Geography MArts

Geography

Key information

Duration:
4 years full time
Typical A-level offer:
AAA-AAB
UCAS code:
L701
Start date:
September 2018

At Sussex, you’ll learn from experts in migration and development who’ll show you how global issues affect local communities.

Even when you’re working closer to home, our setting – Brighton and the UK’s newest National Park – means you’ll learn both inside and outside the classroom.

We also have an excellent choice of global field-trip destinations, including locations such as Los Angeles, the Mojave Desert, Dubai and China.

This course includes an integrated Masters year, allowing you to develop advanced research skills.

“Sussex Geography make it their mission to show that geography isn’t within one box, and their range of modules proves it!” Ryshel PatelGeography BA

MSci or MArts?

Course Overview
Geography MSci

You explore environmental and physical geography, climate and landscape change. 

Geography MArts

You study the relationships between human societies and their environments.

We also offer this course as a three-year BA, a three-year BSc, and as a four-year MSci with research placements. Find out about the benefits of an integrated Masters year.

Entry requirements

A-level

Typical offer

AAA-AAB

GCSEs

You will also need GCSE (or equivalent) Mathematics, with at least grade C (or grade 4 in the new grading scale).

You should also have a broad range of GCSEs (A*-C), including good grades in relevant subjects.

Extended Project Qualification

We take the EPQ into account when considering your application and it can be useful in the summer when your results are released if you have narrowly missed the conditions of your offer. We do not routinely include the EPQ in the conditions of your offer but we sometimes offer alternative conditions that include the EPQ. If you wish to discuss this further please contact Admissions at ug.enquiries@sussex.ac.uk

Other UK qualifications

Access to HE Diploma

Typical offer

Pass in the Access to HE Diploma with 45 level 3 credits at Merit or above, including 30 at Distinction.

Subjects

The Access Diploma would ideally be in humanities or social sciences.

GCSEs

You will also need GCSE (or equivalent) Mathematics, with at least grade C (or grade 4 in the new grading scale).

International Baccalaureate

Typical offer

34 points overall from the full IB Diploma.

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (formerly BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma)

Typical offer

DDD

GCSEs

You will also need GCSE (or equivalent) Mathematics, with at least grade C (or grade 4 in the new grading scale).

You should also have a broad range of GCSEs (A*-C), including good grades in relevant subjects.

Scottish Highers

Typical offer

AAABB

GCSEs

You will also need Mathematics at Standard Grade, grade 1 or 2.

Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced

Typical offer

Grade B and AA in two A-levels.

GCSEs

You will also need GCSE (or equivalent) Mathematics, with at least grade C (or grade 4 in the new grading scale).

You should also have a broad range of GCSEs (A*-C), including good grades in relevant subjects.

International baccalaureate

Typical offer

34 points overall from the full IB Diploma.

European baccalaureate

Typical offer

Overall result of at least 80%

Other international qualifications

Australia

Typical offer

Relevant state (Year 12) High School Certificate, and over 85% in the ATAR or UAI/TER/ENTER. Or a Queensland OP of 5 or below.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Geography is desirable.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Austria

Typical offer

Reifeprüfung or Matura with an overall result of 2.2 or better for first-year entry. A result of 2.5 or better would be considered for Foundation Year entry.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Geography is desirable.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Belgium

Typical offer

Certificat d'Enseignement Secondaire Supérieur (CESS) or Diploma van Hoger Secundair Onderwijs with a good overall average. 

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Geography is desirable.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Bulgaria

Typical offer

Diploma za Sredno Obrazovanie with excellent final-year scores (normally 5.5 overall with 6 in key subjects).

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Geography is desirable.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Canada

Typical offer

High School Graduation Diploma. Specific requirements vary between provinces.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Geography is desirable.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

China

Typical offer

We usually do not accept Senior High School Graduation for direct entry to our undergraduate courses. However, we do consider applicants who have studied 1 or more years of Higher Education in China at a recognised degree awarding institution or who are following a recognised International Foundation Year.

If you are interested in applying for a business related course which requires an academic ability in Mathematics, you will normally also need a grade B in Mathematics from the Huikao or a score of 90 in Mathematics from the Gaokao.

Applicants who have the Senior High School Graduation may be eligible to apply to our International Foundation Year, which if you complete successfully you can progress on to a relevant undergraduate course at Sussex. You can find more information about the qualifications which are accepted by our International Study Centre at  http://isc.sussex.ac.uk/entry-requirements/international-foundation-year .

 

 

 

 

 

 

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Geography is desirable.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Croatia

Typical offer

Maturatna Svjedodžba with an overall score of at least 4-5 depending on your degree choice.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Geography is desirable.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Cyprus

Typical offer

Apolytirion of Lykeion with an overall average of at least 18 or 19/20 will be considered for first-year entry.

