Customise your course

Having the opportunity to personalise your course enriches your learning experience. We call this Sussex Choice. As part of this you can customise most of our single-honours degrees and enhance your main subject by exploring other disciplines.

How customising your course can enhance your degree

Electives

Electives are modules from a subject area that’s different to your core course. They enable you to enrich your degree by spending time in your first two years exploring different disciplines. 

Each elective lasts for one term. You normally take electives in your first or second year, or in both. Electives are open to students on most single-honours courses.

The range of electives is one of the main reasons I wanted to come to Sussex. It gives you opportunities to broaden your studies.” Emily Jane
Politics BA
Elective in Forensic and Applied Cognitive Psychology

Discover electives

  • Arts and Humanities
    • Advertising (E)

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

      This module engages with the historical development of advertising and opens up a critical understanding of its contemporary place within the media (and its economies), culture and society.

      In the 21st century advertising has been transformed by the rise of branding, the maturing of the internet and the emergence of new media forms like social media. Traditional advertising forms and the funding model for media which advertising has provided are now under threat.

      This module will introduce you to current thinking about advertising and demonstrate various approaches to the analysis of its many forms.

    • American Cinema B (E)

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

    • American Cities: New York City

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

      From New Amsterdam to 9/11 and beyond, New York has always been iconic. We experience the Big Apple through the sight and sounds that came before us: the movies, the music, the literature, the songs. But what goes on behind these images of ceaseless activity and glamour?

      Now the hub of global finance, New York was also a haven for immigrants, with Ellis Island and the Statue of Liberty sitting right there in its harbour. As a result of its diversity of population and ever-changing urban development, in this module we will be looking at the city from many perspectives, and find that to study its history and culture is to discover that the city that never sleeps never ceases to pose questions either.

    • American Identities

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1; Year 2, Term 1

      'What is an American?' Hector St. John de Crèvecoeur asked in the 18th century, when the American colonies were on the verge of revolution. That question has never really gone away. Whether as a self-proclaimed Republic, a slave-holding society, a 'nation of immigrants' or an imperial world power, America has had to invent and re-invent its national identity time and time again, from colonial times to the present.

      On this module we study how Americans in different periods and different regions have thought, written, debated and talked about themselves in relation to their country in autobiography, poetry, fiction, and film. We ask how race, gender, and sexuality impact on notions of American citizenship, and we find out how to become an American, now and in the past. We will come across contradictory conceptions of American identity that may surprise us, as well as stereotypes and familiar tropes of optimism, individualism, and the right to bear arms.

    • American Popular Music (E)

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

    • Art and Artists

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1

      This module deals with one of the central issues of the study of art. How did 'great artists' gain their reputation both during their lifetime and afterwards?
       
      Some artists' reputations have not been constant. Others have been admired for very different reasons at different times. The module looks at a variety of cases presenting different 'histories' of the artist from the ancient world to the Renaissance. It focuses on:
      • a particular set of issues surrounding the conceptualisation of the artist and artistic creativity in the classical, Byzantine and/or medieval periods
      • the issue of anonymity
      • the artist versus the craftsman
      • related issues of historiography.
      You may cover painters, printmakers and sculptors as well as artists whose achievements were in the applied arts. This module complements, but is not a pre-requisite for, Art and Artists II.
    • British Cinema B (E)

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

    • Childhood in 19th and 20th Century Britain

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

      In this module, you explore the experience of childhood in Britain from 1800 onwards. You start by considering the concept of ‘childhood’ itself, and how representations of childhood have shifted across time.

      You then explore themes such as:

      • the place of children within the family
      • children at school, work and play
      • the role of the state and other organisations in safeguarding children’s welfare
      • children as both the victims and perpetrators of violence.

      You refer to primary sources throughout, and whenever possible use the voices of children themselves, emphasising children as agents in their own right, rather than passive recipients of a world created by adults.

    • Comedy

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2; Year 2, Term 2

      This module considers the nature and reception of comic texts, focusing particularly on the effects such texts produce on their readers. The module is not limited to comedy as a dramatic genre, but will consider a range of comic forms, which may include physical theatre practices, novels, television sitcoms and films.

      While a historical profile of comedy and its reception will emerge, the module will not adhere to a chronological structure. Instead, the module is organised thematically around critical issues which affect the interpretation and reception of comic works. Central to this will be a consideration of key theories of humour, such as those developed by Kant, Freud and Bergson, among others, who have shaped our understanding of how comic texts function. You will also be introduced to a range of critical and theoretical frameworks through which to explore the social value of comic texts, which often exceeds that of simple pleasure or entertainment.

    • Culture and Society

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1

      This module introduces the relevance and excitement of using cultural studies approaches to explore pertinent aspects of life in the globalised world of the 21st century. The first few weeks are devoted to describing, debating and historicising key areas of cultural life: home, work, leaisure, city. In the second half of the term you are introduced to cultural concepts that are fundamentally contested within society. Concepts such as taste, individualism, and humanity will be discussed and debated, and you will use your crosscultural and historical skills (developed in the first half of the module) to explore issues pertinent to these concepts. You will be guided to undertake focused interdisciplinary study through carefully directed research tasks and reading on these topics. Teaching and learning will involve a mix of lectures, seminars, workshops, screenings, individual and group work.

    • Culture and the Everyday

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2; Year 2, Term 2

      Everyday life is something we take for granted. The phrase tends to refer to the ordinary and unremarkable, to the bedrock activities constitutive of how we live but which are often regarded as tedious or a chore.

      This module opens up this notion offering an understanding of the everyday as simultaneously ordinary and extraordinary, localised and tied into the bigger dynamics of capitalism and globalisation.

      Introducing you to the interdisciplinary perspectives of cultural studies, you explore everyday life through a series of case studies. These may include:

      • dressing or exercising the body
      • food
      • car culture
      • going green
      • love
      • living through media
      • shopping.

      Each case study variously explores the historical development of everyday life, its textures and experiences, hardships and highs.

      If the emphasis is so-called modern everyday life in the rich 'north', you are encouraged to understand the ways our everyday life is tied to and impacts on the everyday lives of those in the much poorer 'south'.

      Emphasis is placed on the ways in which everyday life practices may be conservative (reproducing gender relations for example) or utopian in their creativity, suggesting other ways of living beyond the constraints of neo-liberalism capitalism. What happens in the everyday - its struggles, its changes - is integral to a bigger global politics.

      This module gives you opportunity to reflect on your own lives and those of others. It encourages you to develop an 'anthropological' eye and feel for the details of everyday life, to collect media and other material that speaks about everyday life, and above all to be self-reflective and critical about the specificity of your own ways of doing things.

      Assessment is through an illustrated Learning Diary, which allows you to demonstrate your creative as well as academic skills.

    • Culture in Global Contexts: Debating the Postcolonial

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2; Year 2, Term 2

      This elective will introduce you to some of the key debates in postcolonial studies by studying a selection of short texts across a range of genres including visual images (painting, film and photography), poetry, short stories, essays, music, journalism and interviews. Drawing on a range of theoretical essays (Fanon, Said, Spivak, Lazarus, Mohanty, Gilroy, among others), it will explore the varied ways in which contemporary culture continues to be shaped by colonial history in volatile and complex ways.

      Topics include: 'race', the autobiographical, tourism, eco-criticism, language, sport, resistance and cultures of consumption.

    • Debates in Media Studies E

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2

      In this module the stress is on different theoretical approaches to the study of media and the debates circulating around those approaches. Media can be analysed as ritual, (global) industry, meaning-maker, technology, dreamworld, everyday life, work place, or sensual pleasure machine. Focus can switch from media production and organisation, to analysis of media output, to exploration of consumption and use, to the bigger issue of media in society.

    • Exhibition Studies

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

      Exhibition Studies explores the ways in which works of art and material culture are exhibited in museums, galleries and other relevant contexts. Based around a series of case studies, the module introduces you to the practical considerations that inform exhibition curating, along with the ways in which different types of exhibition impact on the interpretation and understanding of works of art. We will consider exhibitions from a broad range of periods, a wide variety of institutional contexts, and works in a wide variety of media.

    • Feminist Philosophy

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

      Feminist philosophy covers a range of issues. At the applied end, it's concerned with issues of particular political relevance to women, such as discrimination and equality, and ethical issues surrounding reproduction. At the more abstract end, it is concerned with whether Western philosophical approaches and conclusions are themselves a product of patriarchy. You will explore these kinds of themes throughout the module.

    • Film Analysis (E)

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1; Year 2, Term 1

      This module draws upon both 20th-century and contemporary film texts to explore the diverse uses filmmakers have made of such key techniques of cinematic expression as narrative, cinematography, mise-en-scene, editing, sound, and special effects. We consider not simply how such techniques are accomplished (ie the creative choices available to filmmakers) but also the potential they have for generating meaning and pleasure when combined together to produce filmic texts. The module also examines links between technological change and film aesthetics.

    • Film Music after 1950 E

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

    • From Opera to Film (E)

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

    • Gender, Space and Culture (E)

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

    • Global History 1500-2000: Trade, Science, Environment and Empire

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

      Global history has emerged as an innovative and powerful approach to understanding the past and its implications for the present and future. Global history is a history of connections. It addresses the contexts and the structures through which societies and communities interacted with one another. The overarching theme of global history is the emergence of an ever-more integrated global society, but the field looks to explain and understand particular circumtances as well as universal experiences.

      The topics of global history transcend any particular national or local history. You study a theme for between two and three weeks, and lectures support the thematic concerns of the topics. The module looks at several topics in detail:

      • communication and war
      • race, slavery and anti-slavery
      • colonial encounters and environments
      • civil and human rights
      • global order and disorder
      • empire, science, trade and environment.

      Alongside these themes the course addresses particular questions such as the emergence of the 'great divergence': the widening gap in the 19th century between living standards in the Atlantic basin and those in the rest of the world and the global expansion of European empires.

    • Historical Controversy

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2; Year 2, Term 2

      In this module, you are introduced to the study of history through the critical reading of a key historical text.

      In this way, you gain an understanding of the complexity of the historical record, and an appreciation of a range of problems associated with the interpretation
      of evidence.

      Your studies in this module make you think about the discipline of history and the nature of historical enquiry.

      Through a study of how historians have formulated and deployed their arguments, you begin to learn to deploy ideas and to shape your own historical
      arguments.

    • Introduction to Music Studies (E)

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1

      This module relates repertoires and areas of study in music to compositions and performances across many styles and periods, connecting contemporary insights with historical studies. You will discover and develop a command of issues in contemporary musicology, and also learn to evaluate and compare sources and texts. Many questions relevant to musicians working today are opened up and debated during our seminars.

      You will be taught how to interpret and connect examples of music ranging from the 12th century to today. You will demonstrate your command of the ideas and techniques inscribed in these examples through practical exercises and an essay.

    • Issues in Global Cinema E

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2; Year 2, Term 2

      This module looks at international film of the last five decades. A range of films will be studied in order to explore: genre and art cinema; post-colonialism and political cinema; gender and feminist cinema; and globalisation and popular cinema.

      We will study important movements in post-war film culture, including Third Cinema from Brazil and political cinema from Senegal. We will address the relationship between gender, history, allegory and national cinema (examples may include films from Tunisia, Iran and Argentina). We will also examine the aesthetics and economics of the blockbuster in a global film culture (case studies may include contemporary films from South Korea, China, India and Australia).

    • Language and Power

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1; Year 2, Term 1

    • Language, Mind and Brain

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

      This module focuses on linguistic ability as a unique quality of humans. How does human language differ from animal communication systems? How is the human body, particularly the brain, adapted for language? Is language a special kind of cognition, or the product of general higher cognitive abilities?

      We further investigate how humans understand and produce speech in such a speedy and efficient way, using a variety of evidence to evaluate theories of how the mind is structured for speech. We'll ask questions like: How are words stored in the mind so that we can find them? Why are grammatical sentences like 'The horse raced past the barn fell' actually very difficult to comprehend? Why are words sometimes 'on the tip of the tongue'?

    • Media, Memory, History (E)

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

      Examine the relationship between history, memory and media through the following starting points:

      • the media are historical artifacts, forged and developed in historical contexts that they also influence
      • access to history is mediated through  technical and cultural systems e.g. television, print, and networked and mobile media. Media systems capture, store, and re-disseminate material that may be returned to us as collective or individual memories (for instance through family photographs, or through the annual collective commemoration of official memorial days.) The relationship between history and memory is thus bound up with how media systems become embedded cultures
      • new media in particular, produce new kinds of artificial memory and thus may intervene in new ways in the making of history. 

      You will study questions arising around media, history and memory through sessions including:

      • explorations of prosthetic memory, war memories and memorials
      • the history of the invention of the media
      • memory damage and the politics of omission
      • family histories and migration patterns as photographic record
      • race and mediated memory
      • questions of the convergence of the archive and the network which mean media records of events are simultaneously stored and represented.
    • Music and Society (E)

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2

      Music does not exist in isolation from society. Many cultures in the world have no word for music conceived as an entity distinct from the contexts in which it takes place, contexts such as social or religious ritual, dance or performance. Only in modern western culture has the idea of art music as something autonomous and removed from the everyday world evolved. 

      Why is music meaningful to us, and how can we understand how music has meaning at all? What is the function of art music in cultures dominated by commercial values? How can we grasp the relationships between the multiplicity of musical forms that are available in a modern globalised culture? How can we evaluate the impact of the different media and technologies by which music is disseminated and consumed? These are some of the questions that this module seeks to address.

      The module also aims to introduce you to different intellectual approaches to these questions, and to broaden your engagement with the issues through independent research. The module charts recent musical history both in terms of technical innovation and social and aesthetic concerns of the composers involved. The aim of the module is to stimulate awareness of recent musical thinking and also to use that awareness to re-examine more conventional musical views and habits.

    • Objects of Art

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2; Year 2, Term 2

      This module introduces you to a vital skill in the analysis and understanding of art history: how to engage with a single work of art or piece of material culture in great detail.

      Each lecture is based on very specific object – for example, a picture, a sculpture, a photograph, or a piece of ceramics – and builds outwards from them. You will consider a series of key issues, including the materials used, the subject represented, decisions made by the producer of the object, the different contexts in which it has been displayed, the functions it may have performed, and questions of meaning.

    • Philosophy of Religion

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

      This module aims to encourage you to engage with different perspectives on the philosophy of religion, drawing on analytic and continental sources.

      You start with a methodological discussion and an examination of different approaches to the question of how philosophy can contribute to religious knowledge and understanding.

      You cover topics including the existence of God, providence and free will, and the morality of afterlife.

      One question that arises out of this discussion concerns the appropriateness of treating 'God' as a peculiar kind of object. You consider this question in relation to phenomenological and existentialist approaches that focus on religious experience and also approaches that focus on the meaning of religious terms and the nature of belief.

      You conclude by considering current debates about religion and science and the role of religion in everyday life.

    • Philosophy, Politics and the Middle East

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2; Year 2, Term 2

      Contemporary Middle Eastern politics raises many intricate philosophical questions. The aim of this course is to address some of them. Topics to be studied include:

      • jihad and just war theory
      • liberalism vs Islam
      • democracy and freedom of speech
      • freedom of belief
      • what, if anything, is wrong with extremist beliefs?
      • what, if anything, is wrong with conspiracy theories?
      • democracy and religion
      • patriotism and personal identity
      • the ethics of immigration.
    • Questioning the Media E

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1

      This module introduces the study of media forms, texts and systems and their contribution to social life. You will begin to explore the breadth of media studies through attention to the ways in which media matter. In what ways, and how significant are the media in the formation of individual identities and in the practices of everyday life? In the more public world, to what extent are media key to providing knowledge and enabling the debate necessary to the practices of democracy? The module enables you to build on your own experiences of media as a consumer and user. But it also encourages critical attention to how the field of media studies has historically been forged: through argument and contestation between different academic approaches and disciplines.

    • Reading as a Creative and Critical Writer

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1; Year 2, Term 1

      This module invites you to explore how critical and imaginative thinking work productively together. In regular workshops, you develop your own writing, both of essays and creative texts.

      The module is divided into three units. In the first, `Close Reading and Creativity', you are introduced to writing that describes and performs the experience of reading, looking at work by authors such as Ali Smith, Marcel Proust, John Ruskin, and William Wordsworth. This unit encourages you to examine what is meant by `close reading', and to explore links between reading and creativity.

      In the second unit, `Intertextuality and Creative Writing', we consider literary influence, examining works that are shaped by earlier texts. You will study texts by authors such as Angela Carter, Hélène Cixous, J. M. Coetzee, Nalo Hopkinson, Alice Walker and/or Virginia Woolf. From both a practical and theoretical point of view, we consider what these writers can teach us about the use of reading to create new works.

      In the third unit, `The Critic as Writer', you will study writers for whom acts of critical reading and writing overlap and co-habit with creative work. We consider writers such as Sigmund Freud, Denise Riley, Salman Rushdie, Edmund Spenser and/or W. B. Yeats. The creative potential of critical forms (such as the essay and biography) will be explored.

      The three units help you develop key skills as a reader and writer of literary texts, building up to the creative-critical portfolio which you will produce by the end of the module. Each week you will have a lecture, followed by a seminar-workshop in which you discuss your critical thinking and creative practice in small groups.

    • Religion and Culture in the Middle East

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1; Year 2, Term 1

      In this module you explore religion and culture in the Middle East.

      You look at the relationship between religion and culture historically, examining the long-term development of a range of topics with contemporary relevance.

      Our focus is not on theology, but instead on the ways in which religious practice has shaped people’s everyday lives in various contexts, and how this has changed over time.

      The Middle East is a region in which Islam forms the majority religion, so much of the attention falls on Muslim communities and their cultural practices.

      That said, it is also a region with significant religious diversity, so we also look at religious minorities and how their status changed within the Ottoman Empire (1299-1919) and the nation states that succeeded it, including Egypt, Syria, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Israel/Palestine, up until the Arab Uprisings that have transformed the region in recent years.

      Key topics include:

      • religion and the state
      • practicing devotion
      • religion, gender, and sexuality
      • material culture and religion
      • the impact of mass media and social media
      • pilgrimage and travel.

      The module begins with an introduction to the major religions of the Middle East, as well as an exploration of how academics approach studying religion and culture. It includes a consolidation week, where you review the themes covered in the module.

    • Short Period: The Middle East and North Africa since 1908

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

      This course will examine the key political, social, cultural and economic themes in Middle Eastern and North African history since 1908.

      1. The politics of reformism
      2. The impact of World War One
      3. The rise of pan-Arab nationalism
      4. The impact of World War Two
      5. The foundation of Israel
      6. The end of British and French Empires
      7. Suez and the politics of pan-Arabism
      8. The rise of political Islam
      9. Social tensions – women
      10. Social tensions – youth
      11. The ‘Arab Spring’
    • Society, State and Humanity

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2; Year 2, Term 2

      In this module, you look at the fundamental answers given by Western thinkers to the question 'what is society?', exploring them in conjunction with answers to the questions 'what is the state?' and 'what is a human being?'.

      There is a particular focus on the question of whether humans can be said to exist prior to society or only as constituted by it.

      Conceptions of society, state and humanity studied may include those of Plato, Aristotle, St. Paul, Hobbes, Smith, Rousseau, Kant, Hegel, Marx, Durkheim, Freud, and feminist and postmodern critiques of these.

      Please note: this module has some overlap in content with the second year module 'Modern Political Thought', which is a core module for students studying Politics.

    • The African American Experience

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

      This module examines African-American political, cultural and social developments from 1863 onwards. You'll become familiar with the debates that African Americans have had between emancipation and the present day. This establishes a deep historical understanding of the ongoing freedom struggle in the late-20th and early-21st centuries.
       
      You assess intraracial arguments over:
      • the relationship of blacks to the US government in war and peace
      • racial and class identities
      • diverse tactics and strategies for the advancement of the race. 
      The module takes as its foundation the fact that racial prejudice was a national not a regional phenomenon. However, you pay particular attention to the long-running campaign to destroy de jure segregation in the southern states (culminating in the successful nonviolent direct action campaigns of the 1960s).
       
