of their implementation in an object-oriented framework. The data structures are discussed and analysed in terms of efficiency of the basic operations they support and their application to program design problems. Consideration is given to important, fundamental algorithms for searching and sorting data.

Further Programming

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

This module follows on from "Introduction to Programming". It provides an introduction to more advanced programming concepts and techniques.

You cover Java programming, including:

  • use of subclasses and library classes to create well-organised programs
  • choice and implementation of appropriate algorithms and data structures (e.g. arrays, lists, trees, graphs, depth- and breadth-first search, the minimax and A* algorithms)
  • construction of graphical user interfaces for Java programs.

Global Design Challenge

  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

In this module you can participate in the Engineers without Borders (EwB) Challenge. Interdisciplinary teams of 5 or 6 students develop design solutions from project briefs provided by EwB.

Project briefs address real-world, sustainable development projects proposed by EwB partner organisations, who are embedded in communities around the world. In this way, you are brought into contact with novel problems from real communities. You must consider both the technical and cultural dimensions of a design problem in arriving at an appropriate solution.

The module is project-based with weekly, facilitated workshop sessions and further support from EwB UK. As part of the 'Challenge', teams attend dedicated, weekly 2 hour workshop classes. During these they are expected to work through a range of structured activities, including:

  • initial choice of project brief
  • appropriate research
  • development of a design concept fulfilling the brief.

Trained project mentors facilitate the workshops to help teams through the process, ensuring they meet progress goals. Assessment is based on a short, group presentation and group portfolio put together during the workshops. The best projects may be put forward to the national EwB Challenge final.

The module is pass-fail and does not contribute to student credit.

Introduction to Programming

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

The module introduces you to a collection of basic programming concepts and techniques, including:

  • designing
  • testing
  • debugging
  • documenting programmes.  

The module introduces the programming language Java, and is for both absolute beginners and those with prior computing experience. Java is a language used for other components of undergraduate modules. It will be the primary language used for programming assignments in nearly all first year modules taught by the Department of Informatics.

Mathematical Concepts

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

In this introductory mathematics module, you explore the fundamental mathematical concepts and skills needed for all Informatics degrees.

In this module, you cover topics such as:

  • basic set theory
  • number systems
  • regular expressions
  • finite state automata
  • functions
  • basic calculus
  • basic linear algebra
  • proof by induction
  • an introduction to the concepts of probability theory and statistics.

Professional Skills

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

This module covers important professional skills in four categories: technical communication, technical and academic writing, professional conduct, and IT law. Topics include:

Technical communication skills (two lectures)

  • giving effective oral presentations
  • graphical aids for oral presentations.

Writing skills (12 lectures)

  • report writing
  • reviewing
  • correct attribution of credit and referencing.

Professional conduct (six lectures)

  • codes of professional conduct
  • computers and society, including the workplace and education
  • ethical implications of the internet, artificial intelligence, virtual reality, and emerging new technologies.

IT law (four lectures)

  • digital evidence: Information retrieval, retention and protection
  • privacy and data protection
  • contract law and employment law for IT
  • intellectual property in the IT sector.

Programming Concepts

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

In this module, you are introduced to algorithmic problem solving. Your studies in this module will answer the following questions:

  • what is a problem specification, an algorithm, a computation?
  • what are their properties?
  • how does one develop an algorithm?
  • how can one rigorously argue that an algorithm computes correct solutions to a given problem?
  • how can one measure the efficiency of an algorithm and the complexity of a problem?

As part of the module, you use a simple algorithmic language (pseudo code) for the sake of writing algorithms - the focus of this module is on algorithmic thinking, not coding.

In the module, you specify and develop searching, sorting and other simple (and intuitive) algorithms. You apply and explore principles like divide-and-conquer and recursive programming.

You also look at two important properties of algorithms - 'correctness' and 'complexity'.

Algorithms should only compute correct solutions of a problem. To establish correctness, you are introduced to some relevant (propositional and predicate) logic, in an informal style (focusing on logical reasoning principles rather than logical calculi).