A score of 15/20 in the Apolytirion would be suitable for Foundation Year entry. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Geography is desirable.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Czech Republic

Typical offer

Maturita with a good overall average.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Geography is desirable.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Denmark

Typical offer

Højere Forberedelseseksamen (HF) or studentereksamen with an overall average of at least 7 on the new grading scale.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Geography is desirable.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Finland

Typical offer

Finnish Ylioppilastutkinto with an overall average result in the final matriculation examinations of at least 6.5.

France

Typical offer

French Baccalauréat with an overall final result of at least 14/20.

Germany

Typical offer

German Abitur with an overall result of 1.8 or better.

Greece

Typical offer

Apolytirion with an overall average of at least 18 or 19/20 will be considered for first-year entry.

A score of 15/20 in the Apolytirion would be suitable for Foundation Year entry. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Geography is desirable.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Hong Kong

Typical offer

Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education (HKDSE) with grades of 5, 4, 4 from three subjects including two electives. 

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Geography is desirable.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Hungary

Typical offer

Erettsegi/Matura with a good average.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Geography is desirable.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

India

Typical offer

Standard XII results from Central and Metro Boards with an overall average of 75-80%. 

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Geography is desirable.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Iran

Typical offer

High School Diploma and Pre-University Certificate.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Geography is desirable.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Ireland

Typical offer

Irish Leaving Certificate (Higher Level) at H1 H1 H2 H2 H3.

Additional requirements

You must have at least grade O4 in Mathematics.

 

Israel

Typical offer

Bagrut, with at least 8/10 in at least six subjects, including one five-unit subject.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Geography is desirable.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Italy

Typical offer

Italian Diploma di Maturità or Diploma Pass di Esame di Stato with a Final Diploma mark of at least 85/100.

Japan

Typical offer

Upper Secondary Leaving Certificate is suitable for entry to our Foundation Years. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Geography is desirable.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Latvia

Typical offer

Atestats par Visparejo videjo Izglitibu with very good grades in state exams.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Geography is desirable.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Lithuania

Typical offer

Brandos Atestatas including scores of 80-90% in at least three state examinations (other than English).

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Geography is desirable.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Luxembourg

Typical offer

Diplôme de Fin d'Etudes Secondaires.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Geography is desirable.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Malaysia

Typical offer

Sijil Tinggi Persekolahan Malaysia (STPM). As well as various two or three-year college or polytechnic certificates and diplomas.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Geography is desirable.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Netherlands

Typical offer

Voorereidend Wetenschappelijk Onderwijs (VWO), normally with an average of at least 7.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Geography is desirable.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Nigeria

Typical offer

You are expected to have one of the following:

  • Higher National Diploma
  • One year at a recognised Nigerian University
  • Professional Diploma (Part IV) from the Institute of Medical Laboratory Technology of Nigeria
  • Advanced Diploma

You must also have a score of C6 or above in WAEC/SSC English.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Geography is desirable.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Norway

Typical offer

Norwegian Vitnemal Fra Den Videregaende Skole- Pass with an overall average of at least 4.5.

Pakistan

Typical offer

Bachelor (Pass) degree in arts, commerce or science.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Geography is desirable.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Poland

Typical offer

Matura with three extended-level written examinations, normally scored within the 7th stanine.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Geography is desirable.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Portugal

Typical offer

Diploma de Ensino Secundario normally with an overall mark of at least 16/20. 

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Geography is desirable.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Romania

Typical offer

Diploma de Bacalaureat with an overall average of 8.5-9.5 depending on your degree choice.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Geography is desirable.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Singapore

Typical offer

A-levels, as well as certain certificates and diplomas.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Geography is desirable.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Slovakia

Typical offer

Maturitna Skuska or Maturita with honours, normally including scores of 1 in at least three subjects.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Geography is desirable.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Slovenia

Typical offer

Secondary School Leaving Diploma or Matura with at least 23 points overall.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Geography is desirable.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

South Africa

Typical offer

National Senior Certificate with very good grades. 

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Geography is desirable.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Spain

Typical offer

Spanish Título de Bachillerato (LOGSE) with an overall average result of at least 8.0.

Sri Lanka

Typical offer

Sri Lankan A-levels.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Geography is desirable.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Sweden

Typical offer

Fullstandigt Slutbetyg with good grades.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Geography is desirable.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Switzerland

Typical offer

Federal Maturity Certificate.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Geography is desirable.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Turkey

Typical offer

Devlet Lise Diplomasi or Lise Bitirme is normally only suitable for Foundation Years, but very strong applicants may be considered for first year entry. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Geography is desirable.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

USA

Typical offer

We look at your full profile taking into account everything you are studying. You must have your high school graduation diploma and we will be interested in your Grade 12 GPA. However, we will also want to see evidence of the external tests you have taken. Each application is looked at individually, but you should normally have one or two of the following:

  • APs (where we would expect at least three subject with 4/5 in each)
  • SAT Reasoning Tests (normally with a combined score of 1300) or ACT grades
  • and/or SAT Subject Tests (where generally we expect you to have scores of 600 or higher). 

