Health, Wellbeing and Social Care BA

Social Work

Key information

Duration:
3 years full time
Typical A-level offer:
ABB-BBB
UCAS code:
L510
Start date:
September 2018

If you’d like to explore the critical contemporary issue of wellbeing, this pioneering course is for you.

You’ll look at factors – spiritual, emotional, socio-economic, physical and organisational – affecting wellbeing throughout the lifespan. You’ll be able to evaluate the ways in which society cares for those in need of support.

Our interdisciplinary teaching combines theory and social care practices. You’ll be prepared for a range of careers in health, education and social care, and further training.

Entry requirements

A-level

Typical offer

ABB-BBB

GCSEs

You should also have a broad range of GCSEs (A*-C), including good grades in relevant subjects.

Other UK qualifications

Access to HE Diploma

Typical offer

Pass the Access to HE Diploma with 45 level 3 credits at Merit or above, including 24 at Distinction

Subjects

The Access course should be in the humanities or social sciences.

International Baccalaureate

Typical offer

30 points overall from the full IB Diploma.

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (formerly BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma)

Typical offer

DDM

Subjects

The BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma is should normally be in Health and Social Care.

GCSEs

You should also have a broad range of GCSEs (A*-C), including good grades in relevant subjects.

Scottish Highers

Typical offer

ABBBB

Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced

Typical offer

Grade B and BB in two A-levels

GCSEs

You should also have a broad range of GCSEs (A*-C), including good grades in relevant subjects.

International baccalaureate

Typical offer

30 points overall from the full IB Diploma.

European baccalaureate

Typical offer

Overall result of at least 75%

Other international qualifications

Australia

Typical offer

Relevant state (Year 12) High School Certificate, and over 85% in the ATAR or UAI/TER/ENTER. Or a Queensland OP of 5 or below.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Austria

Typical offer

Reifeprüfung or Matura with an overall result of 2.2 or better for first-year entry. A result of 2.5 or better would be considered for Foundation Year entry.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Belgium

Typical offer

Certificat d'Enseignement Secondaire Supérieur (CESS) or Diploma van Hoger Secundair Onderwijs with a good overall average. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Bulgaria

Typical offer

Diploma za Sredno Obrazovanie with excellent final-year scores (normally 5.5 overall with 6 in key subjects).

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Canada

Typical offer

High School Graduation Diploma. Specific requirements vary between provinces.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

China

Typical offer

We usually do not accept Senior High School Graduation for direct entry to our undergraduate courses. However, we do consider applicants who have studied 1 or more years of Higher Education in China at a recognised degree awarding institution or who are following a recognised International Foundation Year.

If you are interested in applying for a course which requires an academic ability in Mathematics, such as a Business related course, you will normally also need a grade B in Mathematics from the Huikao or a score of 90 in Mathematics from the Gaokao.

Applicants who have the Senior High School Graduation may be eligible to apply to our International Foundation Year, which if you complete successfully you can progress on to a relevant undergraduate course at Sussex. You can find more information about the qualifications which are accepted by our International Study Centre at  http://isc.sussex.ac.uk/entry-requirements/international-foundation-year .

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Croatia

Typical offer

Maturatna Svjedodžba with an overall score of at least 4-5 depending on your degree choice.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Cyprus

Typical offer

Apolytirion of Lykeion with an overall average of at least 18 or 19/20 will be considered for first-year entry.

A score of 15/20 in the Apolytirion would be suitable for Foundation Year entry. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Czech Republic

Typical offer

Maturita with a good overall average.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Denmark

Typical offer

Højere Forberedelseseksamen (HF) or studentereksamen with an overall average of at least 7 on the new grading scale.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Finland

Typical offer

Finnish Ylioppilastutkinto with an overall average result in the final matriculation examinations of at least 5.5.

France

Typical offer

French Baccalauréat with an overall final result of at least 13/20

Germany

Typical offer

German Abitur with an overall result of 2.2 or better.

Greece

Typical offer

Apolytirion with an overall average of at least 18 or 19/20 will be considered for first-year entry.

A score of 15/20 in the Apolytirion would be suitable for Foundation Year entry. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Hong Kong

Typical offer

Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education (HKDSE) with grades of 5, 4, 4 from three subjects including two electives. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Hungary

Typical offer

Erettsegi/Matura with a good average.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

India

Typical offer

Standard XII results from Central and Metro Boards with an overall average of 75-80%. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Iran

Typical offer

High School Diploma and Pre-University Certificate.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Ireland

Typical offer

Irish Leaving Certificate (Higher Level) at H2 H2 H2 H3 H3.

Israel

Typical offer

Bagrut, with at least 8/10 in at least six subjects, including one five-unit subject.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Italy

Typical offer

Italian Diploma di Maturità or Diploma Pass di Esame di Stato with a Final Diploma mark of at least 78/100.

