Sussex Neuroscience

Professor Sarah Garfinkel

Sarah GBody-brain interactions in emotion and memory

BSMS

Cognitive and emotional processes are shaped by the dynamic integration of brain and body. A major channel of interoceptive information comes from the heart, where phasic signals are conveyed to the brain to indicate how fast and strong the heart is beating.  These cardiac afferent signals can interact with neuronal mechanisms to alter emotion and memory processing. Moreover, this interoceptive channel is disrupted in distinct ways in first episode psychosis, schizophrenia, autism and anxiety. Sarah Garfinkel will lead a series of projects to investigate how heart and brain interact to alter emotion and cognition, with extension to clinical groups (e.g. PTSD, Schizophrenia). 

Selected publications

(For a full list of publications, visit: https://www.bsms.ac.uk/about/contact-us/staff/dr-sarah-garfinkel.aspx)

Critchley, Hugo D and Garfinkel, Sarah N (2017) Interoception and emotion. Current Opinion in Psychology, 17. pp. 7-14. ISSN 2352-250X

Ewing, Donna L, Manassei, Miranda, Gould van Praag, Cassandra, Philippides, Andrew O, Critchley, Hugo D and Garfinkel, Sarah N (2017) Sleep and the heart: interoceptive differences linked to poor experiential sleep quality in anxiety and depression. Biological Psychology, 127. pp. 163-172. ISSN 0301-0511

Azevedo, Ruben T, Garfinkel, Sarah N, Critchley, Hugo D and Tsakiris, Manos (2017) Cardiac afferent activity modulates the expression of racial stereotypes. Nature Communications, 8. a13854. ISSN 2041-1723

Garfinkel, Sarah N, Manassei, Miranda F, Hamilton-Fletcher, Giles, In den Bosch, Yvo, Critchley, Hugo D and Engles, Miriam (2016) Interoceptive dimensions across cardiac and respiratory axes. Philosophical Transactions B: Biological Sciences, 371 (1708). 2016.0014. ISSN 0962-8436

Garfinkel, Sarah N, Tiley, Claire, O'Keeffe, Stephanie, Harrison, Neil A, Seth, Anil K and Critchley, Hugo D (2016) Discrepancies between dimensions of interoception in autism: implications for emotion and anxiety. Biological Psychology, 114. pp. 117-126. ISSN 0301-0511