We would normally require APs or SAT Subject Tests in areas relevant to your chosen degree course.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Geography is desirable.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

My country is not listed

If your qualifications aren’t listed or you have a question about entry requirements, email ug.enquiries@sussex.ac.uk.

English language requirements

IELTS (Academic)

6.5 overall, including at least 6.0 in each component

IELTS scores are valid for two years from the test date. Your score must be valid when you begin your Sussex course. You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test.

If you are applying for degree-level study we can consider your IELTS test from any test centre, but if you require a Confirmation of Acceptance for Studies (CAS) for an English language or pre-sessional English course (not combined with a degree) the test must be taken at a UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI)-approved IELTS test centre.

Find out more about IELTS.

Other English language requirements

Proficiency tests

Cambridge Advanced Certificate in English (CAE)

For tests taken before January 2015: Grade B or above

For tests taken after January 2015: 176 overall, including at least 169 in each skill

We would normally expect the CAE test to have been taken within two years before the start of your course.

You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Cambridge English: Advanced.

Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE)

For tests taken before January 2015: grade C or above

For tests taken after January 2015: 176 overall, including at least 169 in each skill

We would normally expect the CPE test to have been taken within two years before the start of your course.

You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Cambridge English: Proficiency.

Pearson (PTE Academic)

62 overall, including at least 56 in all four skills.

PTE (Academic) scores are valid for two years from the test date. Your score must be valid when you begin your Sussex course. You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Pearson (PTE Academic).

TOEFL (iBT)

88 overall, including at least 20 in Listening, 19 in Reading, 21 in Speaking, 23 in Writing.

TOEFL (iBT) scores are valid for two years from the test date. Your score must be valid when you begin your Sussex course. You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about TOEFL (iBT).

The TOEFL Institution Code for the University of Sussex is 9166.

English language qualifications

AS/A-level (GCE)

Grade C or above in English Language.

Hong Kong Advanced Level Examination (HKALE)/ AS or A Level: grade C or above in Use of English

French Baccalaureat

A score of 12 or above in English.

GCE O-level

Grade C or above in English.

Brunei/Cambridge GCE O-level in English: grades 1-6.

Singapore/Cambridge GCE O-level in English: grades 1-6.

GCSE or IGCSE

Grade C or above in English as a First Language.

Grade B or above in English as a Second Language

German Abitur

A score of 12 or above in English.

Ghana Senior Secondary School Certificate

If awarded before 1993: grades 1-6 in English language.

If awarded between 1993 and 2005: grades A-D in English language.

Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education (HKDSE)

 Level 4, including at least 3 in each component in English Language.

Indian School Certificate (Standard XII)

The Indian School Certificate is accepted at the grades below when awarded by the following examination boards:

Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) – English Core only: 70%

Council for Indian School Certificate Examinations (CISCE) - English: 70% 

International Baccalaureate Diploma (IB)

English A or English B at grade 5 or above.

Malaysian Certificate of Education (SPM) 119/GCE O-level

If taken before the end of 2008: grades 1-5 in English Language.

If taken from 2009 onwards: grade C or above in English Language.

The qualification must be jointly awarded by the University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES).

West African Senior School Certificate

Grades 1-6 in English language when awarded by the West African Examinations Council (WAEC) or the National Examinations Council (NECO).

Country exceptions

Select to see the list of exempt English-speaking countries

If you are a national of one of the countries below, or if you have recently completed a qualification equivalent to a UK Bachelors degree or higher in one of these countries, you will normally meet our English requirements. Note that qualifications obtained by distance learning or awarded by studying outside these countries cannot be accepted for English language purposes.

You will normally be expected to have completed the qualification within two years before starting your course at Sussex. If the qualification was obtained earlier than this we would expect you to be able to demonstrate that you have maintained a good level of English, for example by living in an English-speaking country or working in an occupation that required you to use English regularly and to a high level.

Please note that this list is determined by the UK’s Home Office, not by the University of Sussex.

List of exempt countries

  • Antigua and Barbuda
  • Australia
  • Bahamas
  • Barbados
  • Belize
  • Canada**
  • Dominica
  • Grenada
  • Guyana
  • Ireland
  • Jamaica
  • New Zealand
  • St Kitts and Nevis
  • St Lucia
  • St Vincent and the Grenadines
  • Trinidad and Tobago
  • United Kingdom
  • USA

** Canada: you must be a national of Canada; other nationals not on this list who have a degree from a Canadian institution will not normally be exempt from needing to provide evidence of English.

