MA
1 year full time, 2 years part time
Starts September 2017

Film Studies

Take a distinctive approach to exploring film – we offer you the opportunity to examine the cultural, economic, aesthetic and ideological operations of cinema.

You gain a high-level introduction to leading theoretical approaches, while also enjoying a flexible and exciting range of specialised options.

This MA is for you if you wish to: 

  • develop advanced skills in research and critical thinking
  • benefit from our expertise in key areas such as global cinema cultures; film, gender and sexuality; history and popular culture
  • investigate a topic of your choice in depth in your supervised dissertation project.
My fondest memory of the Film Studies MA at Sussex was finding a course that had the freedom and creativity to support and value me as an individual.”Anthony Walker
Film Studies MA

Key facts

  • We were rated 7th in the UK for research impact in the most recent Research Excellence Framework (REF).
  • We were ranked in the top 15 in the UK (The Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2016).
  • Brighton has a vibrant film community, including the Cine-City film festival, See international documentary film festival and the Duke of York’s Picturehouse, one of the UK’s oldest purpose-built cinemas.

How will I study?

As this is not a practice-based course, teaching is through seminars, screenings and tutorials. This MA investigates critical, theoretical and historical approaches to the medium.

Your understanding and skills are assessed primarily through essays. In the summer term, you write a dissertation that offers you the opportunity to undertake original research.

Full-time and part-time study

You can choose to study this course full time or part time. Find the modules for the full-time course below. 

For details about the part-time course structure, contact us at mfm@sussex.ac.uk

What will I study?

  • Module list

    Core modules

    Core modules are taken by all students on the course. They give you a solid grounding in your chosen subject and prepare you to explore the topics that interest you most.

    • Dissertation MA Film Studies

      60 credits
      All Year Teaching, Year 1

      The third term and the following long vacation are reserved for the research and writing of an 18,000 word dissertation on a topic of your choosing. Where the core and optional modules present a structured learning environment, with a schedule and bibliography prepared by the course leader, the dissertation constitutes an original and substantial project that is devised by the student themselves, in consultation with an academic supervisor. The dissertation allows you to pursue an independent, detailed investigation of a specific area of film studies to which you are personally committed, and to devise a research programme that will enable you to engage with appropriate scholarly methodologies and to frame and pursue pertinent research questions.

    • Film Studies: Theories and Methods

      30 credits
      Autumn Teaching, Year 1

      This module presents you with a mapping of the intellectual histories, key approaches and theoretical debates within the field of film studies. You will begin with early debates around realism and auteurism, moving to genre theory and ideological and structuralist approaches. Later sessions deal with psychoanalytic and feminist approaches. The module finishes with contemporary critiques of both the textual focus of traditional film studies and the concept of representation itself. Throughout, the concern is to link theoretical approaches with methodologies inviting you to explore, critique and reflect on the discipline's intellectual history.

    Options

    Alongside your core modules, you can choose options to broaden your horizons and tailor your course to your interests.

    • Feminism and Film

      30 credits
      Autumn Teaching, Year 1

      The module begins with an exploration of the relationship between feminism, feminist theory and film theory, and feminist filmmaking.

      Beginning from the assumption that feminism is first and foremost a politics, and its theories – its feminisms – must exist in that space, which Stuart Hall calls the ‘tension ... between ... political and intellectual concerns’, it traces a history, firstly of feminist film theory and criticism, and secondly of feminist film making.

      In the first part, it explores issues of representation, asking what kinds of representations of women mainstream film constructs, how these representations function within wider social discourses and power structures, how film – through its representations – works to construct particular subject positions for its viewers, and how particular genres structure these positions differently through their specific play of realism, ideology and fantasy. In terms of a feminist film practice, it asks how far feminist film makers can intervene in film practices, and what such an intervention might/should look like.

      In each session, a specific film text will be studied in the light of the theoretical issues raised.

    • Gender and Representation

      30 credits
      Autumn Teaching, Year 1

      This module addresses the gendered nature of both mainstream and minority discourses and representations in history and culture.

      It introduces you to the conceptual and theoretical frameworks, which facilitate understanding of the production and reception of powerful representations of masculinities, femininities and sexualities, and how gendered discourses operate in different spheres.