Finally, you discuss asymptotic complexity classes and explore the concept of time complexity of an algorithm.

As part of this module, you undertake exercise classes and coursework, based on a series of examples.

The algorithms you develop in this module should be implemented in Java concurrently or at a later stage in the further programming module.

The Ghost in the Machine?

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

What is mind? How can our view of ourselves as subjects with a mental life be reconciled with the non-mental, scientific accounts we have of our brains and bodies?

We will look at a number of different physicalist theories, concentrating on variants of the view that cognition is computation, and on neurophysiologically-based accounts of mind.

In doing so, we will examine some of the basic issues underlying cognitive science as an interdisciplinary study of the mind, taking in topics from psychology, neuroscience, linguistics, computing, artificial intelligence, robotics, evolutionary theory, biology and philosophy along the way.

Introduction to Computer Systems

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

In this module, you are introduced to three key aspects of computer systems – storage, processing and transmission of information. You study topics including:

Storage

  • transistors and chips
  • memory architecture
  • primary and secondary storage
  • file systems.

Processing

  • logic circuits
  • CPU operation
  • machine language
  • compilers and high level languages
  • the role of operating systems.

Transmission

  • serial and parallel buses
  • interrupts
  • network layers and protocols
  • the internet.

Neuroscience and Behaviour

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

The module deals with nervous and hormonal bases for sensory perception and behavioural action by humans and other animals.

You will be introduced to the basic components of the nervous systems: neurons, synapses and neurotransmitters, and learn how neurons transmit signals and processes information. You will also cover specialisation of the cerebral cortex, looking at lateralisation and language, as well as sensory processing and perception, exemplified by the visual pathway from the eye to specialised feature detectors in the cortex. Finally, lectures on feeding deal with neural and hormonal controls in behaviour.

Acquired Intelligence & Adaptive Behaviour

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

We take Acquired Intelligence and Adaptive Behaviour (AIAB) as a paradigm (similar to 'Artificial Life' or 'New-wave AI') exemplified by situated, embodied approaches to the study of intelligence and robotics.

Topics covered will include: evolutionary (genetic) algorithms, the study and exploitation of emergence in complex systems, simulated and real world robotics, and active perception.

AIAB is introduced scientifically and also in terms of practical uses.

Computer Vision

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

The module introduces the field of computer vision and its relation to research on natural vision systems. Topics include: the functions of vision; finding image structure; the determination and representation of 3-D surface shape; visual motion; object recognition; active vision. The module emphasises practical techniques and you will be introduced to a suitable software package.

Databases

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

This module provides an introduction to the concepts of database software, database design, management, and programming. This includes conceptual database design (using the entity-relationship approach), logical database design and physical database design.

The module focuses on the relational data model. You will learn how to design and implement a relational database using SQL. You will also learn how to retrieve and manipulate data via SQL queries, as well as how to normalize relational databases, what normal forms there are, and how this eliminates certain anomalies based on redundancy. Security via permission rights and indexes for tuning database queries are addressed. You will learn how to write stored procedures and triggers using procedural SQL and how use Java Database Connectivity libraries (JDBC) to access databases in Java programs.

The exercise classes and coursework are based on a series of examples that help you understand the theoretical principles. Practical experience is acquired by implementing these examples in a database management system and a graphical query browser.

Fundamentals of Machine Learning

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

In this module, you are introduced to the important field of machine learning.

You use a systematic approach, based on the following three key ingredients:

  • tasks
  • models
  • features.

You are introduced to both regression and classification, and your studies emphasise concepts such as model performance and learnability.

As part of this module, you learn techniques such as:

  • linear regression
  • single and multiple layer perceptron classification
  • kernel-based models (including RBF and SVM)
  • decision tree models and random forest
  • Naïve Bayes classification and k-means clustering.

You are also introduced to techniques for pre-processing the data (including PCA).

