Anthropology and International Development BA

International Development

Key information

Duration:
3 years full time
Typical A-level offer:
AAB-ABB
UCAS code:
LL69
Start date:
September 2018

Anthropology gives you an in-depth understanding of cultures and societies across the world. It helps you grasp your place in the world, so you can make a difference.

Combining anthropology and international development helps you understand how development interventions affect communities across the world. You’ll also explore the impact of economic growth on social and cultural change.

“The course is fascinating, engaging and so enjoyable that I have loved my degree since the very first lecture.” Harriet HeavenAnthropology BA

Entry requirements

A-level

Typical offer

AAB-ABB

GCSEs

You should have a broad range of GCSEs (A*-C), including good grades in relevant subjects.

Other UK qualifications

Access to HE Diploma

Typical offer

Pass the Access to HE Diploma with 45 level 3 credits at Merit or above, including 24 at Distinction.

Subjects

The Access to HE Diploma should be in the humanities or social sciences.

International Baccalaureate

Typical offer

32 points overall from the full IB Diploma.

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (formerly BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma)

Typical offer

DDD

GCSEs

You should have a broad range of GCSEs (A*-C), including good grades in relevant subjects.

Scottish Highers

Typical offer

AABBB

Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced

Typical offer

Grade B and AB in two A-levels.

GCSEs

You should have a broad range of GCSEs (A*-C), including good grades in relevant subjects.

International baccalaureate

Typical offer

32 points overall from the full IB Diploma.

European baccalaureate

Typical offer

Overall result of at least 77%

Other international qualifications

Australia

Typical offer

Relevant state (Year 12) High School Certificate, and over 85% in the ATAR or UAI/TER/ENTER. Or a Queensland OP of 5 or below.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Austria

Typical offer

Reifeprüfung or Matura with an overall result of 2.2 or better for first-year entry. A result of 2.5 or better would be considered for Foundation Year entry.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Belgium

Typical offer

Certificat d'Enseignement Secondaire Supérieur (CESS) or Diploma van Hoger Secundair Onderwijs with a good overall average. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Bulgaria

Typical offer

Diploma za Sredno Obrazovanie with excellent final-year scores (normally 5.5 overall with 6 in key subjects).

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Canada

Typical offer

High School Graduation Diploma. Specific requirements vary between provinces.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

China

Typical offer

We usually do not accept Senior High School Graduation for direct entry to our undergraduate courses. However, we do consider applicants who have studied 1 or more years of Higher Education in China at a recognised degree awarding institution or who are following a recognised International Foundation Year.

If you are interested in applying for a business related course which requires an academic ability in Mathematics, you will normally also need a grade B in Mathematics from the Huikao or a score of 90 in Mathematics from the Gaokao.

Applicants who have the Senior High School Graduation may be eligible to apply to our International Foundation Year, which if you complete successfully you can progress on to a relevant undergraduate course at Sussex. You can find more information about the qualifications which are accepted by our International Study Centre at  http://isc.sussex.ac.uk/entry-requirements/international-foundation-year .

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Croatia

Typical offer

Maturatna Svjedodžba with an overall score of at least 4-5 depending on your degree choice.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Cyprus

Typical offer

Apolytirion of Lykeion with an overall average of at least 18 or 19/20 will be considered for first-year entry.

A score of 15/20 in the Apolytirion would be suitable for Foundation Year entry. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Czech Republic

Typical offer

Maturita with a good overall average.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Denmark

Typical offer

Højere Forberedelseseksamen (HF) or studentereksamen with an overall average of at least 7 on the new grading scale.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Finland

Typical offer

Finnish Ylioppilastutkinto with an overall average result in the final matriculation examinations of at least 6.0.

France

Typical offer

French Baccalauréat with an overall average result of at least 13/20.

Germany

Typical offer

German Abitur with an overall result of 2.0 or better.

Greece

Typical offer

Apolytirion with an overall average of at least 18 or 19/20 will be considered for first-year entry.

A score of 15/20 in the Apolytirion would be suitable for Foundation Year entry. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Hong Kong

Typical offer

Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education (HKDSE) with grades of 5, 4, 4 from three subjects including two electives. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Hungary

Typical offer

Erettsegi/Matura with a good average.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

India

Typical offer

Standard XII results from Central and Metro Boards with an overall average of 75-80%. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Iran

Typical offer

High School Diploma and Pre-University Certificate.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Ireland

Typical offer

Irish Leaving Certificate (Higher Level) at H1,H2,H2,H3,H3.

Israel

Typical offer

Bagrut, with at least 8/10 in at least six subjects, including one five-unit subject.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Italy

Typical offer

Italian Diploma di Maturità or Diploma Pass di Esame di Stato with a Final Diploma mark of at least 81/100.

Japan

Typical offer

Upper Secondary Leaving Certificate is suitable for entry to our Foundation Years. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Latvia

Typical offer

Atestats par Visparejo videjo Izglitibu with very good grades in state exams.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Lithuania

Typical offer

Brandos Atestatas including scores of 80-90% in at least three state examinations (other than English).

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Luxembourg

Typical offer

Diplôme de Fin d'Etudes Secondaires.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Malaysia

Typical offer

Sijil Tinggi Persekolahan Malaysia (STPM). As well as various two or three-year college or polytechnic certificates and diplomas.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Netherlands

Typical offer

Voorereidend Wetenschappelijk Onderwijs (VWO), normally with an average of at least 7.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Nigeria

Typical offer

You are expected to have one of the following:

  • Higher National Diploma
  • One year at a recognised Nigerian University
  • Professional Diploma (Part IV) from the Institute of Medical Laboratory Technology of Nigeria
  • Advanced Diploma

You must also have a score of C6 or above in WAEC/SSC English.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Norway

Typical offer

Norwegian Vitnemal Fra Den Videregaende Skole - Pass with an overall average of 4.

Pakistan

Typical offer

Bachelor (Pass) degree in arts, commerce or science.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Poland

Typical offer

Matura with three extended-level written examinations, normally scored within the 7th stanine.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Portugal

Typical offer

Diploma de Ensino Secundario normally with an overall mark of at least 16/20. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Romania

Typical offer

Diploma de Bacalaureat with an overall average of 8.5-9.5 depending on your degree choice.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Singapore

Typical offer

A-levels, as well as certain certificates and diplomas.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Slovakia

Typical offer

Maturitna Skuska or Maturita with honours, normally including scores of 1 in at least three subjects.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Slovenia

Typical offer

Secondary School Leaving Diploma or Matura with at least 23 points overall.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

South Africa

Typical offer

National Senior Certificate with very good grades. 

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Spain

Typical offer

Spanish Título de Bachillerato (LOGSE) with an overall average result of at least 8.0.

Sri Lanka

Typical offer

Sri Lankan A-levels.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Sweden

Typical offer

Fullstandigt Slutbetyg with good grades.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Switzerland

Typical offer

Federal Maturity Certificate.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Turkey

Typical offer

Devlet Lise Diplomasi or Lise Bitirme is normally only suitable for Foundation Years, but very strong applicants may be considered for first year entry. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

USA

Typical offer

We look at your full profile taking into account everything you are studying. You must have your high school graduation diploma and we will be interested in your Grade 12 GPA. However, we will also want to see evidence of the external tests you have taken. Each application is looked at individually, but you should normally have one or two of the following:

  • APs (where we would expect at least three subject with 4/5 in each)
  • SAT Reasoning Tests (normally with a combined score of 1300) or ACT grades
  • and/or SAT Subject Tests (where generally we expect you to have scores of 600 or higher). 