      Through lectures and seminars, you examine the connections between African-American history and culture. There's an emphasis on well-known black leaders like Booker T. Washington, Marcus Garvey, and Martin Luther King, female activists and the unsung black masses themselves.
    • The Age of Adolescence: Reading 20th Century Youth Culture

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1

    • The Look of America

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2; Year 2, Term 2

      This module takes as its premise the notion that ever since the explosion of mass media and mass society in the industrial age, the United States has taken an increasingly dominant place in the global visual imagination. This process reached its peak at the beginning of the 20th century, America henceforth generating for the world innumerable iconic and hegemonic visual representations of its own cultural narratives.

      The task of the module will be to investigate and deconstruct some of the products of this visual field, along with the ideologies and narratives that sustain and refract them. Hence we begin by introducting you to visual theory, especially as it applies to the American context, and provide you with the critical tools necessary for the module. We then locate the period under scrutiny (1860-2001) within a broader visual and cultural prehistory, illuminating the roots of the modern world and its visual scene. After this, the module concentrates more particularly on the culture of the late-19th and 20th centuries.

      Following a more or less thematic pattern, the module examines the issues that emerge over the course of the 20th century, referring forwards and backwards in order to generate connections where appropriate (for example, linking the Farm Security Administration projects to Matthew Brady's Civil War photographs). The intention here is to introduce you to aspects of visual culture and its criticism, as well as to defamiliarise and explore some of the more familiar American iconography surrounding us.

    • Theory, Taste and Trash (E)

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

    • Truth and Morality: The Meaning of Life

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1; Year 2, Term 1

      In this module, you study the central issues of morality, examining both the kinds of considerations that might be appealed to in moral arguments, and the status of moral arguments themselves.

      What should we bear in mind when deciding whether to eat meat, or whether to help someone, or whether to fight a war? In what sense are the decisions we make right? How can a moral argument be a good argument? Are some people wiser than others? Is there any truth in moral relativism?

      You tackle these and related issues from a range of theoretical positions.

    • Whose Heritage?

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

      In this module, you build on your Year 1 learning about the materials of culture and the presentation of cultural objects at heritage sites.

      You focus on the issues and ethics of the heritage industry, which are often related to questions concerning the presentation of fragile or problematic materials, the creation of 'period experiences', and choices about a 'characteristic' time period or point in the life of an object.

      You consider such questions as, for example, collecting aboriginal material, exhibiting masks and mummies, and the concerns of both sides surrounding the Parthenon marbles.

      You also look at practical concerns, such as what goes into an ethics review of a collection, how we make decisions about acquiring objects, what might affect de-accessioning choices and the varieties of risk involved in exhibiting certain materials and interpretations of heritage.

  • Business, Finance and Economics
    • Europe in the International Economic Order (Elective)

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

      In this module, you are introduced to main developments in the world economy and its governance arrangements since 1945 - as they affect Europe, including its relations with the US and the developing world.

      You cover debates on globalisation, the role of multinational firms and the role of the WTO, and you follow the evolving international financial crisis.

    • Financial Derivatives (Elective)

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

      This module introduces the markets, trading and valuation of common derivative products, such as forwards/futures, swaps and options. Both equity and interest rate markets are covered. Practical applications of derivatives for hedging or investment purposes are discussed, including their risk-return profiles, advantages and limitations. Fundamental concepts of no arbitrage and risk neutral pricing are introducing, culminatin in the well-known Black Scholes formula for option pricing at the end of the module. An outline of lectures is shown below:

      1. Introduction to derivative markets: forwards, futures, swaps and options: payoffs, market participants, benefits and dangers
      2. Equity and FX futures and forwards: markets, applications, margining, and hedging
      3. Pricing of forwards and futures: no arbitrage, replication, basis risk
      4. Forward rates and forward rate agreements: term structure of interest rates
      5. Interest rate futures and swaps: day-count conventions, duration-based hedging
      6. Option markets and strategies: put-call parity, moneyness, European vs American options, price bounds, structuring, payoff decomposition
      7. Pricing options: the Binomial tree model
      8. Exotic options: digital options, barrier options, Asian options
      9. Stochastic models for derivatives: geometric Brownian motions, Wiener processes
      10. Black-Scholes model: from binomial to Black Scholes, pricing formulae for European options, options on Futures
      11. Greeks: risk management with options, hedging
    • Financial Institutions and Markets (Elective)

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

      This module introduces the various types of financial institutions and their role in society, including banks, insurance companies, and investment managers. It then provides an overview of the major financial markets and products, and how these are related to each other and to the institutions introduced earlier. Finally, behaviour of financial institutions and ethical principles of finance are discussed. A provisional outline of lectures including one revision lecture at the end, is as follows:

      1. Introduction and purpose of module – overview of lectures, textbook, interplay with other courses, finance as an occupation, philanthropy, origins of finance
      2. Commercial banks – origins, adverse selection and moral hazard, operational risks, capital adequacy, regulation, deposit insurance, Sharia / Islamic finance
      3. Investment banks – importance in markets and society, secret of high profit, divisional analysis, shadow finance, leasing
      4. Insurance – origins, life and health, principal-agent problem, AIG blow-up, regulations
      5. Investment managers – 40 Act, mutual funds, hedge funds, private equity, venture capital
      6. Debt markets – term structure, leverage cycle, rating agencies, usury, consumer finance protection
      7. Equity markets – corporations, stock exchanges, capital raising
      8. Real estate – REITs, mortgages, securitization, boom and bust cycles, specialty finance
      9. Derivatives – options, forwards, futures, arbitrage, hedging risks
      10. Crises and regulation – recent financial crisis, historical perspectives, attempts at regulatory reform
      11. Capitalism and ethics – morality of finance, ‘doing God’s work’, different political frameworks
      12. Revision
    • International Business Environment

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

      The module explains the nature of the operating environment for international business today. It reviews the scale, scope and trends in international business activity and evaluates the various methods that firms can use to assess, enter and develop non-domestic markets. Then the relevance is considered of factors such as culture, psychic distance, host and home country perspectives and 'green' issues on the organisation and management of international business.

      Throughout the module emphasis is placed on the business environment in key regions of the world, notably the European Union, North America, East and SE Asia and the transition economies of East and Central Europe. Finally, the impact of the evolving world economy, regional integration and globalisation on today’s international firm is examined.

    • International Business Environment

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1

    • International Business Strategy (Elective)

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2

    • International Human Resource Management (Elective)

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

      The purpose of this module is to introduce students to an analytical and critical approach to international aspects of HRM. Therefore, the module will examine inter alia: how power and politics are implicated in the internal dynamics of multinational corporations, how the ‘ideal worker’ as construed by strategic IHRM practices informs the expectations from workers, and if corporate social responsibility can possibly suffice to ensure a fair employment relationship in the absence of a transnational regulator.

      Topics include:

      • Introduction to the Course and Overview
      • Comparative Human Resource Management: Convergence or Resilient Differences?
      • International Human Resource Management Strategy: Global Integration vs. Local Responsiveness
      • Managing Across Borders I: Culture’s Consequences
      • Managing Across Borders II: Global Staffing and International Assignments
      • Global Talent Management
      • Institutions, Actors and Micropolitics
      • IHRM and Organizational Flux: Mergers, Acquisitions and Offshoring
      • Gender and IHRM
      • Global Diversity Management
      • Global Labour Regulation, Corporate Social Responsibility and IHRM
      • Summary and Review
    • International Marketing (Elective)

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

      This module represents an introduction to international marketing and aims to develop knowledge of the international environment and international marketing. The increased scope, risk and complexity faced by the international marketer is due to the increased level of uncertainty from operating in diverse and less understood environments. Emphasis is placed on the identification of challenges presented by international marketing to equip you to deal with differences, opportunities and threats emerging from diverse economic, demographic, political/legal, cultural, technical and competitive environments. The impact of international issues is related during the module to the marketing decision-making task at three levels; the macro level at which country selection decisions are made; national level at which market entry decisions are made; and market level where marketing mix decisions are made.

    • Introduction to Accounting (Elective)

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2

      This module is designed as an introduction to accounting and financial management for managers.

      The module introduces accounting and financial management topics gradually, examining basic principles and underlying concepts before demonstrating how accounting statements and financial information can be used to improve business decision-making.

      The module focus is for students of business and management as decision-makers and users of financial information.

    • Introduction to Business and Management (Elective)

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1

      Introduction to Business and Management is an introductory study of contemporary organisations and their management. It explores the types of purposes of organisations, their stakeholders (CSR) and changing environments together with their key managerial processes – entrepreneurship, organisational structure, leading, strategic planning and change.

      The focus throughout is on helping you achieve a critical and reflective approach, and learning to apply relevant concepts, tools and models.

      The coursework component of assessment requires you to choose an organisation that is of interest to you and to explore, critically, the way in which it handles a process of your choice. You are supported in this by the submission of a structured proposal on which formative feedback is given.

      Seminar activities are participative and require preparatory work which is signposted though downloads and links on Study Direct well in advance.

      Lectures are interactive, employing the use of quizzes and featuring clips from YouTube, such as Dragons' Den excerpts.

      An unseen examination completes the assessment profile and you tackle a case study (which revisits keys concepts) in the final seminar as a formative exercise.

      The module provides a platform for later study by encouraging skills in critical thinking, academic writing, concept acquisition and research. Introduction to Business and Management aims to facilitate the transition to university-level learning smoothly, meaningfully and enjoyably.

    • Introduction to Economics (Elective)

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1

      This module provides an introduction to the fundamental principles of economics. The first half of the module deals with micro-economic issues including the behaviour of individuals and firms, their interaction in markets and the role of government. The second half of the module is devoted to macroeconomics and examines the determinants of aggregate economic variables, such as national income, inflation, and the balance of payments, and the relationships between them.

    • Introduction to Energy Transitions

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

    • Introduction to Sustainability

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

    • Microeconomics 1 (Elective)

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2

      This module develops consumer and producer theory, examining such topics as consumer surplus, labour supply, production and costs of the firm, alternative market structures and factor markets. It explores the application of these concepts to public policy, making use of real-world examples to illustrate the usefulness of the theory.

    • Microeconomics 2 (Elective)

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

      This module develops the economics principles learned in the first year (Microeconomics 1).

      Alternative market structures, such as oligopoly and monopolistic competition are studied, and comparisons drawn with perfect competition and monopoly.

      Decision-making under uncertainty and over multiple time periods is introduced, relaxing some of the restrictive assumptions made in the first year module.

      The knowledge gained is applied to such issues as investment in human capital (e.g. education), saving and investment decisions, insurance and criminal deterrence.

    • Operations Management (Elective)

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

      This module provides you with an understanding of how the fundamental principles of operations management can support the improvement of management performance in both public and private organisations.

      During the module, you will apply these principles to both manufacturing and service operations, and gain an understanding of the systemic and interactive nature of operations management problems and their relationship to the external environment. You will develop quantitative and qualitative analytical skills, through guided problem-based activities and case study analysis.

      The content of the module covers:

      • Operations strategy
      • Designing operations
      • Organisation design
      • Planning and control
      • Lean operations
      • Project management
      • Managing quality and continous process/product improvement
      • Managing the supply chain and future direction of travel for operations management.
    • Principles of Finance (Elective)

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1

      This module provides an introduction to financial markets, instruments and concepts, and is designed for students with no previous knowledge of finance.

      It begins with an overview of different financial institutions, and the products that they commonly provide and trade. Major historical events in the financial markets are also discussed, illustrating their importance in the wider economy. Reference will also be made, where appropriate, to skills and products contributing to personal financial literacy.

      Topics include:

      • concepts relating to equity
      • loan and bond markets
      • beginning with interest rates
      • returns
      • time value of money
      • discounting
      • present value.
    • Theory of Investments (Elective)

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2

      Learn about the common types of investments and gain a thorough grounding in the analysis of investment portfolios.

      You cover:

      • traditional asset classes and the investment environment (including the investment process and a discussion of mutual funds and other investment companies)
      • standard risk-return-based asset allocation methods
      • popular index models
      • theoretical and empirical asset pricing models and their applications to investment analysis
      • security analysis and performance measurement.

      This module is not suitable if you are studying a single-honours Finance BSc degree.

  • Education
    • Access, Equity and Gender

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

      Access to education is at the heart of development and is central to the Millennium Development Goals. A lack of education reflects and reinforces poverty and access to quality education is a means for poverty reduction. This module will discuss the global agenda of Education for All, access to education, gender's role and relationship with access to education, at all levels including primary, secondary and higher, and the concept of equity.

      The module has three overlapping themes – Access, Equity, and Gender – which reveal the policy challenges of delivering education for all. The three themes build upon one another sequentially and the module moves through levels of education from pre school to university. Access to education has increased during the 15 years of the millenium development goals, but the 'For All' aspect has not been met. There are still millions of children who do not complete basic education, and higher education is still dominated by the socially privileged in many low, middle and high-income countries.

      Suggested lecture / seminar titles:

      1. The Education For All agenda and the Millenium Development Goals
      2. Conceptualising access to primary school
      3. In school but not learning
      4. Policies for expanding access to quality education
      5. Non-state providers – reaching out to the excluded?
      6. Understanding equity – horizontal and vertical
      7. Inequality and social exclusion
      8. Gender and education
      9. Girls excluded?
      10. Transitions and access to secondary education
      11. School, a safe space for girls?
      12. Higher education in developing countries: challenges and successes
      13. Module summary
    • Contemporary Debates in Social Policy: Theory and Practice

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

      This elective explores and questions the ways in which social policy shapes and is shaped by society, taking a critical approach to investigate contemporary issues in areas such as mental health, disability, parenting, family intervention, education, employment, poverty, youth justice, ageing society, consumerism and choice. While the main focus will be on UK social policy, comparisons from contrasting international social policy models will help to provide rich discussion and debate. The elective looks at the struggles over equality and social inclusion which characterise contemporary social policy positions, using a research-led approach to consider the ways that policies evolve and affect the social well-being of a nation. Throughout 12 weeks it will explore concepts of `social justice,` need, `fairness and `well-being' in relation to UK social policy and policy-driven practices, taking note of the voices of recipients of social policy practices through the involvement of key contacts from those using health and other services in some of the lectures. Learning will take place through a combination of lectures, online activities and student-led seminars. Online learning will include formative assessment through involvement in forums and self assessment quizzes, as well as the opportunity to access discussion groups around case studies and key topics of interest. Students will be expected to prepare work for seminars, and case studies around current issues will be used to promote active problem based engagement with the effects of social policy practice. The module will be formally assessed by an essay incorporating knowledge from research, theory and policy-in-practice.

    • Cross Cultural Perspectives on Teaching, Learning and Assessment

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2

      This module is a 15 credit undergraduate module to be offered to Year 1 students in term 2, either as part of an Education 60 credit Pathway or an International Education & Development 60 credit Pathway.

      The module aims to introduce theoretical and conceptual approaches to the curriculum, pedagogy and assessment while encouraging you to critically reflect on your own learning and to know and usefully compare how different countries draw up their curricula, how they teach it and how they assess student learning.

      The module begins by focusing in on how you learn, making direct links to the previous module and situating that learning in your own context. Theories of learning will frame the module. From here, the module explores pedagogical models originating from theories of learning within the UK, Europe and internationally. The following two sessions focus on assessment, discussing your own experiences of being assessed at school and in higher education and drawing in, and critiquing, international comparisons of student learning from surveys such as Progress in Student Assessment (PISA) and Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

      The module will then look more closely at how the curriculum is constructed, bringing in political economy, politics, culture and history and will look internationally at different curriculum models in upper, middle and low-income countries. A third session on the curriculum will provide a critical look at alternative curricula for learning such as those in Montessori and Steiner schools, at Free Schools in the UK, and at Complementary Education Programmes for marginalised children in low-income countries. The module will examine who is included in the curriculum and who is excluded, in the UK and in low-income countries.

      The module concludes by looking at global policy drivers for the curriculum, pedagogy and assessment.

      The module will cover:

      1. How do you learn? (Re)Visiting theories of learning
      2. Pedagogical practices in the UK: now and then
      3. Critical pedagogies for social transformation
      4. Pedagogical practices internationally: From Finland to India
      5. Measuring what you have learnt: formative and summative assessment
      6. International comparisons of student learning and their implications for the UK and beyond
      7. Who decides what you learn, when, how & why? Foundations of curriculum construction
      8. Evaluating curriculum models in developed and developing countries
      9. Breaking the rules: alternative curricula in the UK and globally
      10. Meeting the needs of individuals in the curriculum in the UK
      11. International comparison of inclusion and exclusion in developing countries
      12. Global policy drivers for curriculum, pedagogy and assessment
    • Developing Role Models: Peer-Led Mentoring in Schools

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2; Year 2, Term 2

      The Role Models Project is a peer-led mentoring project. It trains students to create and facilitate workshops for young people (aged 12–15) at BACA (Brighton Aldridge Community Academy). This provides young people in the local community with role models, a safe supported space to be listened to and ask questions, and an appropriate environment in which to engage with important PSHE topics.

      You combine academic learning with practical application to research, design and deliver workshops to the young people at BACA. You'll bring your own passion and ideas, and reflect on your own experiences, values and 'what you wish you’d known'.

      Training will build your skills and confidence in participatory facilitation and working with young people, as well as:

      • the project’s social pedagogic theoretical framework
      • mental health and wellbeing
      • safeguarding and boundaries.

      Developing Role Models: Mentoring can be taken independently or as a follow up to Discovering Role Models: Mentoring. This module is an opportunity to create more in-depth workshops, focusing on developing young people’s agency and critical thinking. The workshops created will be led by what you are passionate about within the broad PSHE framework, feedback received on the Autumn term and what the young people at BACA feel is relevant and interesting to them. Past themes have included gender identity, sexuality, relationships, the media and more.

      More information can be found on the Role Models page.

    • Discovering Role Models: Peer-Led Mentoring in Schools

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1; Year 2, Term 1

      The Role Models Project is a peer-led mentoring project. It trains students to create and facilitate workshops for young people (aged 12–15) at BACA (Brighton Aldridge Community Academy). This provides young people in the local community with role models, a safe supported space to be listened to and ask questions, and an appropriate environment in which to engage with important PSHE topics.

      You'll bring your own passion and ideas, and reflect on your own experiences, values and 'what you wish you’d known'. Training will build your skills and confidence in participatory facilitation and working with young people, as well as:

      • the project’s social pedagogic theoretical framework
      • mental health and wellbeing
      • safeguarding and boundaries.

      You combine academic learning with practical application to research, design and deliver workshops. The workshops have an open theme on mental health and wellbeing. Your role is to consider what topics are important to you, research contemporary approaches, and – most importantly – listen to the young people, in order to create workshops that are relevant, interesting and useful for them. Past topics have included everything from emotional literacy to supporting your peers to body image ideals on Instagram.

      You can this as a stand-alone module, or follow it with Developing Role Models: Mentoring in the spring term – developing your experience and skills even further. 

      More information can be found on the Role Models page.

    • Education for Development: Aid, Policy and the Global Agenda

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1

      This module is a 15 credit undergraduate module to be offered to Year 1 students in term 1, as part of an International Education & Development 60 credit Pathway.

      This module introduces international education and development through three lenses. The module first examines why education is seen as important for development, drawing upon economic, rights based and socio cultural perspectives. It then examines the way education is measured and targets are set for development. The final section of the module introduces the international actors and political economy of delivering the education for all agenda.

      The module provides grounding in education and international development, with a particular focus on the challenges facing resource-constrained and rapidly expanding educational systems. This will equip students with an understanding of the role of education in international development and develop critical, political and methodological perspectives.

      Suggested topic:
      Section 1: Education and development
      Introduction to the field: the education and development relationship
      Education for economic growth
      Education, development and social equity
      Gender and education for development
      Citizenship, curriculum and identity

      Section 2: Measuring Education For All
      Changing patterns of educational access
      Globalisation and educational reforms: educational quality
      Education and social inclusion
      Education and health in the global south

      Section 3: Architecture of Education For All
      Educational aid and the global agenda: International actors in the field
      Teachers and teacher training in the Global South
      Non-state providers of education

    • Education, Education, Education; Theory, Practice and Politics

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1

      In this module, you explore historical and contemporary aspects of the English Education system. You also briefly cover the similarities and differences between the nation states and examine the interplay and interrelationships between policy theory and practice in education. 