Admissions information for applicants

Transfers into Year 2

Yes. Find out more about transferring into Year 2 of this course. We don’t accept transfers into the third or final year.

If your qualifications aren’t listed or you have a question about entry requirements, email ug.enquiries@sussex.ac.uk.

Why choose this course?

  • Ranked 6th in the UK for Geography and Environmental Studies (The Guardian University Guide 2018).
  • 91% for overall satisfaction (National Student Survey 2016).
  • Social sciences at Sussex is ranked 39th in the world (Times Higher Education World University Rankings 2018).

Course information

How will I study?

Year 1 introduces you to key areas of concern in geography today and equips you with the core geographical and study skills necessary to develop your understanding of global change and global challenges.

You learn through lectures, tutorials, workshops and fieldwork, and work individually and in groups. Core modules analyse critical issues such as:

  • development and migration
  • climate and environmental change
  • landscapes and landforms.

Options allow you to further explore specialist topics within geography.

Modules

These are the modules running in the academic year 2017. Modules running in 2018 may be subject to change.

Core modules

Options


Customise your course

At Sussex, you can choose to customise your course to build the sort of degree that will give you the knowledge, skills and experience that could take you in any direction you choose.

Explore subjects different to your course – electives and pathways allow you to complement your main subject. Find out what opportunities your course offers

Gain programming skills and apply them to areas such as digital media, business and interactive design. Find out about our Year in Computing

How will I study?

You begin to specialise in areas of interest while getting further skills training. The MArts focuses on human geography and social and cultural geography.

You may also choose from a range of other topics such as:

  • GIS (geographical information system)
  • international migration
  • sustainable development, postcolonial Africa
  • long-term environmental change.

Field trips

Get involved in fieldwork from the start of your course. You develop research, analytical and team-working skills in regions where our academics actively conduct research. 

In Year 2, you can pick from an exciting range of locations: current destinations include China, the Mojave Desert, Dubai and Los Angeles. There is also a UK-based field trip.

Find out about the 2,000-year-old artefacts found by a Sussex student on a field trip to the Mojave desert.

Find out more about Geography field trips at Sussex

Modules

These are the modules running in the academic year 2017. Modules running in 2018 may be subject to change.

Core modules

Options


Customise your course

At Sussex, you can choose to customise your course to build the sort of degree that will give you the knowledge, skills and experience that could take you in any direction you choose.

Explore subjects different to your course – electives and pathways allow you to complement your main subject. Find out what opportunities your course offers

Gain programming skills and apply them to areas such as digital media, business and interactive design. Find out about our Year in Computing

Study abroad (optional)

Apply to study abroad – you’ll develop an international perspective and gain an edge when it comes to your career. Find out where your course could take you.

Beautiful nature, dog sledging in the Artic, Swedish 'fika', and a great social life. I could not have chosen better!”Georgia Donati Clarke
Geography BSc
Studied abroad in Sweden 

Placement (optional)

A placement is a great way to network and gain practical skills. When you leave Sussex, you’ll benefit from having the experience employers are looking for. Find out more about placements and internships.

Please note

If you’re receiving – or applying for – USA federal Direct Loan funds, you can’t transfer to the version of this program with an optional study abroad period in any country or optional placement in the USA. Find out more about American Student Loans and Federal Student Aid

How will I study?

You focus on your individual research project in your final year. This uses the skills and research training developed throughout your course. A member of faculty supervises your project.

You choose from a variety of modules, tailoring your studies to your interests. Topics range from climate science to the culture of colonialism to food security. You also begin to plan your final-year extended research project.

Modules

These are the modules running in the academic year 2017. Modules running in 2018 may be subject to change.

Core modules

Options

How will I study?

You explore topics at the forefront of geography in seminars where faculty present their research-in-progress. You examine research in human geography. You also study topics such as migrants and society, or theories of underdevelopment.

In the final term, you work on your research project, supervised by leading figures in the field. Your project involves:

  • project design and management
  • research and analysis
  • presenting and writing up your findings.

Modules

These are the modules running in the academic year 2017. Modules running in 2018 may be subject to change.

Core modules

Options

I advise international policy organisations, such as the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change.”Professor David Ockwell
Senior Lecturer in Geography 

Fees

UK/EU students:
Fees are not yet set for entry in the academic year 2018. The University intends to set fees at the maximum permitted by the UK Government (subject to continued satisfaction of the Teaching Excellence Framework). For the academic year 2017, fees were £9,250 per year.