In this module, you adopt an example-based approach throughout.

Natural Language Engineering

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

In this module, you are introduced to techniques and concepts involved in the analysing of text by machine - with particular emphases on various practical applications that this technology drives.

You study core, generic text processing models, such as:

  • segmentation
  • stemming
  • part-of-speech tagging
  • named entity recognition
  • phrasal chunking
  • dependency parsing.

You also cover related problems and application areas, such as:

  • document classification
  • information retrieval
  • information extraction.

As part of this, you make extensive use of the Natural Language Toolkit, which is a collection of natural language processing tools written in the Python programming language.

Program Analysis

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

This module is split into two parts:

Foundations
In the first part of the module, you are introduced to the idea of the asymptotic analysis of algorithms. In particular, you consider the following:

  • specifying a problem
  • the notion of an algorithm and what it means for an algorithm to solve a problem
  • the upper, lower and tight asymptotic bounds associated with an algorithm
  • the best-, worst- and expected-case analysis of an algorithm
  • the lower bound for a problem.

You also consider a number of important data structures, with particular emphasis on priority queues and the generic graph data structure. You look at several basic graph algorithms, in particular:

  • depth-first search of graphs
  • breadth-first search of graphs
  • topological sorting of directed acyclic graphs.

Generic Design Paradigms
In the second part of the module, you consider four of the most important methods used as the basis for algorithm design:

  • greedy methods
  • divide and conquer approaches
  • dynamic programming
  • network flow.

In considering these generic design paradigms, you look at a number of well-known problems, including:

  • interval scheduling
  • single source shortest path
  • minimum spanning tree
  • Huffman codes construction
  • weighted interval scheduling
  • subset sum
  • sequence alignment
  • network flow
  • bipartite matching.

Brain and Behaviour

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

This module provides an introduction to brain mechanisms and behaviour. Topics covered will normally include:

  • Ionic mechanisms underlying the nerve action potential
  • Synapses and neurotransmission
  • Neuropharmacology of commonly used antidepressant and anxiolytic drugs
  • Functional neuroanatomy of the human brain
  • Brain development and neurogenetics
  • Neural mechanisms in motor behaviour
  • Initiation of voluntary actions
  • Neural mechanisms underlying plasticity and learning
  • Individual differences

The module consists of a series of 22 lectures, two seminars and two practical classes. The weekly schedule is as follows:

  • Lecture 1: Introduction

  • Lectures 2 and 3: Neurodevelopment 

  • Lectures 4 and 5: Neurogenetics
    Practical: Neuroanatomy

  • Lectures 6 and 7: Sensory systems 

  • Lectures 8 and 9: Motor systems 
    Seminar: Behavioural genetics

  • Lectures 10 and 11: Neurotransmission 

  • Lectures 12 and 13: Excitation 

  • Lectures 14 and 15: Inhibition 
    Practical: Action potentials

  • Lectures 16 and 17: Neuromodulation

  • Lectures 18 and 19: Emotion

  • Lectures 20 and 21: Cognition and reward 
    Seminar: Exploring human conditions

  • Lecture 22: Summary and revision

Personality and individual difference will be highlighted and focused on at various points in the module through: gene-environment interactions; biomarkers/endophenotypes; and pharmacogenetics – individualised medicine.

Clinical Psychology and Mental Health

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

You will investigate the critical role that clinical psychology can play in promoting well-being and helping those who are experiencing mental health difficulties. An expert team of psychologists will help you to bridge theory, research, and practice, evaluating diverse psychological perspectives on areas of mental health difficulty, from anxiety and mood difficulties through to psychosis.

Drawing on contemporary approaches to mental health, you will learn how to integrate theories of causation and approaches to treatment/support, and use your knowledge of research to understand and apply the evidence base to support those experiencing mental health difficulties.