Japan

Typical offer

Upper Secondary Leaving Certificate is suitable for entry to our Foundation Years. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Latvia

Typical offer

Atestats par Visparejo videjo Izglitibu with very good grades in state exams.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Lithuania

Typical offer

Brandos Atestatas including scores of 80-90% in at least three state examinations (other than English).

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Luxembourg

Typical offer

Diplôme de Fin d'Etudes Secondaires.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Malaysia

Typical offer

Sijil Tinggi Persekolahan Malaysia (STPM). As well as various two or three-year college or polytechnic certificates and diplomas.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Netherlands

Typical offer

Voorereidend Wetenschappelijk Onderwijs (VWO), normally with an average of at least 7.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Nigeria

Typical offer

You are expected to have one of the following:

  • Higher National Diploma
  • One year at a recognised Nigerian University
  • Professional Diploma (Part IV) from the Institute of Medical Laboratory Technology of Nigeria
  • Advanced Diploma

You must also have a score of C6 or above in WAEC/SSC English.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Norway

Typical offer

Norwegian Vitnemal Fra Den Videregaende Skole - Pass with an overall average of at least 4.

Pakistan

Typical offer

Bachelor (Pass) degree in arts, commerce or science.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Poland

Typical offer

Matura with three extended-level written examinations, normally scored within the 7th stanine.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Portugal

Typical offer

Diploma de Ensino Secundario normally with an overall mark of at least 16/20. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Romania

Typical offer

Diploma de Bacalaureat with an overall average of 8.5-9.5 depending on your degree choice.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Singapore

Typical offer

A-levels, as well as certain certificates and diplomas.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Slovakia

Typical offer

Maturitna Skuska or Maturita with honours, normally including scores of 1 in at least three subjects.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Slovenia

Typical offer

Secondary School Leaving Diploma or Matura with at least 23 points overall.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

South Africa

Typical offer

National Senior Certificate with very good grades. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Spain

Typical offer

Spanish Título de Bachillerato (LOGSE) with an overall average result of at least 7.5.

Sri Lanka

Typical offer

Sri Lankan A-levels.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Sweden

Typical offer

Fullstandigt Slutbetyg with good grades.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Switzerland

Typical offer

Federal Maturity Certificate.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Turkey

Typical offer

Devlet Lise Diplomasi or Lise Bitirme is normally only suitable for Foundation Years, but very strong applicants may be considered for first year entry. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

USA

Typical offer

We look at your full profile taking into account everything you are studying. You must have your high school graduation diploma and we will be interested in your Grade 12 GPA. However, we will also want to see evidence of the external tests you have taken. Each application is looked at individually, but you should normally have one or two of the following:

  • APs (where we would expect at least three subject with 4/5 in each)
  • SAT Reasoning Tests (normally with a combined score of 1300) or ACT grades
  • and/or SAT Subject Tests (where generally we expect you to have scores of 600 or higher). 

We would normally require APs or SAT Subject Tests in areas relevant to your chosen degree course.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

My country is not listed

If your qualifications aren’t listed or you have a question about entry requirements, email ug.enquiries@sussex.ac.uk.

English language requirements

IELTS (Academic)

6.5 overall, including at least 6.0 in each component

IELTS scores are valid for two years from the test date. Your score must be valid when you begin your Sussex course. You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test.

If you are applying for degree-level study we can consider your IELTS test from any test centre, but if you require a Confirmation of Acceptance for Studies (CAS) for an English language or pre-sessional English course (not combined with a degree) the test must be taken at a UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI)-approved IELTS test centre.

Find out more about IELTS.

Other English language requirements

Proficiency tests

Cambridge Advanced Certificate in English (CAE)

For tests taken before January 2015: Grade B or above

For tests taken after January 2015: 176 overall, including at least 169 in each skill

We would normally expect the CAE test to have been taken within two years before the start of your course.

You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Cambridge English: Advanced.

Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE)

For tests taken before January 2015: grade C or above

For tests taken after January 2015: 176 overall, including at least 169 in each skill

We would normally expect the CPE test to have been taken within two years before the start of your course.

You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Cambridge English: Proficiency.

Pearson (PTE Academic)

62 overall, including at least 56 in all four skills.

PTE (Academic) scores are valid for two years from the test date. Your score must be valid when you begin your Sussex course. You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Pearson (PTE Academic).

TOEFL (iBT)

88 overall, including at least 20 in Listening, 19 in Reading, 21 in Speaking, 23 in Writing.

TOEFL (iBT) scores are valid for two years from the test date. Your score must be valid when you begin your Sussex course. You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about TOEFL (iBT).

The TOEFL Institution Code for the University of Sussex is 9166.

English language qualifications

AS/A-level (GCE)

Grade C or above in English Language.

Hong Kong Advanced Level Examination (HKALE)/ AS or A Level: grade C or above in Use of English

French Baccalaureat

A score of 12 or above in English.

GCE O-level

Grade C or above in English.

Brunei/Cambridge GCE O-level in English: grades 1-6.