The UK Government has confirmed that if you’re an EU student applying for entry in September 2018, you’ll pay the same fee rate as UK students for the duration of your course, even if the UK leaves the EU before the end of your course. You’ll also continue to have access to student loans and grants. Find out more on the UK Government website

Channel Islands and Isle of Man students:
The University aligns fees for Channel Islands and Isle of Man students with fees for UK/EU students. These fees are not yet set for entry in the academic year 2018. We intend to set fees at the maximum permitted by the UK Government (subject to continued satisfaction of the Teaching Excellence Framework). For the academic year 2017, fees were £9,250 per year.
International students:
£19,200 per year
Study abroad:
Find out about grants and funding, tuition fees and insurance costs for studying abroad
Placement:
Find out about tuition fees for placements

Note that your fees may be subject to an increase on an annual basis.

Find out about typical living costs for studying at Sussex

Scholarships

Our focus is personal development and social mobility. To help you meet your ambitions to study at Sussex, we deliver one of the most generous scholarship programmes of any UK university.

Careers

Your future career

On our Geography MArts, you develop research, numerical, analytical and resource-management skills. This means you can go on to careers in:

  • international development and environmental conservation
  • charities
  • the public and private sectors.

Working while you study

Our Careers and Employability Centre can help you find part-time work while you study. Find out more about career development and part-time work

Sussex taught me about global issues and how to better interact with people of different nationalities. This was essential to my job post-graduation.”Jess Gealer
Modern Slavery Partnership Coordinator

Human Geographies of the Modern World

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

Skills and Concepts in Geography I: Becoming a Geographer

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

The Natural World

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

This interdisciplinary module provides you with a foundation for studying physical geography and ecology. After introducing systems theory and major evolutionary and ecological questions, it considers geology (Earth structure and composition, continental drift, plate tectonics, geological time), setting a framework for studying macro-evolution (patterns and processes, history of life, major extinctions and radiations, historical biogeography). This is followed by an introduction to earth system science, focusing on the hydrosphere and biosphere, and leads into macro-ecology, where we discuss local to global patterns of biodiversity, factors controlling species distribution and abundance, biogeography.

Culture Across Space and Time

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

This module examines the relationship of culture to place, difference and identity. Drawing on key theoretical debates and case studies, culture will be explored in the context of social change and crises, incorporating topics such as:

  • the impact of globalisation and transnationalism on everyday life
  • the impact of consumption on behaviour and life choices
  • the changing relations of multiculturalism, racism and marginalisation
  • and the representation of culture in public spaces.

Throughout the module cultural issues will be deciphered through the prism of racial, ethnic, class and gender relations at local and global levels.

Environmental Management and Sustainable Development

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

This module explores contemporary debates on environmental management and sustainable development from a perspective that bridges physical and human geography. It examines the development of core scientific and social theories and discourses that underpin contemporary management of the environment and sustainable development. In particular it explores the trade offs between the three different pillars of sustainability; economics, environment and society. These trade offs are explored in relation to a range of real world problems, including climate change, biodiversity loss and energy use. The module explicitly deals at a range of geographical scales, from the global to the local, as well as considering different approaches to the management of natural resources.

Skills and Concepts in Geography II: Quantitative and Analytical Skills

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

This module provides you with essential skills in quantitative and analytical methods, enabling you to evaluate different types of numerical data in human and physical geography. Topics include essential maths, trigonometry, descriptive statistics, inferential statistics, least squares regression, mechanics and modelling.

Each week a generic lecture introduces a particular topic and this is supported by practical-based workshops in which you gain experience in these skills. The workshops are based on exercises related to the substantive content of the modules of Geographies of Development and Inequality (for BA Geographers) and The Natural World 2 (for BSc Geographers). To provide intellectual coherence, you will be placed in workshop groups based upon your degree programme.

Colonialism and After

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

This module is an introduction to a range of key historical problems and conceptual questions relating to the colonial and postcolonial experiences.

Focusing on the characteristics of capitalism, imperialism, and modernity, you will examine the making of the modern world.

You’ll be introduced to:

  • European expansion
  • the slave economy
  • the development of wage labour
  • industrial growth
  • imperialism
  • creation of the modern state
  • genocide
  • the idea of development
  • anticolonialism
  • the creation of the “third world”.

Understanding Earth

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

Cultural and Historical Geographies

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

The twin fields of cultural and historical geography have significantly refigured the discipline and doing of human geography since the 1980s, though both have deeper intellectual roots.

By studying this module, you'll develop a nuanced understanding of the relationship between these two approaches and of their overlapping concerns, concepts and practitioners.

After you are introduced to the idea of culture and consider the importance of time in geographical analysis, you analyse the different ways in which cultural and historical geographers have sought to comprehend the world.

In so doing, you explore several critical arenas of study in the past 30 years including:

  • the importance of representational approaches and theories (examining art, visual media, creative writing, sound and song)
  • the challenge of poststructuralism and ‘non-representational’ theory.

