Medical Neuroscience (research placement) MSci

Neuroscience

Key information

Duration:
4 years full time
Typical A-level offer:
AAA
UCAS code:
B146
Start date:
September 2018

If you want to gain advanced knowledge of clinical aspects of neuroscience, this is the course for you.

You learn from experts from the Sussex Neuroscience research programme, which has links with the Brighton and Sussex Medical School.

As part of the course, you can benefit from our guaranteed interview scheme for medicine. And to support your career development, you study research methods and computing skills options.

Through your integrated Masters year and paid summer research placement, you develop advanced research skills and contribute to world-leading research.

Entry requirements

A-level

Typical offer

AAA

Subjects

A-levels must include at least one science subjects from Biology, Human Biology, Chemistry, Physics and/or Psychology. 

If you are taking a science subject that has the separate science practical assessment, we would normally expect a pass. If you are not able to take the science practical assessment, your application will be considered on a case-by-case basis. 

GCSEs

You must have GCSE (or equivalent) English, Mathematics and two Science subjects with grade B in each (or grade 5 in the new grading scale).

Extended Project Qualification

We take the EPQ into account when considering your application and it can be useful in the summer when your results are released if you have narrowly missed the conditions of your offer. We do not routinely include the EPQ in the conditions of your offer but we sometimes offer alternative conditions that include the EPQ. If you wish to discuss this further please contact Admissions at ug.enquiries@sussex.ac.uk

Other UK qualifications

Access to HE Diploma

Typical offer

Pass the Access to HE Diploma with at least 45 credits at Level 3 all at Distinction.

Subjects

You will need substantial amounts of Level 3 credit in at least one science subject or to have taken a science A-level alongside the Access course. 

GCSEs

You must have GCSE (or equivalent) English, Mathematics and two Science subjects with grade B in each (or grade 5 in the new grading scale).

International Baccalaureate

Typical offer

36 points overall from the full IB Diploma.

Subjects

You will need Higher Level in a science subject from Biology, Chemistry, Physics and/or Psychology, with at least grade 6.

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (formerly BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma)

Typical offer

DDD

Subjects

This would need to be in Applied Science and you will need to have opted for substantial numbers of modules in Biology and Chemistry related topics. Alternatively, you will need a relevant science A-levels (from Biology, Chemistry, Physics and/or Psychology) alongside the BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma. 

GCSEs

You must have GCSE (or equivalent) English, Mathematics and two Science subjects with grade B in each (or grade 5 in the new grading scale).

Scottish Highers

Typical offer

AAAAA

Subjects

Highers must include at least a science subject from Biology, Chemistry, Physics and/or Psychology, with at least grade A. Ideally, you will also have one of these sciences as an Advanced Higher.

GCSEs

You will also need Chemistry or Physics, plus Mathematics, at Standard Grade, grade 1 or 2.

Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced

Typical offer

Grade A and AA in two A-levels.

Subjects

A-levels must include a science subject from Biology (or Human Biology), Chemistry, Physics and/or Psychology. 

GCSEs

You must have GCSE (or equivalent) English, Mathematics and two Science subjects with grade B in each (or grade 5 in the new grading scale).

International baccalaureate

Typical offer

36 points overall from the full IB Diploma.

Subjects

You will need Higher Level in a science subject from Biology, Chemistry, Physics and/or Psychology, with at least grade 6.

European baccalaureate

Typical offer

Overall result of at least 85%

Additional requirements

Evidence of academic studies in at least one science subject to a high level and with good results is essential.

Other international qualifications

Australia

Typical offer

Relevant state (Year 12) High School Certificate, and over 85% in the ATAR or UAI/TER/ENTER. Or a Queensland OP of 5 or below.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of academic studies in at least two science subjects to a high level and with good results are essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Austria

Typical offer

Reifeprüfung or Matura with an overall result of 2.2 or better for first-year entry. A result of 2.5 or better would be considered for Foundation Year entry.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of academic studies in at least two science subjects to a high level and with good results are essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Belgium

Typical offer

Certificat d'Enseignement Secondaire Supérieur (CESS) or Diploma van Hoger Secundair Onderwijs with a good overall average. 

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of academic studies in at least two science subjects to a high level and with good results are essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Bulgaria

Typical offer

Diploma za Sredno Obrazovanie with excellent final-year scores (normally 5.5 overall with 6 in key subjects).

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of academic studies in at least two science subjects to a high level and with good results are essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Canada

Typical offer

High School Graduation Diploma. Specific requirements vary between provinces.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of academic studies in at least two science subjects to a high level and with good results are essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

China

Typical offer

We usually do not accept Senior High School Graduation for direct entry to our undergraduate courses. However, we do consider applicants who have studied 1 or more years of Higher Education in China at a recognised degree awarding institution or who are following a recognised International Foundation Year.

If you are interested in applying for a business related course which requires an academic ability in Mathematics, you will normally also need a grade B in Mathematics from the Huikao or a score of 90 in Mathematics from the Gaokao.

Applicants who have the Senior High School Graduation may be eligible to apply to our International Foundation Year, which if you complete successfully you can progress on to a relevant undergraduate course at Sussex. You can find more information about the qualifications which are accepted by our International Study Centre at  http://isc.sussex.ac.uk/entry-requirements/international-foundation-year .

 

 

 

 

 

 

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of academic studies in at least two science subjects to a high level and with good results are essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Croatia

Typical offer

Maturatna Svjedodžba with an overall score of at least 4-5 depending on your degree choice.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of academic studies in at least two science subjects to a high level and with good results are essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Cyprus

Typical offer

Apolytirion of Lykeion with an overall average of at least 18 or 19/20 will be considered for first-year entry.