Singapore/Cambridge GCE O-level in English: grades 1-6.

GCSE or IGCSE

Grade C or above in English as a First Language.

Grade B or above in English as a Second Language

German Abitur

A score of 12 or above in English.

Ghana Senior Secondary School Certificate

If awarded before 1993: grades 1-6 in English language.

If awarded between 1993 and 2005: grades A-D in English language.

Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education (HKDSE)

 Level 4, including at least 3 in each component in English Language.

Indian School Certificate (Standard XII)

The Indian School Certificate is accepted at the grades below when awarded by the following examination boards:

Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) – English Core only: 70%

Council for Indian School Certificate Examinations (CISCE) - English: 70% 

International Baccalaureate Diploma (IB)

English A or English B at grade 5 or above.

Malaysian Certificate of Education (SPM) 119/GCE O-level

If taken before the end of 2008: grades 1-5 in English Language.

If taken from 2009 onwards: grade C or above in English Language.

The qualification must be jointly awarded by the University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES).

West African Senior School Certificate

Grades 1-6 in English language when awarded by the West African Examinations Council (WAEC) or the National Examinations Council (NECO).

Country exceptions

Select to see the list of exempt English-speaking countries

If you are a national of one of the countries below, or if you have recently completed a qualification equivalent to a UK Bachelors degree or higher in one of these countries, you will normally meet our English requirements. Note that qualifications obtained by distance learning or awarded by studying outside these countries cannot be accepted for English language purposes.

You will normally be expected to have completed the qualification within two years before starting your course at Sussex. If the qualification was obtained earlier than this we would expect you to be able to demonstrate that you have maintained a good level of English, for example by living in an English-speaking country or working in an occupation that required you to use English regularly and to a high level.

Please note that this list is determined by the UK’s Home Office, not by the University of Sussex.

List of exempt countries

  • Antigua and Barbuda
  • Australia
  • Bahamas
  • Barbados
  • Belize
  • Canada**
  • Dominica
  • Grenada
  • Guyana
  • Ireland
  • Jamaica
  • New Zealand
  • St Kitts and Nevis
  • St Lucia
  • St Vincent and the Grenadines
  • Trinidad and Tobago
  • United Kingdom
  • USA

** Canada: you must be a national of Canada; other nationals not on this list who have a degree from a Canadian institution will not normally be exempt from needing to provide evidence of English.

Admissions information for applicants

Disclosure and barring service checkYes
Transfers into Year 2

No

If your qualifications aren’t listed or you have a question about entry requirements, email ug.enquiries@sussex.ac.uk.

Why choose this course?

  • 11th in the UK for Social Work (The Guardian University Guide 2017).
  • Take advantage of our excellent partnerships with employers: our placements prepare you for a wide range of careers.
  • Enjoy a flexible approach to your studies – Sussex’s heritage of interdisciplinary study is reflected in a broad range of study choices.

Course information

How will I study?

You’ll learn from researchers working on contemporary issues – the Health, Wellbeing and Social Care BA is affiliated with the Centre for Innovation and Research in Wellbeing. You learn through a combination of:

  • group- and fieldwork
  • lectures and independent study
  • shadowing.

Our innovative course aims to give you the best student experience and help you develop your transferable skills ready for your future career.

You can tailor your course to suit your interests and vocational preferences by choosing from the wide range of electives.

Modules

These are the modules running in the academic year 2016. Modules running in 2018 may be subject to change.

Core modules


Customise your course

Our courses are designed to broaden your horizons and give you the skills and experience necessary to have the sort of career that has an impact.

Gain programming skills and apply them to areas such as digital media, business and interactive design. Find out about our Year in Computing

How will I study?

You have the opportunity to undertake a work-based learning observation in a relevant setting. You build on your existing knowledge by exploring aspects of wellbeing and social care in mid-life.

You also develop your research skills and further tailor your course to suit your interests with your electives.

Modules

These are the modules running in the academic year 2016. Modules running in 2018 may be subject to change.

Core modules


Customise your course

Our courses are designed to broaden your horizons and give you the skills and experience necessary to have the sort of career that has an impact.

Gain programming skills and apply them to areas such as digital media, business and interactive design. Find out about our Year in Computing

Study abroad (optional)

Apply to study abroad – you’ll develop an international perspective and gain an edge when it comes to your career. Find out where your course could take you.

Practice learning

Between Year 2 and your final year, you can apply for a year’s professional experience. 

Spending time with a company is a great way to network and gain practical skills. When you leave Sussex, you'll benefit from already having the experience employers are looking for.

How will I study?

You focus on therapeutic approaches and spirituality in relation to wellbeing and social care. Choose the option that interests you most to develop the skills and knowledge for your chosen career.

You conduct small-scale original research leading to a dissertation.

Modules

These are the modules running in the academic year 2016. Modules running in 2018 may be subject to change.