You will also focus on the following recurrent critical themes: knowledge and power, hegemony and resistance, memory and heritage, and landscape and nature.

Methods and Approaches in Human Geography

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

In this module, you develop the skills you need to carry out a final-year thesis project in human geography.

You will attend:

  • lectures on quantitative and qualitative methods and on their application in particular branches of the discipline
  • presentations, held in the spring term, which include guidance on how to prepare the thesis proposal.

Social Geography

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

After an introduction to the development of social geography, you focus on the interactions between social relations, space and place.

These connections are explored through the geographies of class, ethnicity, sexuality and gender relations (and the intersections between them), at a variety of spatial scales, from local to global, and both urban and rural. We include geographies of activism, health and ability and gentrification.

Geography Overseas Field Class

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

In Year Two, you take part in either an overseas field class or non-residential field class at Sussex.

If you study a:

  • single honours Geography course, the field class is compulsory
  • joint honours Geography course, the field class is optional.

We offer an extensive set of international field class options with recent examples including classes to Dubai, China, the US and with new field classes being developed.

You will carry out data collection – as broadly defined – for at least a week. You then analyse and write up the material in the field and when you return to Sussex.

Global Climate Change

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

This module takes an interdisciplinary view on the scientific basis of claims of global climate change, the human responsibility and the future implications of the change. In doing so it is largely based around theoretical and evidence based elements of climate science. Half of the module is dedicated to providing a sound basis for undergraduate level critical understanding of the science of contemporary climate change for the present-day and in the future. The other half provides the foundations for a critical understanding of the basis of future climate impacts.

Global Landscape Dynamics

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

You are introduced to the properties of earth surface materials, how they are shaped and how they interact with hydrology and ecology via climatic controls.

These themes form the basis for examining the dynamics of slopes, rivers, coasts, glaciers, permafrost and deserts, as well as landscapes developed in particular rock types such as limestone and granite.

In the context of global environmental change this module provides the intellectual framework for understanding the impact of natural and human forcing factors on the world's landscapes.

Culture, Race and Ethnicity

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

In this module, you examine the relationship between ideas of culture, race and ethnicity, both historically and in contemporary society.

You'll study a range of empirical examples that demonstrate how the concepts have been used - sometimes separately, sometimes in interlocking ways - in political projects or movements. Particular focus will be placed on the construction of 'whiteness'.

Examples may include:

  • the use of race in nineteenth century colonial administration
  • the politics of ethnicity in post-war London
  • the rise of the new right in contemporary Europe.

Environmental Perspectives on Development

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

The module explores development with an explicit focus on environmental issues. You will look at the relationships between development and the environment: the consequences of development on the environment, environmental constraints to development, and problems of development in marginal environments. You will examine how the environment and issues around sustainability have been considered (or ignored) in relation to development and how this has changed over time. The module includes historical perspectives on environment and development, illustrating continuities and changes in policies related to environment and development. It also explores core issues around environmental management and development in relation to key resources, such as wildlife, forests and water.

Geographical Information Systems

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

This module is designed to introduce you to the various components that constitute a Geographical Information System (GIS), while providing you with practical skills in using these tools. Using leading GIS software, you will gain direct experience of a range of data collection and input, database, analytical and visualisation techniques. These will include:

  • georeferencing
  • vector/raster integration
  • and data classification.

This methodology will be illustrated through a range of social and environmental applications, emphasising its decision-assisting potential and looking at some real world examples from the fields of disaster management and development.

Ice Age Earth

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

This module examines the ways in which the Earth's environmental and climatic processes have changed during the recent Ice Ages; approximately the last 2.6 million years.

You explore the physical, biological and chemical evidence for these past changes using a range of different records (including ocean sediments, ice cores, stable isotopes and fossil plants and insects), and couple this with an assessment of natural forcing mechanisms, geological dating techniques and earth-surface processes.

This broad, interdisciplinary approach provides a valuable 'palaeo' perspective from which to evaluate the evidence for 21st century global warming and associated environmental change, and will be attractive to students of Physical Geography and the Environmental, as well as Biological sciences.

Southeast England Field Class

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

The Southeast England Field Class introduces you to a particular field destination in SE England usually including the local Sussex region. After a series of preparatory lectures you will carry out data collection in situ for a period of about 10-14 days. Analysis and the writing up of a research report will take place upon your return. The module presents an opportunity for faculty to familiarise you with a location in which you conduct research and gives you the experience of carrying out your own research in that location.

Geography Thesis

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn & Spring Teaching, Year 3

During your final year, you are required to prepare a study to illustrate their ability to design and implement an empirical investigation in geography. The Geography Project entails the collection and analysis of primary data. You will have been given instruction in specific techniques of collecting and handling data and primary source material as well as advice on the presentational format required in the Level 2 module Research Skills, and will be given individual supervision in the design, conduct and writing up of your project throughout your final year.