A score of 15/20 in the Apolytirion would be suitable for Foundation Year entry. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of academic studies in at least two science subjects to a high level and with good results are essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Czech Republic

Typical offer

Maturita with a good overall average.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of academic studies in at least two science subjects to a high level and with good results are essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Denmark

Typical offer

Højere Forberedelseseksamen (HF) or studentereksamen with an overall average of at least 7 on the new grading scale.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of academic studies in at least two science subjects to a high level and with good results are essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Finland

Typical offer

Finnish Ylioppilastutkinto with an overall average result in the final matriculation examinations of at least 6.5.

Additional requirements

Evidence of academic studies in at least one science subject to a high level and with good results is essential.

France

Typical offer

French Baccalauréat with an overall final result of at least 15/20.

Additional requirements

You will need to be taking the science strand within the French Baccalauréat with good results (14/20) in at least one science subject.

Germany

Typical offer

German Abitur with an overall result of 1.6 or better.

Additional requirements

Evidence of academic studies in at least two science subjects with good results (14/15) is essential.

Greece

Typical offer

Apolytirion with an overall average of at least 18 or 19/20 will be considered for first-year entry.

A score of 15/20 in the Apolytirion would be suitable for Foundation Year entry. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of academic studies in at least two science subjects to a high level and with good results are essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Hong Kong

Typical offer

Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education (HKDSE) with grades of 5, 4, 4 from three subjects including two electives. 

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of academic studies in at least two science subjects to a high level and with good results are essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Hungary

Typical offer

Erettsegi/Matura with a good average.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of academic studies in at least two science subjects to a high level and with good results are essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

India

Typical offer

Standard XII results from Central and Metro Boards with an overall average of 75-80%. 

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of academic studies in at least two science subjects to a high level and with good results are essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Iran

Typical offer

High School Diploma and Pre-University Certificate.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of academic studies in at least two science subjects to a high level and with good results are essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Ireland

Typical offer

Irish Leaving Certificate (Higher Level) at H1 H1 H2 H2 H2.

Additional requirements

Highers will need to include at least one science subject from Biology, Chemistry, Physics and/or Psychology, grade H1.

You must have at least grade O5 in Mathematics and English.

Israel

Typical offer

Bagrut, with at least 8/10 in at least six subjects, including one five-unit subject.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of academic studies in at least two science subjects to a high level and with good results are essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Italy

Typical offer

Italian Diploma di Maturità or Diploma Pass di Esame di Stato with a Final Diploma mark of at least 90/100.

Additional requirements

Evidence of academic studies in at least one science subject to a high level and with good results is essential.

Japan

Typical offer

Upper Secondary Leaving Certificate is suitable for entry to our Foundation Years. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of academic studies in at least two science subjects to a high level and with good results are essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Latvia

Typical offer

Atestats par Visparejo videjo Izglitibu with very good grades in state exams.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of academic studies in at least two science subjects to a high level and with good results are essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Lithuania

Typical offer

Brandos Atestatas including scores of 80-90% in at least three state examinations (other than English).

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of academic studies in at least two science subjects to a high level and with good results are essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Luxembourg

Typical offer

Diplôme de Fin d'Etudes Secondaires.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of academic studies in at least two science subjects to a high level and with good results are essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Malaysia

Typical offer

Sijil Tinggi Persekolahan Malaysia (STPM). As well as various two or three-year college or polytechnic certificates and diplomas.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of academic studies in at least two science subjects to a high level and with good results are essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Netherlands

Typical offer

Voorereidend Wetenschappelijk Onderwijs (VWO), normally with an average of at least 7.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of academic studies in at least two science subjects to a high level and with good results are essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Nigeria

Typical offer

You are expected to have one of the following:

  • Higher National Diploma
  • One year at a recognised Nigerian University
  • Professional Diploma (Part IV) from the Institute of Medical Laboratory Technology of Nigeria
  • Advanced Diploma

You must also have a score of C6 or above in WAEC/SSC English.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of academic studies in at least two science subjects to a high level and with good results are essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Norway

Typical offer

Norwegian Vitnemal Fra Den Videregaende Skole- Pass with an overall average of at least 5.

Additional requirements

Evidence of academic studies in at least one science subject to a high level and with good results is essential.

Pakistan

Typical offer

Bachelor (Pass) degree in arts, commerce or science.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of academic studies in at least two science subjects to a high level and with good results are essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Poland

Typical offer

Matura with three extended-level written examinations, normally scored within the 7th stanine.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of academic studies in at least two science subjects to a high level and with good results are essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Portugal

Typical offer

Diploma de Ensino Secundario normally with an overall mark of at least 16/20. 

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of academic studies in at least two science subjects to a high level and with good results are essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Romania

Typical offer

Diploma de Bacalaureat with an overall average of 8.5-9.5 depending on your degree choice.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of academic studies in at least two science subjects to a high level and with good results are essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Singapore

Typical offer

A-levels, as well as certain certificates and diplomas.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of academic studies in at least two science subjects to a high level and with good results are essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Slovakia

Typical offer

Maturitna Skuska or Maturita with honours, normally including scores of 1 in at least three subjects.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of academic studies in at least two science subjects to a high level and with good results are essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Slovenia

Typical offer

Secondary School Leaving Diploma or Matura with at least 23 points overall.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of academic studies in at least two science subjects to a high level and with good results are essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

South Africa

Typical offer

National Senior Certificate with very good grades. 