      The first part of the module concentrates on key issues in feminist and queer theories, focusing specifically on the concepts of gender, representation, and constructions of masculinities, femininities and sexualities.

      The second part of the module considers these theoretical constructs within the frame of various media-centred case studies.

      You also examine the way in which theories of gender and representation across a number of academic disciplines are located within specific cultural and historical contexts which themselves are both structurally and institutionally gendered.

    • Writing Documentary: Sound/Image/Text

      30 credits
      Autumn Teaching, Year 1

      This module explores key issues and debates in the history and theory of documentary. From a 'boom' in theatrical documentary to DIY footage posted online, recent years have witnessed significant changes in the commercial, aesthetic, technological, political and social dimensions of documentaries. The module will consider such developments in the light of earlier trends in documentary and ongoing debates about the purpose, form and efficacy of the mode. Seminars will address aesthetics, power, the politics of representation and ethics across a range of documentary material from film, television and the internet. Topics may include: documentary modes (observational, ethnographic, auto/biographical, etc); truth claims and trust; feminist documentary; documentary ethics; audiences for documentary; hybridity and re-enactment; the politics of documentary; and documentaries online.

    • Writing for the Screen

      30 credits
      Autumn Teaching, Year 1

      The module will cover topics including:

      • The essentials of storytelling: what do all stories have in common?
      • What is a Screenplay?: is it a Blueprint? Literature? How is it formatted?
      • The restorative act structure
      • Alternatives to the restorative act structure
      • Creating convincing characters
      • What is motivation?: how does it manifest?
      • Dialog and the art of subtext
      • Writing visually: writing stage direction for spec scripts
      • Script reports: how to analyse a script
      • Script readings and feedback

       

    • Activist Media Practice

      30 credits
      Spring Teaching, Year 1

      Social movements have historically struggled to get their message reported clearly, accurately and effectively through the lens of mainstream media. This has lead to the rise of alternative media practices and strategies to break through or unsettle the corporate and state-run media systems around the world. In order to challenge hegemonic discourses, activist media seeks to circumvent and dismantle traditional media's communicative strategies either through a disruptive aesthetic or through a reconfigured mode of civic engagement. Whether through radical leaflets, pirate radio, graffiti, protest music, performance art, activist videos, political documentaries, or social media and the internet, today's media landscape has evolved into a range of complex transnational networks that can be activated by independent counter-hegemonic media practices and expressions.

      This module asks you to learn about various forms of cultural resistance (through readings, screenings, lectures and discussions) in order to to formulate an effective form of activist media provocation. This piece of activist media may take the form of a video, a website, site-specific performance, series of photographs, media prank, etc. You will also be asked to write a reflective essay that contextualises the finished piece within the conceptual debates of the module.

    • First Person Film (MA)

      30 credits
      Spring Teaching, Year 1

      First Person Film examines the ways in which film can be used as a personal, subjective medium, whether in fiction or documentary. Autobiographical or analytical, abstract or essayistic, professional or amateur, the first-person modality is increasingly present in all filmmaking practices. This module seeks to introduce you to theories of subjectivity whether from psychoanalysis, post-structuralism and/or literary theory considering the multiple theoretical incursions on the unity of the subject from Lacan to Butler and Nancy, and even the outright denial of the author (Barthes). We will explore questions of subjectivity such as: what constitutes a subject? from what position does s/he speak? and what or who is the 'I' that speaks? From this will arise further questions regarding the address: to whom does s/he speak and to what avail? who is being interpellated as audience? and how is identification constructed? The module will survey a range of first-person filmmaking, including the fictional autobiography, artist's experimental films, first-person documentary, the essay film, the home movie and the proliferation of YouTube direct address.