Compilers and Computer Architecture

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

Topics on this module include:

  • low­-level versus high-­level languages
  • an introduction to language implementation techniques, compilers and interpreters, grammars and parsing
  • hardware implications, instruction set design and implementation
  • lexical analysis
  • the relevance of finite­state automata and regular grammars
  • implementation techniques
  • problems for particular languages, syntax analysis ­ overview of grammars and parsing techniques
  • top­-down and bottom­-up parsing
  • predictive parsing, shift-­reduce parsing
  • implementing hand­-coded top­-down predictive parsers
  • semantic analysis and code generation­ from trees and from flat intermediate codes
  • symbol tables
  • type checking
  • handling of specific high­-level language constructs
  • runtime storage allocation and scoping
  • instruction set consequences
  • hardware aspects of performance enhancement ­ caches, pipelining and parallelism
  • recent developments in processor design
  • code optimisation
  • introduction to flow analysis.

Further Study in Biological and Cognitive Psychology

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

Language, Mind and Brain

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

This module focuses on linguistic ability as a unique quality of humans. How does human language differ from animal communication systems? How is the human body, particularly the brain, adapted for language? Is language a special kind of cognition, or the product of general higher cognitive abilities?

We further investigate how humans understand and produce speech in such a speedy and efficient way, using a variety of evidence to evaluate theories of how the mind is structured for speech. We'll ask questions like: How are words stored in the mind so that we can find them? Why are grammatical sentences like 'The horse raced past the barn fell' actually very difficult to comprehend? Why are words sometimes 'on the tip of the tongue'?

Neural Circuits

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

This module will teach you about neural mechanisms generating animal behaviour. The level of analysis emphasises types of behaviour that can be understood in terms of underlying neural circuits or specific structures with well­ known neural architectures within the brain.

Topics covered include:

  • organisation and modulation of central pattern generator (CPG) circuits
  • advanced techniques for monitoring and manipulating neural circuits
  • modelling of neural circuits
  • sensory and motor functions of spinal cord circuits
  • brain circuits underlying motor control
  • circuits underlying non-associative and associative learning
  • addiction and learning circuits
  • defects in circuits
  • development of neural circuits

Philosophical Foundations of Cognitive Science

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

This module examines various materialist conceptions of the mind, especially the functionalist vision of the mind as a kind of computer program running in the brain. Symbolic and connectionist versions of this view are described and compared. The complex issues surrounding the scientific explanation of consciousness and experience are discussed.

Principles of Neuroscience

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

Neuroscience is the study of the nervous system from its structure, molecular and cellular biology and function through to the consequences of its operation, namely behaviour. The aim of this module is to provide you with your first real insight into the detailed workings of the brain and its development through consideration of the fundamental principles of nervous system operation. The module is also an important grounding for those wishing to take its sister module, Neural Circuits.

Topics covered include:

  • Signalling and transmission by nerves and synapses
  • Neurotransmission and neuromodulation
  • Plasticity in the nervous system
  • Cellular and molecular basis of learning and memory
  • Fundamental disease mechanisms
  • Development of the nervous system
  • The role of early experience in the development of the visual system
  • Methodological approaches to studying fundamental brain processes.

Software Engineering

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

In this module, you study large-scale software production.

Your studies emphasise the whole life-cycle of a software product, including:

  • requirement analysis
  • software architecture and design
  • implementation
  • quality assurance
  • maintenance activities.

As part of the module, you investigate social issues in software engineering such as team-structures and conflict management.

You also cover other issues, including:

  • agile software engineering methods
  • testing
  • test-driven development
  • coding practice and standards
  • design and code reviews
  • version control.

In this module, you undertake team-based coursework, which involves the production of a significant software deliverable such as an interactive gaming application

Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Project

  • 45 credits
  • Autumn & Spring Teaching, Year 4

This module will give you the opportunity to complete an extensive piece of research, design and/or implementation work under the supervision of a member of faculty. You will be able to chose from a range of project topics or offer a project of your own. All topics will require the application of skills and knowledge gained through previous modules of study and you will be involved in the design and implementation of a technological solution to a Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence related problem (using programming, modelling, simulation tools as appropriate).