      You will learn about:

      • the history and background to education in England
      • the purposes and role of education
      • the theoretical frameworks that inform the way that children learn and their relationship to pedagogies used in classrooms
      • education structures, policies and practices in England
      • the relationships between theory, policy and practice 
      • the nature and role of governmental power and its impact on educational policy discourses
      • how research in education is used to support a greater critical understanding of the academic field of education.

       

    • Education, Peacebuilding and Conflict

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

      In recent years, the nature of the relationship between education, conflict and peacebuilding has risen up the international development agenda.

      In this module, you critically explore the relationship between education and conflict in low income countries. You problematise the complex and multidirectional ways that education and conflict affect each other, and the role that education can potentially play in both the production and prevention of violent armed conflict.

      You cover the delivery of education in conflict and post-conflict settings, thematic issues related to, for example, education for refugees, child soldiers and other marginalised groups - and critically analyse the policies, politics and practices of international organisations operating in these contexts.

      Your studies in this module are grounded both in theory and empirical evidence on the complex issues involved in the delivery of education in conflict-affected contexts, and involve a combination of lectures, participatory group work and presentations.

      Your lectures for this module may be structured as follows:

      • Education, conflict and peacebuilding

        In this introductory lecture, you're introduced to the module, and begin by tracing the rise of interest in the field of education, conflict and peacebuilding both as a field of research and practice. You locate the emergence of the field in relation to post-World War II political, economic and social developments. You trace the events, agencies and relationships that have contributed to the rise in interest in conflict and education that has occurred since 2000. In seminars, you also discuss and examine key readings.

      • The multiple faces of education and conflict

        In this lecture, you focus on the multiple ways that education and conflict intersect and relate to each other. Your studies highlight the way education can be both a catalyst for war and peace. You explore illustrative examples of the different ways that education - as a practice, as an institution, and as a basic social service - can strengthen sustainable peacebuilding processes, as well as undermine them. In seminars, you also discuss and examine key readings.

      • The global governance of education in conflict contexts

        In this lecture, you explore the different agencies and actors involved in the global governance and delivery of education in conflict-affected contexts - from major UN organisations, such as UNICEF, to bi-lateral agencies, such as DFID, international NGOs like Save the Children, nation and regional governments and grassroots social movements. Your studies highlight the different logics and drivers for engagement, the differing priorities and the tensions and contradictions therein. In seminars, you also discuss and examine key readings.

      Other seminar topics in this module may include:

      • the role of teachers in conflict and peacebuilding
      • the delivery of education in times of war
      • refugee education
      • youth, education and conflict
      • education and post-conflict reconstruction
      • education and reconciliation in post-conflict contexts
      • gender, education and peacebuilding
      • attacks on education - motivations and mechanisms of protection
      • education as counterinsurgency - the use of education as a weapon of war
      • conclusions and course wrap-up.
    • Exploring Death and Dying; Cultural, Theoretical and Practice Perspectives

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

    • Inclusion, Diversity and Equity in Education

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

      This module is a 15 credit undergraduate module to be offered to Year 2 students in term 1, as part of an Education 60 credit Pathway. The module provides an opportunity to explore what is meant by inclusion and exclusion and the implications of these concepts for education policies, systems and practices in England and internationally. The module will include an in-depth focus on how constructions of gender, ‘race’, social class, poverty, disability sexuality and behavioural norms contribute to the inclusion and/or exclusion of particular groups of young people. Each session will adopt a case study approach and provide an overview of the key issues involved in ensuring equality of access, provision and learning. There will be a strong focus on the evidence relating to each case and approaches at practice level.

      The module will be assessed by a case study, providing an opportunity for students to apply their understanding of issues relating to the inclusion and/or exclusion to ao a group and context which they consider to be of particular interest. The case study will include a discussion of strategies used to promote inclusion and evidence of their effectiveness drawn from a range of secondary sources and conclude with recommendations for policy and practice drawn from the evidence presented.

      Module content by week

      1. Introduction to the module and to key concepts: inclusion, diversity and equity
      2. The power of ‘the norm’
      3. Who is vulnerable – and to what?
      4. Including girls – excluding boys?
      5. Ethnicity and exclusion
      6. Sexuality
      7. Barriers to the inclusion of parents and carers
      8. SEND
      9. Maximising the impact of teaching assistants
      10. Learning outside mainstream contexts: models of inclusion?
      11. Global perspectives on inclusion: overcoming barriers in context
      12. Developing inclusive educational systems: implications for future policy and practice
    • Knowledge and Society; Education, Identity and The (late) Modern State

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

      This module is a 15 credit undergraduate module to be offered to Year 2 students in term 1, as part of an Education 60 credit Pathway. The module aims to allow students to critically engage through a variety of theoretical perspectives with the development of institutionalised education in modern times. It explores how this is associated with the forging of the nation state. It uses the English state as an example, indicating how this was underpinned initially by the ideals of Western Enlightenment thought, and latterly by neoliberal ideologies and the increasing imperative in contemporary globalised societies for education to serve economic ends. It effectively traces the move from a welfare to a post-welfare state and notes how these different formations were contextualised by imperialism, industrialisation and latterly by globalised economic relations of exchange and competition. This leads to questions about the positioning of education as a state institution within these different political and moral economies.

      In particular the module introduces a range of social theorists to consider education in post-welfare societies, addressing both contexts of schooling and higher education. It takes a particular interest in the problematic relationship of institutionalised education and issues of social justice and equity across different education sectors from primary through to higher education. This includes an introduction to the equation of rationality with bourgeois masculinity, enabling a critical understanding of how other identities are often excluded within modern thought, producing deficit accounts of black, female and working class subjects. Reversing this pathological gaze, the module explores the reproduction of gender, race and social class inequalities in contemporary education systems in terms of power relations and the vested interests at stake in maintaining this account.

      Indicative topics

      1. Education and the Modern State

      2. Education Policy and Politics

      3. Progressive Education and Social Reproduction

      4. The Politics of the Curriculum - the post-war social democratic consensus and its exclusion

      5. Structures of Knowledge - reason and its exclusions

      6. The politics of the curriculum - neoliberal instrumentalisms and the curriculum of the dead

      7. Education and the Economy

      8. Contemporary education and the reproduction of social inequalities: Intersections of race, class and gender.

      9. The reconstruction of initial teacher education and its knowledge structure

      10. Widening participation, meritocracy and fair access to higher education

      11. Moral panics and absent presences: the construction of gender in schooling and higher education

      12. Education and citizenship revisiting the relationship of education and the nation state.

    • Migrant and Refugee Well-Being: Theory and Practice

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

      This module offers students the opportunity to examine the well-being of migrants and refugees. Well-being is defined as multidimensional and incorporates the political, economic, health, environment and social contexts in which migrants and refugees exist.

      In the module students examine the historical and political contexts in which different groups of migrants are placed, including the specific situations of asylum seekers and refugees. These are shown to have distinct impacts on the health and social care services migrants receive, and on particular issues of entitlement and access. The welfare contexts of different receiving societies are examined including the impact of current debates on welfare provision for migrants and refugees across the globe. Within these contexts contemporary services for migrants and refugees are examined, including the roles played by central government, local authorities and NGOs. Models of good practice in health and social care are examined as are the prospects for the transfer of good practice across countries.

    • Understanding Autism and Education

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

  • Global Studies
    • Business in World Politics

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

      In this module, you explore the role of business in world politics from the perspectives of both International Relations and Management Studies.

      Drawing on the literature on global governance, non-state actors, co-regulation, and private governance, you explore different roles that businesses play in world politics, including as lobbyists, partners in governance and agents of implementation.

      You also examine whether and, if so, why the role of business in world politics has increased.

      Drawing on Management Studies literature on non-market strategy, corporate political activity and international business, you explore the role of the political environment for corporate strategy, and analyse what the non-market environment of business consists of.

      You address questions such as:

      • why companies engage in world politics
      • how they choose specific strategies of political engagement
      • what the challenges and opportunities of thin regulation at the global level are.
    • Culture and Representation (Elective pathway)

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

      In this module, you focus on the anthropological master trope of 'culture' and on the political dimensions of representing culture or 'cultures'.

      You consider how anthropological understandings of 'culture', as well as anthropologists' modes of analysing and representing it in anthropological work, developed over the 20th century, partially in conversation with other disciplines.

      You also examine how 'culture' operates as a key idea in the public domain, used by politicians, community and human rights activists, artists, scientists, museum curators and others, in relation to a wide range of issues and debates when distinctions between 'ourselves' and 'others' are at stake.

      Finally, you look at some activities within the cultural domain (such as music, dance, theatre, verbal artistry), which have a performative dimension. You consider how anthropologists have approached these activities to address questions about structure and agency, embodiment, experience, art and aesthetics, creativity, power and protest.

    • Environmental Risks and Hazards (Elective)

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2

      This module introduces the risks and hazards associated with the Earth's natural environments. It considers the timescales, magnitudes and frequencies of the associated processes, and the assessment and management of resultant risks and hazards. These are illustrated from a number of case studies, which may include hazards arising from tectonic, mass movement, climate, ice and snow, atmospheric and sea-level processes. A particular focus of the module will be on hazards and risks in cold regions, where environmental change is particularly rapid and where there are growing pressures from resource exploration and extraction.

    • Ethnographic Film

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1; Year 2, Term 1

      In this module, you are introduced to the discipline of anthropology through the medium of film from the early twentieth century to the present-day.

      You gain an overview of the discipline and its history through film, and addresses some of the central concerns of social and cultural anthropology, including:

      • fieldwork and ethnography
      • sameness and difference
      • religion and ritual
      • kinship
      • gender
      • race/ethnicity
      • migration
      • globalisation.

      You become acquainted with different regional contexts and central theoretical debates in the discipline, through a selection of ethnographic films - produced in countries such as Senegal, Kenya, Canada, Bali, Papua New Guinea, India, Britain, France and along the migratory routes from Afghanistan to Turkey.

      In this module, you produce a short film as part of group work, as well as undertaking a written assignment.

    • Ethnography of the Middle East and Central Asia

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

    • Foundations of International Relations (pathway elective)

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2

      This module introduces you to the conceptual history of international relations and outlines the specific characteristics of International Relations (IR) as a distinct scholarly discipline. We will consider what constitutes its core conceptual and methodological coordinates at the present time by looking at historical development of IR through a series of conceptual and methodological debates which will allow you to theoretically frame the global issues discussed in the first semester. Classically these debates are conceived of as tracing a path from idealism via realism to a pluralist methodological position. Understanding these debates, the circumstances that have given rise to them, and the methods they have generated will give you a good basic orientation in the disciplinary terrain of IR.

    • Gender Across Cultures

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2; Year 2, Term 2

      This module focuses on the centrality of gender as a factor structuring, ultimately, all social relations.

      The module will therefore explore:

      1. Relationships between men and women, men and men, women and women, as personal and sexual relations, within the household, the labour market, the state
      2. How gender relations and practices are performed in different cultures
      3. The role of gender in processes of social transformation
      4. The impact of industrialisation and migration on gender relations

    • Gender: Rethinking Politics

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

      In this module, you interrogate how an understanding of gender helps us ask critical questions about the spaces and practices of politics, indeed about the nature and emergence of 'the political'.

      To achieve this, you examine a number of theories of gender: biological, psychological, social constructivist and more.

      You also survey the historical evolution of feminism as critical theory and practice and the theorization of masculinity. From these theoretical bases, you then examine:

      • the gendered nature of central political institutions, such as 'the state', law, democracy, citizenship
      • political practices: war, security, the extension of human rights, development. 
    • Global Cultures, Local Lives

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1

      This module explores anthropology as an exciting, 'living' subject, alive to the concerns of different communities and populations living across the globe, and as cutting edge in terms of the research conducted by anthropologists at Sussex as they actively engage with issues of social, cultural and global transformation. This is accomplished through a module structure which revolves around 5 core themes considered central to the subject that capture anthropological thinking on the subjects of culture, identity and representation: kinship; self and body; economy as culture; religion and politics; and work on the global-local interface.

    • Global Issues

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1

      The module aims to introduce you to the study of global politics and global political economy. To do so, we will examine problems, issues and dynamics that have come to shape contemporary political life at the international, transnational and global levels. This introduction will set the scene for later modules that offer an in-depth analysis of these issues, as well as a thorough examination of the theoretical and conceptual tools used by scholars.

    • Global Politics of the Environment

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2; Year 2, Term 2

      The question of whether current forms of economic and political organisation in international society are capable of responding to the challenge of sustainable development is more pertinent than ever before. Questions are being asked about how development can be redefined to accommodate ecological challenges or whether we need to fundamentally rethink notions of growth and progress.

      This module takes a critical look at the actors and issues implicated in the emerging global debate on sustainable development. It engages with competing theoretical perspectives about the drivers of environmental change and how best to explain the nature of international cooperation on the environment and its limits, but also aims to provide you with a detailed understanding of the defining issues and tensions that constitute the struggle to define future notions of development.

      The module will address empirical case studies such as climate change, biodiversity and biotechnology and deforestation, as well as the relationship between trade and the environment, finance and the environment and production and the environment in a context of globalisation. You will gain an understanding of the key actors in these debates from governments and international institutions to civil society organisations and corporations and the ways their power and influence can best be understood.

      The module begins with an overview of the shifting nature of the relationship between environment and development in world politics before looking at the key actors in global debates about sustainable development. From there it sets out a range of theoretical tools for understanding the global politics of these issues, before focusing in on a range of issue areas (listed above). It concludes with reflection on prospects for change and the viability of alternative proposals for better addressing the environment and development in world politics.

    • Health, Poverty and Inequality (Pathway elective)

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

      This second year interdisciplinary module is concerned with issues of culture, power and knowledge in the study of health and development. It draws on perspectives from medical anthropology, medical sociology, public health, cultural psychology, feminist and activist politics and development studies to focus on the relationship between poverty, social marginality and illness in a variety of historical and contemporary contexts. Apart from a focus on emerging infectious diseases such as HIV and Aids, we also consider the implications of homelessness, mental health and organ donation for individual health and well-being. The scrutiny of health planning and policies, such as in the domain of maternal and child health, as well as the impact of an increasing intervention of medical technologies in healthcare delivery, are further important aspects of the module.

    • Introduction to Human Rights

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1

      This module will introduce you to the diversity of human rights issues and the different approaches that disciplines take in this field. Each week, a member of faculty drawn from one of a number of departments (including law, anthropology, politics and history) will consider a different human rights theme in which they have specific expertise. Subjects may include human rights and immigration, reproductive rights, rights to sexual orientation, genocide, women's rights, children's rights, minority rights and the United Nations human rights institutions.

    • Introduction to International Political Economy (Pathway elective)

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

      The intensity and scope of the relationship between politics and economics has become a central element of international relations. This module offers a distinctive perspective in terms of which traditional issues of international relations – such as war, trade, integration and international society – can be studied. It considers the central theoretical traditions of international political economy: liberalism, realism, Marxism, neo-institutionalism, and critical theory. It then applies these diverse theoretical traditions in an analysis of the evolution of the state system from the 16th to the 20th century, paying particular attention to the relationship between class and state power, on the one hand, and the capitalist world economy, on the other.

    • People, Culture and the Global Economy

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2

      The purpose of this module is to introduce students to how anthropologists have conceptualised, researched, and generated new understandings of the human activities that comprise economic life. Studying economic life from an anthropological view requires us to rethink such concepts as work and leisure, poverty and wealth, gifts and commodities, money and markets, and the term 'economy' itself. Therefore, economic anthropology enables us to critique some of the universalisms of mainstream economics through which capitalism has become naturalised. Traditionally, economic anthropology has been concerned with systems of exchange, non-industrial economies, and livelihood systems. In addition to covering these topics, we will examine issues of contemporary concern such as class, money, debt, shopping, factories, fair trade, globalisation, bioeconomies, and new strategies and practices of resistance.

    • Postcolonial Africa

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

      The module explores debates over key postcolonial political, economic and sociocultural dynamics in sub-Saharan Africa. It encourages you to think critically about dominant representations of the subcontinent in the West, and to understand different, often conflicting accounts of postcolonial continuities and transformations.

      Topics include debates over some of the following:

      • the character of the postcolonial state and governance, nationalism and ethnicity
      • borders
      • the politics of land and natural resources
      • processes of urbanisation
      • mobility and new forms of transnational connection between Africa, Europe and China.
    • The Anthropology of Sexuality

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

      In this module, you become familiar with anthropological work on sexuality, and will develop your understanding of this in respect to themes such as:

      • cultural construction
      • globalization
      • materiality and exchange
      • kinship
      • queer epistemologies.

      You examine the history of sexuality as a contested subject within anthropology, and also in terms of new and emerging scholarship in the field. In particular, you widen your understanding of sexuality as implicated in a wide range of social issues – beyond the biology of sexuality and as relevant to core anthropological/social scientific concepts, in theory and in practice.

      You focus on key concepts and explore a range of ethnographic case studies, locating each topic in contextually specific perspectives. In lectures and seminars, you gain skills in essay writing and in module revision.

      This module covers:

      1. Sex, Sexuality and Anthropology
      In this lecture and seminar, you examine key themes and module content - exploring what anthropology is and what defines an anthropological approach to sexuality - which will entail exploring what constitutes sexuality as a domain of study.
      2. Sexuality and Cultural Construction
      In this week, you locate anthropological debates on sexuality within an analysis of the social and cultural construction of every lives and intimacies. You explore the origins of constructivist perspectives with historiographical research and their influence on anthropology.
      3. Sexuality, Kinship and Care.
      In this lecture and seminar, you examine intimate connections between, and transgressions beyond, kinship and sexuality. You consider whether anthropology has tended to ignore sexuality in favour of kinship. You examine analyses of kinship and their implications for anthropological theories of 'care and relatedness'.
      4. Duka’s Dilemma – An Ethnographic Case-Study
      In this week’s lecture and seminar, you focus on a case-study of the ethnographic film Duka’s Dilemma. You watch an excerpt from the film as a basis to explore issues in the visual ethnographic representation of sexual lives and the relationship between kinship and sexuality.
      5. Globalisation, Commodification and Sexualities
      In this week, you explore sexuality as associated with modernity and social change and consider why changes in socio-sexual values are so accented in studies of globalisation. You question associations between individualism, modernity and the commodification of sexualities.
      6. Same-Sex Sexualities and Queer Anthropology
      During this week, you examine ethnographic material pertaining to the study of same-sex sexual subjectivities and practices, and consider the broader relevance of this literature. You explore new discourses of homophobia (e.g. in Uganda) along with new and positive changes in laws and rights pertaining to same-sex sexualities globally.
      7. Sexual Exchange and Work
      In this week, you look at ways in which sex is sold or exchanged in return for money, favours, goods, love or protection. You consider this in relation to perspectives in the materiality of everyday sexual lives and anthropological perspectives on exchange in intimate lives and relationships.
      8. Transfiction – An Ethnographic Case-Study
      During this week, you focus on the Ethnographic film ‘Transfiction’ – an example of ‘ethnofiction’. You watch excerpts from the film in respect of issues pertaining to the ethical representation of sexual life.
    • Understanding Global Migration

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

      This interdisciplinary module focuses on the profound impact of human migration on the world we live in. You explore a range of geographical, economic, political, social and cultural issues surrounding migration. The module introduces the key theories, concepts and ideas used to define and understand migration, and covers the main types, causes and consequences of migration. Following a roughly chronological sequence in order to foster a sense of historical continuity and change, you covers topics such as labour migration, refugees, irregular migration, integration and exclusion, migration and development, and the impact of gender on the migration process.

  • Languages and English Language Teaching
    • Arabic Ab initio A

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1

      This module acts as an introduction to the foreign language for those with little or no prior knowledge of the target language (TL).

      This module:

      • enables you to understand basic information and communicate effectively in the TL, in everyday situations at an elementary level
      • provides opportunities across various topics to practise understanding and communication in the TL using the four skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at an elementary level
      • introduces fundamental elements of the TL language structures, vocabulary, syntax and pronunciation, and provides a solid foundation for progression in the TL
      • introduces the background culture of the TL through contextualised activities, texts and audio, audio-visual and digital media.

      This module is equivalent to level A1 (Basic User) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages.

    • Arabic Ab initio B

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2

      You will already have a basic prior knowledge of the target language (TL).

