MA
1 year full time, 2 years part time
Starts September 2017

Media Practice for Development and Social Change

This unique course combines critically analysing development, democratisation processes and social change with gaining creative and technical media production skills.

You focus on media as tools for global social and political change with a strong emphasis on the role of civil society and (alternative) media organisations.

Social media, citizen journalism, activist media, participatory media and specialised broadcast media are successfully used to inform and engage audiences outside established channels of communication for issues such as:

  • social inequality
  • human rights
  • gender issues
  • environmental change.
This MA has a truly global perspective and together with students coming from all five continents you are on a journey to change the world for the better.”Wilma De Jong
Co-convener of the Media Practice for Development and Social Change MA

Key facts

  • This course is jointly taught between the School of Media, Film and Music and the School of Global Studies.
  • Media and Film at Sussex were ranked 7th in the UK for research impact in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF).
  • Global Studies is a unique interdisciplinary school. Development Studies at Sussex was ranked 1st in the world in the QS World University Rankings by Subject 2017.

How will I study?

You’ll learn in small groups with fellow students from around the world. You’ll acquire a range of practical media skills and can specialise in photography, documentary or multimedia.

You can also focus on topic-based fields such as poverty, environmental change, media regulation, migration or gender issues.

Assessment consists of:

  • a variety of practical media projects (documentary, podcast, web design, photography, multimedia project)
  • critical reflection reports
  • presentations
  • essays
  • the final project (work placement, independent media project or written dissertation).

Final project

Your final project can be an independent media project shot anywhere in the world, a written dissertation or industry experience (eight weeks with a charity, NGO or media company). Previous experiences have been at institutions such as Oxfam, Unicef, the United Nations and World Granny.

Full-time and part-time study

You can choose to study this course full time or part time. Find the modules for the full-time course below. 

For details about the part-time course structure, contact us at mfm@sussex.ac.uk

What will I study?

  • Module list

    Core modules

    Core modules are taken by all students on the course. They give you a solid grounding in your chosen subject and prepare you to explore the topics that interest you most.

    • Producing Media for Development and Social Change

      30 credits
      Autumn Teaching, Year 1

      This core module introduces core practical skills in a range of media (digital documentary, radio, podcasting and web design) within a critical context focusing on development and social change. Integrating practice and theory, the module aims to develop insight and knowledge of independent and locally produced media initiatives that facilitate citizen participation and foster social development. After an introduction which sets out the contemporary media landscape and its relationship to an active public sphere, the module will focus on case studies of a variety of media projects - such as community radio, mobile media, and documentary projects in the developing world. The practical component of this module focuses on executing exercises in a variety of media formats which will integrate the acquired skills and insights. This course will include some master classes by NGO representatives and/or media professionals who will present a variety of case studies.

    Options

    Alongside your core modules, you can choose options to broaden your horizons and tailor your course to your interests.

    • Dissertation (Media Practice, Development and Social Change)

      60 credits
      All Year Teaching, Year 1

      The preparation for the dissertation consists of dissertation workshops, individual tutorials, participation in a day-long research in progress conference, and independent research and study. The dissertation builds on the taught modules to enable the development of a research proposal and development of a bibliography in the first two teaching blocks leading to the execution of original and independent research using appropriate methodologies and conceptual approaches during the final teaching block and summer vacation.

    • Dissertation (Media Practice, Development and Social Change) with Placement

      60 credits
      All Year Teaching, Year 1

      The placement option takes the form of a 12-week work placement with an organisation working in a field relevant to the degree programme, normally undertaken from May-July after assessments on other courses are completed.

      You can either identify their own placement, or apply for one held on a database of placement opportunities at School level, where over 40 potential placement opportunities have already been identified. We will work with alumni, research networks and external research users to provide as wide a choice as possible. In each case, a detailed work plan will be agreed between yourself, your supervisor and placement provider that is relevant to the programme and of value both in terms of your learning experience, and the external organisation's wider objectives. The placement should provide insight into the organisation's work, and include work on a defined project with agreed objectives and outcomes.

      Where appropriate, permission may be granted for the placement to take place during 8-10 hrs per week across the year, if the organisation is locally-based and working hours can be agreed that do not clash with scheduled classes.