Disasters, Environment and Development

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 4

In this module, you look at the connections between disasters, the environment and development. 

The negative impacts of environmental and climatic change and environmentally-related disasters threaten to roll back decades of development gains. Building resilient and sustainable societies means addressing climate and disaster risks, understanding the links between these issues and integrating these risks, as well as potential opportunities, into development planning and budgeting. 

The module is split into three parts:

  • concepts, exploring similarities and differences in concepts and frameworks and terminology used in these different areas
  • problems, looking at issues of droughts, floods and food security, complex disasters, environmental migration, trapped populations and resource wars
  • solutions, examining the possible avenues that may help address these problems, including remittance bonds, serious games, blended knowledge and science for humanitarian emergencies and resilience.

Geographies of Violence and Conflict

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 4

Conflict and violence are major components of social process, transformation and change – locally, nationally and internationally. This module gives you an overview of how geographers (and other social scientists) have thought about, studied, and explained, violence and conflict. For example, whether violence and conflict are considered an exceptional situation or a ‘normal’ aspect of societal change.

The module highlights the multiple scales at which conflict and violence occur, from domestic violence to international war. Nevertheless, emphasis will be placed on how violence and conflict affect people (and groups of people) at the micro-level of personal experience rather than simply looking at macro-level aggregate patterns. You will be encouraged to examine the differences between diverse forms of violence. For example, does it make sense to consider structural violence (eg racism, sexism) in the same way as physical (or direct) violence?

The first third of the module will focus on the theories and concepts through which violence and conflict have been explained. The second two-thirds will apply these theories and concepts to a range of diverse examples (such as resource wars, undocumented migration, war games and toy guns, counter-insurgency and urban policing).

Geohazards and Risk Assessment

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 4

Earth surface processes and natural hazards pose significant challenges to society and infrastructure.

The expansion of global population and urbanisation, coupled with the potential impacts of climate change on natural processes, are anticipated to result in more frequent natural disasters and an increase in their associated risks.

An understanding of geohazards can be used to evaluate the opportunities for sustainable development and engineering through cost effective mitigation of natural hazards and risk.

The module integrates academic and commercial training with real case work. The course structure and content is based on real-world problems and will be taught by leading practitioners and academic experts in the discipline.

Home

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 4

You explore the meaning of home and how this is represented in literature and film. 

Workshops focus on domestic practices of home in terms of:  

  • consumption
  • display and identification
  • the inhabitation of the embodied and sensuous home space
  • family
  • heteronormativity and gendered practices of home (un)making
  • the lifecourse and home as a site of childhood and ageing
  • the politics of housing and home, including displacement, domicide and homelessness
  • migration, belonging and transnational home-making.

Our studies of the representation of home in literature and film will be complemented by a trip to the Geffrye Museum of Home.

Landscape, Nature and Representation

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 4

This module focuses upon the representation of landscapes and nature, and considers the ways in which representations are sites through which ideas, visions and imaginations are set to work. You will assess the production and impact of such representations, critically analysing a range of textual sources from a variety of origins which claim to represent landscape and natures. This will incorporate art, literature, music, the media and cartography.

Global Environmental Change

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 4

Environmental change has become a central global issue with serious implications for the social and natural world. There is a need to monitor the earth's signs of change, especially where ground information is spatially limited, filled with error, or unavailable. Remote sensing datasets are vital in monitoring local, regional and global changes.

This module enables you to understand and use remote-sensing datasets to answer fundamental questions about our changing planet. This will involve:

  • understanding the nature of remote sensing
  • the different instruments and techniques and processing and manipulation of raw signals
  • applying it to different fields within the earth and environmental sciences (atmosphere, cryosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere).

Remote Sensing in the atmosphere is used for weather monitoring, greenhouse gas detection, and pollution. Remote sensing in the cryosphere is used in determining the presence, absence and change of ice cover over the earth's surface. Remote sensing in the hydrosphere monitors the oceans, organic and inorganic ocean constituents, sea surface temperatures, el nino events, land water fluxes, and flooding events. Remote Sensing in the biosphere monitors the component of the earth that supports life, and is sensitive to changes in climate, such as vegetation structure, composition, land cover types, soil moisture, leaf chemical components, phenology, change detection, plant stress and photosynthesis, transpiration and surface temperatures.

Global Food Security

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 4

Achieving food security for 10 billion people while reducing the environmental footprint of agriculture is a major challenge of the next century.

In this module, we will discuss papers on the multiple dimensions of this challenge, including the biophysical, economic, nutritional, socio-political, and institutional.

We will take a global perspective on the issues, drawing upon both global-scale research as well as case studies from different regions of the world to understand the geography of agricultural production, its environmental footprint, and of malnutrition.