      Building on existing levels of proficiency at level A1 (basic user) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages, this module aims to:

      • enable you to understand basic information and communicate effectively in the TL in everyday situations, at a simple level
      • provide opportunities across a variety of general topics for practice of understanding and communication in the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at a basic level
      • introduce fundamental elements of the TL language structures, vocabulary, syntax and pronunciation, and continue to provide a solid foundation for progression in the TL
      • present the background culture of the TL through a variety of contextualised activities and text, audio and audio-visual materials.

      Successful completion of the module is at least equivalent to level A2 (basic user) of the CEFR for Languages.

    • Arabic Advanced A

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

      This stage 5 advanced module is for students who have already acquired the capacity to function with some autonomy in the target language (TL).

      Building on existing levels of proficiency at level B1 (Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages the module aims to:

      • enable students to understand the main ideas within extended discourse and to communicate effectively in the TL, with increasing fluency, confidence and spontaneity, in a variety of contexts
      • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at an advanced level
      • introduce and develop the range of complex elements of TL language structures, syntax, and vocabulary to allow continued progression in the TL
      • facilitate the analysis of some aspects of the general social, political and/or cultural background of the language through a variety of contextualised activities and materials, in a range of media – eg text, audio, audio-visual, digital.

      Successful completion of the module is equivalent to level B1-B2 (Independent User) of the CEFR for Languages.

    • Arabic Advanced B

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

      This stage 6 advanced module is for students who have already acquired the capacity to function with some autonomy in the target language (TL). Building on existing levels of proficiency at level B1 (Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages, the module aims to:

      • enable students to understand the main ideas within extended discourse and to communicate effectively in the TL, with increasing fluency, confidence and spontaneity, in a variety of contexts
      • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at an advanced level
      • consolidate and develop the range of complex TL language structures, syntax, and specialised vocabulary to allow further accuracy and control in use of the TL
      • facilitate the analysis of some aspects of the general social, political and/or cultural background of the language through a variety of contextualised activities and materials, in a range of media – e.g. text, audio, audio-visual, digital.

      Successful completion of the module is equivalent to level B2 (Independent User) of the CEFR for Languages.

    • Arabic Intermediate A

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

      This stage 3 module is for students with some basic knowledge and experience of the target language (TL). Building on existing levels of proficiency at level A2 (Basic User) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages, the module aims to:

      • enable students to understand key information and to communicate effectively in the TL, sometimes spontaneously, in less routine situations, at a standard level
      • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at a standard level
      • consolidate and develop the range of key elements of TL language structures, vocabulary, syntax and pronunciation, to allow progression in the TL
      • present the background culture and society of the TL through a variety of contextualised activities and materials, in a range of media, eg text, audio, audio-visual, digital.

      Successful completion of the module is equivalent to level A2-B1 (Basic-Independent User) of the CEFR for Languages.

    • Arabic Intermediate B

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

      This stage 4 intermediate module is for students who have already acquired the capacity to function with some independence in the target language (TL). Building on existing levels of proficiency at level A2-B1 (Basic/Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages, the module aims to:

      • enable you to understand key information and to communicate effectively in the TL, sometimes spontaneously, in less routine situations, at a standard level 
      • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at a standard level 
      • consolidate and develop the range of key elements of TL language structures, vocabulary, syntax and pronunciation, to allow continued progression in the TL
      • present the background culture and society of the TL through a variety of contextualised activities and materials, in a range of media, e.g. text, audio, audio-visual, digital.

      Successful completion of the module is equivalent to level B1 (Independent User) of the CEFR for Languages.

    • British Sign Language and Deaf Culture 1

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1

      This first-stage module of the 60-credit pathway offers an introduction to British Sign Language (BSL) and Deaf Culture for students with little or no prior knowledge of the target language (TL). We aim to introduce the basic visual/manual form of BSL and to allow you to discover:

      • how to use hands and eyes to form and understand basic signs and sentences, in basic situations
      • what is a sign, and what is not a sign
      • commonly used phrases, questions and imperatives used in conversation, across a range of basic topics (e.g. weather, holidays, shopping)
      • the cultural rules for interaction with Deaf people
      • an introduction to a selection of perspectives on BSL as a language.

      Classes will consist of a variety of activities and include regular practice in pronunciation (production of signs) and listening (understanding signs), simulations, practical exercises and conversation etc. They are based around themes, grammatical structures and language skills, to encourage autonomous use of the TL. Seminar activities are complemented by guided independent study, individually and in groups, and will make use of Study Direct and other technologies.

      This module is at A1-A2 on the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages. Equivalent Signature Level 101; 102.

    • British Sign Language and Deaf Culture 2

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2

      This second-stage module of the 60-credit pathway in British Sign Language (BSL) and Deaf Culture will develop your range and conversational technique in BSL in everyday contexts. It will also expand your knowledge and awareness of Deaf culture. The module aims to enable you to:

      • hold a conversation
      • gain a clear understanding on how to sign grammatically correct sentences
      • create his/her own everyday sentences about everyday topics (e.g. food/cooking, hobbies, travel) in a range of everyday settings
      • study the world of Deaf people in the UK and abroad
      • develop study skills to access academic resources relating to Deaf people and deaf issues
      • begin to explore Deaf culture topics which relate to the your discipline.

      Classes will consist of a variety of activities, include regular practice in pronunciation (production of signs) and listening (understanding signs), simulations, practical exercises and conversations etc. They are based around themes, grammatical structures and language skills to encourage autonomous use of the TL.

      Seminar activities are complemented by guided independent study, individually and in groups, making use of Study Direct and other technologies.

      This module is at A2-A2+ on the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages.

    • British Sign Language and Deaf Culture 3

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1; Year 2, Term 1

      This third-stage module of the 60-credit pathway in British Sign Language (BSL) and Deaf Culture will continue to develop the student's range and conversational technique in BSL in familiar and everyday contexts, and to broaden the student's knowledge and awareness of Deaf culture. Additionally, the module offers the student the opportunity to discuss in BSL a specific chosen topic of interest relating to BSL and/or Deaf culture.

      The module aims to enable the student to:

      • start and hold a conversation 
      • demonstrate confident use of sign language grammar at a basic level and explore more complex structures 
      • develop study skills to observe, record and evaluate their own use/understanding of BSL, using video technology
      • work in groups to explore new topics and develop conversations in discursive topics (e.g. types of education, examples of Deaf culture, media, where Deaf spaces form)
      • develop an understanding of Deaf lives and how Deaf cultural identity is encouraged and discouraged across times and places.

      Classes will consist of a variety of activities, include regular practice in pronunciation (production of signs) and listening (understanding signs), simulations, practical exercises and conversation etc., based around themes, grammatical structures and language skills, to encourage autonomous use of the TL.

    • British Sign Language and Deaf Culture 4

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

      This fourth and final stage module of the 60-credit pathway in British Sign Language (BSL) and Deaf Culture will further develop and consolidate the student's range and conversational technique in BSL to routine contexts, and broaden the student's knowledge and awareness of Deaf culture. Additionally, the module offers the student the opportunity to present and discuss in BSL an agreed topic of interest which relates to the student's main discipline of study. This may take the form of a community engagement project.

      The module aims to enable the student to:

      • use BSL in a range of routine settings, and converse on a topic of their interest
      • demonstrate clear use of sign language grammar at an intermediate level and use of some complex structures
      • present and lead a discussion in areas of interest (e.g. descriptions on types of education, how Deaf culture is manifested, role of the media, how Deaf spaces are formed)
      • complete a project on a topic of interest related to their own studies, as agreed with the tutor 
      • develop study skills to create a project report in BSL, supported with references and quotes in English.


      Classes will consist of a variety of activities, include regular practice in pronunciation (production of signs) and listening (understanding signs), simulations, practical exercises and conversation etc., based around themes, grammatical structures and language skills, to encourage autonomous use of the TL.

      Seminar activities are complemented by guided independent study, individually and in groups, and will make use of Study Direct and other technologies.

      This module is at B1 on the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for LanguagesEquivalent Signature Level 202 part B; 203.

    • British Sign Language and Deaf Culture 5

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

      This module is a post-beginner stage for students with basic prior knowledge of the target language (TL). Building on existing levels of proficiency at A2 level of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages, the module aims to provide the opportunity for students to:

      • develop practical applied competence in the four TL skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing
      • consolidate and develop a range of standard lexical, phonetic, and grammatical principles to allow rapid progression in the TL
      • encourage autonomous use of the TL
      • develop contextualised cultural knowledge and awareness through study of authentic TL materials in a range of media (e.g. text-based, digital and audio-visual).

      This module is at B1 – B2 on the CEFR for Languages.

    • British Sign Language and Deaf Culture 6

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

      This sixth and final stage module of the 90-credit pathway in British Sign Language (BSL) and Deaf Culture will allow you to improve fluency in conversational technique in BSL, to add specialised vocabulary to your repertoire, and develop your knowledge and awareness of approaches to professional and academic engagement with Deaf people.

      The module aims to enable you to:

      • demonstrate with fluency, clear use of sign language grammar and some complex structures, at an upper-intermediate level
      • analyse your own production, using TL linguistic reference tools
      • take opportunities to use BSL in a professional setting
      • explore opportunities to engage with Deaf people on a topic of specific interest
      • develop knowledge of Deaf culture and sign language in specific areas of interest (e.g. discourses in pedagogy and deaf children, development of oralism in 19th century onwards, the evolution of video-telephony technology, implementing human rights in developing countries)
      • translate (e.g. from English to BSL) specific professional and/or academic information in a semi-public arena using commonly available technology (e.g. Facebook, Twitter, vlogs)
      • develop study skills to create an evaluation report in BSL, supported with references and quotes in English.

      Classes will consist of a variety of activities, include regular practice in pronunciation (production of signs) and listening (understanding signs), simulations, practical exercises, conversation and discussion, based around themes, grammatical structures, linguistic conventions, and language skills, to encourage autonomous use of the TL.

      This module is at B2 on the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages.

    • Chinese Ab initio A

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1

      This acts as an introduction if you have little or no prior knowledge of the target language (TL).

      This module:

      • enables you to understand basic information and communicate effectively in the TL, in everyday situations at an elementary level
      • provides opportunities across general topics for practising the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at an elementary level
      • introduces fundamental elements of the TL language structures, vocabulary, syntax and pronunciation, and provides a solid foundation for progression in the TL
      • introduces the background culture of the TL through various activities and text, audio, audio-visual and digital material.

      This module is equivalent to level A1 (basic user) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages.

    • Chinese Ab initio B

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2

      You will have basic prior knowledge of the target language (TL).

      This module:

      • enables you to understand basic information and communicate effectively in the TL in everyday situations, at a simple level
      • provides opportunities across general topics for practising the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at a basic level
      • introduces fundamental elements of the TL language structures, vocabulary, syntax and pronunciation, and continues to provide a solid foundation for progression in the TL
      • presents the background culture of the TL through various activities and text, audio, audio-visual and digital material.

      This module is at least equivalent to level A2 (basic user) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages.

    • Chinese Advanced A

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

      This stage 5 advanced module is for students who have already acquired the capacity to function with some autonomy in the target language (TL). Building on existing levels of proficiency at level B1 (Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages, the module aims to:

      • enable students to understand the main ideas within extended discourse and to communicate effectively in the TL, with increasing fluency, confidence and spontaneity, in a variety of contexts
      • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at an advanced level
      • introduce and develop the range of complex elements of TL language structures, syntax, and vocabulary to allow continued progression in the TL
      • facilitate the analysis of some aspects of the general social, political and/or cultural background of the language through a variety of contextualised activities and materials, in a range of media – eg text, audio, audio-visual, digital.

      Successful completion of the module is equivalent to level B1-B2 (Independent User) of the CEFR for Languages.

    • Chinese Advanced B

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

      This stage 6 advanced module is for students who have already acquired the capacity to function with some autonomy in the target language (TL). Building on existing levels of proficiency at level B1 (Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages, the module aims to:

      • enable students to understand the main ideas within extended discourse and to communicate effectively in the TL, with increasing fluency, confidence and spontaneity, in a variety of contexts
      • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at an advanced level
      • consolidate and develop the range of complex TL language structures, syntax, and specialised vocabulary to allow further accuracy and control in use of the TL
      • facilitate the analysis of some aspects of the general social, political and/or cultural background of the language through a variety of contextualised activities and materials, in a range of media, eg text, audio, audio-visual, digital.

      Successful completion of the module is equivalent to level B2 (Independent User) of the CEFR for Languages.

    • Chinese Intermediate A

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

      This stage 3 module is for students with some basic knowledge and experience of the target language (TL). Building on existing levels of proficiency at level A2 (Basic User) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages the module aims to:

      • enable students to understand basic information and to communicate effectively in the TL, in everyday situations at an elementary level
      • provide opportunities across a variety of general topics for practice of understanding and communication in the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at an elementary level
      • consolidate and develop the range of key elements of TL language structures, vocabulary, syntax and pronunciation, to allow progression in the TL
      • present the background culture and society of the TL through a variety of contextualised activities and materials, in a range of media, eg text, audio, audio-visual, digital.

      Successful completion of the module is equivalent to level A2-B1 (Basic-Independent User) of the CEFR for Languages.

    • Chinese Intermediate B

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

      This stage 4 intermediate module is for students who have already acquired the capacity to function with some independence in the target language (TL). Building on existing levels of proficiency at level A2-B1 (Basic/Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages, the module aims to:

      • enable students to understand key information and to communicate effectively in the TL, sometimes spontaneously, in less routine situations, at a standard level 
      • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at a standard level 
      • consolidate and develop the range of key elements of TL language structures, vocabulary, syntax and pronunciation, to allow continued progression in the TL
      • present the background culture and society of the TL through a variety of contextualised activities and materials, in a range of media, (e.g. text, audio, audio-visual, digital).

      Successful completion of the module is equivalent to level B1 (Independent User) of the CEFR for Languages.

    • English for Business and Professional Purposes Intermediate

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1; Year 2, Term 1

      This module offers training in all the communication skills required to undertake academic business and professional studies and to participate or interact in business and other working environments. It will focus on the extended reading and writing skills required in essays, reports, assignments, and general business and professional communication. It will also offer training in the listening and speaking skills required to understand and contribute to seminars, tutorials and lectures on business and professional subjects and to prepare you for oral communication in business and professional practice.

      Pre-requisite – You will not have English as your first language

    • English for Business and Professional Purposes Post-Intermediate

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2; Year 2, Term 2

      The English for Business and Professional Purposes module offers training in all the communication skills required to undertake academic business and professional studies and to participate or interact in business and other working environments. It will focus on the extended reading and writing skills required in essays, reports, assignments, and general business and professional communication. It will also offer training in the listening and speaking skills required to understand and contribute to seminars, tutorials and lectures on business and professional subjects and to prepare you for oral communication in business and professional practice, at a post-intermediate level of English language competence.

    • English Language Accuracy and Academic Practice (Intermediate)

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1

      The module is designed to address the specific needs of speakers of other languages, to familiarise them with the conventions of academic English needed for tertiary study in the UK and to develop the language and skills required for effective study.

    • English Language Accuracy and Academic Practice (Post-Intermediate)

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2; Year 2, Term 2

      The module aims are twofold: to enable you to further improve your language, and to provide further practice and development in your academic skills.

      In the language, you will extend your range of vocabulary and grammar structures and develop your formal accuracy. In the academic skills, you will work on tasks to develop your written and oral communication skills within the context of your own disciplines, and integrate reading and listening skills to these tasks.

      Pre-requisite - You will not have English as your first language

    • English Language Accuracy and Academic Practice (Post-Intermediate)

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1; Year 2, Term 1

      The module aims are twofold: to enable you to further improve your language, and to provide further practice and development in your academic skills.

      In the language, you will extend your range of vocabulary and grammar structures and develop your formal accuracy. In the academic skills, you will work on tasks to develop your written and oral communication skills within the context of your own disciplines, and integrate reading and listening skills to these tasks.

      Pre-requisite – You will not have English as your first language

    • English Language Teaching 1A

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1

      This module will provide students with an introduction to the social, political, linguistic and pedagogic issues involved in the teaching of English to Speakers of Other Languages and the principles and practice of a range of methods and approaches.

    • English Language Teaching 1B

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2

      This module will focus primarily on supervised lesson planning and teaching practice. A small number of plenary sessions will further address the evaluation and selection of teaching materials and the principles of lesson planning as well as generally exploring issues arising out of the teaching practice classes. You will be invited to reflect on and evaluate their own classroom practice and that of their peers.

    • English Language Teaching 2A

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

      This module will build on and further develop knowledge and awareness of lexical, grammatical, functional and phonological issues in the teaching and learning of English, and will explore the formal and informal assessment of language knowledge and language skills. The module will also review and further explore principles and best practice in lesson and module planning and delivery in a variety of teaching contexts.

    • English Language Teaching 2B

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

      This module will focus primarily on lesson planning and teaching practice. Plenary sessions will cover the evaluation, selection and use of published teaching materials and the principles of lesson and module planning, as well as addressing key issues in teaching and learning arising from their classes. You will be required to reflect on and critically evaluate their own classroom practice and that of their peers.

    • French Ab initio A

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1

      This module is for:

      • beginners with no previous knowledge
      • false beginners with prior experience of the language at an elementary level, including those who have up to grade C at GCSE

      This module:

      • enables you to understand basic information and communicate effectively in the TL, in everyday situations at an elementary level
      • provides opportunities across general topics for practising the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at an elementary level
      • introduces fundamental elements of the TL language structures, vocabulary, syntax and pronunciation, and provides a solid foundation for progression in the TL
      • introduces the background culture of the TL through various activities and text, audio, audio-visual and digital material.

      This module is equivalent to level A1 (basic user) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages.

    • French Ab initio B

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2

      You will have completed the ab-initio A module.

      This module:

      • enables you to understand basic information and communicate effectively in the TL in everyday situations, at a simple level
      • provides opportunities across general topics for practising the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at a basic level
      • introduces fundamental elements of the TL language structures, vocabulary, syntax and pronunciation, and continues to provide a solid foundation for progression in the TL
      • presents the background culture of the TL through various activities and text, audio, audio-visual and digital material.

      This module is at least equivalent to level A2 (basic user) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages.

    • French Advanced A

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

      This module is designed for students who have completed both intermediate A and B modules.

      The module aims to:

      • enable students to understand the main ideas within extended discourse and to communicate effectively in the TL, with increasing fluency, confidence and spontaneity, in a variety of contexts
      • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at an advanced level
      • introduce and develop the range of complex elements of TL language structures, syntax, and vocabulary to allow continued progression in the TL
      • facilitate the analysis of some aspects of the general social, political and/or cultural background of the language through a variety of contextualised activities and materials, in a range of media, eg text, audio, audio-visual, digital.

      Successful completion of the module is equivalent to level B1-B2 (Independent User) of Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages.

    • French Advanced A (B)

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

      This Stage 5 module is for students who have already acquired the capacity to function with some autonomy in the target language (TL) at level B1 (Independent User) of Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages. Building on existing levels of proficiency at level the module aims to:

      • enable students to understand the main ideas within extended discourse and to communicate effectively in the TL, with increasing fluency, confidence and spontaneity, in a variety of contexts
      • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at an advanced level
      • introduce and develop the range of complex elements of TL language structures, syntax, and vocabulary to allow continued progression in the TL
      • facilitate the analysis of some aspects of the general social, political and/or cultural background of the language through a variety of contextualised activities and materials, in a range of media – eg text, audio, audio-visual, digital.

      Your classes will consist of a variety of activities to develop your practical skill in all four communicative competencies (SLRW), and to encourage autonomous use of the TL. These will include presentations and discussion, text handling and writing activities, such as summarising and reporting, based on themes, grammatical structures and language skills.

      Working individually and in groups, you will have opportunities to develop your knowledge and understanding of TL countries, society, and community through both authentic and specially prepared textual and audio-visual materials. Seminar activities are complemented by guided independent study, and will make use of Study Direct and other technologies.

      This module is at level B1-B1+ (Independent User) of the CEFR for Languages.

    • French Advanced B

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

      This module is designed for students who have completed and advanced A module.