Core modules

Options

 

“My research focuses on parents’ experiences of the professional response following unexpected child death.” Dr Denise TurnerLecturer in Social Work and Social Care

Fees

Fees are not yet set for entry in the academic year 2018. Note that your fees, once they’re set, may be subject to an increase on an annual basis.

The UK Government has confirmed that, if you’re an EU student applying for entry in the academic year 2018, you'll remain eligible for financial support. This applies even if your course ends after the UK’s exit from the EU. Find out more on the UK Government website.

Find out about typical living costs for studying at Sussex

Scholarships

Details of our scholarships are not yet set for entry in the academic year 2018.

Careers

Your future career

On the Health, Wellbeing and Social Care BA, you’ll be able to put your theoretical learning into practice. You’ll graduate with the skills and knowledge tailored to your chosen career. This could include jobs in:

  • public welfare and health
  • counselling and life skills
  • youth work and education.

Working while you study

Our Careers and Employability Centre can help you find part-time work while you study. Find out more about career development and part-time work

Adult Wellbeing and Social Care: Legal Frameworks for Practice

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

You examine the legal framing of adult well-being in the social care context, looking at the Care Act 2014 and the Mental Capacity Act 2005, as well as case law, judicial reviews and relevant Court of Protection judgments.

You explore international human rights law, including the European Convention on Human Rights and the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

In this module, you look at the connection between legal rules and how they support practice, which is lawful and ethical.

You also study policy approaches to improving adult social care relating to:

  • choice
  • the integration of health and social care
  • patient safety
  • long term conditions
  • dementia and substance use.

Children's Rights and Legal Frameworks

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

This module aims to provide a foundation in key legal and policy frameworks affecting work with children and young people in a broad range of contexts. The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child will be used to structure the module giving a strong focus on the global reach of children's rights and legal frameworks. Example of the construction and consequences of children's rights and legal frameworks will be drawn from national (UK) and international contexts. These will be considered from historical, cultural, political and social perspectives. This module is complemented by the course on Inter-professional Practice in Year 2 which explores these issues at practice level.

Human Growth and Development

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn & Spring Teaching, Year 1

This module will provide you with an introduction to the key theories of human development. Concepts such as attachment, resilience, loss, change and identity will be explored in relation to their relevance to social work practice. You will explore the social and political contexts of these issues and the importance of making connections between individual and family development and disadvantage.

The impact of aspects of inequality such as class, race, gender and sexuality will be explored. Although not the main focus of this course, you will be introduced to the use and critique of statistics and data sets in order to foster the early appreciation of such information alongside that arising from qualitative research.

Teaching will take place via lectures, facilitated seminars and unfacilitated student led groups in which you will prepare your assessed presentations. In addition, specialist workshops will be run by members of the service user and carer network and by practitioner colleagues in relation to key areas.

Learning will take place using a problem-based learning approach using a case study as the basis of the group work and assessed tasks. The group presentation will be in poster format so that you are able to demonstrate your skills in presenting material visually, albeit with accompanying text and brief oral explanations.

Theories of Wellbeing and Social Care

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn & Spring Teaching, Year 1

In this module, you are introduced to key theories of wellbeing and social care - during terms 1 and 2 of your first year.

You build from an initial introduction to wellbeing and social care, to trace the emergence historically of theories of wellbeing and examine how these are reflected in contemporary policies, particularly in the spheres of health and social care.

You then move on to examine theories of social care and convergences between theories of wellbeing and social care in contemporary policies and laws, including examining the theories underpinning the Care Act 2014.

In the second term, you look at theories of ethics for wellbeing work, and examine the relationship between measures for the assessment and evaluation of wellbeing, and the way in which these are underpinned by theory.

You are introduced to critical approaches to wellbeing and social care theory and you examine the ways that these emerge from participatory and rights driven perspectives, such as Disability and Mad Studies.

You are introduced to theories including the emergence of social capital theory in both the sphere of wellbeing and social care, and the impact of social capital on contemporary policies.

You consider specifically evidence of the links between social capital and wellbeing, including on social support and mental health.

You examine contemporary thinking on social capital and diversity, and the challenges posed by policy agendas that stress bridging and bonding social capital.

You also examine the development of the capabilities approach, and assess the extent to which it has impacted on current policies in the fields of wellbeing and social care.

You examine further theoretical approaches such as Positive Psychology, and also the 'five ways to wellbeing’, which was developed by the New Economics Foundation from evidence gathered in the UK governments’ Foresight Project on Mental Capital and Wellbeing, and is influential in a number of fields of health and social care.

You also consider the potential that these, and other, theoretical frameworks have to influence future policy agendas.

Your studies in this module include examining the contribution of positive psychology to current theory.

The aims of the module are:

  • to develop a sound understanding of salient theories of wellbeing and social care
  • to generate understanding of historical and contemporary social and political influences on the development of theory
  • to gain understanding of the links between specific theories of wellbeing to their emergence and use in distinctive disciplinary fields and policy development
  • to offer critical understanding of theories of wellbeing and social care and their impact contemporary laws in health and social care.