We would normally require APs or SAT Subject Tests in areas relevant to your chosen degree course.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

My country is not listed

If your qualifications aren’t listed or you have a question about entry requirements, email ug.enquiries@sussex.ac.uk.

English language requirements

IELTS (Academic)

6.5 overall, including at least 6.0 in each component

IELTS scores are valid for two years from the test date. Your score must be valid when you begin your Sussex course. You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test.

If you are applying for degree-level study we can consider your IELTS test from any test centre, but if you require a Confirmation of Acceptance for Studies (CAS) for an English language or pre-sessional English course (not combined with a degree) the test must be taken at a UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI)-approved IELTS test centre.

Find out more about IELTS.

Other English language requirements

Proficiency tests

Cambridge Advanced Certificate in English (CAE)

For tests taken before January 2015: Grade B or above

For tests taken after January 2015: 176 overall, including at least 169 in each skill

We would normally expect the CAE test to have been taken within two years before the start of your course.

You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Cambridge English: Advanced.

Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE)

For tests taken before January 2015: grade C or above

For tests taken after January 2015: 176 overall, including at least 169 in each skill

We would normally expect the CPE test to have been taken within two years before the start of your course.

You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Cambridge English: Proficiency.

Pearson (PTE Academic)

62 overall, including at least 56 in all four skills.

PTE (Academic) scores are valid for two years from the test date. Your score must be valid when you begin your Sussex course. You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Pearson (PTE Academic).

TOEFL (iBT)

88 overall, including at least 20 in Listening, 19 in Reading, 21 in Speaking, 23 in Writing.

TOEFL (iBT) scores are valid for two years from the test date. Your score must be valid when you begin your Sussex course. You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about TOEFL (iBT).

The TOEFL Institution Code for the University of Sussex is 9166.

English language qualifications

AS/A-level (GCE)

Grade C or above in English Language.

Hong Kong Advanced Level Examination (HKALE)/ AS or A Level: grade C or above in Use of English

French Baccalaureat

A score of 12 or above in English.

GCE O-level

Grade C or above in English.

Brunei/Cambridge GCE O-level in English: grades 1-6.

Singapore/Cambridge GCE O-level in English: grades 1-6.

GCSE or IGCSE

Grade C or above in English as a First Language.

Grade B or above in English as a Second Language

German Abitur

A score of 12 or above in English.

Ghana Senior Secondary School Certificate

If awarded before 1993: grades 1-6 in English language.

If awarded between 1993 and 2005: grades A-D in English language.

Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education (HKDSE)

 Level 4, including at least 3 in each component in English Language.

Indian School Certificate (Standard XII)

The Indian School Certificate is accepted at the grades below when awarded by the following examination boards:

Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) – English Core only: 70%

Council for Indian School Certificate Examinations (CISCE) - English: 70% 

International Baccalaureate Diploma (IB)

English A or English B at grade 5 or above.

Malaysian Certificate of Education (SPM) 119/GCE O-level

If taken before the end of 2008: grades 1-5 in English Language.

If taken from 2009 onwards: grade C or above in English Language.

The qualification must be jointly awarded by the University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES).

West African Senior School Certificate

Grades 1-6 in English language when awarded by the West African Examinations Council (WAEC) or the National Examinations Council (NECO).

Country exceptions

Select to see the list of exempt English-speaking countries

If you are a national of one of the countries below, or if you have recently completed a qualification equivalent to a UK Bachelors degree or higher in one of these countries, you will normally meet our English requirements. Note that qualifications obtained by distance learning or awarded by studying outside these countries cannot be accepted for English language purposes.

You will normally be expected to have completed the qualification within two years before starting your course at Sussex. If the qualification was obtained earlier than this we would expect you to be able to demonstrate that you have maintained a good level of English, for example by living in an English-speaking country or working in an occupation that required you to use English regularly and to a high level.

Please note that this list is determined by the UK’s Home Office, not by the University of Sussex.

List of exempt countries

  • Antigua and Barbuda
  • Australia
  • Bahamas
  • Barbados
  • Belize
  • Canada**
  • Dominica
  • Grenada
  • Guyana
  • Ireland
  • Jamaica
  • New Zealand
  • St Kitts and Nevis
  • St Lucia
  • St Vincent and the Grenadines
  • Trinidad and Tobago
  • United Kingdom
  • USA

** Canada: you must be a national of Canada; other nationals not on this list who have a degree from a Canadian institution will not normally be exempt from needing to provide evidence of English.

Admissions information for applicants

Transfers into Year 2

Yes. Find out more about transferring into Year 2 of this course. We don’t accept transfers into the third or final year.

If your qualifications aren’t listed or you have a question about entry requirements, email ug.enquiries@sussex.ac.uk.

Why choose this course?

  • Ranked 1st in the world for Development Studies (QS World University Rankings by Subject 2017).
  • Ranked 6th in the UK for Anthropology (The Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).
  • Learn from experts who influence debate on topics such as gender, migration, economic and political processes, religion, health and reproduction.

Course information

How will I study?

You are introduced to the unique ways through which anthropologists understand humans, and how we make sense of diverse social and cultural practices. You learn about the theory, methodology and applications of anthropology, as well as issues emerging from the study of exchange and kinship. 

In International Development, you gain an interdisciplinary overview of development practices and processes. You learn about colonialism, policy, key thinkers and current issues in development, and development actors from international organisations to local NGOs.

Modules

These are the modules running in the academic year 2017. Modules running in 2018 may be subject to change.

Core modules


Customise your course

Our courses are designed to broaden your horizons and give you the skills and experience necessary to have the sort of career that has an impact.

Gain programming skills and apply them to areas such as digital media, business and interactive design. Find out about our Year in Computing

How will I study?

There is training in the research methods, techniques and skills that are used by anthropologists and development researchers in the field.

You learn about key areas in anthropology, such as the anthropology of politics, religion and ritual, and culture and representation. Studying abroad is also an option.

You explore the contemporary development debates in more depth and examine the social and economic dimensions of development.

Modules

These are the modules running in the academic year 2017. Modules running in 2018 may be subject to change.

Core modules

Options


Customise your course

Our courses are designed to broaden your horizons and give you the skills and experience necessary to have the sort of career that has an impact.

Gain programming skills and apply them to areas such as digital media, business and interactive design. Find out about our Year in Computing

Study abroad (optional)

Apply to study abroad – you’ll develop an international perspective and gain an edge when it comes to your career. Find out where your course could take you.

“America is a great place for road tripping! I’m experiencing what it’s like to go to college here and I’ve learnt how other people view life.” James AckroydAnthropology BA, studied abroad at Arizona State University, US

Placement (optional)

A placement is a great way to network and gain practical skills. When you leave Sussex, you’ll benefit from having the experience employers are looking for. Find out more about placements and internships.

How will I study?

You build on the knowledge you acquired in Years 1 and 2 to understand more advanced topics. You’ll learn from leading international scholars, and can study topics including:

  • the anthropology of South Asia, Africa or Latin America
  • performance, environment, medicine and the body
  • human rights, development and advanced theory.

In International Development, you deepen your understanding of development in practice. You can explore a range of development issues and the real-world concerns faced by development professionals.