      The module aims to:

      • enable students to understand the main ideas within extended discourse and to communicate effectively in French, with increasing fluency, confidence and spontaneity, in a variety of contexts
      • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in French, using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at an advanced level
      • consolidate and develop the range of complex structures, syntax, and specialised vocabulary of French to allow further accuracy and control in use
      • facilitate the analysis of some aspects of the general social, political and/or cultural background of French and the Francophone world through a variety of contextualised activities and materials, in a range of media, eg text, audio, audiovisual, digital.

      Successful completion of the course is equivalent to level B2 (Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages.

    • French Advanced B (B)

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

      This Stage 6 module is for students who have already acquired the capacity to function with some autonomy in the target language (TL) at level B1+ (Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages.

      Building on existing levels of proficiency at level the module aims to:

      • enable students to understand the main ideas within extended discourse and to communicate effectively in the TL, with increasing fluency, confidence and spontaneity, in a variety of contexts
      • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at an advanced level
      • consolidate and develop the range of complex TL language structures, syntax, and specialised vocabulary to allow further accuracy and control in use of the TL
      • facilitate the analysis of some aspects of the general social, political and/or cultural background of the language through a variety of contextualised activities and materials, in a range of media – eg text, audio, audio-visual, digital.

      Your classes will consist of a variety of activities to develop your practical skill in all four communicative competencies (SLRW), and to encourage autonomous use of the TL. These will include presentations and discussion, text handling and writing activities, such as summarising and reporting, based on themes, grammatical structures and language skills.

      Working individually and in groups, you will have opportunities to develop your knowledge and understanding of TL countries, society, and community through both authentic and specially prepared textual and audio-visual materials. In this module you will have the opportunity to focus on a topic of special interest to you.

      Seminar activities are complemented by guided independent study, and will make use of Study Direct and other technologies.

      This module is at level B1+-B2 (Independent User) of the CEFR for Languages.

    • French For Professional Purposes 1A

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1

      This module is designed for advanced learners who have a good A-level pass, or equivalent.

      The module aims to:

      • enable students to understand the main ideas within extended discourse and to communicate effectively in the TL, with increasing fluency, confidence and spontaneity, in a variety of contexts
      • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, including common professional themes, for practice of understanding and communication in the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at an advanced level
      • introduce and develop the range of complex elements of TL language structures, syntax, and vocabulary to allow continued progression in the TL
      • facilitate the analysis of some aspects of the general social, professional, political and/or cultural background of the language through a variety of contextualised activities and materials, in a range of media (e.g. text, audio, audio-visual, digital).

      Your classes will consist of a variety of activities to develop your practical skill in all four communicative competencies (SLRW), and to encourage autonomous use of the TL. These will include presentations and discussion, text handling and writing activities such as summarising and reporting etc., based on themes, grammatical structures and language skills.

      Working individually and in groups, you will have opportunities to develop your knowledge and understanding of TL countries, society, and community through both authentic and specially prepared textual and audio-visual materials. Seminar activities are complemented by guided independent study, and will make use of Study Direct and other technologies.

      This module is at level B1-B2 (Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages.

    • French For Professional Purposes 1B

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2

      This module is designed for advanced learners who have completed French for Professional Purposes 1A.

      Building on existing levels of proficiency, the module aims to:

      • enable you to understand the main ideas within extended discourse and to communicate effectively in French with increasing fluency, confidence and spontaneity in a variety of contexts
      • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, including common professional themes, for practice of understanding and communication in French, using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at an advanced level
      • consolidate and develop the range of complex structures, syntax, and specialised vocabulary in French to allow further accuracy and control in use
      • facilitate the analysis of some aspects of the general social, professional, political and/or cultural background of the language through a variety of contextualised activities and materials, in a range of media, eg text, audio, audio,visual, digital.

      Your classes will consist of a variety of activities to develop your practical skill in all four communicative competencies (speaking, listening, reading and writing), and to encourage autonomous use of French. These will include presentations and discussion, text-handling and writing activities such as summarising and reporting, based on themes, grammatical structures and language skills.

      Working individually and in groups, you will have opportunities to develop your knowledge and understanding of Francophone countries, society, and communities, through both authentic and specially prepared textual and audiovisual materials. In this module you will have the opportunity to focus on a topic or text of special interest to you.

      Seminar activities are complemented by guided independent study, and will make use of Study Direct and other technologies.

      This module is at level B2 (Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages.

    • French for Professional Purposes 2A

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

      This module is designed for advanced learners who have completed Advanced for Professional Purposes 1B.

      Building on existing levels of proficiency the module aims to:

      • enable students to understand the main ideas within extended discourse and to communicate effectively in the TL, with fluency, confidence and spontaneity, in a variety of contexts
      • provide opportunities, across a range of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at a proficient level
      • consolidate and develop the range of complex TL language structures, syntax, and specialised vocabulary to allow consistent accuracy and control in use of the TL
      • facilitate the analysis of important aspects of the general social and cultural background of the language in a professional context, through a variety of contextualised activities and materials, in a range of media, eg text, audio, audio-visual, digital.

      Your classes will consist of a variety of activities to develop your practical skill in all four communicative competencies (SLRW), and to encourage autonomous use of the TL. These will include subject-specific presentations and discussion, text handling and analysis, writing activities such as letter-writing, summarising and reporting, etc. Working individually and in groups, you will have opportunities to develop your knowledge and understanding of TL countries, society, and community through both authentic and specially prepared textual and audio-visual materials. In this module you will have the opportunity to focus on your employment profile and/or workplace simulation activities.

      Seminar activities are complemented by guided independent study, and will make use of Study Direct and other technologies.

      This module is at level B2 (Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages.

    • French for Professional Purposes 2A (B)

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

      This Stage 7 module is for students who have already acquired the capacity to function with autonomy in the target language (TL) at level B2 (Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages.

      Building on existing levels of proficiency the module aims to:

      • enable students to understand the main ideas within extended discourse and to communicate effectively in the TL, with fluency, confidence and spontaneity, in a variety of contexts
      • provide opportunities, across a range of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at a proficient level
      • consolidate and develop the range of complex TL language structures, syntax, and specialised vocabulary to allow consistent accuracy and control in use of the TL
      • facilitate the analysis of important aspects of the general social and cultural background of the language in a professional context, through a variety of contextualised activities and materials, in a range of media, eg text, audio, audio-visual, digital.

      Your classes will consist of a variety of activities to develop your practical skill in all four communicative competencies (SLRW), and to encourage autonomous use of the TL. These will include subject-specific presentations and discussion, text handling and analysis, writing activities, such as letter-writing, summarising and reporting. Working individually and in groups, you will have opportunities to develop your knowledge and understanding of TL countries, society, and community through both authentic and specially prepared textual and audio-visual materials. In this module you will have the opportunity to focus on your employment profile and/or workplace simulation activities.

      Seminar activities are complemented by guided independent study, and will make use of Study Direct and other technologies.

      This module is at level B2 (Independent User) of the CEFR for Languages.

    • French for Professional Purposes 2B

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

      This module is designed for advanced learners who have completed Advanced for Professional Purposes 2A.

      Building on existing levels of proficiency, this module aims to:

      • enable you to understand the main ideas and detail within extended discourse and to communicate effectively in French with fluency, confidence and spontaneity in a variety of contexts
      • provide opportunities, across a range of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in French using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at a proficient level
      • consolidate and develop the range of complex structures, syntax, and specialised vocabulary in French to allow consistent accuracy and control in use
      • facilitate the analysis of important aspects of the general social and cultural background of the language in a professional context through a variety of contextualised activities and materials in a range of media, eg text, audio, audiovisual, and digital.

      Your classes will consist of a variety of activities to develop your practical skill in all four communicative competencies (speaking, listening, reading and writing) and to promote autonomous use of French. These will include subject-specific presentations and discussion, text-handling and analysis, writing activities such as letter-writing, summarising and reporting, based on themes, grammatical structures and language skills.

      Working individually and in groups, you will have opportunities to develop your knowledge and understanding of Francophone countries, society, and community through both authentic and specially prepared textual and audiovisual materials. In this module you will have the opportunity to specialise and report on professional matters or on topics in your field of expertise.

      Seminar activities are complemented by guided independent study, and will make use of Study Direct and other technologies.

      This module is at level B2-C1 (Independent-Proficient User) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages.

    • French for Professional Purposes 2B (B)

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

      This Stage 8 module is for students who have already acquired the capacity to function with autonomy in the target language (TL) at level B2 (Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages.

      Building on existing levels of proficiency the module aims to:

      • enable students to understand the main ideas and detail within extended discourse and to communicate effectively in the TL, with fluency, confidence and spontaneity, in a variety of contexts
      • provide opportunities, across a range of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at a proficient level
      • consolidate and develop the range of complex TL language structures, syntax, and specialised vocabulary to allow consistent accuracy and control in use of the TL
      • facilitate the analysis of important aspects of the general social and cultural background of the language in a professional context, through a variety of contextualised activities and materials, in a range of media – eg text, audio, audio-visual, digital.

      Your classes will consist of a variety of activities to develop your practical skill in all four communicative competencies (SLRW), and to promote autonomous use of the TL. These will include subject-specific presentations and discussion, text handling and analysis, writing activities, such as letter-writing, summarising and reporting, based on themes, grammatical structures and language skills. Working individually and in groups, you will have opportunities to develop your knowledge and understanding of TL countries, society, and community through both authentic and specially prepared textual and audio-visual materials. In this module you will have the opportunity to specialise and report on professional matters or on topics in your field of expertise.

      Seminar activities are complemented by guided independent study, and will make use of Study Direct and other technologies.

      This module is at level B2-C1 (Independent-Proficient User) of the CEFR for Languages.

    • French Intermediate A

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

      This module is designed for:

      • lower intermediate learners who have a recent grade A/B at GCSE, or a D/E pass at AS level, or equivalent
      • intermediate learners who have a good AS grade, or perhaps a low D/E pass at A level, or equivalent.

      The module aims to:

      • enable students to understand key information and to communicate effectively in the TL, sometimes spontaneously, in less routine situations, at a standard level
      • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at a standard level
      • consolidate and develop the range of key elements of TL language structures, vocabulary, syntax and pronunciation, to allow progression in the TL
      • present the background culture and society of the TL through a variety of contextualised activities and materials, in a range of media, eg text, audio, audio-visual, digital

      Successful completion of the module is equivalent to level A2-B1 (Basic-Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages.

    • French Intermediate A Year 1

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1

      This module is for students with some basic knowledge and experience of the target language (TL). Building on existing levels of proficiency at level A2 (Basic User) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages, the module aims to:

      • enable you to understand key information and to communicate effectively in the TL, sometimes spontaneously, in less routine situations, at a standard level 
      • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at a standard level 
      • consolidate and develop the range of key elements of TL language structures, vocabulary, syntax and pronunciation, to allow progression in the TL
      • present the background culture and society of the TL through a variety of contextualised activities and materials, in a range of media (e.g. text, audio, audio-visual, digital).

      Successful completion of the module is equivalent to level A2-B1 (Basic-Independent User) of the CEFR for Languages.

    • French Intermediate B

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

      This module is desigend for intermediate learners who have completed an intermediate A module.

      The module aims to:

      • enable students to understand key information and to communicate effectively in the TL, sometimes spontaneously, in less routine situations, at a standard level 
      • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at a standard level 
      • consolidate and develop the range of key elements of TL language structures, vocabulary, syntax and pronunciation, to allow continued progression in the TL
      • present the background culture and society of the TL through a variety of contextualised activities and materials, in a range of media (e.g. text; audio, audio-visual, digital).

      Successful completion of the module is equivalent to level B1 (Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages.

    • French Intermediate B Year 1

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2

      This module is desigend for intermediate learners who have completed an intermediate A module.

      The module aims to:

      • enable you to understand key information and to communicate effectively in French, sometimes spontaneously, in less routine situations at a standard level 
      • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in French, using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at a standard level
      • consolidate and develop the range of key elements of structures, vocabulary, syntax and pronunciation of French, to allow continued progression
      • present the background culture and society of French and the Francophone world through a variety of contextualised activities and materials in a range of media (e.g. text, audio, audiovisual, and digital).

      Successful completion of the module is equivalent to level B1 (Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages.

    • German Ab initio A

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1

      This acts as an introduction if you have little or no prior knowledge of the target language (TL).

      This module:

      • enables you to understand basic information and communicate effectively in the TL, in everyday situations at an elementary level
      • provides opportunities across general topics for practising the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at an elementary level
      • introduces fundamental elements of the TL language structures, vocabulary, syntax and pronunciation, and provides a solid foundation for progression in the TL
      • introduces the background culture of the TL through various activities and text, audio, audio-visual and digital material.

      This module is equivalent to level A1 (basic user) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages.

    • German Ab initio B

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2

      You will have basic prior knowledge of the target language (TL).

      This module:

      • enables you to understand basic information and communicate effectively in the TL in everyday situations, at a simple level
      • provides opportunities across general topics for practising the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at a basic level
      • introduces fundamental elements of the TL language structures, vocabulary, syntax and pronunciation, and continues to provide a solid foundation for progression in the TL
      • presents the background culture of the TL through various activities and text, audio, audio-visual and digital material.

      This module is at least equivalent to level A2 (basic user) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages.

    • German Advanced A

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

      This stage 5 advanced module is for students who have already acquired the capacity to function with some autonomy in the target language (TL). Building on existing levels of proficiency at level B1 (Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages, the module aims to:

      • enable students to understand the main ideas within extended discourse and to communicate effectively in the TL, with increasing fluency, confidence and spontaneity, in a variety of contexts
      • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at an advanced level
      • introduce and develop the range of complex elements of TL language structures, syntax, and vocabulary to allow continued progression in the TL
      • facilitate the analysis of some aspects of the general social, political and/or cultural background of the language through a variety of contextualised activities and materials, in a range of media (e.g. text, audio, audio-visual, digital).

      Successful completion of the module is equivalent to level B1-B2 (Independent User) of the CEFR for Languages.

    • German Advanced B

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

      This stage 6 advanced module is for students who have already acquired the capacity to function with some autonomy in the target language (TL). Building on existing levels of proficiency at level B1 (Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages, the module aims to:

      • enable students to understand the main ideas within extended discourse and to communicate effectively in the TL, with increasing fluency, confidence and spontaneity, in a variety of contexts
      • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at an advanced level
      • consolidate and develop the range of complex TL language structures, syntax, and specialised vocabulary to allow further accuracy and control in use of the TL
      • facilitate the analysis of some aspects of the general social, political and/or cultural background of the language through a variety of contextualised activities and materials, in a range of media – eg text, audio, audio-visual, digital.

      Successful completion of the module is equivalent to level B2 (Independent User) of the CEFR for Languages.

    • German Intermediate A

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

      This stage 3 module is for students with some basic knowledge and experience of the target language (TL). Building on existing levels of proficiency at level A2 (Basic User) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages, the module aims to:

      • enable students to understand key information and to communicate effectively in the TL, sometimes spontaneously, in less routine situations, at a standard level
      • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at a standard level
      • consolidate and develop the range of key elements of TL language structures, vocabulary, syntax and pronunciation, to allow progression in the TL
      • present the background culture and society of the TL through a variety of contextualised activities and materials, in a range of media, (e.g. text, audio, audio-visual, digital).

      Successful completion of the module is equivalent to level A2-B1 (Basic-Independent User) of the CEFR for Languages.

    • German Intermediate B

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

      This stage 4 intermediate module is for students who have already acquired the capacity to function with some independence in the target language (TL). Building on existing levels of proficiency at level A2-B1 (Basic/Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages, the module aims to:

      • enable students to understand key information and to communicate effectively in the TL, sometimes spontaneously, in less routine situations, at a standard level 
      • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at a standard level 
      • consolidate and develop the range of key elements of TL language structures, vocabulary, syntax and pronunciation, to allow continued progression in the TL
      • present the background culture and society of the TL through a variety of contextualised activities and materials, in a range of media (e.g. text, audio, audio-visual, digital).

      Successful completion of the module is equivalent to level B1 (Independent User) of the CEFR for Languages.

    • Introduction to English Language Teaching and Learning

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2; Year 2, Term 2

      This module introduces you to the social, political, linguistic and pedagogic issues involved in English language teaching and learning. We also explore the principles and practice of a range of methods and approaches.

    • Italian Ab initio A

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1

      This acts as an introduction if you have little or no prior knowledge of the target language (TL).

      This module:

      • enables you to understand basic information and communicate effectively in the TL, in everyday situations at an elementary level
      • provides opportunities across general topics for practising the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at an elementary level
      • introduces fundamental elements of the TL language structures, vocabulary, syntax and pronunciation, and provides a solid foundation for progression in the TL
      • introduces the background culture of the TL through various activities and text, audio, audio-visual and digital material.

      This module is equivalent to level A1 (basic user) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages.

    • Italian Ab initio B

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2

      You will have basic prior knowledge of the target language (TL).

      This module:

      • enables you to understand basic information and communicate effectively in the TL in everyday situations, at a simple level
      • provides opportunities across general topics for practising the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at a basic level
      • introduces fundamental elements of the TL language structures, vocabulary, syntax and pronunciation, and continues to provide a solid foundation for progression in the TL
      • presents the background culture of the TL through various activities and text, audio, audio-visual and digital material.

      This module is at least equivalent to level A2 (basic user) of the Common European Framework of Reference for languages.

    • Italian Intermediate A

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

      This stage 3 module is for students with some basic knowledge and experience of the target language (TL). Building on existing levels of proficiency at level A2 (Basic User) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages, the module aims to:

      • enable students to understand key information and to communicate effectively in the TL, sometimes spontaneously, in less routine situations, at a standard level
      • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at a standard level
      • consolidate and develop the range of key elements of TL language structures, vocabulary, syntax and pronunciation, to allow progression in the TL
      • present the background culture and society of the TL through a variety of contextualised activities and materials, in a range of media (e.g. text, audio, audio-visual, digital).

      Successful completion of the module is equivalent to level A2-B1 (Basic-Independent User) of the CEFR for Languages.

    • Italian Intermediate B

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

      This stage 4 intermediate module is for students who have already acquired the capacity to function with some independence in the target language (TL). Building on existing levels of proficiency at level A2-B1 (Basic/Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages, the module aims to:

      • enable students to understand key information and to communicate effectively in the TL, sometimes spontaneously, in less routine situations, at a standard level 
      • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at a standard level 
      • consolidate and develop the range of key elements of TL language structures, vocabulary, syntax and pronunciation, to allow continued progression in the TL
      • present the background culture and society of the TL through a variety of contextualised activities and materials, in a range of media (e.g. text; audio, audio-visual, digital).

      Successful completion of the module is equivalent to level B1 (Independent User) of the CEFR for Languages.

    • Japanese Ab initio A

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1

      This acts as an introduction if you have little or no prior knowledge of the target language (TL).

      This module:

      • enables you to understand basic information and communicate effectively in the TL, in everyday situations at an elementary level
      • provides opportunities across general topics for practising the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at an elementary level
      • introduces fundamental elements of the TL language structures, vocabulary, syntax and pronunciation, and provides a solid foundation for progression in the TL
      • introduces the background culture of the TL through various activities and text, audio, audio-visual and digital material.

      This module is equivalent to level A1 (basic user) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages.

    • Japanese Ab initio B

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2

      You will have basic prior knowledge of the target language (TL).

      This module:

      • enables you to understand basic information and communicate effectively in the TL in everyday situations, at a simple level
      • provides opportunities across general topics for practising the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at a basic level
      • introduces fundamental elements of the TL language structures, vocabulary, syntax and pronunciation, and continues to provide a solid foundation for progression in the TL
      • presents the background culture of the TL through various activities and text, audio, audio-visual and digital material.

      This module is at least equivalent to level A2 (basic user) of the Common European Framework of Reference for languages.

    • Japanese Advanced A

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

      This stage 5 advanced module is for students who have already acquired the capacity to function with some autonomy in the target language (TL). Building on existing levels of proficiency at level B1 (Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages, the module aims to:

      • enable students to understand the main ideas within extended discourse and to communicate effectively in the TL, with increasing fluency, confidence and spontaneity, in a variety of contexts
      • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at an advanced level
      • introduce and develop the range of complex elements of TL language structures, syntax, and vocabulary to allow continued progression in the TL
      • facilitate the analysis of some aspects of the general social, political and/or cultural background of the language through a variety of contextualised activities and materials, in a range of media (e.g. text, audio, audio-visual, digital).