    • Global News Industries A

      30 credits
      Spring Teaching, Year 1

      This module explores the function, impact and current status of international journalism in an increasingly 'deterritorialised' media environment. The module will cover a comparative study of different news media systems in the world, the global news flow, institutional and professional issues in international news reporting, and the transformation in international journalism. It will also investigate the extent to which the audiences of global journalism might constitute alternative news networks and a putative global public sphere. New technologies from blogging to multiplatform television, twitter to online distribution, have also transformed the way news is made, disseminated and consumed. This module provides a critical consideration of the economics, culture, politics and sociology of journalism on a global scale. It examines fundamental issues in theories and practices of journalism and assesses ongoing developments in the area of journalism development, expansion, ethics and policies. The module aims to enable you to understand rapid technological changes and further internationalisation of journalism and the impact and consequences for future of journalism.

    • Interactive Project Development

      30 credits
      Spring Teaching, Year 1

      The module focuses on the methods, processes and research techniques involved in the development of interactive media projects from initial concept to distribution -- with close analyses of how the different stages of a project are related, planned and connected to other media.

      You will learn how to identify original sources and subjects with a view to creating a distinctive style and approach through practical exercises and the creation of a test or pilot project. The module will aid you in the development of the tools required to conceptually frame your interactive practice and help them communicate clearly and critically. During the module you will be given time to explore media projects in a variety of media and to consider the implications of those projects for your own work. You will be asked to study and discuss a number of different methods for the critical appraisal and theorisation of creative media projects across genres and will be expected to show initiative in undertaking a wide range of research to help develop your ideas and skills (viewing, listening, reading, observing, testing of techniques, etc).

      The module is taught through a combination of presentations by the module tutor as well as individual students, group-critiques and one-on-one critiques. 

      The module uses an application form containing questions drawn from industry and research council funding and commisioning calls as a structure for you to focus and present your work. At the end of the module, you will produce a proposal in the form of a contextualising essay answering all the questions on the application form, a work plan, a pilot project demonstrating the style and forms of itneraction in your project and a journal demonstrating how you have thought through you ideas, what has emerged from the discussion and in-class critiques. This combination of essay and pilot will be the framework for you self-directed project.

    • Media Histories and Cultural Change

      30 credits
      Spring Teaching, Year 1

      This module explores key changes in the media over the past 120 years and how these have both reflected and shaped our cultural life in profound ways. 

      By focusing on the emergence of 'new' media, such as radio and cinema in the early 20th century, television in the later 20th century and the internet on the eve of the 21st century, the module looks at key transitional moments in electronic media forms. It assesses how these media were the products of the cultural life of the time and how they subsequently enriched or, arguably, damaged this broader culture. 

      The module is arranged in three sections that:

      1. Explores the emergence of broadcasting and cinema between the 1890s and the 1930s, and discusses them in the context of new ideas in America and Europe about communication, mass culture and social psychology, and in the context of new artistic ideas such as modernism.
      2. Explores the rise and spread of television between the 1940s and the 1990s, and discusses it in the context of wider debates about visual culture, the consumer society, the Cold War, the witnessing of global media events, national identity and globalisation
      3. Tackles the spread since the 1990s of internet and social media, discussing them in the context of fierce international debates about the changing nature of knowledge and literacy and in particular the alleged creation of a 'distracted' mindset and a superficial and banal popular culture 

      In drawing on specific case studies at each stage, the module aims to enhance your skills in using historical evidence, including written and audio-visual archives and oral history testimony, to develop arguments about media.

    • Media, Culture and Communication

      30 credits
      Spring Teaching, Year 1

      The module offers you the chance to explore at an advanced level a number of principal theories and methods within a cultural studies approach to media studies, and to consider how these shape the ways we might think about and research particular media industries, forms and issues. The module begins with a focus on questions concerning media production, distribution and consumption. In the latter part of the module, we pay attention to a variety of methodological approaches which draw attention in particular to different ways of conceptualising the relation between the media and concepts like subjectivity, identity, perception and experience.

      The theory element aims to introduce you to the key thinkers, traditions and debates in media and cultural studies and contributing disciplines. You will investigate media as institutions and systems of representation and explore problems of production and consumption in a variety of social and geo-political contexts. You will be encouraged to prepare informal presentations and to engage in discussion with other members of the seminar group. Each week there will also be a short introduction to the following week’s topic in the lecture given by members of the Media and Film faculty. The research element aims to develop a systematic and critical understanding of the practical, epistemological and ethical issues involved in conducting different kinds of media and cultural research. It also aims to make you methodologically self-conscious in your own research and written work.