A good mark could be obtained from production of a large application with extensive functionality or from the implementation of a novel or complex technique with significant research background.

Knowledge & Reasoning

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 4

This module covers computational methods of knowledge representation and reasoning, tracing their origins in epistemology and the study of logic, and showing their evolution and use in artificial intelligence.

Advanced Natural Language Engineering

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 4

Advanced Natural Language Engineering builds on the foundations provided by the Natural Language Engineering module. You will develop your knowledge and understanding of key topics including word sense disambiguation, vector space models of semantics, named entity recognition, topic modelling and machine translation. 

Seminars will provide an opportunity to discuss research papers related to the key topics and also general issues that arise when developing natural language processing tools, including:

  • hypothesis testing
  • data smoothing techniques
  • domain adaptation
  • generative versus discriminative learning
  • semi-supervised learning 

Labs will provide the opportunity for you to improve your python programming skills, experiment with some off-the-shelf technology and develop research skills.

Current Issues in Cognitive Science

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 4

This module will familiarise you with topics at the leading edge of scientific and philosophical progress in cognitive science.

It will provide insights into the range of methods used to research those topics and the theories behind those methods, in a way that builds upon issues covered in previous modules on the cognitive science pathway.

Topics vary from year to year, and are sometimes chosen by you, but may include:

  • cognitive neuroscientific investigations of the self
  • models of schizophrenia
  • integrated information theories of consciousness
  • the explanatory power of mirror neurons
  • individuating the senses and sensory augmentation
  • theories and architectures of emotion and affect
  • folk psychology as theory, simulation and narrative practice

Human-Computer Interaction

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 4

Human computer interaction (HCI) is concerned with designing, evaluating and deploying usable, effective and enjoyable technologies in a range of contexts.

The aim of this module is to give an introduction to the key areas, approaches and developments in the field.

Topics include:

  • principles of design
  • methods for evaluating interfaces with or without user involvement
  • techniques for prototyping and implementing graphical user interfaces.

Ultimately you will be reflective practitioners, able to understand the 'tools' that you have in your user-centred design toolkit and to think constructively and analytically about the best uses, limitations and implications of using these tools to design and evaluate interactive technologies.

Intelligence in Animals and Machines

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 4

The module will develop your understanding of what it means for an animal or a machine to behave intelligently, and how brain and behavioural systems are adapted to enable an animal to cope effectively within its environment. You will consider diverse aspects of intelligence, including navigation and motor control, numerical, language, memory and social skills. You will explore how these are related to one another and how they are matched to the particular needs of animals and machines.

Multimedia Design and Applications

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 4

In this module, you develop a basic understanding of human perception and how this relates to the capture, display, storage and transmission of digital media.

Your studies in this module cover the theory and the software and hardware required for the capture, display, storage and transmission of:

  • audio
  • video
  • image
  • graphical-based digital media.

Neural Networks

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 4

To take this module you must already be able to write software in one appropriate programming language such as Java, C, Python, or Matlab. Basic knowledge of formal computational skills is also a prerequisite.

In recent years neural computing has emerged as a practical technology with applications in many fields. The majority of these applications are concerned with problems in pattern recognition, and make use of feed-­forward network architectures such as the multi­layer perceptron and the radial basis function network.

It is widely acknowledged that the successful application of neural computing requires a principled approach, and this module will use the recent advances in neural computing to explore neural networks in-depth. By concentrating on the pattern-recognition aspects of neural networks, the module will cover many important topics such as:

  • spiking neural networks
  • multi­layer perception
  • radial basis function network
  • support vector machines
  • competitive learning
  • independent component analysis.

You will also learn to use neural networks in solving real world problems.

Philosophy and Science of Consciousness

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 4

The module examines the problems and prospects for a science of consciousness. Topics include: defining consciousness, the Hard Problem, the Knowledge Argument against physicalism, qualia, theories of the self, the neuroscience of consciousness, attention and volition, machine consciousness, the evolution and function of consciousness, the Grand Illusion theory.

