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Ion Quantum Technology Group2020-02-25T08:19:44+00:00

Ion Quantum Technology at Sussex

Welcome to the web page of the Ion Quantum Technology group at the University of Sussex, Brighton, UK. The group is headed by Prof. Winfried Hensinger. Our aim is to develop new quantum technologies, in particular, the ion trap quantum computer. For this purpose our research focuses on applied experimental quantum information science, development of new scalable methods to build ion trap arrays and the generation of large scale entanglement. We are in the process of constructing a quantum simulation engine and a large-scale trapped-ion quantum computer. Another research area is the development of quantum sensors. The group is part of the UK Quantum Technology Hub on Networked Quantum Technologies and the UK Quantum Technology Hub for Sensors and Metrology. The group is part of the Sussex Centre for Quantum Technologies.

More information about our research, grouped by different target groups, can be found in the Research Section. Here you can find videos, explanations, interviews with current students and other useful information.

You can also go on a Virtual Lab Tour exploring our labs and the technology we develop. A good summary of our research in quantum computing can be found here.

The Frontier of Computing

Department of Energy

General News

The future of quantum computing in academia and industry

Professor Winfried Hensinger presented his personal journey spanning three continents and four countries, in a bid to achieve his goal of building a scalable quantum computer. He discussed the future of quantum computing and quantum technologies in academia and industry at the Careers in Quantum online event on 3 June 2021, organised by the University of Bristol Quantum Engineering Centre for Doctoral Training. You can watch the advice he gave here.

September 1st, 2021|

University announces strategic partnership with Universal Quantum

We are happy to announce a strategic partnership with full stack quantum computing company Universal Quantum. Universal Quantum is a spin-out from the Sussex Ion Quantum Technology group. This partnership will allow us to develop and construct practical quantum computers. More information can be found here.

November 25th, 2020|

Sussex quantum physicist gives evidence to MPs on future of technology

Professor Winfried Hensinger, Director of the SussexCentre for Quantum Technologies and Head of the Sussex Ion Quantum Technology Group appeared before the House of Commons’ Science and Technology Select Committee on 17 July, to give evidence as part of the Committee’s inquiry exploring the opportunities and challenges for new quantum technologies. (more…)

July 19th, 2018|

Sussex physicist advises German Parliament on quantum computing

Professor Winfried Hensinger, Director of the Sussex Centre for Quantum Technologies and Head of the Sussex Ion Quantum Technology Group, was invited by the German Parliament to testify about the ideas and technology behind quantum computing. (more…)

June 8th, 2018|

June 2016

PhD student Anna Webb has won a University-wide competition explaining her PhD in just three minutes. A news article describing this achievement can be found here.

June 1st, 2016|

March 2016

Four Phd positions in quantum technologies with trapped ions are availalable in the areas of: Microwave Quantum Computing and Simulation with Trapped Ions, Developing a trapped-ion quantum computer demonstrator device, Quantum technology for finance and other commercial applications, Quantum sensing with trapped ions. Info available here.

March 1st, 2016|

December 2014

The IQT group at Sussex becomes part of the UK National Quantum Technology Programe, a press release can be found here here).

December 12th, 2014|

December 2014

We currently have an opening for a postdoctoral position. More details can be found here. We expect to have further vacancies that will be advertised shortly. If you are interested, please contact Dr.Winfried Hensinger for more information.

December 2nd, 2014|

December 2014

Phd positions in Quantum Technologies with trapped ions are available. There are a number of positions availalable in the areas of microwave quantum logic, quantum simulation and quantum sensing (info available here).

December 1st, 2014|

October 2013

Book author John Gribbin, Biolologist Laurence Pearl, PhD student Kim Lake and Winfried Hensinger give a short introduction to quantum computing for the Physics World special about 5 physics spin-offs that will change our lives.

October 1st, 2013|

August 2013

Details on the 1st Workshop on Quantum Simulations with Trapped Ions (IQSim13), to be held 16-19 December in Brighton can be found here.

August 2nd, 2013|

June 2013

Chris Reed is awarded the prize for the best BSc. project in the Department of Physics & Astronomy at Sussex.

June 1st, 2013|

January 2013

The Sussex Ion Quantum Technology group is featured in EPSRC’s Pioneer magazine, you can find the article here, see p.18 and 19.