Modules

These are the modules running in the academic year 2017. Modules running in 2018 may be subject to change.

Options

“I’ve written for the Guardian on how boys and men are being left out of the conversation on gender equality.” Professor Andrea CornwallProfessor of Anthropology and International Development

Fees

Fees are not yet set for entry in the academic year 2018. Note that your fees, once they’re set, may be subject to an increase on an annual basis.

The UK Government has confirmed that if you’re an EU student applying for entry in September 2018, you'll pay the same fee rate as UK students for the duration of your course, even if the UK leaves the EU before the end of your course. You'll also continue to have access to student loans and grants. Find out more on the UK Government website.

Find out about typical living costs for studying at Sussex

Scholarships

Details of our scholarships are not yet set for entry in the academic year 2018.

Careers

Graduate destinations

100% of Department of Anthropology and Department of International Development graduates were in work or further study six months after graduating (HESA EPI)

Recent graduates from the Department of Anthropology and Department of International Development have taken up a variety of jobs, including:

  • young refugees adviser, British Red Cross
  • events co-ordinator, Médecins San Frontières
  • senior programme assistant, UN Human Rights Council.

(Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey 2015 and Department of Anthropology careers database)

Your future career

Our Anthropology and International Development BA gives you the skills to go on to research and further study, as well as work in:

  • development and environment
  • charity and voluntary sector
  • politics and the Civil Service.

Sussex students also have opportunities to attend specialist careers talks, drop-in sessions and workshops with industry representatives and potential employers. Recent events have included ‘Career Options in Global Studies’ and the chance to find out about placements and graduate programmes with the Department of Work and Pensions.

Working while you study

Our Careers and Employability Centre can help you find part-time work while you study. Find out more about career development and part-time work

Engaging with the UN, NGOs and the private sector provides a lens through which you can view career possibilities.”Luke Heslop
Anthropology and International Development BA 

Colonialism and After

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

This module is an introduction to a range of key historical problems and conceptual questions relating to the colonial and postcolonial experiences. Focusing on the characteristics of capitalism, imperialism, and modernity, the module examines the making of the modern world. It provides an introduction to European expansion, the slave economy, the development of wage labour, industrial growth, imperialism, creation of the modern state, genocide, the idea of development, anticolonialism, and the creation of the `third world'.

Global Development Paradigms, Policy and Politics

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

This module offers an introduction to key ideas and actors in international development. It begins by considering what the term 'development' means, exploring a range of different interpretations and the different kinds of practices that are associated with the idea of development. It goes on to look at trends in development thinking, and from there to identify a series of ideas and actors who have been influential in shaping international development thinking, policy and practice. By looking at the kinds of ideas about development associated with different kinds of actors, and at debates about aid, development and social change, the module will give you an overview of the field of international development and put in place some of the foundations for subsequent development modules.

Key Concepts in Anthropology

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

This module provides an overview of the big questions that anthropologists have contributed to and the different theoretical paradigms and concepts that they have developed or adopted. The aim is to provide you with a rapid overview of the discipline. It begins with two weeks examining the concepts of Society and Culture and their varied conceptualisations, followed by weeks that take in turn the key characteristics and assumptions of

  • British structural functionalism
  • methodological individualism and agency
  • French structuralism
  • British structuralism
  • marxism, ideology and hegemony
  • poststructuralism
  • discourse and power/knowledge
  • poststructuralism
  • 'practice' and phenomenology.

The Anthropological Imagination

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

We aim to convey a sense of anthropology as an exciting, 'living' subject, alive to the concerns of different communities and populations living across the globe. You'll also experience it as cutting edge in terms of the research conducted by anthropologists at Sussex, as we actively engage with issues of social, cultural and global transformation.

The module structure revolves around five core themes considered central to the subject. These capture anthropological thinking about culture, identity and representation:

  • kinship, self and body
  • economy as culture
  • religion
  • politics
  • work on the global-local interface.

Global Development Challenges and Innovation

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

The aim of the module is to provide you with an overview of international development using key topics to explore the different theoretical and conceptual perspectives that underpin understandings of development. The module is not a comprehensive review of all development-related issues but instead focuses on a smaller set of issues in development, covering amongst other matters, topics of poverty, international trade, growth, population, environment, aid and debt.

Key Thinkers in Development

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

This module provides an introduction to some of the most important thinkers in international development. It provides a broad historical overview of the evolution of development thinking by starting with key debates initiated in the 18th and 19th centuries and moving to contemporary thinkers from diverse geographical regions. Each week, you will read an original text from the key thinker discussed, as well as an additional supporting/critical text. Above all else the module aims to provide you with a broad understanding of different approaches to development thinking, why they arose and their current applicability in the age of globalisation.

The Anthropology of Exchange, Money and Markets

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

This module introduces you to how anthropologists conceptualise, research, and generate new understandings of the human activities that comprise economic life.

Studying economic life from an anthropological view requires us to rethink concepts such as work and leisure, poverty and wealth, gifts and commodities, money and markets, and the term 'economy' itself. Therefore, economic anthropology enables us to critique some of the universalisms of mainstream economics through which capitalism has become naturalised.

Traditionally, economic anthropology has been concerned with systems of exchange, non-industrial economies, and livelihood systems. In addition to covering these topics, we will examine issues of contemporary concern such as:

  • class, money, debt and shopping
  • factories, fair trade, globalisation and bioeconomies
  • new strategies and practices of resistance.

Worlds and Selves

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

Economic Perspectives on Development

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

This module introduces you to how economics can be used to understand contemporary international development issues. You will obtain a basic understanding of tools that economics uses to analyse and evaluate development questions. The emphasis is on analysing a topic and the nature of the problem, and policy responses, from both an economic and critical perspective. The module begins with a non-technical introduction to economics and then covers a set of topics, such as determinants of economic growth and the connection between growth, inequality and poverty, trade and trade policy, poverty reduction policies, the roles of corruption, legal and political institutions in economic development, agriculture, land and credit markets, the determinants and consequences of violent conflict and environment and development.

Ethnographic Research Methods

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

In this module, you are introduced to practical, theoretical and ethical issues surrounding ethnographic research in anthropology, and the social sciences more generally.

You explore methodological concerns around research design and implementation - through a series of workshops on epistemology, methodology, and ethics.

You are introduced to a range of qualitative research methods, including the research interview, participant-observation, and various participatory research methods. You also get an introduction to the analysis of qualitative data, and key issues of writing and representation.

For this module, you are assessed on a group research project. In this project, you design and conduct an independent piece of ethnographic research around a key anthropological theme, while reflecting on and applying the theoretical and practical insights gained through the module.

Religion and Ritual

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

This module is concerned with the explanation of religious and ritual phenomena.

It explores the key theoretical issues by examining ethnographic material that deals with - among other things - initiation, myth, witchcraft, symbolism and religious experience.

There is also some treatment of more 'secular' rituals such as carnival and Christmas.

The focus is as much on how people believe as on what they believe; on why they perform rituals as much as what these rituals look like.

It explores both classic texts and more recent accounts, to give students a sense of where particular arguments have come from and where they are going.