    • Music and the Media of Performance (Practice)

      30 credits
      Spring Teaching, Year 1

      During the past fifty years the parameters of musical performance have expanded enormously. For John Cage all musical performance was inherently theatrical since it engaged both eye and ear. The visual aspect of musical performance, and the relationship of music to the spatial and to the embodied, has often been overlooked, and has led composers such as, eg, Cage himself, Mauricio Kagel and Heiner Goebbels to explore the extended theatricality of musical performance in directions beyond opera. Other artists like Meredith Monk, Philip Glass and Robert Wilson have restored the term 'opera' to refer to music theatre works that reconfigure the traditional media of opera (music, language, voice, sound, body, space, image) in new ways. More recently muscians such as Michel van der Aa have incorporated sonic and visual media in a live performance context.

      The module will examine both theories and practices of experimental music theatre and multi-media performance through critical and practical engagement with the ideas that lie behind such practices. The module will be assessed by an essay, through which you will demonstrate your knowledge and understanding of key theories and practices in experimental music theatre or multi-media performance.

    • Music and the Media of Performance (Theory)

      30 credits
      Spring Teaching, Year 1

      During the past fifty years the parameters of musical performance have expanded enormously. For John Cage all musical performance was inherently theatrical since it engaged both eye and ear. The visual aspect of musical performance, and the relationship of music to the spatial and to the embodied, has often been overlooked, and has led composers such as, eg, Cage himself, Mauricio Kagel and Heiner Goebbels to explore the extended theatricality of musical performance in directions beyond opera. Other artists like Meredith Monk, Philip Glass and Robert Wilson have restored the term 'opera' to refer to music theatre works that reconfigure the traditional media of opera (music, language, voice, sound, body, space, image) in new ways. More recently musicians such as Michel van der Aa have incorporated sonic and visual media in a live performance context.

      The module will examine both theories and practices of experimental music theatre and multi-media performance through critical and practical engagement with the ideas that lie behind such practices. The module will be assessed by an essay, through which you will demonstrate your knowledge and understanding of key theories and practices in experimental music theatre or multi-media performance.

    • New Developments in Digital Media 1a

      30 credits
      Spring Teaching, Year 1

      This module critically surveys developments in the expanding field of new media and explores the dynamics driving digital convergence, which is viewed as an industrial, political, social, economic and technological process. You will consider what drives convergence between previously discrete industries, technologies, and contents, and what limits convergence processes. You will explore key developments in the field of new media, including phenomena such as social networks, pervasive and locative technologies, new forms of knowledge organization and gathering.

      The module is both theoretical and practical, with seminars exploring the areas outlined above through critical reading, while a series of workshops provide you with an understanding of core technologies underlying contemporary developments, and help you gain literacy in approaches to content development in this field.

    • New Developments in Digital Media 1b

      30 credits
      Spring Teaching, Year 1

      This module critically surveys developments in the expanding field of new media.  You will explore the dynamics driving digital convergence, viewed as an industrial, political, social, economic and technological process. You will ask what drives convergence between previously discrete industries, technologies, contents, and what limits convergence processes. You will also explore key developments in the field of new media, including phenomena such as social networks, pervasive and locative technologies, new forms of knowledge organisation and gathering. This version of the module is theoretical; seminars explore the areas outlined above through critical reading, seminar discussion and presentation, and you will also write a 5000-word term paper.

    • Photography: Documentary, Landscape, Politics

      30 credits
      Spring Teaching, Year 1

      This module introduces you to a wide range of work in the documentary and landscape genres, both historical and contemporary, but with an emphasis on `conceptual documentary' and contemporary politicised landscape photography. You will also focus on the problematics of documentary and photojournalism, such as ethical issues and questions of efficacy, and the use of text and sound in documentary publications, gallery installations and websites.

      The module will be taught through tutor-led discussion in seminars, and regular `group crits' of student work-in-progress in the lab. Early on in the module you will conceive and research your own idea for a photographic project, and start producing images for class viewing. The module will equip you with the necessary production & critical skills to continue working independently on your projects during the Easter vacation before the assessment deadline in early Summer.