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of academic studies in at least two science subjects to a high level and with good results are essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Spain

Typical offer

Spanish Título de Bachillerato (LOGSE) with an overall average result of at least 8.5.

Additional requirements

Evidence of academic studies in at least one science subject to a high level and with good results is essential.

Sri Lanka

Typical offer

Sri Lankan A-levels.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of academic studies in at least two science subjects to a high level and with good results are essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Sweden

Typical offer

Fullstandigt Slutbetyg with good grades.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of academic studies in at least two science subjects to a high level and with good results are essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Switzerland

Typical offer

Federal Maturity Certificate.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of academic studies in at least two science subjects to a high level and with good results are essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Turkey

Typical offer

Devlet Lise Diplomasi or Lise Bitirme is normally only suitable for Foundation Years, but very strong applicants may be considered for first year entry. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of academic studies in at least two science subjects to a high level and with good results are essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

USA

Typical offer

We look at your full profile taking into account everything you are studying. You must have your high school graduation diploma and we will be interested in your Grade 12 GPA. However, we will also want to see evidence of the external tests you have taken. Each application is looked at individually, but you should normally have one or two of the following:

  • APs (where we would expect at least three subject with 4/5 in each)
  • SAT Reasoning Tests (normally with a combined score of 1300) or ACT grades
  • and/or SAT Subject Tests (where generally we expect you to have scores of 600 or higher). 

We would normally require APs or SAT Subject Tests in areas relevant to your chosen degree course.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of academic studies in at least two science subjects to a high level and with good results are essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

My country is not listed

If your qualifications aren’t listed or you have a question about entry requirements, email ug.enquiries@sussex.ac.uk.

English language requirements

IELTS (Academic)

6.5 overall, including at least 6.0 in each component

IELTS scores are valid for two years from the test date. Your score must be valid when you begin your Sussex course. You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test.

If you are applying for degree-level study we can consider your IELTS test from any test centre, but if you require a Confirmation of Acceptance for Studies (CAS) for an English language or pre-sessional English course (not combined with a degree) the test must be taken at a UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI)-approved IELTS test centre.

Find out more about IELTS.

Other English language requirements

Proficiency tests

Cambridge Advanced Certificate in English (CAE)

For tests taken before January 2015: Grade B or above

For tests taken after January 2015: 176 overall, including at least 169 in each skill

We would normally expect the CAE test to have been taken within two years before the start of your course.

You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Cambridge English: Advanced.

Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE)

For tests taken before January 2015: grade C or above

For tests taken after January 2015: 176 overall, including at least 169 in each skill

We would normally expect the CPE test to have been taken within two years before the start of your course.

You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Cambridge English: Proficiency.

Pearson (PTE Academic)

62 overall, including at least 56 in all four skills.

PTE (Academic) scores are valid for two years from the test date. Your score must be valid when you begin your Sussex course. You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Pearson (PTE Academic).

TOEFL (iBT)

88 overall, including at least 20 in Listening, 19 in Reading, 21 in Speaking, 23 in Writing.

TOEFL (iBT) scores are valid for two years from the test date. Your score must be valid when you begin your Sussex course. You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about TOEFL (iBT).

The TOEFL Institution Code for the University of Sussex is 9166.

English language qualifications

AS/A-level (GCE)

Grade C or above in English Language.

Hong Kong Advanced Level Examination (HKALE)/ AS or A Level: grade C or above in Use of English

French Baccalaureat

A score of 12 or above in English.

GCE O-level

Grade C or above in English.

Brunei/Cambridge GCE O-level in English: grades 1-6.

Singapore/Cambridge GCE O-level in English: grades 1-6.

GCSE or IGCSE

Grade C or above in English as a First Language.

Grade B or above in English as a Second Language

German Abitur

A score of 12 or above in English.

Ghana Senior Secondary School Certificate

If awarded before 1993: grades 1-6 in English language.

If awarded between 1993 and 2005: grades A-D in English language.

Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education (HKDSE)

 Level 4, including at least 3 in each component in English Language.

Indian School Certificate (Standard XII)

The Indian School Certificate is accepted at the grades below when awarded by the following examination boards:

Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) – English Core only: 70%

Council for Indian School Certificate Examinations (CISCE) - English: 70% 

International Baccalaureate Diploma (IB)

English A or English B at grade 5 or above.

Malaysian Certificate of Education (SPM) 119/GCE O-level

If taken before the end of 2008: grades 1-5 in English Language.

If taken from 2009 onwards: grade C or above in English Language.

The qualification must be jointly awarded by the University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES).

West African Senior School Certificate

Grades 1-6 in English language when awarded by the West African Examinations Council (WAEC) or the National Examinations Council (NECO).

Country exceptions

Select to see the list of exempt English-speaking countries

If you are a national of one of the countries below, or if you have recently completed a qualification equivalent to a UK Bachelors degree or higher in one of these countries, you will normally meet our English requirements. Note that qualifications obtained by distance learning or awarded by studying outside these countries cannot be accepted for English language purposes.

You will normally be expected to have completed the qualification within two years before starting your course at Sussex. If the qualification was obtained earlier than this we would expect you to be able to demonstrate that you have maintained a good level of English, for example by living in an English-speaking country or working in an occupation that required you to use English regularly and to a high level.

Please note that this list is determined by the UK’s Home Office, not by the University of Sussex.