Social Change, Culture and Development

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

This module starts from the observation that development is more than economic change and involves important social and cultural aspects. It begins with an interrogation of the way development practices and ideas are embedded in cultural contexts, and specifically how the development industry is historically and culturally entangled in Western conceptions of progress, rationality, and the individual. Against a view of culture as 'tradition' and an impediment to development we will examine different cultural conceptions of progress. This involves both alternate visions of future development as well as the negative impacts that development policies and interventions have on local people, communities and cultures. Questions of power and cultural relativism inevitably arise: what happens when different interests and commitments collide, and who or what determines the module development interventions take?

Politics and Power

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

You explore forms of power by drawing on political anthropology and social theory.

In Western societies the term 'politics' tends to imply a narrow range of activities and institutions, typically those focused around parties, government and the state.We use the term 'political' in a much wider sense, and link it to the operations of power.

Power is not a thing, but an aspect of a vast range of relationships from the most local to the global.

There can be no neat boundaries around this field of study. Instead our intention is to explore the way the analysis of power has widened and deepened over the last fifty years, and to suggest continuity with economic and cultural processes that you are studying in other modules.

Research Skills for Development

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

This module is an introduction to the research methods, techniques and skills used in development research and provides a foundation for the International Development thesis in the third year. The module is taught through workshops during which you focus on practical issues to do with research skills, as well as consider some of the more abstract issues that inform how we do research. The module encourages you to think about research ethics and the linkages between project design and methods of data collection.

During the module team work is emphasised, and many of the workshops involve hands-on group work.

Cities and Urban Lives

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

In this module, you are introduced to literature and debates in the fields of urban anthropology and anthropology of the city.

You explore historical processes of urbanization, focusing on the spatial, cultural, political and social characteristics of the modern cities, as well
as looking at the experiences of everyday urban life in cities across the world.

You undertake a comparative analysis of the diversity of urban forms and experiences based on specific case studies, to engage with theories ascribing universal characteristics to modern urban society and culture.

Topics covered in this module include:

  • Urban Anthropology and Anthropology of the City: methodological and epistemological challenges
  • From Nomadism to Modern City: the long march of urbanization
  • Pre-modern cities: spiritual economies and cosmopolitan spaces
  • The Colonial and the Colonised City: the spatialization of hierarchies
  • Capitalism, (de)industrialization and the modern city: urban economies
  • Modern Urban Cultures: from street corner society to urban gangs
  • Modern Urban Politics: revolutions, revolts and protests
  • Globalisation, neo-liberalism and the city: the (re)making of class privilege and exclusion
  • Post-modern cityscapes: skyscrapers, shopping malls and slums
  • Materialities of urban life-worlds: crowds, traffic, leisure, etc.

Culture and Representation

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

In this module, you focus on the anthropological master trope of 'culture' and on the political dimensions of representing culture or 'cultures'.

You consider how anthropological understandings of 'culture', as well as anthropologists' modes of analysing and representing it in anthropological work, developed over the 20th century, partially in conversation with other disciplines.

You also examine how 'culture' operates as a key idea in the public domain, used by politicians, community and human rights activists, artists, scientists, museum curators and others, in relation to a wide range of issues and debates when distinctions between 'ourselves' and 'others' are at stake.

Finally, you look at some activities within the cultural domain (such as music, dance, theatre, verbal artistry), which have a performative dimension. You consider how anthropologists have approached these activities to address questions about structure and agency, embodiment, experience, art and aesthetics, creativity, power and protest.

Development and the State

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

This module is concerned with the role of the state in development. It considers this subject matter theoretically (that is by exploring debates in state theory, and on the relationship between the state and development), empirically (by investigating a range of historical and contemporary state forms, and the impacts of these state forms on processes of development) and normatively (by posing questions about what the nature and role of the state should ideally be).

The module examines the main theoretical approaches to the state and historical state forms and their attendant development experiences, in the North and in the post-colonial South. Finally, the module moves to Development since the 1980s, exploring the impacts of state failure, neo-liberalism, democratisation and global governance on state forms and patterns of development.

Environmental Perspectives on Development

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

The module explores development with an explicit focus on environmental issues. You will look at the relationships between development and the environment: the consequences of development on the environment, environmental constraints to development, and problems of development in marginal environments. You will examine how the environment and issues around sustainability have been considered (or ignored) in relation to development and how this has changed over time. The module includes historical perspectives on environment and development, illustrating continuities and changes in policies related to environment and development. It also explores core issues around environmental management and development in relation to key resources, such as wildlife, forests and water.

Ethnographic Field Research

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

Gender and Development: Theory, Concepts and Issues

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

This module considers development processes in the light of how they are shaped by and impact upon gender discourses and relations. The module introduces you to key concepts in the analysis of social relations between women and men in different cultural, economic and political contexts. This includes examining the nature of gender inequality and of the household as a social construct, and reviewing concepts of power and empowerment. While concerned with providing a theoretical and conceptual grounding by reviewing debates on the household and the gender division of labour, the module is organised around substantive and policy topics related to poverty, labour markets, women’s employment, migration, and globalisation.

Health, Poverty and Inequality

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

This second year interdisciplinary module is concerned with issues of culture, power and knowledge in the study of health and development. It draws on perspectives from medical anthropology, medical sociology, public health, cultural psychology, feminist and activist politics and development studies to focus on the relationship between poverty, social marginality and illness in a variety of historical and contemporary contexts. Apart from a focus on emerging infectious diseases such as HIV and Aids, we also consider the implications of homelessness, mental health and organ donation for individual health and well-being. The scrutiny of health planning and policies, such as in the domain of maternal and child health, as well as the impact of an increasing intervention of medical technologies in healthcare delivery, are further important aspects of the module.

International Education and Development

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

This module aims to give you a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the role of education in social development and transformation in the Global South. To achieve this, the module more broadly aims to support you in gaining a theoretical knowledge of key educational theories and policies that they can then critically apply to different educational contexts at the level of country, region, school and groups of learners.

The module begins by discussion of the institutional architecture of Education For All, its economic indicators, the different agencies involved in the global governance and delivery of education and the impact of increasing privatisation of schools and services. Analysis of the way in which different forms of social exclusion interact with educational access, transition, classroom processes and outcomes supports a closer examination of the educational experiences of children with disabilities, school drop outs and girls. These experiences include alternative approaches found within informal schooling, involving critique of formal education systems.

Theories informing curriculum construction, pedagogy and assessment are discussed, and directly linked to issues around national identity and language and further explored at the micro level of teaching, learning and assessment and related back to issues around school inclusion. The roles of the teacher and teacher education, seen as central to any discussions around ‘quality education’, are explored in relation to teacher and educational governance. The module also critically examines the multiple ways in which education and conflict intersect and relate to each other, and the role of education and teachers in supporting processes of reconciliation and reconstruction in post-conflict contexts.

Race, Ethnicity and Nationalism

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

This module introduces you to various themes and conceptual issues in the study of culture, ethnicity and nationalism from a range of disciplinary perspectives. 

There are three sections, which provide you with an understanding of the interaction between power and cultural meanings, particularly as they relate to the construction of boundaries and the creation of difference between social groups. After considering key concepts such as race, culture, ethnicity and nationalism, emphasis is placed on ethnic and religious mobilisation.

We consider the extent to which similar and different processes are at work in South Africa, the Caribbean, and the Indian sub-continent. These cases are included to give you a contextualised understanding of the complex historical and cultural dimensions of modern political struggles.

Visual Anthropology

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

In this module, you become familiar with theories and applications of visual anthropology.