    • Queering Popular Culture

      30 credits
      Spring Teaching, Year 1

      This module offers you the chance to explore lesbian, gay, bisexual and queer contributions to, and perspectives on, the key fields of popular culture, including film, television, the press, popular music, fashion and style. Topics for detailed study will include lesbian representation in mainstream television genres; cinematic homosexualities and their historical context; lesbian and gay 'community television'; contemporary lesbian and gay magazines and newspapers; queer pop from David Bowie to the Pet Shop Boys and beyond; sexuality and style politics; and the pleasures and problematics of camp.

      You will investigate issues of representation, consumption and interpretation; unravel debates over stereotyping, subcultures and sensibilities; and ask whether a specifically 'queered' critique of the existing academic discourses used in the study of popular culture is conceptually feasible and/or politically desirable. You can expect to sharpen and deepen your skills in interdisciplinary cultural analysis, and there will be a particular emphasis on a self-reflexive examination of (y)our own popular cultural tastes and practices, exploring the connections and contradictions between theoretical accounts of popular images and forms and our experiential investments in them as consumers located in (or interested in) sexual minorities.

      The approach on this module is unrepentantly interdisciplinary - there is no overarching theoretical model to which you will be obliged to subscribe. Students with or without backgrounds in cultural studies will be made equally welcome.

    • Race, Culture and the Media

      30 credits
      Spring Teaching, Year 1

      This module explores the intersection of race, culture and analogue/digital media.

      It begins by looking at the origins of these debates and introduces how their transformation can be approached through discourse and performance.

      It then moves to explore key theoretical lenses through which this module’s topic can be engaged, including a discussion of:

      • whiteness
      • class
      • gender
      • post-colonialism

      Following this conceptual grounding, the course explores a number of contemporary debates that highlight different transformations of race, culture and the media.

      These include explorations of the War on Terror, drone warfare, urban multiculture (sound systems, pirate radio and YouTube music videos), #blacklivesmatter, and debates on post-race. Through these means the module complements the School’s offerings in the areas of media, digital media, culture and social change in addition to complementing Global Studies options.

      Subjects may include:

      • origins and transformations: race, culture and media
      • whiteness
      • race and class
      • race, gender and difference  
      • post-colonialism and orientalism
      • the War on Terror: Twin Towers to Jihadi John
      • drone warfare
      • urban multiculture: from analogue to digital
      • #blacklivesmatters
      • post-race and rehumanistion
    • Sound Environments (Practice)

      30 credits
      Spring Teaching, Year 1

      This module examines sonic media creations and sound architectures – physical, digital or hybrid – through alternating seminars and workshops.

      Seminars provide interdisciplinary context and review a range of practices, while workshops afford a space for you to develop your ideas through practical work and theory.

      You will consider the rapid development of sound creation beyond the concert hall. Urban spaces as venues are considered alongside creative, curatorial and critical practices arising from networked sound technologies (streamed radio, distributed performance works, podcasts, etc).

      We also consider architectures where performance is integral. Earlier examples of the integration of architecture, space and organised sound include Semper's Fespielhaus in Bayreuth. Today, digital processing opens up new performance possibilities including new notions of "performative architectures". You will create a practical project and critical commentary in response to these ideas.

    • Sound Environments (Theory)

      30 credits
      Spring Teaching, Year 1

      This module examines sonic media creations and sound architectures, which may be physical, digital or hybrid, through alternating seminars and workshops.

      Seminars will provide interdisciplinary context and review a range of practices, while workshops afford a space for you to develop your ideas through practical work and theory.

      You will consider the rapid development of sound creation beyond the concert hall. Urban spaces as venues are considered alongside creative, curatorial and critical practices arising from networked sound technologies (streamed radio, distributed performance works, podcasts, etc).

      You'll also consider architectures where performance is integral. Earlier examples of the integration of architecture, space and organised sound include Sempers Fespielhaus in Bayreuth. Today, digital processing opens up new performance possibilities including new notions of "performative architectures". You will write a term paper of 5,000 words in response to these ideas.