List of exempt countries

  • Antigua and Barbuda
  • Australia
  • Bahamas
  • Barbados
  • Belize
  • Canada**
  • Dominica
  • Grenada
  • Guyana
  • Ireland
  • Jamaica
  • New Zealand
  • St Kitts and Nevis
  • St Lucia
  • St Vincent and the Grenadines
  • Trinidad and Tobago
  • United Kingdom
  • USA

** Canada: you must be a national of Canada; other nationals not on this list who have a degree from a Canadian institution will not normally be exempt from needing to provide evidence of English.

Admissions information for applicants

Transfers into Year 2

No

If your qualifications aren’t listed or you have a question about entry requirements, email ug.enquiries@sussex.ac.uk.

Why choose this course?

  • Ranked 5th in the UK (The Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2018).
  • 93% of our students, of those available, were in work or further study six months after graduating (Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey 2015).
  • Learn from specialists in intelligence, genetic and molecular neural development, and learning and memory.

Course information

How will I study?

You study a variety of modules in both fundamental biology and neuroscience, with options to study topics such as cognition, psychology and physiology. 

Teaching is through a mix of lectures, seminars, tutorials and practicals. You are assessed through a mix of coursework and unseen exams.

Modules

These are the modules running in the academic year 2017. Modules running in 2018 may be subject to change.

Core modules

Options


Customise your course

Our courses are designed to broaden your horizons and give you the skills and experience necessary to have the sort of career that has an impact.

Gain programming skills and apply them to areas such as digital media, business and interactive design. Find out about our Year in Computing

How will I study?

You explore topics like:

  • principles of neuroscience
  • neural circuits
  • techniques in neuroscience
  • developmental biology
  • medical neuroscience.

You also choose from topics like:

  • cell regulation and cancer
  • structural basis of biological function
  • clinical psychology of mental health computing
  • comparative animal physiology.

Modules

These are the modules running in the academic year 2017. Modules running in 2018 may be subject to change.

Core modules

Options


Customise your course

Our courses are designed to broaden your horizons and give you the skills and experience necessary to have the sort of career that has an impact.

Gain programming skills and apply them to areas such as digital media, business and interactive design. Find out about our Year in Computing

Study abroad (optional)

Apply to study abroad – you’ll develop an international perspective and gain an edge when it comes to your career. Find out where your course could take you.

Research placements

Each summer throughout your degree you can apply for a research placement, based in the School of Life Sciences. Research placements are stimulating intellectual challenges and great practical experiences.

You work on cutting-edge medical neuroscience projects, hone your research skills, and take the first steps toward a research-based career. During the summer research placements, you receive funding to cover your living expenses. 

Find out about other placements and internships

Please note

If you’re receiving – or applying for – USA federal Direct Loan funds, you can’t transfer to the version of this program with an optional study abroad period in any country or optional placement in the USA. Find out more about American Student Loans and Federal Student Aid

How will I study?

You work towards your integrated Masters degree.

In this year, you develop your research skills, and carry out a major research project conducted with one of our research teams. This project takes up about 50% of your work load.

You study modules exploring topics such as research, professional and communication skills, and advanced methods in molecular research. There is also a selection of specialised options.

Modules

These are the modules running in the academic year 2017. Modules running in 2018 may be subject to change.

Core modules

I work on synapses – the connection sites between neurons. These fascinating structures are targets for diseases such as Alzheimer’s.”Professor Kevin Staras
Professor of Neuroscience 

Fees

UK/EU students:
Fees are not yet set for entry in the academic year 2018. The University intends to set fees at the maximum permitted by the UK Government (subject to continued satisfaction of the Teaching Excellence Framework). For the academic year 2017, fees were £9,250 per year.

The UK Government has confirmed that if you’re an EU student applying for entry in September 2018, you’ll pay the same fee rate as UK students for the duration of your course, even if the UK leaves the EU before the end of your course. You’ll also continue to have access to student loans and grants. Find out more on the UK Government website

Channel Islands and Isle of Man students:
The University aligns fees for Channel Islands and Isle of Man students with fees for UK/EU students. These fees are not yet set for entry in the academic year 2018. We intend to set fees at the maximum permitted by the UK Government (subject to continued satisfaction of the Teaching Excellence Framework). For the academic year 2017, fees were £9,250 per year.
International students:
£19,200 per year
Study abroad:
Find out about grants and funding, tuition fees and insurance costs for studying abroad
Placement:
Find out about tuition fees for placements

Note that your fees may be subject to an increase on an annual basis.

Find out about typical living costs for studying at Sussex

Scholarships

Our focus is personal development and social mobility. To help you meet your ambitions to study at Sussex, we deliver one of the most generous scholarship programmes of any UK university.

Careers

Graduate destinations

93% of Medical Neuroscience students were in work or further study six months after graduating. Recent Life Sciences graduates have started jobs as:

  • trainee scientist, neurophysiology, Taunton and Somerset NHS
  • CEO, The Mind and Body Project
  • researcher, Gillespie Manners.

(HESA EPI, Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey 2015)

Your future career

Our modules help you develop transferable skills in time management, communication and analysis. You gain laboratory skills and improve your problem-solving, independent thinking and teamwork abilities. You can go on to work in fields such as:

  • the pharmaceutical and biotechnology sectors
  • environment and health science
  • research careers in neuropharmacology and neuropsychology.

Working while you study

Our Careers and Employability Centre can help you find part-time work while you study. Find out more about career development and part-time work

Human Physiology

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

An introduction to homeostasis, physiological mechanisms and control in humans and other mammals. This module deals with circulatory and respiratory systems, fluid balance and kidney function, digestion and feeding. The approach to regulation and control uses hormonal signalling as a unifying principle, with several negative feedback examples. Furthermore, some case studies are explored such as exercise related cardiovascular and respiratory changes, diabetes as a break-down of control and regulation, and satiety mechanisms and obesity.