You have the opportunity to study complex legacies of visual representation in anthropology as well as contemporary, activist visual work. You explore cross-overs between anthropological and other relevant visual epistemologies in the social sciences.

You also undertake visual research projects.

Anthropology of Fertility, Reproduction and Health

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

Anthropology of Fertility, Reproduction and Health

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

The module uses social and cultural perspectives to examine academic and policy work in the area of reproduction, sexuality and health. It draws on the insights of medical anthropology, especially in relation to the body, gender and power, to critically reflect on reproduction, sexuality and health issues across the global North and South. A particular concern is with the existence and experience of sexual and reproductive inequalities in diverse social and cultural settings. Contrary to popular belief, reproduction is a process which is as much about men as it is about women, and is studied in the context of, for example, male fertility/infertility, masculinity, fatherhood and male sexual health. The module builds upon the theoretical perspectives introduced in the second year on kinship, procreation, social reproduction, sexuality, personhood, reproductive technologies, human rights and applied anthropology.

Anthropology of Migration

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

In this module, you engage closely with the anthropology of migration.

You cover topics such as:

  • migration, development and modernity
  • transnationalism and diaspora
  • belonging and home
  • multiculturalism and cultural identity
  • refugees and asylum seekers
  • borderlands and the state.

And through these topics, you explore the ways in which anthropologists have critically engaged with debates surrounding migration - from early work on the South African Copperbelt, to contemporary work which interrogates the nature and politics of mobility and immobility.

Anthropology of Migration

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

In this module, you engage closely with the anthropology of migration.

You cover topics such as:

  • migration, development and modernity
  • transnationalism and diaspora
  • belonging and home
  • multiculturalism and cultural identity
  • refugees and asylum seekers
  • borderlands and the state.

And through these topics, you explore the ways in which anthropologists have critically engaged with debates surrounding migration - from early work on the South African Copperbelt, to contemporary work which interrogates the nature and politics of mobility and immobility.

Anthropology of the Body

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

This module explores the body from an anthropological perspective and considers how different societies and cultures conceptualise and experience the human body. In recent years, anthropologists and other academics have become increasingly interested in the body, including authors such as Foucault and Bourdieu. Some draw upon Merleau-Ponty's phenomenological approach with its emphasis on the senses, while others attempted to resolve the tensions between experience and agency. The module asks how the body represents a challenge for anthropological research, and explores recent ethnographic contributions to this field. We consider the body as a site on which social and cultural processes are inscribed, where power relations converge and are articulated and as a site where agency is performed. Materials are drawn from both non-Western and Western societies.

This module will be assessed by a 5,000-word essay.

Contemporary Issues in the Global Political Economy

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

The central theme running through this module is how the architecture of existing capitalism has to be adjusted or brought into balance with the needs of expanding markets. We begin by looking at attempts by global governance institutions like the WTO (World Trade Organisation) to create a largely deregulated world market. We then examine how financial systems are expanding and how the stock market has become a key institution of modern capitalism. We discuss then the changing nature of multinational corporations and the state as they reorient themselves towards a global market. We examine empirically the post-Cold War expansion of capitalism into Eastern Europe, Central Asia and the Middle East. Finally, we analyse the most recent developments in world affairs from a political economy perspective, looking at the increasing military bias of foreign policy of major capitalist states, as well as at the changing nature of anti-capitalist protest in the wake of 9/11.

Contemporary Issues in the Global Political Economy

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

The central theme running through this module is how the architecture of existing capitalism has to be adjusted or brought into balance with the needs of expanding markets. We begin by looking at attempts by global governance institutions like the WTO (World Trade Organisation) to create a largely deregulated world market. We then examine how financial systems are expanding and how the stock market has become a key institution of modern capitalism. We discuss then the changing nature of multinational corporations and the state as they reorient themselves towards a global market. We examine empirically the post-Cold War expansion of capitalism into Eastern Europe, Central Asia and the Middle East. Finally, we analyse the most recent developments in world affairs from a political economy perspective, looking at the increasing military bias of foreign policy of major capitalist states, as well as at the changing nature of anti-capitalist protest in the wake of 9/11.

Cultures of Colonialism

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

Current Themes in the Anthropology of Latin America

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

In this module, you develop a framework for understanding current social, cultural and political issues in Latin American.

Throughout the module, you engage with anthropological understandings of a number of key ideas including:

  • indigeneity
  • race
  • gender
  • colonialism
  • nation states
  • the environment.

Each week is centred on ethnographic pieces that offer interesting reflections on contemporary issues as well as anthropological theory.

You begin with a basic history of the continent that sets up some of the key issues that underpin the current cultural and social diversity of the region.

This includes both the dichotomy between the European 'conquerors' and indigenous groups, as well as the introduction of African slaves and notable distinctions based around urban and rural living, and nation states and their peripheries.

In doing this, the emphasis is on including both European-based understandings of events and ideas - but also local, alternative understandings of the world, particularly in the form of Amazonian cosmology and ideas of perspectivism.

This cultural and historical knowledge then gives you the foundations from which to look at key contemporary issues including:

  • race and identity
  • rural to urban migration
  • cities, slums and current attempts to 'pacify' and control them
  • music and festivals
  • the Latin American diaspora and the creation of transnational cultures and communities.

Throughout the course, the heterogeneity of Latin America is emphasised, while you explore some basic ideas and theoretical approaches to the continent and its people. This allows you to find a topic or idea that interests you and that can form the core of your own 5,000 word essay.

Development Tools and Skills

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

The aim of the module is to introduce you to a range of key tools, approaches and skills used in the development world to identify, design and evaluate development interventions. The module will take a 'hands-on' approach and will allow you to develop skills that are useful not only in development but also in many other types of work in the public policy, private and voluntary sectors.

In addition to the specific skills and tools covered in this module – such as project management, problem analysis, stakeholder analysis, risk analysis, cost-benefit analysis and logical frameworks – you will also gain experience of working in teams, of presenting clear and convincing arguments, and in advocacy and negotiating.

The module is based around a series of three-hour workshops, and you will work together in groups throughout the term to apply a variety of tools and skills to different development scenarios and then reflect critically on their strengths and weakness. 

Learning outcomes:

  1. To demonstrate knowledge of a range of key tools and approaches used in development organisations to identify, design and evaluate development programmes
  2. To gain practical experience of using and applying these tools and approaches
  3. To critically evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of these tools and approaches
  4. To develop interpersonal skills of working in teams, in presenting clear and convincing arguments, and in advocacy and negotiating."

Development Work Experience

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

This module is designed to allow students to gain practical work experience in an area of relevance to their degree course, as well as carrying out a supervised project that builds on knowledge, experience and practical skills learned in the first two years of the degree.

It takes the form of a period of work experience, of a minimum of six weeks duration, to be undertaken during the summer vacation between the second and third years of the degree, with supervised assessment completed during term one of the third year.

Students on this module will be given access to a range of work experience providers but will also be expected to be proactive in developing their own work experience provider.

Registration on the module, which will take place at the same time as other third year module choices, does not guarantee that work experience will be secured, and in any instances where this is not achieved, students can transfer to an alternative year three module. The work experience element of the module is not paid, although students will have opportunities to apply for bursaries within the school.

Disasters, Environment and Development

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

In this module, you look at the connections between disasters, the environment and development. 

The negative impacts of environmental and climatic change and environmentally-related disasters threaten to roll back decades of development gains. Building resilient and sustainable societies means addressing climate and disaster risks, understanding the links between these issues and integrating these risks, as well as potential opportunities, into development planning and budgeting. 