    • Media Project for Development and Social Change

      60 credits
      All Year Teaching, Year 1

      With guidance from your supervisor, and through workshops, you will design and execute a media project relevant to development and social change. Accompanying the project you will also provide a 5000 word written critical self-reflection on the process and outcomes. This will include a relevant biblography of relevant media and scholarly sources, and demonstrate your critical evaluation of and engagement with relevant scholarship.

    • Media Project for Development and Social Change with Placement

      60 credits
      All Year Teaching, Year 1

      The placement is a student-led placement developed in close consultation with the module convenor, with the details agreed by all parties in a Work Plan finalised in TB2. The placement is assessed via a portfolio of media work including a 5,000 word critical analysis (essay). The placement and project is supported through dissertation workshops, tutorials, and work in progress demonstrations.

    • Activism for Development and Social Justice

      30 credits
      Spring Teaching, Year 1

      This modue addresses the ways in which activists and activism have sought to engage in development and social justice. It explores and evaluates different approaches to activism, grounding this in theories of social mobilisation and citizenship, and will work through a series of practical examples, drawing on empirical material produced by anthropologists and others, to explore how activism has been used to address issues of development and social justice. In doing so it will seek to build on the material introduced in previous terms, on theories of social change and approaches to development and social justice, to explore how different kinds of activisms seek to bring about change. The module will explore the contributions that imaginative, insurgent, disruptive and chaotic forms of social action have to make to development, and will cover a range of collective action from the use of petitions and lobbying of representatives, to the use of the arts in 'interrupting' everyday life to bring some of its elements into question, to mobilisation for protests and peaceful demonstrations, to non-violent direct action and info-activism.

    • Activist Media Practice

      30 credits
      Spring Teaching, Year 1

      Social movements have historically struggled to get their message reported clearly, accurately and effectively through the lens of mainstream media. This has lead to the rise of alternative media practices and strategies to break through or unsettle the corporate and state-run media systems around the world. In order to challenge hegemonic discourses, activist media seeks to circumvent and dismantle traditional media's communicative strategies either through a disruptive aesthetic or through a reconfigured mode of civic engagement. Whether through radical leaflets, pirate radio, graffiti, protest music, performance art, activist videos, political documentaries, or social media and the internet, today's media landscape has evolved into a range of complex transnational networks that can be activated by independent counter-hegemonic media practices and expressions.

      This module asks you to learn about various forms of cultural resistance (through readings, screenings, lectures and discussions) in order to to formulate an effective form of activist media provocation. This piece of activist media may take the form of a video, a website, site-specific performance, series of photographs, media prank, etc. You will also be asked to write a reflective essay that contextualises the finished piece within the conceptual debates of the module.

    • Interactive Project Development

      30 credits
      Spring Teaching, Year 1

      The module focuses on the methods, processes and research techniques involved in the development of interactive media projects from initial concept to distribution -- with close analyses of how the different stages of a project are related, planned and connected to other media.

      You will learn how to identify original sources and subjects with a view to creating a distinctive style and approach through practical exercises and the creation of a test or pilot project. The module will aid you in the development of the tools required to conceptually frame your interactive practice and help them communicate clearly and critically. During the module you will be given time to explore media projects in a variety of media and to consider the implications of those projects for your own work. You will be asked to study and discuss a number of different methods for the critical appraisal and theorisation of creative media projects across genres and will be expected to show initiative in undertaking a wide range of research to help develop your ideas and skills (viewing, listening, reading, observing, testing of techniques, etc).

      The module is taught through a combination of presentations by the module tutor as well as individual students, group-critiques and one-on-one critiques. 

      The module uses an application form containing questions drawn from industry and research council funding and commisioning calls as a structure for you to focus and present your work. At the end of the module, you will produce a proposal in the form of a contextualising essay answering all the questions on the application form, a work plan, a pilot project demonstrating the style and forms of itneraction in your project and a journal demonstrating how you have thought through you ideas, what has emerged from the discussion and in-class critiques. This combination of essay and pilot will be the framework for you self-directed project.