Introduction to Neuroscience

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

In this module, you gain a historic overview of how neuroscience and the understanding of how the brain works developed over the centuries.

Fundamental knowledge about neuronal activity and the outline of the nervous system will be discussed but the overarching goal of the module will be to demonstate the role of neuroscience as a core discipline in a wide variety of scientific fields.

In your lectures, you study selected topics on the forefront of modern neuroscience including:

  • fMRI and synaptic imaging
  • modelling and artificial manipulation of neurons and circuits.

Cell Biology

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

In this module, you cover the fundamentals of cell structure and function.

You begin with a comparison of procaryotic and eucaryotic cells, and then proceed with a systematic dissection of a eucaryotic cell - attending lectures on:

  • the nucleus
  • membrane architecture and permeability
  • the secretory apparatus
  • origin and function of mitochondria and chloroplasts and their role in metabolism
  • the cytoskeleton
  • the cell cycle
  • the extracellular matrix and cell adhesion.

Emphasis is placed on the role of key proteins in regulating specific cellular functions and on experimental techniques used to study cellular processes.

Neuroscience and Behaviour

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

The module deals with nervous and hormonal bases for sensory perception and behavioural action by humans and other animals.

You will be introduced to the basic components of the nervous systems: neurons, synapses and neurotransmitters, and learn how neurons transmit signals and processes information. You will also cover specialisation of the cerebral cortex, looking at lateralisation and language, as well as sensory processing and perception, exemplified by the visual pathway from the eye to specialised feature detectors in the cortex. Finally, lectures on feeding deal with neural and hormonal controls in behaviour.

Research Methods for Neuroscience

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

The use of statistics allows us to form a quantitative understanding about experimental or observational data and the information we can extract from it. It allows us to make clear statements about the data in a form that can be understood by other scientists. Ultimately, it gives a rigour and clarity to our analysis of experimental or observational data. An essential aspect of the module is getting experience by solving problems and actually calculating quantities from data. Such experience only comes about from practice and since we are dealing with a highly numerate subject, the details are very important.

A fundamental part of science is asking questions. This leads to a process of inquiry. The results then need to be analyzed and the significance of the results assessed. This is generally done by various statistical methods of course, but looking at how data is represented or misrepresented is also instructive.

The interpretation of findings is a very difficult area, as can be seen in the climate change debate. Even if all scientists agreed on exactly how much of the climatic changes we are observing is due to human activities, what in the data can tell us what to do about it?

Where do the questions come from? Observation. Curiosity. Enquiring minds. Then formalizing the questions and come up with an established and/or interesting and/or useful and/or innovative way of approaching a solution. Neurocientists need to know some specific physics, which are also represented in this module.

Life Sciences Research Placement 1

  • Summer Vacation, Year 1

You learn about research methods and practices while you develop your knowledge and understanding of life sciences. This is particularly valuable if you are considering a research career.

During your research placement in the summer vacation each year, you will work as a member of one of the School’s research groups and receive a stipend to cover your living costs.

During your research placement, you explore research methods, learn to understand and use scientific literature, and develop practical skills.

The placement can be done in the same research group each year or a different one in different years. You work on a project to contribute to the research programme of the group.

Cognition in Clinical Contexts

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

This module will introduce you to the aims, methods, theories and empirical findings associated with a scientific approach to studying the human mind. You will learn how psychologists develop models of cognitive function that are tested against data from behavioural studies of healthy individuals, as well as from individuals with brain damage or psychopathology.

After an introductory lecture covering the historical background to cognitive psychology and the main methodological approaches taken, the module will proceed to cover five core topics: perception, attention, thinking, memory, and language.

Each topic will begin with one or two background lectures that introduce key concepts and experimental approaches. The background lectures are then typically followed by a lecture which addresses the topic from a neuropsychological approach, considering how that aspect of cognition is affected by brain injury; covering material such as agnosia, neglect, and amnesia.

Additional lectures will address the topics from a more psychopathological approach, for example examining the role of attentional biases in anxiety. The module concludes with four lectures considering cognition in the broader context of behaviour and behavioural control.

Molecular Biology

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

Despite the diversity of life, the molecular mechanisms that ensure the flow of genetic information from one generation to the next, and the expression of genes from DNA to protein via an RNA intermediate, are remarkably conserved.

This module aims to teach fundamental mechanisms such as DNA replication, transcription and translation.

You will also learn about how the structures of nucleic acids and proteins relate to their functions. Finally, you will find out how the tools of molecular biology, such as cloning and PCR, allow us to manipulate and understand genes and proteins.

Biological Chemistry

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

Biological Chemistry is a module that addresses the central chemical concepts in Biology. It is not a chemistry module, but does require some chemistry knowledge. The topics covered in the module include understanding enzymes and the mechanism by which they catalyse biological reactions as well as carbohydrate and lipid structures. Protein structure discussed in the Molecular Biology module in autumn term will be built upon and discussed in terms of the structure and mechanisms of action of haemoglobin.

The module includes practical sessions as well as tutorial problems and lectures.