The module is split into three parts:

  • concepts, exploring similarities and differences in concepts and frameworks and terminology used in these different areas
  • problems, looking at issues of droughts, floods and food security, complex disasters, environmental migration, trapped populations and resource wars
  • solutions, examining the possible avenues that may help address these problems, including remittance bonds, serious games, blended knowledge and science for humanitarian emergencies and resilience.

Environment, Ecology and Development

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

This module examines the impact of social and economic transformations, trade and technological development on people, environment and ecology in the tropics. The analysis includes a historical perspective, present-day impacts and future scenarios. Topics include problems of water and energy supply and their health and environmental consequences; indigenous environmental knowledge; intellectual property rights and biotechnology; local and national perspectives on wildlife, ecotourism and environmental protection.

Environmental Anthropology

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

In this module, you consider the cross-cultural study of relations between people and their environment.

Like the focus of many environmental movements, much recent work in ecological anthropology has been crisis-driven.

Whilst covering this literature, the focus of this module will be broader, taking a wider perspective, including the context in which the research itself is being done. Current work on the human dimensions of deforestation, or global climate change, for example, can be informed and strengthened by an understanding of the century-old intellectual lineage of the underlying issues.

Therefore, in this module you cover the evolution of environmental anthropology, using ethnographic exemplars that relate to contemporary environmental issues, whilst at the same time probing debates such as:

  • the Nature-Culture trap, and beyond
  • Ecology and Social Organisation
  • the Politics of Natural Resources and the Environment (including environmental anthropological contributions to mining, resource conflict etc.)
  • knowing (and the limits to knowing) and researching the environment.

Ethnographies of Aid

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

This module considers the 'ethnographic turn' in development studies, which brings ethnographic perspectives to bear on aid, people and practices. These include particular methodological approaches such as participant observation in aid organisations and 'expert' communities, attention to themes such as beliefs and moralities in aid, role of the body in development work, as well as material culture and the importance of time, place and mobility. Among many other materials, this will also entail using resources such as films, aid worker blogs, memoirs, and 'development blockbusters'.

Some examples of weekly topics includes:

  • Aid stories: memoirs, fiction and blogs
  • The 'ethnographic turn' in development studies
  • Inside organisations and projects
  • Beliefs, values and morality
  • The body in development
  • Time, place and mobility
  • Material cultures of aid
  • Aid as work.

Gender and (Global) Politics: Subjects Practices and Institutions

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

Geographies of Violence and Conflict

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

In this module, you study how geographers have thought about, studied, and explained, violence and conflict.

You study whether violence and conflict are considered an exceptional situation or a 'normal' aspect of societal change.

You look at: 

  • the scale of conflict, from domestic violence to international war
  • how violence and conflict affect people (and groups of people)
  • the differences between diverse forms of violence. 

Landscape, Nature and Representation

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

Marxism and International Relations

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

This module enables you to engage systematically with the Marxist tradition of theorising about international relations.

You gain an introduction to Marx’s thought, using selections from primary texts. Then, you examine how later Marxist writers have applied and developed these ideas across a range of themes in international studies, including:

  • imperialism
  • the Cold War
  • international political economy and globalisation theory.

Mercenaries, Gangs and Terrorists: Private Security in International Politics

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

The module looks at the nature of security in international politics from the non-traditional perspective of private actors who are willing to use force to advance the objectives that (for better or worse) they place a high value on. The first section of the module provides a theoretical context that will enable you to develop your ideas about: what 'security' is and how it relates to other values; why sovereign states are often treated as the starting-point for the study of global security; the ways in which the private use of force can be conceptualised as both a problem and a solution to security dilemmas; and the ways in which actors in the global South face security challenges that are often unique from the challenges of those in the North.

In the second section of the module, you will have the opportunity to study particular actors, issues and cases, including private military companies, gangs, political insurgency movements and transnational terrorist groups. you will be challenged to think through the assumption that the private use of force automatically constitutes a threat that needs to be dealt with by sovereign actors, particularly at the international level. By the end of the module, you will demonstrate your theoretical and empirical understanding of the nature and significance of private security in international politics through a case-based research essay.

The assessment for this module is a piece of coursework (weighted 10%) and a long term paper of 6000 words (weighted 90%). The teaching mode is a one-hour lecture and a two-hour seminar each week.

Religions in Global Politics

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

During this module you will explore the implications of the 'return' of religions, both for world politics and for thinking about international relations.

Many sociologists and philosophers have interpreted this return as 'the end of modernity' or the 'de-secularisation of the world'. You will primarily focus on the renewed centrality of religious identities as strategic frames of reference for politics in the post-Cold War world.

Against the background of the growing multicultural nature of contemporary international society resulting from what Hedley Bull has aptly termed the 'revolt against the West', the module will encourage you to:

  • consider the implicit and predominant reading of religion in international relations as the ultimate threat to international order and stability (especially in the forms of the identity politics of the 'new wars' and the terrorist attacks of religious fundamentalists)
  • engage critically with Huntington's thesis of the 'clash of civilisations'
  • discuss the implications of this 'return' for the future of foreign policy and the normative structure and world order of contemporary international society.

Sex and Death in Global Politics

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

The Anthropology of Africa

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

In this module, you are introduced to contemporary anthropological approaches in culture and society in Africa.

The guiding thread of the module is an exploration of the relationship between macro and micro levels of analysis in understanding of African society, through a selection of thematic lenses such as:

  • economy
  • politics
  • religion
  • health
  • gender
  • conflict
  • power.

The assessment for this module is a 5,000-word essay.

The Political Economy of Latin American Development

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

The Politics of International Trade

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

This module aims to equip you with an understanding of the modern international trading system and the theoretical traditions and political practices that have helped to shape it. The first section examines the core theories around trade and trade liberalisation, particularly those of liberalism, economic nationalism and neo-Marxism, in order to explore different understandings of the relationship between free trade, protectionism, and development.

The second section of the module examines the evolution of a liberal trade regime in the world economy from its collapse in the interwar period to its resurrection and extension in the form of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) in 1947 and the World Trade Organisation (WTO) in 1995. Core elements of, and controversies within, the global trade system will be scrutinised and situated within this historical context. These will include the recurring threat and changing forms of protectionism, the increasing fragmentation of the trade system engendered by regional trade agreements, the role of emerging powers, and the differential impact of the trade system on developed and developing countries. This survey will establish the empirical and theoretical resources to move in the third section towards an assessment of the deadlocked WTO Doha Round and the ongoing negotiations of a Transatlantic Free-Trade Agreement (TAFTA).

The aim of this section is to understand the main actors and areas of contention and to assess the potential for a more equitable and ethical trading system.

The module is taught through a weekly three-hour seminar that normally consists of a combination of `mini-lectures' and seminar discussions on the week's topics. The assessment for this module is a research exercise (weighted 10%) and a long term paper of 6000 words (weighted 90%).

The Reign of Rights in Global Politics

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

Proponents and opponents alike would today concur that human rights are becoming the world's secular religion (Eli Wiesel). This course systematically interrogates the rise of human rights to such prominence. Early on, the module examines the history and evolution of rights within the history of western liberalism and introduces the prominent ways of defining and understanding human rights. It then explores new theorisations of rights as practices of governing and forms of subjectification in global politics. Moreover, the course discusses well-known critiques of the universality of human rights and their Western-centric conception of the human.