    • Knowledge, Power and Resistance

      30 credits
      Spring Teaching, Year 1

      The purpose of this module is to reflect on the various ways in which power and knowledge interact within contexts of development and economic change. Whilst providing you with the conceptual apparatus to theorise notions of discourse, power and resistance, much of the course will deal with the historically and culturally contingent nature of the various meanings given to 'development', 'modernity' and 'tradition' and how these are in turn linked to different forms of knowledge. As the module will show, narratives and counter narratives of development are not only produced by the developers and 'developees', but also by those studying them. They are also inextricable from relations of power.

      The first part of the module engages with the theoretical framework provided by the concepts of ideology, hegemony and discourse, looking at the work of Gramsci and Foucault in week 2. In the following week we will consider the implications of concepts from these thinkers in analyses of development, particularly discourse theory. We shall then move on to consider the concept of resistance and what it means for development practice. In weeks 5 and 6 we consider two cases. First is the domain of developmental knowledge 'women in development', and we look at ways it has been contested both by activists and academics. Then we turn to the environment and consider the role of anthropologists who refuse to take for granted categories such as 'indigenous knowledge'.

      In the latter part of the module we shall pursue analyses of power and culture in relation to modernity. In week 7 we critically assess bureaucracies, governance and work on neoliberal ideas of freedom, power and knowledge in the production of policy and bureaucratic structures. We will explore how Foucault's later work directs anthropological attention to the production of the self within development projects.

      In weeks 8 and 9 we consider in more detail how different forms of knowledge, power and culture interrelate within contexts of colonial and post-colonial intervention and development. Just as these are highly complex, so too are the reactions of the subjects of the developmental gaze, who have their own versions of modernity and development. In week 8 we consider the various ways in which local people imagine and represent development and modernity. In week 9 we will evaluate the benefits of an 'actor network' approach to development and how it might take us beyond a focus on 'discourse'. As we will see, the discourse of development is itself far from static or monolithic.

    • New Developments in Digital Media 1a

      30 credits
      Spring Teaching, Year 1

      This module critically surveys developments in the expanding field of new media and explores the dynamics driving digital convergence, which is viewed as an industrial, political, social, economic and technological process. You will consider what drives convergence between previously discrete industries, technologies, and contents, and what limits convergence processes. You will explore key developments in the field of new media, including phenomena such as social networks, pervasive and locative technologies, new forms of knowledge organization and gathering.

      The module is both theoretical and practical, with seminars exploring the areas outlined above through critical reading, while a series of workshops provide you with an understanding of core technologies underlying contemporary developments, and help you gain literacy in approaches to content development in this field.

    • Photography: Documentary, Landscape, Politics

      30 credits
      Spring Teaching, Year 1

      This module introduces you to a wide range of work in the documentary and landscape genres, both historical and contemporary, but with an emphasis on `conceptual documentary' and contemporary politicised landscape photography. You will also focus on the problematics of documentary and photojournalism, such as ethical issues and questions of efficacy, and the use of text and sound in documentary publications, gallery installations and websites.

      The module will be taught through tutor-led discussion in seminars, and regular `group crits' of student work-in-progress in the lab. Early on in the module you will conceive and research your own idea for a photographic project, and start producing images for class viewing. The module will equip you with the necessary production & critical skills to continue working independently on your projects during the Easter vacation before the assessment deadline in early Summer.

    • Poverty, Vulnerability and the Global Economy

      30 credits
      Spring Teaching, Year 1

    • Race, Culture and the Media

      30 credits
      Spring Teaching, Year 1

      This module explores the intersection of race, culture and analogue/digital media.

      It begins by looking at the origins of these debates and introduces how their transformation can be approached through discourse and performance.

      It then moves to explore key theoretical lenses through which this module’s topic can be engaged, including a discussion of:

      • whiteness
      • class
      • gender
      • post-colonialism

      Following this conceptual grounding, the course explores a number of contemporary debates that highlight different transformations of race, culture and the media.

      These include explorations of the War on Terror, drone warfare, urban multiculture (sound systems, pirate radio and YouTube music videos), #blacklivesmatter, and debates on post-race. Through these means the module complements the School’s offerings in the areas of media, digital media, culture and social change in addition to complementing Global Studies options.