Introduction to Metabolism and Pharmacology

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

This module aims to introduce you to the general principles of metabolism and pharmacology. The initial lectures cover ATP, substrate-level phosphorylation, Chemiosmosis and oxidative phosphorylation, glycolysis, and the the Krebs cycle. This is complemented by lectures covering glycogen, nucleotide and lipid metabolism, introducing metabolic flux with exercise as an example. Anti-metabolites, anti-cancer drugs and G protein agonist and antagonists will be discussed as examples of therapeutic intervention. The pharmacology aspects of the module will cover how drugs act at receptors, ion channels and specific enzymes, their molecular targets and the underlying cellular mechanisms of action. It will cover methods and measurement in pharmacology and the absorption and distribution of drugs, their elimination and pharmacokinetics.

Psychology of Childhood and Adolescence

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

This module examines the historical origins, perspectives, theories, methods, and empirical findings of research in the area of developmental psychology, with attention to cognitive, perceptual, language, social, emotional, and atypical development. A core emphasis on major theories and research findings in the field of developmental psychology will be complemented by presentations by various members of the Psychology faculty that address a wide range of psychological processes, from the antenatal period through to young adulthood. The module does not require any prior knowledge of psychology.

Genetics and Genomics

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

This module covers aspects of both classical and molecular genetics. Starting from the basic principles of Mendelian inheritance and meiosis, the concepts of genetic linkage, recombination and mapping will then be introduced. We discuss, in detail, how the understanding of these processes can be used in the analysis of human disease traits.

You then move on to looking at the structure of genomes – again with an emphasis on the human genome and how changes to this structure can relate to human disease. Finally, we build on basic molecular genetics (covered in the Level 4 molecular biology module) to describe the advanced techniques now being used to analyse and manipulate genomes.

Medical Neuroscience

  • 45 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

You will learn the following topics:

  • the structure and function of the brain at the anatomical, cellular and molecular levels
  • the way that drugs interact with the brain
  • the development of the brain as well as its degeneration and the changes accompanying ageing
  • the organisation and function of the sensory and motor pathways and the biological bases of pain and the diseases of motor control
  • the neuroanatomy and neurochemistry of learning and memory and of dementias
  • the biological and psychosocial bases of major clinical syndromes in psychiatry
  • the biological and psychosocial bases of common neurological diseases.

Developmental Biology

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

How does an adult organism arise from a fertilized egg? This module presents the concepts and principles that are rapidly emerging from studies of developmental processes in animals.

Topics to be discussed include egg organisation and origins of cell differences, molecular mechanisms of cell differentiation, cell movements and inductive interactions, long-range signalling mechanisms, the cellular and molecular processes underlying pattern formation, and the evolutionary conservation of developmental mechanisms in different phyla.

Neural Circuits

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

This module will teach you about neural mechanisms generating animal behaviour. The level of analysis emphasises types of behaviour that can be understood in terms of underlying neural circuits or specific structures with well­ known neural architectures within the brain.

Topics covered include:

  • organisation and modulation of central pattern generator (CPG) circuits
  • advanced techniques for monitoring and manipulating neural circuits
  • modelling of neural circuits
  • sensory and motor functions of spinal cord circuits
  • brain circuits underlying motor control
  • circuits underlying non-associative and associative learning
  • addiction and learning circuits
  • defects in circuits
  • development of neural circuits

Techniques in Neuroscience

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

The module will provide practical demonstrations of how neurons and the nervous system function, and will introduce a range of experimental techniques, both old and new, that can be used to address current issues in neuroscience.

It will provide hands on experience with the following topics:

  • The ionic basis of the action potential
  • The generation of force by muscles
  • The structure and development of the nervous system
  • The performance of the human eye and ear
  • The mechanisms of learning

Life Sciences Research Placement 2

  • Summer Vacation, Year 2

You learn about research methods and practices while you develop your knowledge and understanding of life sciences. This is particularly valuable if you are considering a research career.

During your research placement in the summer vacation each year, you work as a member of one of the School’s research groups and receive a stipend to cover your living costs.

During your research placement, you explore research methods, learn to understand and use scientific literature, and develop practical skills.

The placement can be done in the same research group each year or a different one in different years. You work on a project to contribute to the research programme of the group.

Clinical Psychology and Mental Health

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

You will investigate the critical role that clinical psychology can play in promoting well-being and helping those who are experiencing mental health difficulties. An expert team of psychologists will help you to bridge theory, research, and practice, evaluating diverse psychological perspectives on areas of mental health difficulty, from anxiety and mood difficulties through to psychosis.

Drawing on contemporary approaches to mental health, you will learn how to integrate theories of causation and approaches to treatment/support, and use your knowledge of research to understand and apply the evidence base to support those experiencing mental health difficulties.

Computing for Life Sciences

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

Gain basic computer coding skills in modern structured languages.

This enables you to apply these skills to develop computer programmes that perform computations and analyses of direct relevance to modern Life Sciences research.

Biological Bases of Mental Disorders

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

The module examines the biochemical and anatomical bases of selected clinical disorders. It considers drug models (both animal and human) developed to understand the clinical condition and approaches to treatment, and examines the relationship between biochemical effects and behavioural and cognitive changes. Topics covered include anxiety, depression and schizophrenia.

This module builds on knowledge gained in the core psychology modules Psychobiology, and Brain and Behaviour. Students not enrolled on the BSc in Psychology are expected to be familiar with the material covered in these modules.

 

Cognitive Neuroscience

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

The module aims to provide you with an understanding of how research in cognitive neuroscience has informed our understanding of cognitive processes in the brain. Sussex has an excellent reputation of research in cognitive neuroscience and the module is taught by an expert in the field. Evidence is drawn from a wide variety of methods.

These include case studies of brain-damaged individuals (similar to those featured in The Man who Mistook his Wife for a Hat), electrical recordings of ‘brainwave’ (EEG), and neuroimaging using fMRI. These methods provide unprecedented clues about the organization of cognition in the living human brain.