Following these initial sessions, the module analyses the challenges that rights present to state sovereignty and examines the violent global politics associated with human rights, such as the emergence of human rights wars (Beck) and the more recent, often racist, trade-off between rights and security within the ensemble of practices we call the 'war on terror'.

Finally, the course reflects on the link between human rights and power: how might we make sense of the apparent tension between human rights as essential to both the sustenance of hegemony and to the politics of resistance? Moreover, it investigates the use of rights in our practices of resistance, analysing how rights delegitimise other paths of action whilst inciting rights-holders as appropriate political subjectivities (Foucault). It discusses the expansion of human rights into emergent areas such as women's rights, indigenous rights, economic rights etc (you will be able to select specific cases for further research and presentation to suit your particular interests) and explores the ways in which human rights talk becomes the hegemonic register in which to articulate and legitimate dissent and social/political action. The module concludes by discussing problems of human rights advocacy by NGOs and poses the philosophical and practical question of who can speak on behalf of sub-altern others (Alcoff).

The assessment for this module is a research plan due in week 7 (weighted 10%) and a long term paper of 6,000 words (weighted 90%). The teaching method is a three-hour seminar, though this includes a 50-minute talk by the convenor each week.

Anthropology Thesis

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn & Spring Teaching, Year 3

During your final year you are required to undertake an individual project based on original research, which culimates in a ten thousand word dissertation. Whilst some of you may wish to conduct fieldwork for your dissertation (which we anticipate would be done during the spring / summer of Y2), others may choose to work on secondary sources. In order to prepare for this work, you will have been given methodological training in the module 'Ethnographic Methods' (TB1, Y2). By the end of TB1, Y2, you will be allocated a supervisor, who will help them prepare for their research, and supervise their project as they write it up over a course of regular meetings during Y3.

International Development Thesis

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn & Spring Teaching, Year 3

The International Development Undergraduate Thesis provides you with an opportunity to integrate what they have learnt in the module of your studies into a single, sustained piece of writing that will explore a topic in depth. The module will involve the design, planning and execution of the thesis, with the support of a supervisor, and may include the collection of empirical data or the use of secondary source material. You choose your own topics, and develop your own approaches to investigating the topic, drawing on earlier skills-based modules and on interests developed through the module of the degree programme.

Anthropology of Islam and Muslim Societies

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

The module introduces you to anthropological debates concerning Islam and Muslim societies. Focusing on the complex and diverse experiences of being Muslim in different ethnographic contexts, it explores intersections between religious practice - Islamic knowledge, authority, prayer, ritual and piety and political, economic, social and cultural processes. On the basis of ethnographic studies, the module questions whether 'Islam' can be considered as a unified experiential and analytical category, and how anthropologists have participated in the production of Islam as a specific field of study. The module considers actual instances or expressions of religiosity and how these are the ground of everyday contestations and, at times, conflict between different sects and groups.

Capitalism and Geopolitics

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

Conflict, Violence and Peace: Critical perspectives

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

In recent years, there has been increased focus on conflict, violence and peace-building in the media, popular literature and aid programmes raising important questions about how these processes are understood and represented and what implications this has for the local and international response and in turn the transformation of conflict and violence. This module will offer critical perspectives on mainstream approaches to the study of conflict, violence and peace drawing on both anthropology and development studies.

Decolonial Movements

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

Development and Geopolitics in East Asia: in-depth Analysis

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

The aim of this module is to understand the rise of East Asia through examining the interconnections between regional development and geopolitical contestation in the Cold War and contemporary eras. The module will adopt a historical approach, beginning with an examination of the legacies of European and Japanese imperialism in East Asia and an analysis of the establishment of post-war US hegemony in the region and its implications for subsequent economic development. The module examines the divergent experiences of Northeast and Southeast Asia and the rise of China. We then examine the implications of the decline of Cold War geopolitical rivalry and the rise of globalisation and its role in explaining subsequent trends such as the East Asian financial crisis, East Asian regionalism and the changing nature of US-China relations. Within this historical context varying analytical frameworks and debates concerning late development will be examined, such as neoclassical versus structural institutionalism, Marxist vs. dependency theories, international/regional vs. domestic factors etc. Such theories are examined critically both in terms of their analytical purchase and their origins and role in geopolitical rivalry itself.

The assessment for this module is a long term paper of 7000 words. The teaching method is a three-hour seminar each week.

Development, Business and Corporate Social Responsibility

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

This module explores the role of business in development and the rise of the corporate social responsibility (CSR) movement. In recent years, the private sector, and transnational corporations (TNCs) in particular, have become increasingly important players in the development process. The business and development movement has emerged as part of the dramatic rise of CSR over the past decade - providing a new vision for the role of business in society as 'corporate citizen'. Development institutions, such as DFID and the UN, as well as global NGOs, have become increasingly interested in mobilising business, not only as donors, but as partners in development. At the same time, ethical trading initiatives, the fairtrade movement and pro-poor enterprise models offer opportunities, in different ways, for harnessing the power of the market in the service of development. This module will explore a number of key questions concerning the role of business in development and the rise of the CSR movement, from the perspective of both its proponents and opponents.

Development, Business and Corporate Social Responsibility

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

This module explores the role of business in development and the rise of the corporate social responsibility (CSR) movement.

In recent years, the private sector – transnational corporations (TNCs) in particular – have become increasingly important players in the development process. The business and development movement has emerged as part of the dramatic rise of CSR over the past decade – providing a new vision for the role of business in society as 'corporate citizen'. Development institutions (such as DFID and the UN, as well as global NGOs) have become increasingly interested in mobilising businesses, not only as donors, but as partners in development. At the same time, ethical trading initiatives, the fairtrade movement and pro-poor enterprise models offer different opportunities for harnessing the power of the market in the service of development.

We will explore a number of key questions concerning the role of business in development and the rise of the CSR movement, from the perspective of both its proponents and opponents.

Global Food Security

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

Achieving food security for 10 billion people while reducing the environmental footprint of agriculture is a major challenge of the next century.

In this module, we will discuss papers on the multiple dimensions of this challenge, including the biophysical, economic, nutritional, socio-political, and institutional.

We will take a global perspective on the issues, drawing upon both global-scale research as well as case studies from different regions of the world to understand the geography of agricultural production, its environmental footprint, and of malnutrition.

Key topics include:

  • global change and sustainable agriculture
  • what is food security?
  • globalisation: the economics, finance and trade of food
  • impact of climate change: mitigation and adaptation potential of agriculture
  • farm management: soil-water-fertilizers
  • livestock
  • emerging issues in food security: biofuels, GMOs, labels, diets, urban agriculture, organic agriculture, permaculture.

Global Resistance: Subjects and Practices: in-depth Analysis

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

In this module, you explore the 'global movement' of opposition to neoliberalism, capitalism and imperialism.

You learn about the global summit protests of the early 21st Century, the Zapatista movement in Mexico, international trade unionism and the most recent anti-austerity protests in Europe.

You look at:

  • the history of global resistance
  • the main concepts and theories used to make sense of resistance – including Marxist, post-structuralist, decolonial, feminist and anarchist approaches
  • political groups who have been hailed as responsible for revolutionary movements, for example the anti-globalisation movement
  • the politics of resistance
  • campaigns against multinational corporations. 