      Subjects may include:

      • origins and transformations: race, culture and media
      • whiteness
      • race and class
      • race, gender and difference  
      • post-colonialism and orientalism
      • the War on Terror: Twin Towers to Jihadi John
      • drone warfare
      • urban multiculture: from analogue to digital
      • #blacklivesmatters
      • post-race and rehumanistion
    • Sexuality and Development: Intimacies, Health and Rights in Global Perspective

      30 credits
      Spring Teaching, Year 1

      This module explores sexualities in the context of global socio-economic changes and development practice. It brings together theoretical perspectives on sexual subjectivity with a range of applied concerns relating to health, activism and policy.

      In particular the module examines ways in which "dissident sexual subjects" have been imagined globally, often both included and marginalised in communities, in the state and internationally.

      Themes and issues include:

      • sexual subjectivities, intimate lives and global transformations
      • HIV and Aids through anthropology and policy
      • citizenship, economies and queer abandonment
      • sexuality, law and the state
      • UN agencies and (im)possible sexual subjects
      • sexualities in transition – trans-subjectivites, trans-bodies, trans-nationalisms
      • viral and virtual intimacies
      • sex work, sex, and work
      • working with non-governmental organisations (NGOs) on sexual rights and health
      • global dialogue, sexual rights, wellbeing and marginalisation.

      You will also look at concerns such as new imaginaries of sexual identity and subjectivity portrayed in the media, through new technology and via neoliberalism.

      The module will be taught through seminar-based readings and discussions, film analysis, reflexive class exercises and group presentations.

      You'll draw widely on literature from anthropology and the social sciences, comparing theoretical perspectives on sexuality with more practice-based literature, such as reports by UN agencies, NGOs and so on.

      The aim will be explore, contest and consider differing modes of engaging with sexualities on a global scale – as academics, health practioners, activists and so forth.

    • Sexuality and Development: Intimacies, Health and Rights in Global Perspective

      30 credits
      Spring Teaching, Year 1

      The module will explore sexualities as sites of political contestation, claims to rights and intimate aspirations in context of global socio-economic transformations, international health and development practice. The module will bring together theoretical perspectives on sexual subjectivity and sexual life, worlds with a range of applied concerns relating to health, actvism and development policy, and programming internationally. In particular the module will examine ways in which 'dissident sexual subjects' have been imagined globally, often both included and marginalised in different domains, such as the community, the state and international policy fora.

      Themes and issus addressed by the module will include:

      • Sexual subjectivities, intimate lives and global transformations
      • Heteronormativity in interntional development and health
      • HIV and AIDS: Epidemiology, anthropology and policy - contested engagements with sexual lives and 'key populations'
      • Citizenship, economies and queer abandonment
      • Sexuality, law and the state: Homonational contestations
      • UN agencies and (im)possible sexual subjects
      • Sexualities in transition: trans-subjectivites, trans-bodies and trans-nationalisms
      • Viral and virtual intimacies
      • Intimate economies: Sex work, sex and work
      • Collaborative action: working with NGOs on sexual rights and health
      • Creative engagement: visual ethnographic work on sexual life-worlds - globally
      • Advocacy and exclusions: Global dialogues, sexual rights, well-being and marginalisations 

      Sexual life-worlds are increasingly interpreted in relation to global flows and transitions. One way in which connections between global processes and sexualities are becoming ever-more visible is in relation to new imaginaries of sexual identity and subjectivity, as mediated through transnational media, new communication technologies and the global momentum of neo-liberal capital. International development and heath practices are closely associated with such social processes as they seek to respond to the changing and enduring attributes of sexual lives, practices and risks in the context of wider concerns for well-being. The module will respond to such concerns and seek to equip you with both theoretical and practice based frameworks for engaging with a range of themes and issues related to sexuality and development.

      The module will be interdisciplinary in focus, drawing more widely on literature from anthropology and the social sciences, international development, health, gender and sexuality studies. In particular the module will seek to explore a range of literatures comparatively, bringing theoretical perspectives on sexuality into dialogue with more practice-based literature, such as reports by UN agencies, NGOs and so on. Through class readings, and drawing on the experience of the tutor and your own experiences, the aim will be explore, contest and consider differing modes of engaging with sexualities on a global scale - as academics, health practioners, activists, development professionals and so on. The module will be taught via a combination of seminar-based readings and discussions, analysis of (ethnographic) film, reflexive class exercises and group presentations.