Social Cognitive Development

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 4

This module considers aspects of development that reflect the social nature of humans. The module covers three broad areas: social cognition (eg normal development of theory of mind and its apparent absence in autism), self-reflection (eg the growth of self-consciousness and shyness) and self-regulation and agency (eg development of emotion regulation, cross-cultural and historical concepts of the person). The underlying theme is the role of cognitive development and social context in children's developing understanding of themselves and others.

The module is structured to enable participants to study a chosen topic in depth, while also viewing it from the theoretical contexts of the other topics addressed. This module builds on knowledge gained in the core psychology module C8546: Developmental Psychology. Students who are not enrolled on the BSc Psychology course at Sussex are expected to have knowledge of developmental theory and of social, cognitive, and language development at Year 2 level. Helpful overviews of these topics can be found in many textbooks on child development.

Structure and Function in the Brain

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 4

The aim of the module is to reveal the anatomical substrates on which the processing of sensory information and the generation of motor commands depend. Specific attention will be paid to the relationship between structure and function. The module will cover the development of the anatomical features of the nervous system and will give a comparative interpretation of the anatomy of brain regions and their cellular components using a variety of examples including vertebrate and invertebrate models. The module will provide basic knowledge of the main techniques used to study the functional anatomy of the brain at systems, cellular and molecular levels.

Technology-Enhanced Learning Environments

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 4

This module aims to develop your understanding of how digital technologies can be used to facilitate learning. It covers established methods of using computers for learning before covering innovative and cutting edge applications. It focuses on theories of how people learn and looks at how these theories influence the design of learning environments.

Topics in the Philosophy of Cognitive Science

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 4

This module aims to provide students of cognitive science with the opportunity to think critically about recent theoretical developments in cognitive science and associated philosophical discussion, and to read key writings by people in the field.

It will stress the links between the study of cognition and the study of other aspects of the mind, such as:

  • phenomenal consciousness
  • emotion
  • creativity
  • embodiment
  • sensorimotor coordination
  • dynamical coupling, etc.

Actual topics covered will vary from year to year, and may depend on levels of interest.

It will equip you with the ability to understand some of the deeper issues in current research in cognitive science, and to enable you to become a reflective researcher in that area.

Web 3D Applications

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 4

Through laboratory-based tuition and utilising Study Direct-based online teaching and learning materials (including slides, video, audio, demonstrations), this module will explore how 3D can be integrated into mobile web-based applications.

Technologies covered include but are not limited to:

  • 3D modelling methods for real-time rendering and associated authoring packages (e.g. 3ds Max)
  • implementation of efficient navigation and interaction methods
  • responsive web design applied to the implementation of mobile web-based 3D applications.

The main focus of this module is:

  • to gain practical experience on 3D modelling and programming (e.g. 3ds Max, X3D/VRML, X3DOM, HTML, CSS3, XML, JavaScript and associated frameworks and libraries, AJAX, JSON, PHP and SQLite)
  • to build a web mobile 3D application (an interactive 3D application that will render across desktop, tablet and mobile devices based on an MVC design pattern).

Example web mobile 3D applications may include a virtual museum, product configurator, vehicle visualisation, burglary simulation, or simple web game.

Web Applications and Services

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 4

This module provides an introduction to the models and technologies used to provide distributed applications and services over the Internet.

You will study the features and problems of building distributed applications, such as:

  • naming
  • security
  • synchronisation
  • replication
  • object persistence
  • content distribution.

You will use the framework provided by the Java Enterprise Edition to build distributed web applications.

Web Computing

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 4

In this module, you are introduced to the models and technologies used to provide services over the Internet and, in particular, the World Wide Web.

You cover topics including:

  • XML – DTD, Schema, DOM, XPATH and XSLT
  • client-side programming – embedded scripting languages, style sheets
  • server-side programming – Java Servlets, JSP
  • applications.
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