Your formal assessment for this module takes place in two parts:

  1. In week 10 of term 1, you submit a 750-word precis of a selected chapter or article. This provides a formative assessment of your building academic skills.
  2. Your second formal assignment will include a 500-word essay plan followed by a 3,000-word essay, submitted in term 2. You also present your essay plan in a short individual presentation.

Throughout the module, you are expected to prepare for each session and engage in active discussion, in order to provide peer critique and support your independent learning.

Contemporary Debates In Social Policy: Theory and Practice

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

In this module, you explore and question the ways in which social policy shapes, and is shaped, by society. You investigate contemporary issues in areas such as:  

  • mental health
  • disability
  • parenting
  • family intervention
  • education
  • employment
  • poverty
  • youth justice
  • ageing society
  • consumerism and choice.

You mainly focus on UK social policy, but you will also look at international social policy models.

You examine equality and social inclusion and use a research-led approach to investigate the ways that policies evolve and affect the social well-being of a nation. 

You also explore social justice, need, fairness and well-being in relation to UK social policy and policy-driven practices, and hear from people using the health service.

Inter-professional Practice

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

The module aims to develop knowledge of partnership and inter-professional working, and to sensitise you to the opportunites and challenges offered by collaborative working. Drawing on theory, research and practice in national (UK) and international contexts, the module aims to develop your conceptual thinking on the topics of interdisciplinary working with children and young people, at the same time as developing their practical skills in collaborative group work.

The module is underpinned by the idea that the 'messy interconnectedness' of welfare matters calls for multi-professional and multi-agency working. The rights framework provided by the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child will be used to frame the approach to the module content. Detailed reference will be made to cases of inter-professional working in the UK and internationally, and the contexts that enable and constrain succesful partnership working will be considered.

This module builds upon the foundations of the first-year course Rights and Legal Frameworks, through greater emphasis on practice and implementation of child- and youth-focused services. It locates partnership and inter-professional working in an institutional landscape that requires the balancing of rights, risks, and resilience in the practice of promoting children and young people's wellbeing.

Examples of areas in which partnership and inter-professional working will be explored include:

  • introduction to roles and group/team dynamics in interdisciplinary contexts
  • legal and policy frameworks for interagency working (eg introduction of the Common Assessment Framework in the UK)
  • collaborative working in complex support systems (eg Looked After Children, children in residential care, pupils with Statements of Special Educational Needs, Pupil Referral Units)
  • collaborative working in mixed ecologies of care (eg statutory services, charity and voluntary sector support for 'vulnerable' children and young people)
  • child protection, with examples from the UK, Europe and from the field of international development
  • the role of language in inter-professional contexts (eg across health, education, and social work)
  • inter-professional working with disabled children and with children in the youth justice system. 

The assessment will mirror the dual emphasis of the module in developing your understanding of collaborative working alongside your collaboration skills. As such, the assessment will consist of a group presentation (35% weighting) and 2,000-word report on collaborative working (65% weighting). You will be asked to choose a collaborative working context on which to present, and your short report will reflect on your collaborative practice, using literature where relevant to support your arguments.

Teaching and learning will be delivered through a combination of weekly lectures and seminars and a tutorial incorporating facilitated group work.

Introduction to Research Methods

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

This module introduces you to the different ways in which research with children and young people can be conducted, and to the key theoretical and methodological debates about research with children and young people. It provides insights in to different methodologies, methods and applications of research, gives the opportunity to explore a specific research paper in detail, and prepares you for the dissertation in Year 3.

The module content will include:

  • theories of knowledge and dominant approaches to research with children and young people, including an introduction to qualitative and quantitative methodologies and how these are used
  • literature reviews - including how to do an electronic search and how to summarise key debates and draw conclusions
  • ethical concerns relating to research with children and young people, and the implications for research design
  • practitioner and insider research, including action research, case study and evidence-based practice
  • exploration of the ways in which published research is used by policy makers and practitioners to develop practice
  • consideration of power relations as a factor affecting research, including reference to critical theory and theories of 'capital'; and
  • an introduction to the academic skills needed to identify an article for review and to critique it from both a methodological and a substantive perspective.

Teaching methods will include a combination of weekly lectures and seminars, group tutorials and individual tutorials. Much of the course will be taught alongside the BA in Social Work. Individual tutorials will provide support with the identification of an appropriate focus for the essay and formative feedback on a draft prior to submission.

Assessment will have two components:

  1. A 2000 word essay, providing an in depth critique of a published article exploring an aspect of work with children and young people.
  2. A 1000 word outline proposal for the Year 3 dissertation, considering research methodology and design issues related to working with particular groups of children or in particular services, along with the potential ethics issues involved. This proposal will prepare you for your dissertation, and enable timely planning for allocation of supervisors, negotiation of access to sites for research and ethics review, whilst allowing you flexibility in the development of the focus of your research as you move into Year 3.