Following a discussion of the main methods, the remaining lectures will be organised around a series of different cognitive processes such as:

  • recognising objects and faces
  • space and action
  • memory and amnesia
  • brain development
  • the musical brain
  • executive control of behaviour
  • understanding numbers.

Intelligence in Animals and Machines

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

The module will develop your understanding of what it means for an animal or a machine to behave intelligently, and how brain and behavioural systems are adapted to enable an animal to cope effectively within its environment. You will consider diverse aspects of intelligence, including navigation and motor control, numerical, language, memory and social skills. You will explore how these are related to one another and how they are matched to the particular needs of animals and machines.

Life Sciences Final Year Research Project

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

This is an individual research project involving the investigation of a biological problem or phenomenon using experimental procedures, or the investigation and evaluation of a medical condition, intervention or treatment using literature-based methods, in addition to patient feedback where possible. You will obtain data and information from either laboratory or field-based experiments; from work performed in silico, or from literature-based research.

Literature Project in Life Sciences

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

Molecular Genetics

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

The module will cover the application of molecular genetics to the study of processes in model systems and higher eukaryotes.

Particular topics will include cell cycle and checkpoint control, recombination and mating type switching in lower eukaryotes, gene mapping and cloning disease genes in higher eukaryotes and the production of transgenic plants and animals.

Neuronal Transduction and Transmission

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

This module explores aspects of neuronal signalling, in both vertebrates and invertebrates, highlighting how molecular structure relates to function in signalling pathways. The emphasis will be on understanding how molecular and cellular mechanisms underlie the function of the CNS at a systems level and the generation of behaviour.

The module begins with the problem of sensory transduction (getting information into the nervous system), with a particular emphasis on mechanical (auditory) and visual modalities. This will be followed by a series of lectures on how information is processed at the synapse, covering electrical transmission and preand post-synaptic mechanisms at the chemical synapse. You will also be introduced to non-synaptic information processing.

Regulating the Transcriptome

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

This module takes an up-to-the-minute look at the molecular mechanisms controlling RNA expression in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, focusing largely on gene transcription but also examining RNA processing events in eukaryotes.

We will examine the way in which bacteria control gene expression in response to different environmental cues through precisely coordinated transcription regulatory networks, and investigate the way in which eukaryotic transcriptional regulators control RNA polymerase recruitment and retention and modulate chromatin structure during transcriptional activation and repression.

Understanding these processes and mechanisms is fundamental for the study of health and disease, for example to aid the development of new antibiotics and decipher how gene regulatory networks are perturbed during cancer development.

Social Insects

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

The eusocial insects comprise approximately 20,000 species of ants, termites, bees and wasps. Eusociality in these groups has evolved 20­-100 million years ago on approximately 10 occasions and has given rise to highly ­organized societies with up to 20 million individuals. Eusocial insects are of great economic and ecological importance. They are also key model systems in many important areas of biology.

The module is divided into several parts:

1) general background material on social insects, focusing in greater detail on four contrasting areas in which research on social insects is particularly active

2) inclusive fitness theory and relatedness

3) how insect societies are organised

4) another special topic relevant to social insect biology, such as mutualisms and symbioses involving social insects; the ecological importance of social insects; the evolution of eusociality in insects; or using social insects to investigate sensory physiology (topics will vary each year)

There will also be two laboratory sessions from a range including: the honey bee waggle dance, nestmate recognition and guarding in honey bees, organisation of ant trail systems, and reproductive queueing in Polistes wasps.

Conflict & Cooperation in Social Groups

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

Conflict and cooperation cuts across the whole of biology and can be studied among genes or among organisms, in societies of micro-organisms, animals and humans, and also in multi-species mutualisms. It is relevant both in the origin of life and in modern-day organisms and societies. The module focuses on factors affecting the balance between conflict and cooperation in human society, vertebrate societies including primates and cooperative breeders, mutualism partners, and genes within organisms. There are eight lectures followed by six two-hour seminars covering research papers in a single area. In the first of these seminars the research papers are presented by the faculty, and in the others by you and your coursemates.

Conscious and Unconscious Mental Processes

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

In this module, you explore the existence and nature of conscious and unconscious mental processes in the domains of learning, memory, perception, and volition.

Drugs, Brain and Behaviour

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

Drugs, Brain and Behaviour offers you an overview to the psychological, pharmacological, neurobiological and neurophysiological bases of drug use, abuse and contemporary understanding of addiction (and some mental conditions), and has a strong natural science (neuroscience) orientation. The acute and long-term effects of selected drugs of abuse on behaviour, mood, cognition and neuronal function are discussed using empirical findings and theoretical developments from both human and non-human subject studies on the neurobiological and psychological basis of drug action and addiction.

The module will discuss the anatomical, neurochemical and cell-molecular mechanisms targeted by psychoactive drugs and their distribution, regulation and integration in the broader central nervous system. The focus is on potentially addictive drugs, and the major classes are discussed, including opiates (heroin and morphine), psychomotor stimulants (amphetamine and cocaine), sedative-hypnotics (alcohol, barbiturates and chloral hydrate), anxiolytics (benzodiazepines), marijuana, hallucinogens (LSD, mescaline) and hallucinogenic-stimulants (MDA, MDMA). Critically, with the knowledge of the basic neurobiological and behavioural pharmacology of these drugs 'in hand', contemporary theories and understanding of mental conditions, substance abuse and addiction are considered, focusing on key concepts related to (drug) experience-dependent neuroplasticity, drug-induced neurotoxicity, associative learning, neuronal ensembles and the synaptic basis of learning and plasticity, habit formation and impulse-control.