Human Rights

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

This module focuses less on human rights rules and laws than on the assumptions of human rights, the historical context and issues around their operation and implementation. It draws from a new and growing literature on the sociology and anthropology of human rights which seeks to move beyond the assumptions of legal positivism (rights as being 'read off' from lists of human rights covenants) in order to develop the legal realist argument which focuses upon the living law of the operation of courts, the police, and the everyday understandings which citizens give to notions such as truth, justice, and morality.


 

Human Rights

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

This module focuses less on human rights rules and laws, and more on the assumptions of human rights, and the historical context and issues around their operation and implementation.

It draws from a new and growing literature on the sociology and anthropology of human rights that seeks to move beyond the assumptions of legal positivism (rights as being 'read off' from lists of human rights covenants) in order to develop the 'legal realist' argument. This argument focuses upon the living law of the operation of courts, the police, and the everyday understandings that citizens give to notions such as truth, justice, and morality.

Race, Ethnicity and Identity

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

This module focuses on theories of race, ethnicity and identity. You will apply diverse approaches to race, ethnicitiy and identity to historical and contemporary ethnographic contexts.

As well as examining the ways in which racial and ethnic identities have been constructed across time and space, we interrogate these constructions with specific reference to:

  • the development of anthropology
  • slavery and colonialism
  • scientific racism
  • postcolonial political regimes
  • postcolonial feminism
  • conflict and genocide
  • identity-based mass violence
  • diaspora, transnationalism and the Black Atlantic
  • contemporary understandings of race and racism in its myriad forms
  • multicultural lives and hybridity.

You are assessed by a 7,000-word dissertation.

Race, Ethnicity and Identity

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

This module focuses on theories of race, ethnicity and identity. It applies diverse theoretical approaches to race, ethnicity and identity to historical and contemporary ethnographic contexts. As well as examining the way in which racial and ethnic identities have been constructed across time and space, the module interrogates these constructions with specific reference to:

  • the development of anthropology
  • slavery and colonialism
  • scientific racism
  • postcolonial political regimes
  • postcolonial feminism
  • conflict and genocide
  • identity-based mass violence
  • diaspora, transnationalism and the Black Atlantic
  • contemporary understandings of race and racism in its myriad forms
  • and multicultural lives and hybridity.

Rural Livelihoods in the Global South

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

This module considers the varied nature of rural livelihood systems in developing countries.

You consider changes in livelihoods through livelihood diversification and migration, and the interconnectedness of the global and the local in causing change in rural societies. You also explore the impact of different agents of change on livelihoods. This will include:

  • the role of non-governmental organisations
  • the impact of modern biotechnology
  • the effects of trade on livelihoods, amongst other important examples.

The module draws primarily (though by no means exclusively) on evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa and India.

Rural Livelihoods in the Global South

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

This module considers the varied nature of rural livelihood systems in developing countries. 

You consider changes in livelihoods through livelihood diversification and migration, and the interconnectedness of the global and the local in causing change in rural societies. You also explore the impact of different agents of change on livelihoods. This will include: 

  • the role of non-governmental organisations
  • the impact of modern biotechnology
  • the effects of trade on livelihoods, amongst other important examples.

The module draws primarily (though by no means exclusively) on evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa and India.

Russia and the Former Soviet Union in Global Politics

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

This module explores the international politics of post-Soviet Russia and the former Soviet space. After a period of relative decline in the 1990s, Russia has more recently been described as 'rising Great Power' and developments in the CIS have returned to the news - from 'gas wars' to the conflict between Russia and Georgia, from the 'democratic revolutions' in Ukraine, Georgia and Kyrgyzstan to the apparent erosion of democracy in Russia and talk of a "new Cold War" between Russia and the West. 

These are developments with implications for Western Europe and beyond, touching on traditional and new security issues alike, and shedding light on the implications of Western democracy promotion and the role of norms and identity in contemporary global politics. 

The module will investigate the background for and current development of international relations in the region - in particular Russia's status as great power, the 'colour revolutions' in Ukraine and Georgia and the 2008 war between Georgia and Russia, NATO and the US in the former Soviet space, the question of Europe's 'energy security' and its relations with Russia, and what has been called the 'new Great Game' between Russia, China and the US in Central Asia. In doing this, it will introduce relevant theoretical concepts related to foreign policy analysis and constructivist explanations of the role of norms and identity in the international politics of Russia and the FSU.

The Anthropology of Europe

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

Anthropology is generally thought to be the study of non-European societies, but actually has a long and significant history of research on societies within Europe. This module examines this European tradition, focusing particularly on how anthropologists have tried to understand the sociocultural transformations of Europe since World War II. The guiding theme is an exploration of the relationship between macro and micro levels of analysis in our understanding of European society: what are the relationships between Europe and its constituent regions, nation states, communities? How do broader trends within European society and politics impact upon the everyday life of Europeans today?

The Anthropology of Food

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

The Politics of Terror

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

The United States in the World

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

As the 21st century begins, the United States is still the world's only superpower: no other nation possesses comparable military and economic power or has interests that reach the entire globe. To understand the place and power of the US in the contemporary world, it is vital to understand how its geopolitical strategies function, militarily and economically. Yet because US power is also secured through cultural and discursive strategies, it is equally important to analyse how US cultural/discursive products and processes participate in the construction of the US in all the varied ways it imagines itself. The aim of this module is to analyse how US cultural/discursive strategies participate in imagining the US in the world, either by being embedded within traditional geopolitical strategies or by sitting alongside them. Rather than taking an historical approach, the module is organised around specific theoretical and cultural/discursive themes and practices.

These include:

  • Architectural theory and the building of embassies abroad
  • Design theory and designing the nation through everyday objects
  • Film theory and screening the nation through popular film
  • Remediation theory and virtually remediating the nation
  • Entertainmentality theory and exhibiting the nation in museums
  • Performance/performativity theory and re-enacting the nation though historical re-enactments as well as song
  • Advertising theory and advertising the nation to US citizens

Along the way, significant foreign and domestic policy debates from Cold War politics to the 'War on Terror' to the US domestic 'War on Illegal Immigration' will be considered through political, cultural and discursive theories (eg Said's notion of orientalism, Foucault's notion of governmentality, Butler's notion of performativity and Ranciere's notion of the birth of the nation).

Understanding Contemporary India

  • 30 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

This module introduces you to some key contemporary debates in the study of South Asian societies, with a focus on India.

Starting with an interrogation of anthropological representations of South Asia, the module will explore debates about caste and hierarchy, leading to a discussion of everyday experiences of caste and its changing meaning and importance in contemporary India. It will question why bonded labour, patronage, inequality and poverty are so persistent in one of the world’s fastest growing regions. It will explore how neoliberal policies and ideologies are reshaping South Asian subjectivity and society.

The module will then turn to the politics of identity as shaped by class, caste and religious affiliations. It will explore the rise of the middle classes and its links with consumption, urban restructuring and the new enterprise culture, as well as its implications for growing inequalities of class and wealth. It will look into religious and communal identity formation and conflict, and will explore the nature of popular religion in South Asia. Finally, the module will look at the role of the state and politics in the making of contemporary South Asia. The state will be considered as a key actor in the shaping of neoliberal policies and ideologies, as a terrain of patronage and politics, and as the deliverer of new social welfare policies.

This module will be assessed by a 7,000-word dissertation.

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