Social Care with adults: Mental Health, Disability and Older People's Service

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

In this module, you are introduced to the professional skills needed for work with adults - drawing on theories of practice in a variety of professional contexts in mental health, disabilities and ageing.

You explore, in-depth, the aspects of practice that were highlighted in the 'Stage 1 Human Growth and Development' module, and link as appropriate with the theoretical debates discussed in the 'Theories of Wellbeing and Social Care' module.

A key focus of this module is on problematising and supporting difference and diversity within social care and wellbeing work.

Your readings for this module are drawn from a range of professional and disciplinary perspectives, including:

  • social work
  • social policy
  • psychology
  • sociology
  • gerontology.

In this module, you address key concepts and principles in professional practice, and their application to work with adults.

In the first part of the module, you're introduced to skills for practice, including:

  • observation, reflective and knowledge-based learning
  • communication, dialogue and listening
  • assessment, planning, intervention and reviewing
  • creative work with adults and families (for example, person-centred approach, mindfulness, art therapy, music therapy and group work).

Subsequently, you move on to explore specialist contexts for work with adults and families, addressing:

  • working with adults with mental health difficulties and their families
  • working with adults with learning disabilities and their families
  • working with adults with substance misuse and their families
  • working with adults with dementia and their families
  • working with older people and their families.

To complement, challenge and extend your theoretical learning in the lecture and seminar sessions, you undertake five days of workplace learning, spread across five weeks, in the second half of this module - during which you observe in an adult social care setting.

This will also help you to prepare if you are intending to apply for an optional year-long professional placement between the second and final year of your course.

As part of your workplace learning, you are required to complete a task for your assessment portfolio, focusing on the concepts of the module (for example, working with relationships, using creative methods, listening and communicating or working with a group). This will form part of your reflective diary.

Culture, Spirituality and Wellbeing

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

Engagement with spiritual, religious and intercultural understandings of wellbeing is essential in developing research and policies that address the needs of diverse cultural and religious groups within an increasingly globalized world.

In this module, you develop your understanding of wellbeing from different cultural perspectives and, in so doing, you challenge the notion that wellbeing is a contemporary Western formulation.

You examine the idea around the globe, in different communities, ethnic and religious contexts. You also examine modern, `Western’ formulations and explore how these may be derived from different cultural contexts.

A key example will be mindfulness, which is now an accepted approach to the effective treatment of a range of mental health problems, and embedded in health, and social care services in the UK. However, mindfulness has its roots in the Buddhist tradition, where it's a central component of the religious path and is deeply linked to Buddhist concepts of suffering and emancipation.

In the module, you consider whether the de-contextualisation of religious and spiritual practices may undermine potential for their positive impact on wellbeing.

You look more widely at religious and spiritual influences on wellbeing - engaging with studying the impact of forms of prayer and meditation.

You also consider questions about the challenges health and social care services face in meeting the needs of diverse populations, with distinctive cultural, religious and spiritual beliefs and perspectives on wellbeing.

Assessment for this module is in two parts:

  1. You are expected to contribute to an online blog by week 11, providing a reflective account of your research on, and engagement with, a key notion from the module. You submit this in PDF form for assessment, including a link to the blog. There is an opportunity for peer review before your second assignment.
  2. The second assignment is a critically focussed essay, which engages you in planning for wellbeing interventions.

Dissertation

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

This module focuses on guided research enquiry into a topic of your choice. It brings together research and professional practice by providing you with an opportunity to undertake empirical research or a desk-based study in an area relevant to work with children and young people.

Individual and group tutorials will provide: support with the identification of a focus for the dissertation, an appropriate research design and research questions; advice on ethics review; formative feedback on one proposal plan and and one dissertation draft prior to submission.

The module draws on knowledge of research processes gained earlier in the course, specifically in the Research Methods course taught in Year 2.

The module content will include:

How to conduct a small-scale research study - either desk-based or empirical - in an area relating to work with children, young people or families.
Ethics issues relating to research with children and young people, including how to obtain ethics approval for an empirical project.
Issues relating to desk-based studies and use of secondary data.
Approaches to reviewing the literature.
How to develop a research design and to frame research questions.
Input on specific data collection methods such as interviewing, observation and focus groups.
Researcher positionality.
Methods of data analysis, including workshops to introduce the use of ICT for this purpose.
Input relating to the academic skills necessary to communicate and present research findings in an accessible and appropriate format.

Teaching methods will include a combination of weekly lectures and seminars, workshops on data analysis requiring ICT facilities and group and individual tutorials.

Some lectures, seminars and workshops will involve joint learning with the BA in Social Work. The majority of the work will be undertaken through private study but there will also be opportunities for peer presentation to support the initial development of the project focus and design.

Organisations and Inter-professional Practice

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn & Spring Teaching, Year 3

In this module, you examine theory and research to help prepare you for the contemporary organisational settings you will work in, and inter-professional working relationships you will form.