    • Short Documentary: Research and Production

      30 credits
      Spring Teaching, Year 1

      This module focuses on the methods, processes and research techniques involved in the development of documentary projects from initial concept to distribution, with close analyses of how the different stages of a production are related and may be planned. You will learn how to identify original sources and subjects with a view to creating a distinctive style and approach through practical exercises and the shooting of pilot material. You will study and undertake the development process in relation to acquiring a critical understanding of the markets and other exhibition possibilities for projects from galleries and festivals to the web and television. You will look at how to locate and utilise archives, contributors, interviewees, performers, locations and facilities. Key areas to be explored include scripting, budgeting, scheduling, copyright and contracts, with reference to contemporary and historical examples. You will also look critically at a range of production methods and ways of working through looking both at case studies of specific productions and companies. You may undertake short optional placements as part of your research for this unit.

    • Transnationalism, Diaspora and Migrants' Lives

      30 credits
      Spring Teaching, Year 1

    • Transnationalism, Diaspora and Migrants' Lives

      30 credits
      Spring Teaching, Year 1

Postgraduate student Sylvia Gasana talks about her Media Practice for Development and Social Change MA

Entry requirements

An upper second-class (2.1) undergraduate honours degree or above in any subject. We also welcome applicants with relevant work experience or who submit a portfolio of work.

English language requirements

Standard level (IELTS 6.5, with not less than 6.0 in each section)

Find out about other English language qualifications we accept.

English language support

Don’t have the English language level for your course? Find out more about our pre-sessional courses.

Additional information for international students

We welcome applications from all over the world. Find out about international qualifications suitable for our Masters courses.

Pre-Masters in Media, Journalism and Film Studies

Need to boost your academic skills for your taught course? Find out more about our Pre-Masters in Media, Journalism and Film Studies.

Visas and immigration

Find out how to apply for a student visa


Fees and scholarships

How much does it cost?

Fees

Home: £7,700 per year

EU: £7,700 per year

Channel Islands and Isle of Man: £7,700 per year

Overseas: £17,000 per year

Note that your fees may be subject to an increase on an annual basis.

How can I fund my course?

Postgraduate Masters loans

Borrow up to £10,280 to contribute to your postgraduate study.

Find out more about Postgraduate Masters Loans

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's Masters Scholarship (2017)

Open to students with a 1st class from a UK university or excellent grades from an EU university and offered a F/T place on a Sussex Masters in 2017

Application deadline:

1 August 2017

Find out more about the Chancellor's Masters Scholarship

Sussex Graduate Scholarship (2017)

Open to Sussex students who graduate with a first or upper second-class degree and offered a full-time place on a Sussex Masters course in 2017

Application deadline:

1 August 2017

Find out more about the Sussex Graduate Scholarship

Sussex India Scholarships (2017)

Sussex India Scholarships are worth £3,500 and are for overseas fee paying students from India commencing Masters study in September 2017.

Application deadline:

1 August 2017

Find out more about the Sussex India Scholarships

Sussex Malaysia Scholarships (2017)

Sussex Malaysia Scholarships are worth £3,500 and are for overseas fee paying students from Malaysia commencing Masters study in September 2017.

Application deadline:

1 August 2017

Find out more about the Sussex Malaysia Scholarships

Sussex Nigeria Scholarships (2017)

Sussex Nigeria Scholarships are worth £3,500 or £5,000 and are for overseas fee paying students from Nigeria commencing a Masters in September 2017.

Application deadline:

1 August 2017

Find out more about the Sussex Nigeria Scholarships

Sussex Pakistan Scholarships (2017)

Sussex Pakistan Scholarships are worth £3,500 and are for overseas fee paying students from Pakistan commencing Masters study in September 2017.

Application deadline:

1 August 2017

Find out more about the Sussex Pakistan Scholarships

How Masters scholarships make studying more affordable

Living costs

Find out typical living costs for studying at Sussex.


Faculty

You will be taught by faculty from the School of Media, Film and Music and also by faculty from the School of Global Studies.