    • The Cinematic Body

      30 credits
      Spring Teaching, Year 1

      This module examines the interplay between body and cinema. This includes not only the representation of the body in films but also how the body of the spectator and cultural formations of the body influence and shape cinema itself. You will draw on a wide range of theoretical frames (including film studies, psychoanalysis, gender studies, philosophy, feminism and cultural theory) to consider a variety of themes including: the body as resistance and force; notions of beauty and the sublime; the hysterical body; discipline and punishment; the body as desire. The module will also consider recent developments in film, including the idea of cyber-cinema and its impact on the body.

    • The Politics of Promotional Culture

      30 credits
      Spring Teaching, Year 1

      This module is not about advertising per se or the marketing 'tools' usually suggested by the term promotion but an exploration of 1) how advertising has crossed over into domains beyond the commercial with an alleged collapse of boundaries, and 2) how branding seems increasingly to take over aspects of the lifeworld. According to Andrew Wernick, from whom the term promotional culture is borrowed, advertising 'has come to shape not only culture's symbolic and ideological contents, but also its ethos, texture and constitution' (1991: viii).

      The module is about understanding contemporary promotional culture via a grasp of historical developments. These include the development of the capitalist market, the rise of a sign-culture and women as key consumers.

      The module opens up theoretical ideas and debate via a series of case studies which may include 'the department store', 'spin', 'celebrity politics', PR journalism, 'the spectacular university', 'the branded self'. The questions it is concerned with include: does it matter that commercial advertising has been overtaken by branding and promotion extending into politics, public services, the arts and charity organisations? Does this mark a problematic undermining of a 'public sphere'? Or can the 'inauthenticity' of promotional culture be democratically enabling in so far its practices lay open the malleability of social life? Do the developments of other modernities (eg. South/East Asia) suggest we should think about the rise of the market, branding and promotion in different ways than is suggested in a Western literature?

Entry requirements

An upper second-class (2.1) undergraduate honours degree or above in media studies, film studies or another subject in the social sciences or humanities.

English language requirements

Standard level (IELTS 6.5, with not less than 6.0 in each section)

Find out about other English language qualifications we accept.

English language support

Don’t have the English language level for your course? Find out more about our pre-sessional courses.

Additional information for international students

We welcome applications from all over the world. Find out about international qualifications suitable for our Masters courses.

Pre-Masters in Media, Journalism and Film Studies

Need to boost your academic skills for your taught course? Find out more about our Pre-Masters in Media, Journalism and Film Studies.

Visas and immigration

Find out how to apply for a student visa


Fees and scholarships

How much does it cost?

Fees

Home: £7,700 per year

EU: £7,700 per year

Channel Islands and Isle of Man: £7,700 per year

Overseas: £15,100 per year

Note that your fees may be subject to an increase on an annual basis.

How can I fund my course?

Postgraduate Masters loans

Borrow up to £10,280 to contribute to your postgraduate study.

Find out more about Postgraduate Masters Loans

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's Masters Scholarship (2017)

Open to students with a 1st class from a UK university or excellent grades from an EU university and offered a F/T place on a Sussex Masters in 2017

Application deadline:

1 August 2017

Find out more about the Chancellor's Masters Scholarship

Sussex Graduate Scholarship (2017)

Open to Sussex students who graduate with a first or upper second-class degree and offered a full-time place on a Sussex Masters course in 2017

Application deadline:

1 August 2017

Find out more about the Sussex Graduate Scholarship

Sussex India Scholarships (2017)

Sussex India Scholarships are worth £3,500 and are for overseas fee paying students from India commencing Masters study in September 2017.

Application deadline:

1 August 2017

Find out more about the Sussex India Scholarships

Sussex Malaysia Scholarships (2017)

Sussex Malaysia Scholarships are worth £3,500 and are for overseas fee paying students from Malaysia commencing Masters study in September 2017.

Application deadline:

1 August 2017

Find out more about the Sussex Malaysia Scholarships

Sussex Nigeria Scholarships (2017)

Sussex Nigeria Scholarships are worth £3,500 or £5,000 and are for overseas fee paying students from Nigeria commencing a Masters in September 2017.