You will develop an understanding of how core social work roles and tasks are undertaken effectively in an inter-agency context, where coordinated professional responses are required. You also go on an organisational observation.

You are trained to meet the professional capability standards set out in The College of Social Work Professional Capabilities Framework. 

You learn to: 

  • adapt to changing contexts that shape practice
  • operate effectively within own organisational frameworks
  • contribute to the development of services and organisations
  • operate effectively within multi-agency and inter-professional settings.

Therapeutic Interventions for Emotional Wellbeing: Theory and Practice

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

This is a 30-credit module, which is core to the BA Wellbeing and Social Care. In this module, you familiarise yourself with key models of therapeutic interventions used in the community with children, adults and families to promote mental health and psychological wellbeing.

You gain an understanding of professional ‘use of self’ within relationship-based practice, and you begin to develop some skills, self-awareness and emotional readiness for practice with service users.

Your studies for this module are split into sessions, with each session beginning with a one-hour lecture where various therapeutic perspectives are outlined by your tutor. These may include:

  • relationship-based practice in social care settings
  • working in groups
  • the ‘skilled helper’ approach of Egan (2014)
  • person-centred approaches to counselling
  • non-directive play therapy
  • arts therapies
  • cognitive-behavioural therapy
  • psychodynamic psychotherapy
  • mentalisation-based approaches
  • mindfulness and yoga-based practice
  • family and systemic therapy
  • solution-focused therapy.

In the lectures for this module, you engage with the theoretical and research underpinnings of each model and learn how they might be used in practice with children, adults and families.

You also explore examples of such methods with specific service user groups, such as CBT-based group work with sexual offenders.

You're given reading for each session, and you are expected to be prepared in advance of each lecture.

Another key aspect of the module learning how practitioners develop their ‘use of self’ - and the self-awareness, emotional availability and emotional resilience that this entails.

In the two-hour workshop that follows each lecture, you have an opportunity to try out basic skills and approaches within the models that you will have discussed earlier that day.

You consider how practitioners need to develop specific knowledge, skills and personal qualities in order to practise safely and effectively with service users.

You also undertake un-facilitated group work, in order to support peer development and to prepare a poster presentation.

You reflect on your group work as a source of experiential learning for the module, and you're provided with theoretical resources and tutor guidance to develop this learning.

Your assessment for this module has several aspects:

  1. You develop a group poster presentation in relation to one therapeutic approach, working in small groups. For this assessment, you should outline briefly the key aspects of the approach and then provide a demonstration of the approach in a storied scenario with an individual or group. The group work skills you develop through working on this are a key part of the module learning.
  2. You write a 200-word case analysis of how and why the approach you selected for the poster presentation might potentially be used with a child, adult or family in one of several vignettes provided.
  3. You complete a 200-word reflective journal, which draws on your learning from the group exercise, skills practice and other self-awareness exercises that you have undertaken during the module. The aim of this assessment is to draw your learning about ‘use of self’ together.

Health and Wellbeing

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

This module aims to provide you with knowledge and understanding of a range of factors relating to children and young people's health and well-being. It will begin by addressing key areas of health of particular relevance to work with children and young people, whilst critically examining underpinning theoretical constructions of health and of health behaviour. Throughout, the module will incorporate discussion of key facets of health and well-being in childhood with consideration of corresponding health problems (e.g. in linking discussion of emotional health and of emotional and behavioural problems). Discussion of approaches to work with children and young people's health will be embedded throughout the module, both in relation to health education and health promotion, and in supporting and working with children and young people with additional needs. Through this approach, the module will build on aspects of theory and debate covered in earlier parts of the module, including the 'Contemporary Debates' modules, and modules relating to inter-professional practice and work with children, young people and families.

The module involves regular three hour sessions including  both lecture and seminar discussion within each session. You will also take part in two group tutorials, to support your preparation for the assessment.

Assessment will be a three hour Unseen Examination which accounts for 100% of the module grade. You will be required to select and answer short essay questions. Seminars and tutorials will be used to prepare students for the examination, for example with practice exam questions and peer assessment.

The module content will include:

(a) Critical concepts in health;

  • well-being and happiness
  • inequalities in health
  • global perspectives

(b) Diet and health;

  • perspectives on food and family
  • childhood obesity

(c) Understanding health risks for children and young people;

  • concepts of vulnerability
  • risk and play
  • sexual health
  • drug and alcohol use

(d) Health and happiness;

  • emotional health and emotional and behavioural difficulties
  • mental health in childhood and adolescence

(e) Complex needs and disability;

  • concepts of disability
  • identification and assessment of special and complex needs
  • children with chronic illness
  • children as carers

The module will be assessed formatively by student presentations and summatively by a Long Term Paper, and so teaching will be delivered by a combination of weekly lectures and seminars, with the addition of two group tutorials to monitor progress and provide support with development of the course assigment.