This module builds on knowledge gained in the core psychology modules C8003: Psychobiology and C8518: Brain and Behaviour. If you are not enrolled on the BSc Psychology course at Sussex you are expected to be familiar with the material covered in these modules.

Genomics and Bioinformatics

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

This module will introduce the common types of genomic and proteomic data available in biological databases; including DNA and protein sequences, motifs, gene structure, protein interactions and expression profiles. The aims and methods of DNA and protein sequence analysis will be covered, including analysis of homology, identification of motifs and domains, pair-wise and multiple alignments and prediction of gene structure.

The practical sessions will include the analysis of DNA and protein sequence data from biological databases. In these sessions you will learn how to integrate data to find the functional links between disease related genes and proteins.

Innovation in Bioscience and Medicine

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

The purpose of this module is to provide you with an overview of how research in the Life Sciences can lead to innovation in society, and the factors that shape, boost or inhibit such innovation.

The module explores the applications of bioscience, particularly in medicine, its products and processes, and their patterns of development. It examines the mechanisms through which products and services are commercialised, such as university-industry links, spin-off firms and corporate alliances.

Wider regulatory and ethical debates and the role they play in the development of biotechnology are also explored.

Molecular Pharmacology

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

In this module, you examine the actions of drugs at the molecular level. And you analyse the methods employed to study these interactions.

Such methods include molecular cloning, receptor binding and cell-based functional assays.

The focus of your studies in this module is on receptor binding theory and the effects of drugs on intracellular signalling pathways.

In the module, you study a variety of drug targets in detail, including examples of the G-Protein couple receptor (GPCR), ligand-gated ion channel, neurotransmitter transporter and enzyme facilities.

You use GPCRs to exemplify the effects of drugs on second messenger systems (e.g. cyclic AMP, inositol trisphosphate) and related signalling cascades - and the GABAA receptor is highlighted as a prototypic ligand-gated ion channel.

Neuronal Plasticity and Gene Regulation

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

This module will consider how cellular and molecular mechanisms interact in the regulation of neuronal plasticity, the ability of the nervous system to adapt its structural-functional organisation to new situations emerging from changes in intrinsic and extrinsic inputs. During the module particular emphasis will be placed on mechanisms underlying the acquisition, processing and storage of information by the nervous system. You will also discuss recently discovered phenomena such as epigenetic regulation and natural antisense transcripts (NATs) in the context of their importance for the regulation of neural functions.

Protein Form and Function

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

Protein Form and Function provides a sense of how protein structures are related to each other and of how these structures relate to protein function. On this module you will be equipped with the necessary knowledge and skills to learn about and appreciate this class of molecule. This module covers aspects of protein structure in detail and introduces computational and experimental techniques that are essential for studying proteins, and provides the basis for the in depth discussion of more topical issues such as protein engineering and design, protein folding, chaperones and protein folding diseases.

Psychobiology of Cognitive Ageing and Dementia

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

This module will examine cognitive processes in older adulthood, and the neuropharmacology and neuroanatomy of normal and abnormal changes that are observed. It will describe the clinical and functional consequences of age-related changes in cognitive performance, and it will describe the risk and protective factors associated with the most common organic dementias. It will examine current treatment options and future treatment possibilities, considering both drug and psychotherapeutic options.

Sensory Function and Computation

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

You learn fundamental concepts in sensory coding, including:

  • feature detection
  • adaptive representations
  • coding by spike rates and timing
  • population coding.

You will learn in seminars as well as workshops where computer code will be introduced and used to analyse and simulate sensory coding by neurons.

Structure and Function in the Brain

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

The aim of the module is to reveal the anatomical substrates on which the processing of sensory information and the generation of motor commands depend. Specific attention will be paid to the relationship between structure and function. The module will cover the development of the anatomical features of the nervous system and will give a comparative interpretation of the anatomy of brain regions and their cellular components using a variety of examples including vertebrate and invertebrate models. The module will provide basic knowledge of the main techniques used to study the functional anatomy of the brain at systems, cellular and molecular levels.

Advanced Techniques in Neuroscience

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 4

This module offers a choice of practical classes on key current techniques in neuroscience including:

  • advanced microscopy and imaging
  • electrophysiology
  • molecular biology
  • psychophysics
  • EEG
  • computational neuroscience 

This practical experience is complemented by seminars on the ethics of human and animal studies.

Life Sciences Master of Science Research Proposal

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 4

The module aims to develop an appreciation of the research field in which students will be conducting their research project, thereby enabling them to design and propose a detailed programme of research. Students will also attend seminars on science communication, careers, grant writing and science funding. Students will also have regular tutorials with their project supervisor during which they will discuss the background of the project, sources for literature review and appropriateness of experimental strategy.

Current Topics in Neuroscience

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 4

This module will introduce you to a diversity of active areas of research in life sciences. The module will be taught via a series of research seminars given by University of Sussex staff, research students and invited speakers. These seminars will provide an excellent opportunity for you to learn about the latest developments in a range of topics, gain insight into the nature of scientific research, and meet with a diversity of researchers. The module will be assessed via a portfolio of work summarising, synthesising and communicating the research for a scientific audience and the general public.

Life Sciences MSci/MRes Research Project 1

  • 45 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 4

This individual research project will involve the investigation of a biological problem or phenomenon using laboratory-based, field-based or computer-based experimental procedures. Research results will be critically analysed, evaluated and presented, both orally and in the form of a written project report.

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