Application deadline:

1 August 2017

Find out more about the Sussex Nigeria Scholarships

Sussex Pakistan Scholarships (2017)

Sussex Pakistan Scholarships are worth £3,500 and are for overseas fee paying students from Pakistan commencing Masters study in September 2017.

Application deadline:

1 August 2017

Find out more about the Sussex Pakistan Scholarships

How Masters scholarships make studying more affordable

Living costs

Find out typical living costs for studying at Sussex.


Faculty

The research interests and expertise of our faculty are expansive. Collectively we offer supervision across a wide range of subjects, approaches and methodologies.

The themes listed here are just three of our most widely researched areas in Film Studies.

  • Film, gender and sexuality

    Sussex is world renowned for its research into questions of gender and sexuality. This forms part of a broader focus on the politics of representation.

    We look at feminist and queer interventions within cinema and film theory, and explore questions raised by cinematic representations of the body. 

    Dr Katherine Farrimond
    Lecturer in Media and Cultural Studies
    K.Farrimond@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: crime fictions, cultural studies, Feminist theory, Film, film noir, Gender and Sexuality, genre, girlhood, Gothic, horror, Media, Nostalgia, popular culture, representation, retro and vintage, science fiction, television, The body, virginity

    View profile

    Dr Catherine Grant
    Senior Lecturer In Film Studies
    C.Grant@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: Audiovisual Essay, creative and critical practice, digital media, Film-based media (History, Theory & Practice), Found Footage Film, Gender and Sexuality, Hispanic, Portguese & Latin Studies, Media & Communication Studies, Media and film, Multimedia - video, psychoanalytic object relations theory, Publishing, Videographic Criticism

    View profile

    Dr Michael Lawrence
    Reader
    Michael.Lawrence@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: Adaptation, animals and media, Bollywood, children and film, indian cinema, Stars and performance

    View profile

    Mr Andy Medhurst
    Senior Lecturer in Media, Film & Cultural Studies
    A.Medhurst@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: Genre of comedy

    View profile

    Dr Niall Richardson
    Senior Lecturer
    N.D.Richardson@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: body image in film and media, disability and human rights, Queer studies, representation of gender and sexuality in film and popular culture, Transgender politics and representation

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    Dr Luke Robinson
    Lecturer In Film Studies
    Luke.Robinson@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: Chinese-language cinema, Documentary theory and practice, East Asian cultural studies, Film History, Theory and Criticism, Queer studies, Transnational cinema

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    Prof Sue Thornham
    Professor of Media & Film Studies
    S.Thornham@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: Cultural Theory, Feminist theory, Film History, Theory and Criticism, Gender Studies

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  • Film, history and popular culture

    We explore the intersections between film, history and popular culture, focusing on topics such as genre, authorship and stardom. We address questions of audience and performance while examining the politics of films and film form (within both fiction and documentary).

    Our research also touches upon intertextual and transmedial synergies as well as broader issues of cultural representation. 

    Dr Thomas Austin
    Senior Lecturer in Media & Film Studies
    T.R.Austin@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: Aesthetics and Politics, audience studies, documentary, european cinema, reception studies

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    Dr Katherine Farrimond
    Lecturer in Media and Cultural Studies
    K.Farrimond@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: crime fictions, cultural studies, Feminist theory, Film, film noir, Gender and Sexuality, genre, girlhood, Gothic, horror, Media, Nostalgia, popular culture, representation, retro and vintage, science fiction, television, The body, virginity

    View profile

    Dr Catherine Grant
    Senior Lecturer In Film Studies
    C.Grant@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: Audiovisual Essay, creative and critical practice, digital media, Film-based media (History, Theory & Practice), Found Footage Film, Gender and Sexuality, Hispanic, Portguese & Latin Studies, Media & Communication Studies, Media and film, Multimedia - video, psychoanalytic object relations theory, Publishing, Videographic Criticism

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    Dr Frank Krutnik
    Reader in Film Studies
    F.S.Krutnik@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: Comedy, contemporary television, film noir, radio, stardom, the Hollywood Left, US cinema and popular culture