January 3rd, 2013|

October 2012

Come and explore Ion Quantum Technology research at Sussex using our new interactive display, located in the Pevensey 2 building right in front of the IQT lab.

October 2nd, 2012|

October 2012

PhD position available. You can find more information here. Application deadline is 20 December 2012 (applications after this deadline may be considered if position is not filled).

October 1st, 2012|

June 2011

The IQT group received a grant from the Sussex Enterprise Development Fund for another commercialisation project.

June 1st, 2011|

January 2011

There will be a special Issue on “Ion Trapping” in Applied Physics B – Lasers and Optics, edited by Winfried Hensinger, Danny Segal and Richard Thompson. Details can be found here. Submission deadline is 30 April 2011.

January 1st, 2011|

December 2010

The electronic proceedings of the 1st European Conference on Trapped Ions (ECTI 2010) have now been published and can be found here. We also added some conference pictures to the website and you can find them here.

December 1st, 2010|

October 2010

Postdoctoral research fellow / associate position in Trapped Ion Quantum Technology and Nano-science is available. More details can be found here.

October 1st, 2010|

June 2009

The IQT group received a grant from the Sussex Enterprise Development Fund to commercialize a specialized laser.

June 2nd, 2009|

June 2009

Ben Jacques-Parr is the recipient of the departmental Pamela Rothwell prize for an outstanding BSc. research project.

June 1st, 2009|

June 2008

Marcus Hughes is the recipient of the departmental prize for an outstanding Master of Physics research project.

June 1st, 2008|

March 2008

Rajiv Ramasawmy is featured on the cover of the departmental prospectus featuring lasers in the mist (in our lab).

March 2nd, 2008|

July 2007

Jessica Grove-Smith is the co-recipient of the departmental prize for an outstanding Master of Physics research project.

July 1st, 2007|

April 2007

Dan Brown, Nik Davies, Jack Friedlander, Jessica Grove-Smith, Ben Pruess, David Scrivener and Tim Short successfully complete their undergraduate research projects.

April 2nd, 2007|

Science News

Robust Entanglement by Continuous Dynamical Decoupling of the J-Coupling Interaction

We propose a new microwave gate which uses the intrinsic J-coupling of ions in a static magnetic gradient. The gate is virtually insensitive to common amplitude noise of the microwave fields and enables high fidelities despite qubit frequency fluctuations, while the J-coupling interaction’s inherent robustness to motional decoherence is retained. Errors far below the fault-tolerant threshold can be achieved at high initial temperatures, negating the requirement of sideband cooling below the Doppler temperature.

Manuscript : Robust Entanglement by Continuous Dynamical Decoupling of the J-Coupling Interaction

July 15th, 2021|

A Scalable Helium Gas Cooling System for Trapped-Ion Applications

Microfabricated ion-trap devices offer a promising pathway towards scalable quantum computing. Addition of on-chip features, however, increases the power dissipated by components such as current-carrying wires and digital-to-analogue converters (DACs). Presented here is the development of a modular cooling system designed for use with multiple ion-trapping experiments simultaneously enabling efficient cooling to 70K while provide significant and scalable cooling power.
Manuscript: A Scalable Helium Gas Cooling System for Trapped-Ion Applications

 

June 15th, 2021|

Efficient Qubit Routing for a Globally Connected Trapped Ion Quantum Computer

The cost of enabling connectivity in Noisy-Intermediate-Scale-Quantum devices is an important factor in determining computational power. A particular architecture for trapped-ion quantum computing relies on shuttling ions. An efficient ion routing algorithm has been created along with an appropriate error model, which can be used to estimate the achievable circuit depth and quantum volume as a function of experimental parameters.

Our paper has been published in Advanced Quantum Technologies 3, June 2020 Efficient Qubit routing for a globally connected trapped ion quantum computer

University of Sussex Research News press release, August 2020 Sussex study enables predicting computational power of early quantum computers

February 28th, 2020|

Engineering of Microfabricated Ion Traps and Integration of Advanced On-Chip Features

Ion trap microchips form the core of many quantum technologies, in particular, the trapped ion quantum computers. We provide an overview of state-of-the-art microfabrication techniques, as well as various considerations which motivate the choice of materials and processes. Finally, we discuss current efforts to include advanced, on-chip features into next generation ion traps. Our paper has been published in Nature Review Physics, June 2020.