      Successful completion of the module is equivalent to level B1-B2 (Independent User) of the CEFR for Languages.

    • Japanese Advanced B

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

      This stage 6 advanced module is for students who have already acquired the capacity to function with some autonomy in the target language (TL). Building on existing levels of proficiency at level B1 (Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages the module aims to:

      • enable students to understand the main ideas within extended discourse and to communicate effectively in the TL, with increasing fluency, confidence and spontaneity, in a variety of contexts
      • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at an advanced level
      • consolidate and develop the range of complex TL language structures, syntax, and specialised vocabulary to allow further accuracy and control in use of the TL
      • facilitate the analysis of some aspects of the general social, political and/or cultural background of the language through a variety of contextualised activities and materials, in a range of media (e.g. text; audio, audio-visual, digital).

      Successful completion of the module is equivalent to level B2 (Independent User) of the CEFR for Languages.

    • Japanese Intermediate A

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1; Year 2, Term 1

      This stage 3 module is for students with some basic knowledge and experience of the target language (TL). Building on existing levels of proficiency at level A2 (Basic User) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages, the module aims to:

      • enable students to understand key information and to communicate effectively in the TL, sometimes spontaneously, in less routine situations, at a standard level
      • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at a standard level
      • consolidate and develop the range of key elements of TL language structures, vocabulary, syntax and pronunciation, to allow progression in the TL
      • present the background culture and society of the TL through a variety of contextualised activities and materials, in a range of media, eg text, audio, audio-visual, digital.

      Successful completion of the module is equivalent to level A2-B1 (Basic-Independent User) of the CEFR for Languages.

    • Japanese Intermediate B

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2; Year 2, Term 2

      This stage 4 intermediate module is for students who have already acquired the capacity to function with some independence in the target language (TL). Building on existing levels of proficiency at level A2-B1 (Basic/Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages, the module aims to:

      • enable students to understand key information and to communicate effectively in the TL, sometimes spontaneously, in less routine situations, at a standard level 
      • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at a standard level 
      • consolidate and develop the range of key elements of TL language structures, vocabulary, syntax and pronunciation, to allow continued progression in the TL
      • present the background culture and society of the TL through a variety of contextualised activities and materials, in a range of media, (e.g. text, audio, audio-visual, digital).

      Successful completion of the module is equivalent to level B1 (Independent User) of the CEFR for Languages.

    • Perspectives on Global English

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

      This elective module addresses current issues concerning the spread and use of English in various forms and for diverse purposes around the world. The increasingly international profile of the language, its learners and teachers are reflected in higher education, business and research, and raises challenging questions. Linguistic issues of standards, variation and models are considered, as well as more sociocultural aspects relating to language and identity, lingua franca communication, multilingualism, intercultural competence, technology and language education policy.

    • Spanish Ab initio A

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1

      This module is for:

      • beginners with no previous knowledge
      • false beginners with prior experience of the language at an elementary level, including those who have up to grade C at GCSE.

      This module:

      • enables you to understand basic information and communicate effectively in the TL, in everyday situations at an elementary level
      • provides opportunities across general topics for practising the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at an elementary level
      • introduces fundamental elements of the TL language structures, vocabulary, syntax and pronunciation, and provides a solid foundation for progression in the TL
      • introduces the background culture of the TL through various activities and text, audio, audio-visual and digital material.

      This module is equivalent to level A1 (basic user) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages.

    • Spanish Ab initio B

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2

      You will have completed the ab-initio A module.

      This module:

      • enables you to understand basic information and communicate effectively in the TL in everyday situations, at a simple level
      • provides opportunities across general topics for practising the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at a basic level
      • introduces fundamental elements of the TL language structures, vocabulary, syntax and pronunciation, and continues to provide a solid foundation for progression in the TL
      • presents the background culture of the TL through various activities and text, audio, audio-visual and digital material.

      This module is at least equivalent to level A2 (basic user) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages.

    • Spanish Advanced A

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

      This module is designed for studens who have completed both intermediate A and B modules.

      The module aims to:

      • enable students to understand the main ideas within extended discourse and to communicate effectively in the TL, with increasing fluency, confidence and spontaneity, in a variety of contexts
      • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at an advanced level
      • introduce and develop the range of complex elements of TL language structures, syntax, and vocabulary to allow continued progression in the TL
      • facilitate the analysis of some aspects of the general social, political and/or cultural background of the language through a variety of contextualised activities and materials, in a range of media (e.g. text, audio, audio-visual, digital).

      Successful completion of the module is equivalent to level B1-B2 (Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages.

    • Spanish Advanced A (B)

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

      This Stage 5 module is for students who have already acquired the capacity to function with some autonomy in the target language (TL) at level B1 (Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages.

      Building on existing levels of proficiency at level the module aims to:

      • enable students to understand the main ideas within extended discourse and to communicate effectively in the TL, with increasing fluency, confidence and spontaneity, in a variety of contexts
      • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at an advanced level
      • introduce and develop the range of complex elements of TL language structures, syntax, and vocabulary to allow continued progression in the TL
      • facilitate the analysis of some aspects of the general social, political and/or cultural background of the language through a variety of contextualised activities and materials, in a range of media (e.g. text, audio, audio-visual, digital).

      Your classes will consist of a variety of activities to develop your practical skill in all four communicative competencies (SLRW), and to encourage autonomous use of the TL. These will include presentations and discussion, text handling and writing activities, such as summarising and reporting, based on themes, grammatical structures and language skills. Working individually and in groups, you will have opportunities to develop your knowledge and understanding of TL countries, society, and community through both authentic and specially prepared textual and audio-visual materials.

      Seminar activities are complemented by guided independent study and will make use of Study Direct and other technologies.

      This module is at level B1-B1+ (Independent User) of the CEFR for Languages.

    • Spanish Advanced B

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

      This module is designed for students who have completed and advanced A module.

      The module aims to:

      • enable you to understand the main ideas within extended discourse and to communicate effectively in Spanish with increasing fluency, confidence and spontaneity in a variety of contexts
      • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in Spanish using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at an advanced level
      • consolidate and develop the range of the complex structures, syntax, and specialised vocabulary in Spanish to allow further accuracy and control in use
      • facilitate the analysis of some aspects of the general social, political and/or cultural background of the language through a variety of contextualised activities and materials in a range of media (e.g. text, audio, audiovisual, digital).

      Successful completion of the module is equivalent to level B2 (Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages.

    • Spanish Advanced B (B)

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

      This Stage 6 module is for students who have already acquired the capacity to function with some autonomy in the target language (TL) at level B1+ (Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages.

      Building on existing levels of proficiency at level the module aims to:

      • enable students to understand the main ideas within extended discourse and to communicate effectively in the TL, with increasing fluency, confidence and spontaneity, in a variety of contexts
      • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at an advanced level
      • consolidate and develop the range of complex TL language structures, syntax, and specialised vocabulary to allow further accuracy and control in use of the TL
      • facilitate the analysis of some aspects of the general social, political and/or cultural background of the language through a variety of contextualised activities and materials, in a range of media (e.g. text, audio, audio-visual, digital).

      Your classes will consist of a variety of activities to develop your practical skill in all four communicative competencies (SLRW), and to encourage autonomous use of the TL. These will include presentations and discussion, text handling and writing activities, such as summarising and reporting, based on themes, grammatical structures and language skills. Working individually and in groups, you will have opportunities to develop your knowledge and understanding of TL countries, society, and community through both authentic and specially prepared textual and audio-visual materials. In this module you will have the opportunity to focus on a topic of special interest to you.

      Seminar activities are complemented by guided independent study, and will make use of Study Direct and other technologies.

      This module is at level B1+-B2 (Independent User) of the CEFR for Languages.

    • Spanish for Professional Purposes 1A

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1

      This module is designed for advanced learners who have a good A-level pass, or equivalent.

      The module aims to:

      • enable students to understand the main ideas within extended discourse and to communicate effectively in the TL, with increasing fluency, confidence and spontaneity, in a variety of contexts
      • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, including common professional themes, for practice of understanding and communication in the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at an advanced level
      • introduce and develop the range of complex elements of TL language structures, syntax, and vocabulary to allow continued progression in the TL
      • facilitate the analysis of some aspects of the general social, professional, political and/or cultural background of the language through a variety of contextualised activities and materials, in a range of media (e.g. text, audio, audio-visual, digital).

      Your classes will consist of a variety of activities to develop your practical skill in all four communicative competencies (SLRW), and to encourage autonomous use of the TL. These will include presentations and discussion, text handling and writing activities such as summarising and reporting etc., based on themes, grammatical structures and language skills. Working individually and in groups, you will have opportunities to develop your knowledge and understanding of TL countries, society, and community through both authentic and specially prepared textual and audio-visual materials.
      Seminar activities are complemented by guided independent study, and will make use of Study Direct and other technologies.

      This module is at level B1-B2 (Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages.

    • Spanish for Professional Purposes 1B

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2

      This module is designed for advanced learners who have completed Advanced for Professional Purposes 1A.

      Building on existing levels of proficiency the module aims to:

      • enable students to understand the main ideas within extended discourse and to communicate effectively in Spanish with increasing fluency, confidence and spontaneity in a variety of contexts
      • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, including common professional themes, for practice of understanding and communication in Spanish using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at an advanced level
      • consolidate and develop the range of complex the structures, syntax, and specialised vocabulary in Spanish to allow further accuracy and control in use
      • facilitate the analysis of some aspects of the general social, professional, political and/or cultural background of the language through a variety of contextualised activities and materials in a range of media (e.g. text, audio, audiovisual, digital).

      Your classes will consist of a variety of activities to develop your practical skill in all four communicative competencies (speaking, listening, reading and writing) and to encourage autonomous use of Spanish. These will include presentations and discussion, text-handling and writing activities such as summarising and reporting, based on themes, grammatical structures and language skills.

      Working individually and in groups, you will have opportunities to develop your knowledge and understanding of Spanish-speaking countries, society, and community through both authentic and specially prepared textual and audiovisual materials. In this module you will have the opportunity to focus on a topic or text of special interest to you.

      Seminar activities are complemented by guided independent study, and will make use of Study Direct and other technologies.

      This module is at level B2 (Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages.

    • Spanish for Professional Purposes 2A

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

      This module is designed for advanced learners who have completed Advanced for Professional Purposes 1B.

      Building on existing levels of proficiency the module aims to:

      • enable students to understand the main ideas within extended discourse and to communicate effectively in the TL, with fluency, confidence and spontaneity, in a variety of contexts;
      • provide opportunities, across a range of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at a proficient level;
      • consolidate and develop the range of complex TL language structures, syntax, and specialised vocabulary to allow consistent accuracy and control in use of the TL;
      • facilitate the analysis of important aspects of the general social and cultural background of the language in a professional context, through a variety of contextualised activities and materials, in a range of media (e.g. text, audio, audio-visual, digital).

      Your classes will consist of a variety of activities to develop your practical skill in all four communicative competencies (SLRW), and to encourage autonomous use of the TL. These will include subject-specific presentations and discussion, text handling and analysis, writing activities such as letter-writing, summarising and reporting etc. Working individually and in groups, you will have opportunities to develop your knowledge and understanding of TL countries, society, and community through both authentic and specially prepared textual and audio-visual materials. In this module you will have the opportunity to focus on your employment profile and/or workplace simulation activities.

      Seminar activities are complemented by guided independent study, and will make use of Study Direct and other technologies. This module is at level B2 (Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages.

    • Spanish for Professional Purposes 2A (B)

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

      This Stage 7 module is for students who have already acquired the capacity to function with autonomy in the target language (TL) at level B2 (Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages.

      Building on existing levels of proficiency the module aims to:

      • enable students to understand the main ideas within extended discourse and to communicate effectively in the TL, with fluency, confidence and spontaneity, in a variety of contexts
      • provide opportunities, across a range of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at a proficient level
      • consolidate and develop the range of complex TL language structures, syntax, and specialised vocabulary to allow consistent accuracy and control in use of the TL
      • facilitate the analysis of important aspects of the general social and cultural background of the language in a professional context, through a variety of contextualised activities and materials, in a range of media (e.g. text, audio, audio-visual, digital).

      Your classes will consist of a variety of activities to develop your practical skill in all four communicative competencies (SLRW) and to encourage autonomous use of the TL. These will include subject-specific presentations and discussion, text handling and analysis, writing activities, such as letter-writing, summarising and reporting. Working individually and in groups, you will have opportunities to develop your knowledge and understanding of TL countries, society, and community through both authentic and specially prepared textual and audio-visual materials. In this module you will have the opportunity to focus on your employment profile and/or workplace simulation activities.

      Seminar activities are complemented by guided independent study and will make use of Study Direct and other technologies.

      This module is at level B2 (Independent User) of the CEFR for Languages.

    • Spanish for Professional Purposes 2B

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

      This module is designed for advanced learners who have completed Advanced for Professional Purposes 2A.

      Building on existing levels of proficiency the module aims to:

      • enable you to understand the main ideas within extended discourse and to communicate effectively in Spanish with fluency, confidence and spontaneity in a variety of contexts
      • provide opportunities, across a range of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in Spanish using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at a proficient level
      • consolidate and develop the range of complex structures, syntax, and specialised vocabulary in Spanish to allow consistent accuracy and control in use
      • facilitate the analysis of important aspects of the general social and cultural background of the language in a professional context through a variety of contextualised activities and materials in a range of media (e.g. text, audio, audiovisual, digital).

      Your classes will consist of a variety of activities to develop your practical skill in all four communicative competencies (speaking, learning, reading and writing) and to encourage autonomous use of Spanish. These will include subject-specific presentations and discussion, text-handling and analysis, writing activities such as letter-writing, summarising and reporting.

      Working individually and in groups, you will have opportunities to develop your knowledge and understanding of Spanish-speaking countries, society, and communities through both authentic and specially prepared textual and audiovisual materials. In this module you will have the opportunity to focus on your employment profile and/or workplace simulation activities.

      Seminar activities are complemented by guided independent study, and will make use of Study Direct and other technologies.

      This module is at level B2 (Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages.

    • Spanish for Professional Purposes 2B (B)

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

      This Stage 8 module is for students who have already acquired the capacity to function with autonomy in the target language (TL) at level B2 (Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages.

      Building on existing levels of proficiency the module aims to:

      • enable students to understand the main ideas within extended discourse and to communicate effectively in the TL, with fluency, confidence and spontaneity, in a variety of contexts
      • provide opportunities, across a range of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at a proficient level
      • consolidate and develop the range of complex TL language structures, syntax, and specialised vocabulary to allow consistent accuracy and control in use of the TL
      • facilitate the analysis of important aspects of the general social and cultural background of the language in a professional context, through a variety of contextualised activities and materials, in a range of media (e.g. text, audio, audio-visual, digital).

      Your classes will consist of a variety of activities to develop your practical skill in all four communicative competencies (SLRW) and to promote autonomous use of the TL. These will include subject-specific presentations and discussion, text handling and analysis, writing activities, such as letter-writing, summarising and reporting, based on themes, grammatical structures and language skills. Working individually and in groups, you will have opportunities to develop your knowledge and understanding of TL countries, society, and community through both authentic and specially prepared textual and audio-visual materials. In this module you will have the opportunity to specialise and report on professional matters or on topics in your field of expertise.

      Seminar activities are complemented by guided independent study, and will make use of Study Direct and other technologies.

      This module is at level B2-C1 (Independent-Proficient User) of the CEFR for Languages.

    • Spanish Intermediate A

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

      This module is designed for:

      • lower intermediate learners who have a recent grade A/B at GCSE, or a D/E pass at AS level, or equivalent
      • intermediate learners who have a good AS grade, or perhaps a low D/E pass at A level, or equivalent.

      The module aims to:

      • enable students to understand key information and to communicate effectively in the TL, sometimes spontaneously, in less routine situations, at a standard level
      • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at a standard level
      • consolidate and develop the range of key elements of TL language structures, vocabulary, syntax and pronunciation, to allow progression in the TL
      • present the background culture and society of the TL through a variety of contextualised activities and materials, in a range of media, eg text, audio, audio-visual, digital.

      Successful completion of the module is equivalent to level A2-B1 (Basic-Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages.

    • Spanish Intermediate A Year 1

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1

      This module is designed for:

      • lower-intermediate learners who have a recent grade A/B at GCSE, or a D/E pass at AS-Level, or equivalent
      • intermediate learners who have a good AS grade, or perhaps a low D/E pass at A-Level, or equivalent

      The module aims to:

      • enable you to understand key information and to communicate effectively in Spanish, sometimes spontaneously, in less routine situations at a standard level 
      • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in Spanish using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at a standard level 
      • consolidate and develop the range of key elements of the structures, vocabulary, syntax and pronunciation of Spanish, to allow progression
      • present the background culture and society of the Spanish-speaking world through a variety of contextualised activities and materials in a range of media (e.g. text, audio, audiovisual, digital).

      Successful completion of the module is equivalent to level A2-B1 (Basic-Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages.

    • Spanish Intermediate B

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

      This module is desigend for intermediate learners who have completed an intermediate A module

      The module aims to:

      • enable you to understand key information and to communicate effectively in Spanish, sometimes spontaneously, in less routine situations at a standard level 
      • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in Spanish using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at a standard level 
      • consolidate and develop the range of key elements of the structures, vocabulary, syntax and pronunciation of Spanish, to allow continued progression
      • present the background culture and society of the Spanish-speaking world through a variety of contextualised activities and materials in a range of media, eg text, audio, audiovisual, and digital.

      Successful completion of the module is equivalent to level B1 (Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages.

    • Spanish Intermediate B Year 1

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2

      This module is desigend for intermediate learners who have completed an intermediate A module.

      The module aims to:

      • enable you to understand key information and to communicate effectively in Spanish, sometimes spontaneously, in less routine situations at a standard level 
      • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in Spanish using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at a standard level
      • consolidate and develop the range of key elements of the structures, vocabulary, syntax and pronunciation of Spanish, to allow continued progression
      • present the background culture and society of the Spanish-speaking world through a variety of contextualised activities and materials in a range of media, eg text, audio, audiovisual, and digital.

      Successful completion of the module is equivalent to level B1 (Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages.

    • Theories of Language Learning

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

      This elective module offers an overview of various perspectives on how second or foreign languages are learnt. Linguistic, psychological and social models of second language acquisition (SLA) are examined, along with some of the implications for our broader understanding of the nature of language and communication. Applications for language teaching and learning are considered, in both naturalistic contexts and classroom settings.

  • Law, Criminology and Politics
    • A Sociology of 21st Century Britain

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1

      A Sociology of 21st Century Britain will use Britain today as an empirical base for exploring wider sociological perspectives and the insights that social science can bring into key problems and debates about contemporary life.

      During the module you will explore the relationship between empirical research and theory using examples from recent sociological work, drawing from studies no older than 5 years, to look at a range of issues in 21st century Britain, including work and employment, family, sport, intimacy, life online, nationalism, death and wealth.

      The module is designed to demonstrate the capacity of sociology to explore the social world in interesting, challenging and critical ways, but will be relevant to anyone who wishes to learn more about contemporary Britain, from the perspective of insider or outsider.

    • British Political History

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1

      This module will give you an overview of the key questions, concepts and controversies in modern British political history, with a particular emphasis on the period since 1945.

      You will gain an understanding of both academic and political debates on topics such as the postwar 'consensus', Thatcherism and New Labour, and will also be introduced to some of the ways in which politicians throughout this period have presented their own interpretations of British political history.

    • Contemporary Issues in Law

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

      This module provides you with the opportunity to examine contemporary issues in law. The module is designed to engage students with challenging legal issues currently experiencing transformation and in need of reform.

      Specifically, the module will cover issues drawn from four key areas:

      • Media Law and practice (e.g. privacy, internet regulation)
      • Medical Law and ethics (e.g. euthanasia, abortion)
      • Protection of the environment (e.g. climate change)
      • Human Rights (e.g. marginalised rights)

      The module develops your analytical skills in exploring the way in which law responds to current controversies. It enhances the development of research and writing skills by the production of a research plan and a substantive piece of writing on an area of law in need of reform.

