How do nervous systems sense the world and generate behaviours? How do circuits of neurons process information? And how can we treat diseases that interfere with these processes? Answering these questions is a challenge that involves disciplines from molecular biology to engineering and psychiatry to computer science.

At the University of Sussex, there are over 50 research groups working on these questions, and this community is represented by Sussex Neuroscience. Our aim is to further world-class research that will help us understand the nervous system in both health and disease.

Tom Baden elected as FENS-Kavli scholar 

Tom BadenDr Tom Baden, School of Life Sciences, has been elected as one of 15 new scholars to join the prestigious FENS-Kavli network of 35 outstanding young European neuroscientists at early to mid-career stages. This high-level multidisciplinary network aims to put young researchers at the forefront of promoting and advancing neuroscience in Europe and beyond, through influencing science policy, providing opportunities for young scientists, and facilitiating the exchange between science and society.

Since the network was established in 2014, Kavli scholars have written a number of articles to guide young neuroscientists in their careers, including "The Hitchiker's Guide to a Neuroscience Career" in Neuron and a series of opinion articles in the European Journal of Neuroscience. They have also created a position document on science policy and funding issues and entered into bilateral discussions with the  Europen Commissioner on Research, Innovation and Science. The Scholars will also run a series of networking socials and student prizes at the FENS Forum 2016.

On being elected as a FENS-Kavli scholar, Tom said, "I am humbled and excited to join this group of outstanding young Neuroscientists and I look forward to working with my new colleagues and the FENS community to promote neuroscience research, education and public outreach across the continent." Tom recently joined Sussex Neuroscience as a Senior Lecturer in Neuroscience. His research focuses on visual information processing of natural inputs

 

Upcoming seminars

No items are currently available.

View all events

Recent publications from Sussex Neuroscience

Please see our recent publications page for features on some of our latest research.  

Sussex Neuroscience on Twitter

The community of Neuroscientists at the University of Sussex and the Brighton and Sussex Medical School

RT @Scientifica_Int: A highly detailed map of the human brain, created at @WUSTL, has revealed almost 100 previously unidentified regions go.nature.com/2aiRkS9

RT @scienmag: The eyes are the window into the brain scienmag.com/?p=1483216 pic.twitter.com/UtiVJ0qKnr

RT @SussexUni: Sussex scientists have designed a protein that has given new hope to study of Alzheimer's sussex.ac.uk/newsandevents/… pic.twitter.com/ihyYRzC9O6

RT @TReNDinAfrica: Our FlyPi project made it to the finalists of the citizen @hackaday prize to improve society through #openscience ! bit.ly/29SDmTj

@Fauteux_C @HumanBrainProj @SecNewsBot @schneiderleonid Short answer is Yes. Long answer would point out how it changes, not always right...

Visit SussexNeuro on Twitter

Contact

Academic contacts:

Professor Leon Lagnado

Professor Jamie Ward

Dr Ruth Staras

Admin Contacts: 

Fiona Hurd

General enquiries: sussexneuro@sussex.ac.uk