  • School of Global Studies faculty

    Dr Paul Boyce
    Senior Lecturer in Anthropology and Inteal Development
    P.Boyce@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: Anthropology and Queer Theory in India, Anthropology of Sexualities, Anthropology of the Body, Applied Anthropology, Bioavailability, HIV prevention research, International Development, Intimacy, Male and Transgender Sex Work, Male Sex work in SE Africa, Psycho-social and Psychoanalytic perspectives in Anthropology, Queer and Transgender Representation, Queer Theory, Sexual and gendered subjectivities, Sexuality and Law in Nepal, Visual Anthropology and Media

    View profile

    Dr Geert De Neve
    Professor of Social Anthropology & SouthAsian Studies
    G.R.De-Neve@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: Anthropology of Development, anthropology of South Asia, Anthropology of the Global Economy, Corporate Social Responsibility and Ethical Trade, India, Poverty and inequality, Social Protection, Social transformation, Tamil Nadu

    View profile

    Dr Peter Luetchford
    Senior Lecturer in Anthropology
    P.G.Luetchford@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: Coffee producers and cooperatives, Economic anthropology, ethical consumption, food politics, Latin America, Organic farming, Political anthropology, Spain, The moral economy

    View profile

    Prof JoAnn McGregor
    Professor Of Human Geography
    J.Mcgregor@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: African diasporas, Conflict and violence, Development studies, Migration, Refugees and asylum, Southern Africa social history, Ur

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    Dr Anke Schwittay
    Senior Lecturer in Anthropology & International Development
    A.Schwittay@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: digital development, financial inclusion, humanitarian design, microfinance tourism, online microfinance, representations of development

    View profile

  • School of Media, Film and Music faculty

    Ms Wilma De Jong
    Senior Lecturer in Media & Film Studies
    W.Dejong@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: Archives and media production, Documentary theory and practice, Film-based media (History, Theory & Practice), Interactive and web based documentaries, Media and international development, media and pressure groups

    View profile

    Dr Emile Devereaux
    Senior Lecturer In Digital Media
    E.Devereaux@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: Critical Gender Studies, Digital Art & Design, Digital Cartography, Digital Culture, Interaction design, media history and theory, Tactical Media, Visual Studies

    View profile

    Ms Rachael Duncan
    Teaching Fellow in Media Practice & Journalism
    R.Duncan@sussex.ac.uk

    View profile

    Ms Melanie Friend
    Reader in Photography
    M.Friend@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: Media and film

    View profile

    Dr Yorgos Karagiannakis
    Teaching Fellow in Video Production
    Y.Karagiannakis@sussex.ac.uk

    View profile

    Dr Alisa Lebow
    Reader In Film Studies
    A.S.Lebow@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: Activism and Documentary, Documentary theory and practice, Experimental Documentary, First Person Film, Jewish Culture and Film, Queer and Transgender Representation, Revolution and Film, Turkish and Middle Eastern Documentary

    View profile

    Dr Eleftheria Lekakis
    Senior Lecturer In Media & Communication
    E.Lekakis@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: civic engagement, consumer activism, cultural politics, Digital Culture, digital media, global communication, Humanitarianism, media activism, media sociology, Nationalism, political communication, political consumerism, promotional cultures

    View profile

    Ms Lizzie Thynne
    Reader in Film
    L.Thynne@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: art cinema, contemporary television, Cultural and Critical Theory, Documentary theory and practice, Experimental Documentary, Feminist Art History, Film drama, Gay & Lesbian Studies, Gender and Sexuality, Life writing, Queer studies, Television History, Theory and Criticism, Visual fields, women's liberation

    View profile

Careers

Graduate destinations

94% of students from the Department of Media and Film were in work or further study six months after graduating. Recent graduates have gone on to jobs including:

  • video editor, MWP Digital Media
  • internet content and new media officer, Parks Canada Agency
  • news editor, Alpha Media Holdings.

(HESA EPI, Destinations of Post Graduate Leavers from Higher Education Survey 2015)

Your future career

Civil society institutions, social movements and international development agencies increasingly require skilled and creative people to apply digital media technologies in enhancing their capacity to communicate, interact and influence within and across borders.

This MA has been developed specifically for those seeking employment in:

  • global or national media industries
  • NGOs and the international voluntary sector
  • international development institutions
  • independent media production companies.

Working while you study

Our Careers and Employability Centre can help you find part-time work while you study. Find out more about career development and part-time work

Contact us