    • Crime and Criminal Justice

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

      This module encompasses an introduction to criminal law and notions of criminal responsibility.

      It examines two specialised substantive areas of criminal law covering, for example:

      • homicide
      • non-fatal offences against the person
      • sexual offences
      • hate crim

      It will then turn to examine aspects of international criminal law including its institutional framework and an in-depth analysis of one of the core international crimes, such as:

      • genocide
      • crimes against humanity
      • war crimes

      Some aspects of criminal law theory such as theories of punishment, why conduct should be criminalised, and issues of procedure and evidence that are relevant to the substantive law are covered.

    • Criminology in Theory and Perspective

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

      This module will familiarise you with the main theories, perspectives and concepts associated with major traditions in sociological criminology. It builds on two first year modules, Thinking Like a Criminologist and Criminological Classics, which are prerequisites.

      You will examine a range of criminological perspectives, from those prevalent in the mid twentieth-century to contemporary, cutting edge theories. You will be encouraged to take a critical approach to these perspectives and to situate them within their wider social and political contexts.

      In particular, the module will cover the following:

      • Strain Theory
      • Labelling Theory
      • Radical and Critical Criminology
      • Left Realism
      • Right Realism
      • Feminist Criminology
      • Masculinities and Crime
      • Psycho-Social Approaches
      • Cultural Criminology, and
      • Green Criminology.
    • Gender Equality

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1

      This module provides an introduction to the relationship between law and gender. It will explore different areas where law interacts with, and regulates, gender relations while also providing a basic introduction to feminist legal theory. Substantive areas of study will include issues such as reproductive rights (abortion, surrogacy, new reproductive technologies), sexual violence, body image and pornography, prostitution, parity democracy, and maternity rights.

    • Gendering the Life Course

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2

      Students taking this elective will learn to think critically about inequalities in our societies as they emerge across the life course, especially those relating to gender. Through engaging with key moments in the life course (including birth and the ascription of gender identity; childhood and education; sexual reproduction, parenting and families; paid and unpaid work; illness and health; old age) students will build on their own experiences and observations to develop new perspectives and insights on this key issue in contemporary society.

      Throughout the module, we will explore key theoretical frameworks as well as a series of concrete cases and problems in which researchers apply such theories to gender issues in social policy, health, education and psychology. By the end of the module you should have gained an understanding of gender and the concept of inequality and be able to provide critical accounts of the links between gendered social relations, cultural settings and individual behaviour and experiences.

    • Introduction to the European Union

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

      This module will give you a basic grounding in how the EU works today, how it has evolved over time, and how it might develop in the future.

      It will introduce you to the main theories of European integration and key concepts that underpin the European project, and will include analysis of some key policy areas, including management of the euro and foreign policy.

      There will also be discussion of the role of ordinary citizens in the integration process and their changing attitudes towards the European project, including the study of euroscepticism.

    • Introduction to the European Union

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2

      This module will provide an introduction to the origins, institutions and main policies of the European Union, including the introduction of European citizenship and attempts by EU institutions to forge a European identity.

    • Justice, Equality and Society

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2

    • Justice, Equality and Society

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2

      In this module, special attention is given to justice, equality and rights. You are introduced to theory, which is then explored though a number of case studies focusing in particular on the development of non-discrimination and equality law in English Law. The module will encourage you to think about contemporary issues from the perspectives of justice, equality and rights.

    • Making of Modern Europe Year 2 Elective

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

      The module aims to give you an understanding of the historical evolution of Europe as a region, as it has evolved from the middle ages until the present day. In particular we will trace the relationship between, on the one hand; ideas and ideals of European cooperation, integration and unity, and on the other; the realities of European economic, political and social development and conflict.

      We will try to explain the different dimensions of the idea of Europe in their historical context, exploring both the political struggles and the philosophical arguments which have characterised Europe over its history.

    • Political and Social Change in Contemporary Europe

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

      This module analyses the broad social changes which have occurred in Western Europe since 1945, and in postcommunist European countries since the collapse of communism. It does this by using the social scientist's notion of 'cleavages', to explore divisions in society derived from factors such as religion, class, gender and ethnicity, and their impact on political behaviour. It also looks at the role played by nationalism, populism, regionalism and postmaterialism in driving social change and political affiliation. We also consider recent demographic trends such as declining birth rates and ageing populations, and the impact of these trends on social and political behaviour.

      Whilst the module has a theoretical underpinning in social science, it is taught in a way which is accessible to students from any discipline. It is particularly enriched by the participation of students from a wide range of nationalities and cultures, and visiting and exchange students are most welcome on this module.

    • Punishment and Penology

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

      This module will examine both the theory and practice of punishment, and will encourage you to take a critical approach to analysing these. The focus will mainly be on England and Wales, but comparison will be drawn with other countries, such as those in Europe, North America and Australasia, where relevant.

      After exploring a range of theoretical approaches in relation to the justifications for and purposes of punishment, you will consider a range of empirical examples. The latter will be largely contemporary, but historical examples will also be used.

      Topics will include:

      • justifications for punishment
      • Durkhemian, Marxist and Foucauldian perspectives on punishment
      • Garland's (2001) culture of control and the new penology (Feeley and Simon, 1992)
      • contemporary imprisonment
      • women in prison
      • children and young people in custody
      • immigration detention centres
      • alternatives to imprisonment
      • radical critiques, such as abolitionism and feminist jurisprudence.
    • Security and Insecurity in Global Politics (Pathway elective)

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

      Gain an introduction to the broad issue agenda that shapes the contemporary study of (in)security.

      Each week, you focus on a different issue that defines the agenda of International Security.

      Security is central to the issue agenda of international relations. Traditionally security has been understood to comprise the question of the protection of sovereign territory through armed force.

      Security has thus examined issues such as arms races, war and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction.

      Traditionally these issues were addressed through a realist lens that regarded the state and its survival as the central conceptual maxims.

      However, contemporary scholarship concerning security has broadened this agenda considerably.

      New sources of insecurity have emerged outside the traditional state form, as can be seen in the rise of issues such as terrorism as well as wider 'complex emergencies' on the international security agenda.

      Moreover, the conceptual lenses for examining these questions of (in)security have increased. This has given rise to new referent objects of security and a wider security agenda which includes issues such as identity, genocide and the environment. 

    • The Far Right and the Politics of Immigration

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

      This module explores the far right and the increasingly contested politics of immigration in liberal democracies. The module begins by looking at the rise of the far right political parties in contemporary Europe and their relationship to public opinion, mainstream parties and immigration policies. It then examines a number of cases including countries in which the far right has been more and less successful. You will gain an understanding of the causes and consequences of the rise of far right parties and an understanding of their impact on immigration politics and policies.

    • The Making of Modern Europe

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1

      This module provides you with an understanding of the historical development of the idea of Europe as it has evolved from the middle ages until the present day. In particular we shall trace the relationship between, on the one hand, ideas and ideals of European cooperation, integration and unity and, on the other, the realities of European economic, political and social development and conflict.

      The module explains the different dimensions of the idea of Europe and places them in their contemporary context, highlighting aspects of continuity and change. It further examines the inherent tension between unity and diversity in European history and explores how this tension has been manifest in the political struggles and the philosophical arguments which have characterised Europe over time.

      The first half of the module considers the development of Europe as idea and reality over the long run while the second half examines how these aspects have interacted in the 20th and 21st centuries.

    • The Transformation of Contemporary Europe

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

      This module examines the changes in the political and economic systems of Europe, East and West, since 1945, with particular reference to the impact of the Cold War and its aftermath.

    • Thinking Like a Criminologist

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1

      This modules aims to introduce students to the key skills involved in thinking like a criminologist. It places a joint emphasis on gaining both a theoretical and practical understanding of criminology as a discipline.

      You will develop skills in interpreting crime statistics, critically assessing definitions of crime and engaging with media debates about crime and justice. These will be informed by introductory criminological theory to provide a foundation, including positivism and classicism, Durkheim and the Chicago School.

      Key topics will include:

      • What is crime?
      • Who is a criminal?
      • How can we use crime statistics?
      • The history of crime
      • Media representations of crime
      • The use of official reports and policy documents.
    • Understanding Law

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1

      This module introduces students to English Law by exploring the way in which law is made, interpreted and applied within the broader context of Human Rights and EU Law.

      It also provides students with an opportunity to critically examine the structures and personnel of the English Law System.

    • Understanding the Criminal Justice System

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2

      Gain an introduction to the criminal justice system by focusing on key debates around social control and the historic development of institutions.

      You study the development of key components of the justice system including:

      • prisons
      • the police
      • probation
      • the courts and community justice.

      You also examine contemporary debates including:

      • race and crime
      • gender
      • power and punishment
      • issues of overpolicing and criminalisation
      • youth justice and crime prevention.

      You will study the British justice system within an international context (to allow for a comparative understanding).

  • Sciences
    • Applying Psychology to Everyday Problems

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1; Year 2, Term 1

      This module introduces you to a variety of ways in which psychological knowledge is applied to everyday problems. You cover topics such as:
      • understanding mental health problems and how they can be treated
      • how psychology can influence health and well-being
      • the role of psychology in the workplace
      • the relevance of psychology to educational practice – including understanding why ‘bullying’ occurs and how we can prevent it
      • how psychological knowledge about face recognition can aid criminal investigations.
      You'll learn about some of the research and theories that support these applications of psychology. We also introduce you to the areas of professional applied psychology that underpin them.
    • Clinical Psychology and Mental Health

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

    • Design Techniques in Practice

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

    • Drawing for Design

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1

    • Experience Prototyping

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2

    • From Quarks to the Cosmos

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2; Year 2, Term 2

      This elective provides an overview of state-of-the-art research in fundamental physics for non-physicists, covering:

      • Physics of the quantum world
      • Particle physics and the search for the fundamental constituents of matter
      • Cosmology and the large-scale structure of our world
      • The quest for the fundamental forces of nature.

      The elective is non-mathematical and suitable for non-scientists as well as scientists from other disciplines.

    • Further Study in Biological and Cognitive Psychology

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

    • Further Study in Social, Clinical and Developmental Psychology

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

    • Introduction to Biological and Cognitive Psychology

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1; Year 2, Term 1

      In this module, you are introduced to psychology - the scientific study of mind, brain and behaviour.

      You begin your journey by examining some of the basic approaches and methodologies of psychology, evaluating theories and ideas with respect to empirical data and applying the findings of psychology to everyday experience.

      As part of the module, you cover core areas including:

      • approaches in psychology
      • research methods
      • biological psychology
      • sensation and perception
      • consciousness
      • learning
      • attention and memory
      • thinking and intelligence.

      This elective module is not suitable for students of BSc Psychology, please do not choose this module if you are on a BSc Psychology course.

    • Introduction to Social, Clinical and Developmental Psychology

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2; Year 2, Term 2

      This elective module is not suitable for students of BSc Psychology, please do not choose this module if you are on a BSc Psychology course.

      This module continues the introduction to Psychology started in the preceeding Introduction to Psychology elective module.

      Psychology is the scientific study of mind, brain and behaviour.

      We continue our journey of examining some of the basic approaches and methodologies of Psychology, evaluating theories and ideas with respect to empirical data and applying the findings of Psychology to everyday experience.

      The module surveys core areas including:

      • human development
      • emotion and motivation
      • health and well-being
      • social psychology
      • personality
      • psychological disorders
      • and the treatment of psychological disorders.
    • Our Place in the Universe(s)

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1; Year 2, Term 1

      Astronomy, the study of space and its contents beyond the earth, is both the oldest science, and one in which new discoveries are being made on a daily basis. It is used to explain such familiar phenomena as the tides, eclipses and meteor showers, as well as much more exotic objects such as black holes and exoplanets. The observable universe also provides a laboratory for testing physical theories at extreme energies that are unachievable on earth.

      This elective will provide non-science students with a broad, non-mathematical understanding of astronomy from our solar system, via stars and galaxies, to the universe as a whole, all to appreciate our place in the universe(s).

    • Philosophical Foundations of Cognitive Science

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

      In this module, you examine various philosophical foundational issues in cognitive science by focusing on the nature and role of computation and representation in cognitive scientific explanations.

      In particular, you will answer the question: can our everyday way of understanding the mind, in terms of beliefs, desires and intentions, serve as a foundation for a scientific understanding of mind? You then analyse answers that have been given to this question.

    • Principles of Cognitive Science

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2

      How do our minds work?

      In this module, you answer this question from the perspective of classical cognitive science, which treats the mind as a processor of information.

      Over the last 50 years, cognitive scientists have gained deep insights into how we think and what makes us intelligent.

      We will investigate how the mind receives, transforms, stores, retrieves and transmits information in order to understand how we comprehend the world, reason, solve problems, remember, develop skills and learn.

      In addition to studying the variety, power and limitations of our cognitive capabilities, you analyse and explain the nature of exceptional cognitive abilities, such as creativity and expertise, but we will also see that even seemingly simple everyday tasks involves a surprising richness and complexity of cognition.

      A key part of the module will be a case study on a task of your own choosing, which you investigate using the core concepts and models presented in the seminars.

    • Psychology Now: Contemporary Approaches to Understanding Behaviour

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 2; Year 2, Term 2

      This module introduces you to a wide range of research themes in contemporary psychology. Internationally recognised researchers will help you learn about work at the cutting edge of this dynamically changing discipline, covering topics such as the psychology of gender differences, the effects of drugs on our thinking and behaviour, the mechanisms involved in hypnosis, and the role of psychology in environmental issues.

      You will evaluate diverse approaches to understanding human behaviour, from comparative perspectives that help us revisit assumptions about the human-animal divide, through to social psychological explanations of why we interact with other people in the ways that we do. This module does not require any prior knowledge of psychology – all are welcome.

    • Psychology of Forensic Analysis and Investigation

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 1

      Your studies in this module are concerned with the application of psychological theory and research to criminological and forensic contexts.

      In this module, you explore how psychology can be used to understand and enhance aspects of criminological and security investigations, such as eyewitness testimony and the identification of suspects.

      In addition, you learn to evaluate connections between crime and mental illness.

      The kinds of specific questions you encounter during the module include:

      • what is wrong with current face recall systems such as Photofit, Identikit and E-fit?
      • how reliable are eyewitnesses’ accounts of what they have seen, and their identifications of faces they have encountered?
      • why is that faces of other races are more likely to be misidentified in police lineups?
      • can people be recognised reliably from ID cards, passports and CCTV?
      • do children make reliable witnesses, or is their testimony not to be trusted?
      • how is memory affected by stress, and why do some individuals develop post-traumatic stress disorder?
      • how can deception be detected by investigators?
      • what kinds of biases and errors affect investigators of serious crimes?
      • what is the relationship between mental illness and crime?
      • to what extent does the media portrayal of 'psychopathy' have any basis in psychological research?
    • The Ghost in the Machine?

      15 credits
      Year 1, Term 1

      You will examine what it means to be an intelligent being and explore how we view ourselves.

      You will look at a number of physicalist theories, including the view that cognition is computation.

      In doing so, you will examine some of the basic issues underlying cognitive science as an interdisciplinary study of the mind, taking in topics from psychology, neuroscience, linguistics, computing, artificial intelligence, robotics, evolutionary theory, biology and philosophy.

       

       

       

    • Toy and Game Design

      15 credits
      Year 2, Term 2

Pathways

A pathway is a combination of electives from a single subject area that is distinct from your main subject. Pathways are open to students on most single-honours degrees.

There are two ways you can study a pathway:

  • You can choose to take a pathway across the first two years of your course alongside your main subject. Your pathway will be recorded on your degree certificate. For example, if you take Spanish for two years, your degree certificate will list your main subject ‘with proficiency in Spanish’.
  • Some of our pathways are available for three years, forming the minor part of a major/minor degree. If, for example, you take Spanish for three years alongside your main subject, your degree certificate will list your main subject ‘with Spanish’.
I believe that learning one of the most spoken languages in the world can be of great benefit for both personal and professional development.Cathy Wiesan
Business and Management Studies BSc
Mandarin Chinese Pathway

Discover pathways

  • Arts and Humanities
    • American Studies Pathway

      Examine the history of slavery and the Black Power movement, analyse Andy Warhol's silkscreens, or study New York City by ‘reading’ it as a site of politics, art, music and literature. 

      We introduce you to the key topics in American studies. You will sharpen your oral and written communication, analyse the complex ways that Americans define their racial and cultural identities, and learn to critically but sensitively interpret texts and images.

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • American Identities
      • The Look of America
      • The African American Experience
      • American Cities: New York City
    • Art and Heritage Pathway

      This pathway focuses on the objects, monuments and institutions that make up cultural heritage. You will consider the issues in studying, conserving and exhibiting heritage. You look at material from the past, but also relatively recent objects and monuments. 

      Heritage now occupies a significant part of our cultural industries. You can enhance your employment prospects in the arts, culture and heritage sectors by increasing your familiarity with the scope and problems of heritage. 

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • Art and Artists
      • Objects of Art
      • Exhibition Studies
      • Whose Heritage?
    • Culture and Society Pathway

      Study pop culture, high art, community, digital media and everyday life. Understand how everything from taste to time is culturally constructed. Maximise your potential as a cultural critic, interpreter, curator or maker by developing confidence, imagination and analytical skills.

      Cultural understanding is vital for work in a globalised world. Our graduates have gone on to careers in heritage, community development, arts administration, the creative industries, journalism, public relations, charities and NGOs, and teaching.

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • Culture and Society
      • Culture and the Everyday
      • Theory, Taste and Trash (E)
      • Culture and Representation (Elective pathway)
    • Film Studies Pathway

      Study critical perspectives on cinema – both past and present and from diverse cultures. This pathway is for you if you are fascinated not only by the power of film as a medium but also by the intellectual challenges and rewards of film study at university level. 

      You develop a flexibility of thought, enabling you to negotiate problems in creative ways – an asset in a range of careers. Graduates have taken up posts in fields such as PR, teaching, film festivals, production companies and promotions.

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • Film Analysis (E)
      • Issues in Global Cinema E
      • American Cinema B (E)
      • British Cinema B (E)
    • Gender Studies Pathway

      Understand feminist/gender/queer theories and the ways they can be applied. Explore issues of gender (in)equality and gender justice in different societies. Gain insights into areas such as education, work, reproduction, families, sexual violence, body image, illness, and age.

      Graduates of this pathway may wish to go on to careers as researchers, lawyers, activists, policy-makers, or to work for charities and NGOs. You could also go on to postgraduate study at Sussex.

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • Gender Equality
      • Gendering the Life Course
      • The Anthropology of Sexuality
      • Gender, Space and Culture (E)
    • Media Pathway

      Gain insight into key debates, issues and approaches to media studies. Analyse a range of media objects, forms and consumption in everyday life. Explore the relationships between media and social, cultural, economic, political and technological processes.

      You develop skills in data collection, research, critical analysis and oral and written communication. Informed, in-depth media knowledge and understanding is an asset in a wide range of careers.

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • Questioning the Media E
      • Debates in Media Studies E
      • Media, Memory, History (E)
      • Advertising (E)
    • Middle East Studies Pathway

      Study the modern Middle East, including its history, culture, politics and religion. Expand your understanding of the region's complexities and challenge media stereotypes. Examine the core of the Middle East as well as Israel and North Africa.

      You also consider Islam and its relationship to other religious traditions in the region, as well as the underlying social and cultural dynamics of the region's politics. This pathway enhances your cultural awareness, an asset valued by employers in our globalised world.

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • Religion and Culture in the Middle East
      • Ethnography of the Middle East and Central Asia
      • Short Period: The Middle East and North Africa since 1908
      • Philosophy, Politics and the Middle East
    • Music Pathway

      Get an introduction to current approaches in the study of music and recent developments in musicology. Through thought-provoking critique you will learn to appraise existing music practices and how they reflect and sometimes change society. 

      You will analyse a range of musical texts, ranging from the 13th century to the present day. This pathway does require you to think about music’s inner workings and its social and historical functions, but it does not require musical literacy.