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    Dr Michael Lawrence
    Reader
    Michael.Lawrence@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: Adaptation, animals and media, Bollywood, children and film, indian cinema, Stars and performance

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    Mr Andy Medhurst
    Senior Lecturer in Media, Film & Cultural Studies
    A.Medhurst@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: Genre of comedy

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    Dr Matilda Mroz
    Lecturer in Film Studies
    M.Mroz@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: art cinema, cultural memory, european cinema, Film, Film and the Holocaust, Film as philosophy, Film History, Theory and Criticism, Polish cinema, Temporality, the body in film

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    Dr Niall Richardson
    Senior Lecturer
    N.D.Richardson@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: body image in film and media, disability and human rights, Queer studies, representation of gender and sexuality in film and popular culture, Transgender politics and representation

    View profile

    Prof Sue Thornham
    Professor of Media & Film Studies
    S.Thornham@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: Cultural Theory, Feminist theory, Film History, Theory and Criticism, Gender Studies

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    Dr Dolores Tierney
    Senior Lecturer
    D.M.Tierney@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: Latin American Cinema, race and ethnicity, Transnational cinema

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    Dr Lawrence Webb
    Lecturer in Film Studies
    L.Webb@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: American cinema, cinema and architecture, cultural geography and space, Film History, Theory and Criticism, US cinema and popular culture

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  • Global cinemas

    Research collected under this theme addresses popular, art and documentary cinemas from Asia, Europe, Britain, the US, Latin America and the Middle East.

    We explore debates about how cinema has been approached within national, regional and transnational production contexts and how such productions have been theorised in relation to shifting paradigms of film style, identity, intermediality and cultural representation. 

    Dr Catherine Grant
    Senior Lecturer In Film Studies
    C.Grant@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: Audiovisual Essay, creative and critical practice, digital media, Film-based media (History, Theory & Practice), Found Footage Film, Gender and Sexuality, Hispanic, Portguese & Latin Studies, Media & Communication Studies, Media and film, Multimedia - video, psychoanalytic object relations theory, Publishing, Videographic Criticism

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    Dr Michael Lawrence
    Reader
    Michael.Lawrence@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: Adaptation, animals and media, Bollywood, children and film, indian cinema, Stars and performance

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    Dr Alisa Lebow
    Reader In Film Studies
    A.S.Lebow@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: Activism and Documentary, Documentary theory and practice, Experimental Documentary, First Person Film, Jewish Culture and Film, Queer and Transgender Representation, Revolution and Film, Turkish and Middle Eastern Documentary

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    Dr Matilda Mroz
    Lecturer in Film Studies
    M.Mroz@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: art cinema, cultural memory, european cinema, Film, Film and the Holocaust, Film as philosophy, Film History, Theory and Criticism, Polish cinema, Temporality, the body in film

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    Dr Luke Robinson
    Lecturer In Film Studies
    Luke.Robinson@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: Chinese-language cinema, Documentary theory and practice, East Asian cultural studies, Film History, Theory and Criticism, Queer studies, Transnational cinema

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    Dr Dolores Tierney
    Senior Lecturer
    D.M.Tierney@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: Latin American Cinema, race and ethnicity, Transnational cinema

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    Dr Lawrence Webb
    Lecturer in Film Studies
    L.Webb@sussex.ac.uk

    Research interests: American cinema, cinema and architecture, cultural geography and space, Film History, Theory and Criticism, US cinema and popular culture

    View profile

Careers

Graduate destinations

94% of students from the Department of Media and Film were in work or further study six months after graduating. Recent graduates have gone on to jobs including:

  • video editor, MWP Digital Media
  • internet content and new media officer, Parks Canada Agency
  • news editor, Alpha Media Holdings.

(HESA EPI, Destinations of Post Graduate Leavers from Higher Education Survey 2015)

Your future career

Brighton offers one of the largest concentrations of film, digital and new media industries outside of London.

Our graduates have gone on to pursue careers in:

  • the media industries
  • secondary education
  • sales and marketing
  • information services.

Some of our graduates have also gone on to further study.

Working while you study

Our Careers and Employability Centre can help you find part-time work while you study. Find out more about career development and part-time work

Contact us