Situating Mental Health and Disability: National and International Perspectives

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

In this module, you build on the foundation you gained in the second-year module 'Social Care with Adults' - through which you've already developed practical and legal knowledge about how mental health and disability services address the challenges they face.

In this module, you take this learning deeper and situate it within wider debates about the models, theories, histories and politics of both mental health and disability.

You explore parallels and differences in the historical and contemporary experience of mental health and disability service users, by looking at the development of service user-led rights movements, identities and evolving legal frameworks.

You explore diversity and difference, and problematise through dialogues about Queer Theory, Mad Studies, and cultural diversity with disability.

You explore national and international perspectives in relation to both policy and practice, enabling you to undertake comparative and critical analysis of these fields.

The significance of ‘intersectionalities’ is a constant theme of this module, meaning that you explore the ways in which social characteristics - such as class, ethnicity and race, age, sexuality, and gender - interact with mental health issues or disabilities, leading to complex forms of exclusion and disadvantage.

Your studies in this module are informed by an engagement with sociology, anthropology, psychology, law and social policy, as well as the interdisciplinary fields of disability studies and mad studies.

You may cover topics such as:

  1. The history and anthropology of mental health and disability
    You explore how mental health and disability have been seen differently in different times and different places.
  2. The politics of mental health and disability
    Organisations led by and representing disabled people, mental health service users and mental health survivors have become increasingly prominent in recent decades. You consider the impact that they have made in promoting rights and delivering services, alongside public and governmental responses.
  3. Law, policy and rights-based interventions
    You examine the processes leading to, and the effects of, national legislation and international agreements, in particular the 2006 United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disability. And you consider what is required for such policies to be successfully applied.
  4. Stigma, discrimination, labelling and stigma reduction
    Social models of both disability and mental health have argued that societal responses, rather than the condition itself, are responsible for much of the disadvantage faced by individuals. You take a critical approach to theories of stigma, discrimination and labelling that contribute to this, and to interventions that have sought to bring about change.
  5. Personhood, self and identity
    Mental health and disability, like all other aspects of our lives, have implications for personhood, self and identity. You explore theory, research and autobiographical narratives to examine how and when this occurs.

You study this module in three hour sessions, with a range of teaching and learning methods, including lectures, group discussions and activities and case studies.

You are expected to prepare for each session through individual reading, as guided, and to participate actively in the sessions.

Formative assessment to help you progress your learning will take place through active discussion in the seminar sessions.

 

In this module, you build on the foundation gained in the 2nd year module 'Social Care with Adults', in which you will have already developed your practical and legal knowledge about how mental health and disability services address the challenges they face.

In this module, you take this learning deeper and situate it within wider debates about the models, theories, histories and politics of both mental health and disability.

You explore parallels and differences in the historical and contemporary experience of mental health and disability service users, by looking at the development of service user-led rights movements, identities and evolving legal frameworks.

You also explore diversity and difference, and problematise through dialogues about Queer Theory, Mad Studies, and cultural diversity with disability.

You explore national and international perspectives in relation to both policy and practice, enabling you to undertake comparative and critical analysis of these fields.

A constant theme running through the module will be the significance of ‘intersectionalities’ (the ways in which social characteristics such as class, ethnicity and race, age, sexuality, and gender) interact with mental health issues or disabilities, leading to complex forms of exclusion and disadvantage.

Your studies in this module are informed by an engagement with sociology, anthropology, psychology, law and social policy, as well as the interdisciplinary fields of disability studies and mad studies.

You cover topics including:

  • the history and anthropology of mental health and disability - you explore how mental health and disability have been seen differently in different times and different places
  • the politics of mental health and disability - you cover organisations led by and representing disabled people, mental health service users and mental health survivors have become increasingly prominent in recent decades. The impact that they have made in promoting rights

and delivering services will be considered, alongside public and governmental responses.
- Law, policy and rights-based interventions: The processes leading to, and the effects of, national legislation and international
agreements, in particular the 2006 United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disability, will be examined. We will
consider what is required for such policies to be successfully applied.
- Stigma, discrimination, labelling and stigma reduction: Social models of both disability and mental health have argued that societal
responses, rather than the condition itself, are responsible for much of the disadvantage faced by individuals. A critical approach will
be taken to theories of stigma, discrimination and labelling that contribute to this, and to interventions that have sought to bring about
change.
- Personhood, self and identity: Mental health and disability, like all other aspects of our lives, have implications for personhood, self
and identity. The module will explore theory, research and autobiographical narratives to explore how and when this occurs.
The module will be delivered in three hour flipped learning sessions, using a range of teaching and learning methods, including
lectures, group discussions and activities and case studies. Students will be expected to prepare for each session through individual
reading, as guided, and to participate actively in the sessions. Formative assessment to help students progress their learning will take
place thr

 

All candidates offered a place on the course will be required to satisfactorily complete an Enhanced Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) check (formerly known as a CRB check), including a check of all cautions and warnings as well as convictions, before their place on the course is confirmed.

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