Key topics include:

  • global change and sustainable agriculture
  • what is food security?
  • globalisation: the economics, finance and trade of food
  • impact of climate change: mitigation and adaptation potential of agriculture
  • farm management: soil-water-fertilizers
  • livestock
  • emerging issues in food security: biofuels, GMOs, labels, diets, urban agriculture, organic agriculture, permaculture.

Rural Livelihoods in the Global South

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 4

This module considers the varied nature of rural livelihood systems in developing countries.

You consider changes in livelihoods through livelihood diversification and migration, and the interconnectedness of the global and the local in causing change in rural societies. You also explore the impact of different agents of change on livelihoods. This will include:

  • the role of non-governmental organisations
  • the impact of modern biotechnology
  • the effects of trade on livelihoods, amongst other important examples.

The module draws primarily (though by no means exclusively) on evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa and India.

Critical Approaches to Human Geography

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 4

No other discipline in the social sciences and humanities could claim the diversity of research themes and practices as Human Geography.

From the highly technical, the applied and policy-orientated, to the theoretically rich and philosophical, and from the past through the present to the future, human geography research – including at Sussex – embraces all possible worlds.

Through a series of reading-led seminars, this module will introduce you to some of the debates at the critical cutting edge of human geographical scholarship pertinent to ongoing research in the ‘Histories, Cultures, Networks’, ‘Geographies of Migration’ and ‘Globalisation and Development’ research clusters. Each week a different member of faculty will lead discussion on their area of research, introducing discussions of literature review, method and epistemology.

Alongside reading foundational texts and/or work in progress, discussions will focus on exploring how theory and evidence combine in critical geographical research. In the second half of the term you will be given the opportunity to read and critically review a set of real grant proposals and take part in a mock grant review panel.

This will not only provide a hands-on appreciation of the assessment and grading process associated with research bids, but also help to develop critical appraisal skills in an environment where you will also learn directly from your peers.

The final weeks of term will be devoted to research project formulation workshops. In so doing, the module will expose you to geographical debates, and profile the diversity of research processes and practices at Sussex and begin the process of project formulation for the extended research project in the final term.

Research Project

  • 60 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 4

In this module, you complete an extended piece of research on a topic relevant to your course. You are given one-on-one supervision and learn relevant research methodologies.

The project is 12,000 words in length and will involve either desk-based or original empirical study.

You will also give a 20-minute presentation in the style of an academic paper, detailing your research question, methodology and initial analysis and conclusions, and will be given both verbal and written feedback.

Critical Debates in Development Theory

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 4

During this module you will examine the theories associated with modernisation, dependency, participatory approaches, post-modernism and all-encompassing 'globalisation'.

You will explore how our thinking about development has changed over time and why it has changed. While theoretical in orientation, you will consider through seminar discussions that the division between 'theory' and 'practice' is to some extent misleading.

Geopolitics and Grand Strategy

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 4

This module is designed to provide you with an overview on the changing nature of contemporary geopolitics, great power foreign policy strategies and world order in the context of globalisation and against the background of the major historical and epoch-making shifts of longue dure - economic and civilisational - which are challenging the western-centric nature of modern international society. The first part of the module will present the contemporary debate on world order and explore the current revival of geopolitical thinking as well as a number of approaches to the analysis of the contemporary international system with a particular attention to the issues of multi-polarity, regionalisation and non-western perspectives; the second part will focuse on the grand strategies and foreign policy practices developed by the major powers of the international system; the final part of the module will cover some of the key regional dynamics of contemporary geopolitics, including the Middle East, the transatlantic relationships, the international security in South and East Asia as well as in the Post-Soviet world.

Migrants and Society: Global Transformations

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 4

This introductory core module examines a wide range of theoretical and conceptual frameworks for studying migration and ethnic relations. Starting from the perspective that migration is one of the key drivers of globalisation and the transformation of contemporary societies, it examines the consequences of migration for people in both sending and receiving societies. Topics covered include:

  • general theories of migration
  • migration and development
  • transnationalism
  • return migration
  • sending and receiving state policies for migration
  • international migration governance
  • citizenship and integration
  • political mobilisation by migrants
  • migrants' social capital and networks
  • culture, identification and migrants' group rights. 

Political Economy of the Environment

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 4

This module explores a series of environmental issues and challenges through the lens of different political economy approaches. Early sessions survey different ways of thinking about the environment in political economy terms of who wins, who loses, how and why from the prevailing distribution of benefits and burdens of resource use and allocation. Concepts from political economy, political ecology and ecological economics among others are then drawn upon to make sense of the actors, institutions and decision-making procedures at work in a range of key issue areas such as climate change, forests, energy, food and water. We explore key contemporary debates within each of these areas and encourage you to develop your own critical thinking on these issues.

 

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