Manuscript: Engineering of Microfabricated Ion Traps and Integration of Advanced On-Chip Features

July 1st, 2019|

Generation of high-fidelity quantum control methods for multi-level systems

We introduce a powerful technique to transform all existing two-level quantum control methods to new multi-level quantum control methods. We illustrate the technique by coherently mapping between two different qubit types with error well below the relevant fault-tolerant threshold, creating another important tool towards constructing a large scale quantum computer. (more…)

October 1st, 2018|

Blueprint for a microwave trapped-ion quantum computer

We unveil the first industrial blueprint on how to build a large-scale quantum computer. The work features a new invention permitting actual quantum bits to be transmitted between individual quantum computing modules in order to obtain a fully modular large-scale machine. The work is published in Science Advances. (more…)

February 1st, 2017|

Trapped-ion quantum logic with global radiation fields

We describe a new approach for trapped-ion quantum computing based on the application of global radiation fields and voltages applied to individual gate zones. Using this technique we demonstrate a two-qubit quantum gate producing a maximally entangled state with fidelity close to the fault-tolerant threshold. This quantum gate also constitutes a simple-to-implement tool for quantum metrology, sensing and simulation. (more…)

November 1st, 2016|

Ground-state cooling of a trapped ion using long-wavelength radiation

We demonstrate ground-state cooling of a trapped ion using long-wavelength radiation. This is a powerful tool for the implementation of quantum operations, where long-wavelength radiation instead of lasers is used for motional quantum state engineering.
Published in Physical Review Letters.

Manuscript: Ground-state cooling of a trapped ion using long-wavelength radiation

University of Sussex Press Release

July 1st, 2015|

Efficient preparation and detection of microwave dressed-state qubits and qutrits with trapped ions

We have developed a new method to efficiently prepare dressed state qubits and qutrits, thereby significantly reducing the experimental complexity of gate operations with dressed-state qubits. Dressed states are well protected from noise making them ideal for use in many quantum technology applications. Published in Physical Review A and selected as ‘Editor’s Suggestion’.

Manuscript: Efficient preparation and detection of microwave dressed-state qubits and qutrits with trapped ions

January 12th, 2015|

Generation of spin-motion entanglement in a trapped ion using long-wavelength radiation

We demonstrate spin-motion entanglement using longwave radiation. This is a critical step towards the experimental realisation of high-fidelity two-qubit gates using microwaves rather than laser radiation. Published in Physical Review A.

Manuscript: Generation of spin-motion entanglement in a trapped ion using long-wavelength radiation

University of Sussex Press Release

January 10th, 2015|

Fabrication and operation of a two-dimensional ion-trap lattice on a high-voltage microchip

Demonstration of the first two-dimensional ion lattice integrated on a microchip. We realize a two-dimensional ion-trap lattice on a microchip using a new fabrication method that allows very-high voltages to be applied to the chip, enabling very deep ion traps. Published in Nature Communications.

Manuscript: Fabrication and operation of a two-dimensional ion-trap lattice on a high-voltage microchip

University of Sussex Press Release

April 4th, 2014|

Versatile ytterbium ion trap experiment for operation of scalable ion-trap chips with motional heating and transition-frequency measurements

Article on design and operation of an ytterbium ion trap experiment with a setup that can host advanced surface and multilayer ion trap chips. We make a heating rate measurement and provide transition frequency measurements more precise than previously published work, published in Phys. Rev. A (21 Jan. 2011)

Manuscript: Versatile ytterbium ion trap experiment for operation of scalable ion-trap chips with motional heating and transition-frequency measurements

July 1st, 2010|

Single ytterbium ions are trapped in an experimental setup

Single ytterbium ions are trapped in an experimental setup particularly designed for the development of advanced ion trap chips. This setup allows for rapid turn-around time, optical access for all type of ion trap chips and up to 100 electric interconnects. The particular ion trap used features an ion – electrode distance of 300 microns and we observed an ion life time of more than 1 hour.

December 9th, 2009|

Measurement of motional decoherence scaling for an ion trap with moveable electrodes

September 06

Measurement of motional decoherence scaling for an ion trap with moveable electrodes, demonstrated significant suppression of patch potential heating, demonstrated ion trap with 23 microns ion-electrode spacing in experiments at the University of Michigan published in Physical Review Letters.

Manuscript

September 1st, 2006|

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