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • Introduction to Music Studies (E)
      • Music and Society (E)
      • From Opera to Film (E)
      • Film Music after 1950 E
    • Philosophy Pathway

      This pathway gives you a grounding in philosophical thinking, introduces you to major historical philosophers and enables you to examine key questions in four major and complementary areas:

      • human nature
      • politics
      • religion
      • science.

      You learn to think and argue clearly, which is highly valued by employers and will help you in your future career. 

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • Truth and Morality: The Meaning of Life
      • Society, State and Humanity
      • Feminist Philosophy
      • Philosophy of Religion
  • Business, Finance and Economics
    • Business and Management Pathway

      Learn to break down problems and apply practical solutions. Understand how the business world works, including the roles of key institutions, the range of products and instruments, and the risks faced by companies and individuals.

      You develop transferable skills in data interpretation, decision-making, and critical thinking. This pathway prepares you for a variety of careers in the business sector, including banking, marketing research, public relations and sales.

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • Introduction to Business and Management (Elective)
      • Introduction to Accounting (Elective)
      • International Business Environment
      • Operations Management (Elective)
    • Economics pathway

      Following this pathway gives you a basic grounding in Economics. The focus will be on Microeconomics (concerning the behaviour of firms and individuals), starting with the basic theory, before moving on later in the pathway to some applications.

      You learn how to ‘think like an economist’ – focusing on the essentials of a problem and using a relevant economic model to analyse it. If you continue into the final year of the pathway you apply your knowledge to global markets and find out about how the new field of behavioural economics provides new insights into everyday problems.

      Please note that due to the time available to the pathway we do not cover Macroeconomics (issues such as inflation and unemployment).

      What will I achieve?

      This pathway can challenge the way in which you think about your own discipline and what it is saying about the world.

      Career paths

      The knowledge that you gain on this pathway might prove useful in your future career. Economic concepts, such as scarcity of resources and opportunity cost, can be applied to a wide range of phenomena. 

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • Introduction to Economics (Elective)
      • Microeconomics 2 (Elective)
      • Microeconomics 1 (Elective)
      • Europe in the International Economic Order (Elective)
    • Finance Pathway

      This pathway introduces you to finance, modern financial markets and core financial skills. You gain an understanding of the roles of key institutions, the variety of products and instruments, the risks companies and individuals face, and the tools and techniques to manage such risks.

      You develop skills in constructing arguments, evaluating ideas, problem solving and critical thinking. You are equipped for a range of careers in the financial sector and in finance roles within other industries, as well as careers in regulatory bodies, governments or non-profit organisations.

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • Principles of Finance (Elective)
      • Theory of Investments (Elective)
      • Financial Institutions and Markets (Elective)
      • Financial Derivatives (Elective)
    • International Business Pathway

      Gain skills and strategies you can use in international business environments. Learn about developments that pose opportunities and challenges for overseas business. Understand the cultural differences that act as barriers to communication and negotiation.

      Our graduates start their careers equipped with knowledge about the global business context. They can make informed decisions while working as international managers or entrepreneurs.

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • International Business Environment
      • International Business Strategy (Elective)
      • International Marketing (Elective)
      • International Human Resource Management (Elective)
  • Education
    • Education Pathway

      Study the historical, political and theoretical background of educational policy and practice. Examine how curricula are constructed, understand different education systems, and assess what is happening to education in the UK today.

      This pathway can help start your career in teaching, counselling, youth work, educational psychology or in educational environments such as charities, Children’s Services or Children’s Rights in the UK or overseas.

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • Education, Education, Education; Theory, Practice and Politics
      • Cross Cultural Perspectives on Teaching, Learning and Assessment
      • Inclusion, Diversity and Equity in Education
      • Knowledge and Society; Education, Identity and The (late) Modern State
    • International Education and Development Pathway

      Understand the issues faced in helping all children to access, stay in and learn in school. This pathway is an excellent introduction to the major institutions that direct aid and influence policy and practice. See how education can shape individuals, families and communities. 

      This pathway is for you if you wish to work in teaching, educational environments, charities, international NGOs, or overseas or politics and policy-making around education and development.

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • Education for Development: Aid, Policy and the Global Agenda
      • Cross Cultural Perspectives on Teaching, Learning and Assessment
      • Education, Peacebuilding and Conflict
      • Access, Equity and Gender
  • Global Studies
    • Anthropology Pathway

      Boost your career prospects by understanding a core social science. You analyse everyday culture and social practices, norms and values. By critically questioning contemporary issues you will explore processes of social transformation.

      This pathway enhances your critical thinking and analytic skills. These are useful in a range of careers including NGOs, charities, policy-making, the media or postgraduate study in anthropology.

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • Global Cultures, Local Lives
      • People, Culture and the Global Economy
      • Religion and Ritual (Pathway elective)
      • Culture and Representation (Elective pathway)
    • Human Rights Pathway

      Interested in how and why human rights are applied in practice? This pathway explores the role of the state, law, and morality to understand how human rights work. You examine individual rights, the right to protest, and the relationship between human rights and business.

      Studying an interdisciplinary pathway will boost your employability because your knowledge can be applied in a variety of careers, such as law, social care, business, government and the charitable sector. It's also an excellent basis for postgraduate study.

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • Introduction to Human Rights
      • Justice, Equality and Society
      • Migrant and Refugee Well-Being: Theory and Practice
      • Health, Poverty and Inequality (Pathway elective)
    • International Relations Pathway

      Learn about current affairs and understand the major concepts in international relations. This is a cross-disciplinary introduction to world politics, which covers a range of analytical approaches that help us make sense of the world. 

      This pathway prepares you for employment in any area of global affairs. You gain the skills to understand the complexities of the global economy and society – a valuable addition to your main degree.

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • Global Issues
      • Foundations of International Relations (pathway elective)
      • Introduction to International Political Economy (Pathway elective)
      • Security and Insecurity in Global Politics (Pathway elective)
  • Languages and English Language Teaching
    • Advanced French Pathway

      Learn another language as you study and boost your career prospects. Enrich your understanding of your first language and develop your confidence, communication skills and cultural awareness. 

      Study is in small seminar groups taught by experienced language speakers. You practise spoken and written usage and understanding of your chosen language.

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • French Intermediate A Year 1
      • French Intermediate B Year 1
      • French Advanced A
      • French Advanced B
    • Advanced Spanish Pathway

      Learn another language as you study and boost your career prospects. Enrich your understanding of your first language and develop your confidence, communication skills and cultural awareness. 

      Study is in small seminar groups taught by experienced language speakers. You practise spoken and written usage and understanding of your chosen language.

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • Spanish Intermediate A Year 1
      • Spanish Intermediate B Year 1
      • Spanish Advanced A
      • Spanish Advanced B
    • Arabic [CEFR B2]

      Learn another language as you study and boost your career prospects. Enrich your understanding of your first language and develop your confidence, communication skills and cultural awareness. 

      Study is in small seminar groups taught by experienced language speakers. You practise spoken and written usage and understanding of your chosen language.

      Find out about the Common European Framework of Reference to Languages (CEFR)

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • Arabic Ab initio A
      • Arabic Ab initio B
      • Arabic Intermediate A
      • Arabic Intermediate B
      • Arabic Advanced A
      • Arabic Advanced B
    • Arabic Pathway

      Learn another language as you study and boost your career prospects. Enrich your understanding of your first language and develop your confidence, communication skills and cultural awareness. 

      Study is in small seminar groups taught by experienced language speakers. You practise spoken and written usage and understanding of your chosen language.

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • Arabic Ab initio A
      • Arabic Ab initio B
      • Arabic Intermediate A
      • Arabic Intermediate B
    • British Sign Language Pathway

      Learn another language as you study and boost your career prospects. Enrich your understanding of your first language and develop your confidence, communication skills and cultural awareness. 

      Study is in small seminar groups taught by experienced language speakers. You practise spoken and written usage and understanding of your chosen language.

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • British Sign Language and Deaf Culture 1
      • British Sign Language and Deaf Culture 2
      • British Sign Language and Deaf Culture 3
      • British Sign Language and Deaf Culture 4
    • English Language Teaching Pathway

      Learn another language as you study and boost your career prospects. Enrich your understanding of your first language and develop your confidence, communication skills and cultural awareness. 

      Study is in small seminar groups taught by experienced language speakers. You practise spoken and written usage and understanding of your chosen language.

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • English Language Teaching 1A
      • English Language Teaching 1B
      • English Language Teaching 2A
      • English Language Teaching 2B
    • French [CEFR B2+]

      Learn another language as you study and boost your career prospects. Enrich your understanding of your first language and develop your confidence, communication skills and cultural awareness. 

      Study is in small seminar groups taught by experienced language speakers. You practise spoken and written usage and understanding of your chosen language.

      Find out about the Common European Framework of Reference to Languages (CEFR)

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • French Intermediate A Year 1
      • French Intermediate B Year 1
      • French Advanced A
      • French Advanced B
      • French for Professional Purposes 2A
      • French for Professional Purposes 2B
    • French [CEFR B2]

      Learn another language as you study and boost your career prospects. Enrich your understanding of your first language and develop your confidence, communication skills and cultural awareness. 

      Study is in small seminar groups taught by experienced language speakers. You practise spoken and written usage and understanding of your chosen language.

      Find out about the Common European Framework of Reference to Languages (CEFR)

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • French Ab initio A
      • French Ab initio B
      • French Intermediate A
      • French Intermediate B
      • French Advanced A
      • French Advanced B
    • French [CEFR C1]

      Learn another language as you study and boost your career prospects. Enrich your understanding of your first language and develop your confidence, communication skills and cultural awareness. 

      Study is in small seminar groups taught by experienced language speakers. You practise spoken and written usage and understanding of your chosen language.

      Find out about the Common European Framework of Reference to Languages (CEFR)

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • French For Professional Purposes 1A
      • French For Professional Purposes 1B
      • French for Professional Purposes 2A
      • French for Professional Purposes 2B
      • French For Professional Purposes 3A
      • French For Professional Purposes 3B
    • French for Professional Purposes Pathway

      Learn another language as you study and boost your career prospects. Enrich your understanding of your first language and develop your confidence, communication skills and cultural awareness. 

      Study is in small seminar groups taught by experienced language speakers. You practise spoken and written usage and understanding of your chosen language.

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • French For Professional Purposes 1A
      • French For Professional Purposes 1B
      • French for Professional Purposes 2A
      • French for Professional Purposes 2B
    • French Pathway

      Learn another language as you study and boost your career prospects. Enrich your understanding of your first language and develop your confidence, communication skills and cultural awareness. 

      Study is in small seminar groups taught by experienced language speakers. You practise spoken and written usage and understanding of your chosen language.

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • French Ab initio A
      • French Ab initio B
      • French Intermediate A
      • French Intermediate B
    • German [CEFR B2]

      Learn another language as you study and boost your career prospects. Enrich your understanding of your first language and develop your confidence, communication skills and cultural awareness. 

      Study is in small seminar groups taught by experienced language speakers. You practise spoken and written usage and understanding of your chosen language.

      Find out about the Common European Framework of Reference to Languages (CEFR)

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • German Ab initio A
      • German Ab initio B
      • German Intermediate A
      • German Intermediate B
      • German Advanced A
      • German Advanced B
    • German Pathway

      Learn another language as you study and boost your career prospects. Enrich your understanding of your first language and develop your confidence, communication skills and cultural awareness. 

      Study is in small seminar groups taught by experienced language speakers. You practise spoken and written usage and understanding of your chosen language.

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • German Ab initio A
      • German Ab initio B
      • German Intermediate A
      • German Intermediate B
    • Italian [CEFR B2]

      Learn another language as you study and boost your career prospects. Enrich your understanding of your first language and develop your confidence, communication skills and cultural awareness. 

      Study is in small seminar groups taught by experienced language speakers. You practise spoken and written usage and understanding of your chosen language.

      Find out about the Common European Framework of Reference to Languages (CEFR)

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • Italian Ab initio A
      • Italian Ab initio B
      • Italian Intermediate A
      • Italian Intermediate B
      • Italian Advanced A
      • Italian Advanced B
    • Italian Pathway

      Learn another language as you study and boost your career prospects. Enrich your understanding of your first language and develop your confidence, communication skills and cultural awareness. 

      Study is in small seminar groups taught by experienced language speakers. You practise spoken and written usage and understanding of your chosen language.

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • Italian Ab initio A
      • Italian Ab initio B
      • Italian Intermediate A
      • Italian Intermediate B
    • Japanese [CEFR B2]

      Learn another language as you study and boost your career prospects. Enrich your understanding of your first language and develop your confidence, communication skills and cultural awareness. 

      Study is in small seminar groups taught by experienced language speakers. You practise spoken and written usage and understanding of your chosen language.

      Find out about the Common European Framework of Reference to Languages (CEFR)

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • Japanese Ab initio A
      • Japanese Ab initio B
      • Japanese Intermediate A
      • Japanese Intermediate B
      • Japanese Advanced A
      • Japanese Advanced B
    • Japanese Pathway

      Learn another language as you study and boost your career prospects. Enrich your understanding of your first language and develop your confidence, communication skills and cultural awareness. 

      Study is in small seminar groups taught by experienced language speakers. You practise spoken and written usage and understanding of your chosen language.

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • Japanese Ab initio A
      • Japanese Ab initio B
      • Japanese Intermediate A
      • Japanese Intermediate B
    • Mandarin Chinese [CEFR B2]

      Learn another language as you study and boost your career prospects. Enrich your understanding of your first language and develop your confidence, communication skills and cultural awareness. 

      Study is in small seminar groups taught by experienced language speakers. You practise spoken and written usage and understanding of your chosen language.

      Find out about the Common European Framework of Reference to Languages (CEFR)

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • Chinese Ab initio A
      • Chinese Ab initio B
      • Chinese Intermediate A
      • Chinese Intermediate B
      • Chinese Advanced A
      • Chinese Advanced B
    • Mandarin Chinese Pathway

      Learn another language as you study and boost your career prospects. Enrich your understanding of your first language and develop your confidence, communication skills and cultural awareness. 

      Study is in small seminar groups taught by experienced language speakers. You practise spoken and written usage and understanding of your chosen language.

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • Chinese Ab initio A
      • Chinese Ab initio B
      • Chinese Intermediate A
      • Chinese Intermediate B
    • Spanish [CEFR B2+]

      Learn another language as you study and boost your career prospects. Enrich your understanding of your first language and develop your confidence, communication skills and cultural awareness. 

      Study is in small seminar groups taught by experienced language speakers. You practise spoken and written usage and understanding of your chosen language.

      Find out about the Common European Framework of Reference to Languages (CEFR)

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • Spanish Intermediate A Year 1
      • Spanish Intermediate B Year 1
      • Spanish Advanced A
      • Spanish Advanced B
      • Spanish for Professional Purposes 2A
      • Spanish for Professional Purposes 2B
    • Spanish [CEFR B2]

      Learn another language as you study and boost your career prospects. Enrich your understanding of your first language and develop your confidence, communication skills and cultural awareness. 

      Study is in small seminar groups taught by experienced language speakers. You practise spoken and written usage and understanding of your chosen language.

      Find out about the Common European Framework of Reference to Languages (CEFR)

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • Spanish Ab initio A
      • Spanish Ab initio B
      • Spanish Intermediate A
      • Spanish Intermediate B
      • Spanish Advanced A
      • Spanish Advanced B
    • Spanish [CEFR C1]

      Learn another language as you study and boost your career prospects. Enrich your understanding of your first language and develop your confidence, communication skills and cultural awareness. 

      Study is in small seminar groups taught by experienced language speakers. You practise spoken and written usage and understanding of your chosen language.

      Find out about the Common European Framework of Reference to Languages (CEFR)

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • Spanish for Professional Purposes 1A
      • Spanish for Professional Purposes 1B
      • Spanish for Professional Purposes 2A
      • Spanish for Professional Purposes 2B
      • Spanish for Professional Purposes 3A
      • Spanish For Professional Purposes 3B
    • Spanish for Professional Purposes Pathway

      Learn another language as you study and boost your career prospects. Enrich your understanding of your first language and develop your confidence, communication skills and cultural awareness. 

      Study is in small seminar groups taught by experienced language speakers. You practise spoken and written usage and understanding of your chosen language.

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • Spanish for Professional Purposes 1A
      • Spanish for Professional Purposes 1B
      • Spanish for Professional Purposes 2A
      • Spanish for Professional Purposes 2B
    • Spanish Pathway

      Learn another language as you study and boost your career prospects. Enrich your understanding of your first language and develop your confidence, communication skills and cultural awareness. 

      Study is in small seminar groups taught by experienced language speakers. You practise spoken and written usage and understanding of your chosen language.

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • Spanish Ab initio A
      • Spanish Ab initio B
      • Spanish Intermediate A
      • Spanish Intermediate B
  • Law, Criminology and Politics
    • Criminology Pathway

      Understand the main concepts in criminology, its historical and contemporary debates, and an overview of the type of research that criminologists do. Address issues of punishment, social control and deviance, and explore the relationship between crime and society. 

      Taking this pathway can show employers that you're interested in working in the criminal justice system (i.e. police, probation work, prisons, youth justice), or you could pursue criminology at postgraduate level here at Sussex.

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • Thinking Like a Criminologist
      • Understanding the Criminal Justice System
      • Criminology in Theory and Perspective
      • Punishment and Penology
    • Legal Studies Pathway

      Want to explore big questions about how we order society and the role of law? Learn about the English legal system, aspects of international law, and the relationship between law, morality and politics. It's an enriching experience whether you wish to become a lawyer or not.

      You'll learn to analyse cases, present confidently and develop your ability to construct arguments. These skills are attractive to employers and knowledge of how law works is very useful in business, public relations, human resources, broadcast media, development and politics.

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • Understanding Law
      • Justice, Equality and Society
      • Crime and Criminal Justice
      • Contemporary Issues in Law
    • Politics Pathway

      Interested in issues of power, representation and change? This pathway tackles these core political themes. Learn about the historical context of contemporary issues and study the actors and institutions that shape politics, including (non-)citizens, parties, the state and business. 

      You gain conceptual and factual knowledge of politics and policy as well as practical skills in summarising, presenting and debating. These capabilities are useful in active politics, the Civil Service, non-governmental organisations and the media.

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • British Political History
      • Introduction to the European Union
      • Political and Social Change in Contemporary Europe
      • The Far Right and the Politics of Immigration
  • Sciences
    • Cognitive Science Pathway

      Meet the challenge of understanding the mind in an interdisciplinary way. Explore different approaches to cognitive science, and integrate multiple perspectives. This pathway draws on psychology, neuroscience, philosophy, linguistics, computing and AI.

      You examine current and historical contexts, recent trends in cognitive science, and the philosophy of mind. This is a conceptually demanding but rewarding subject; by choosing this pathway you'll learn to reason, argue and grasp difficult ideas.

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • The Ghost in the Machine?
      • Principles of Cognitive Science
      • Philosophical Foundations of Cognitive Science
      • Language, Mind and Brain
    • Product Design Pathway

      Gain knowledge and understanding of creative processes and specific skills in design. Learn how to generate, grow and present ideas. Understand how to develop and specify a concept to meet constraints, including risk and uncertainty. 

      An understanding of the principles underpinning effective design and the ability to apply them complements many disciplines. You can also build up a portfolio of work to be presented to potential employers as evidence of your achievements.

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • Drawing for Design
      • Experience Prototyping
      • Design Techniques in Practice
      • Toy and Game Design
    • Psychology Pathway

      Psychology illuminates human cognition, emotion, and relationships. Study a variety of theoretical, methodological and analytical frameworks and understand how psychology is applied to diverse issues, from mental health to forensic investigation.

      You'll also gain skills that all employers value, such as effective communication, critical thinking and analysis. This pathway is suited to further study or a career in psychology, media, advertising, market research, human resources, and business and management.

      This pathway includes the following modules:

      • Introduction to Biological and Cognitive Psychology
      • Introduction to Social, Clinical and Developmental Psychology
      • Further Study in Social, Clinical and Developmental Psychology
      • Further Study in Biological and Cognitive Psychology

Please note that these are the electives and pathways running in 2017. Electives and pathways running in 2018 may be subject to change.

How do I apply for an elective or pathway?

As a student on most of our single-honours courses, you start choosing your electives and pathway just before you start your degree at Sussex.

For more information, contact us by email at curricdevelop@sussex.ac.uk


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