Chemistry MChem

Chemistry

Key information

Duration:
4 years full time
Typical A-level offer:
AAA-AAB
UCAS code:
F103
Start date:
September 2018

Study for a Royal Society of Chemistry-accredited degree in one of the top-ranked chemistry departments in the UK and learn skills that have real-world impact.

At Sussex, you work and study at the forefront of chemistry and are taught by leading researchers and industry experts in drug discovery and renewable energy research.

Your integrated Masters year means you develop advanced research skills through working with one of the departmental research groups.

This has been a fantastic opportunity to really get to grips with the reality of being a research scientist.”Aidan Ashton-Griffiths
Chemistry MChem 

MChem or BSc?

We also offer this course with an industrial placement year, with summer research placements, or as a three-year BScFind out about the benefits of an integrated Masters year.

Entry requirements

A-level

Typical offer

AAA-AAB

Subjects

A-levels must include Chemistry, at least grade B. You will also normally need to pass the separate science practical assessment in Chemistry. If you are not able to take the science practical assessment, applications will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

GCSEs

You will also need GCSE (or equivalent) English, Mathematics and two Science subjects with grade B in each (or in the new grading scale grade 6 in Mathematics and grade 5 in English and two sciences).

Other UK qualifications

International Baccalaureate

Typical offer

34 points overall from the full IB Diploma.

Subjects

Higher Levels must include Chemistry, with a grade of 6.

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (formerly BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma)

Typical offer

DDD

Subjects

You will need an A-level in Chemistry, grade B, in addition to the BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma.

 

GCSEs

You will also need GCSE (or equivalent) English, Mathematics and two Science subjects with grade B in each (or in the new grading scale grade 6 in Mathematics and grade 5 in English and two sciences).

Scottish Highers

Typical offer

AAABB

Subjects

Highers must include Chemistry, normally grade A. Ideally, you will also have an Advanced Higher in Chemistry (grade B). 

GCSEs

You will also need Mathematics and Chemistry at Standard Grade, grade 1 or 2.

Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced

Typical offer

Grade B and AA in two A-levels.

Subjects

A-levels must include Chemistry.

GCSEs

You will also need GCSE (or equivalent) English, Mathematics and two Science subjects with grade B in each (or in the new grading scale grade 6 in Mathematics and grade 5 in English and two sciences).

International baccalaureate

Typical offer

34 points overall from the full IB Diploma.

Subjects

Higher Levels must include Chemistry, with a grade of 6.

European baccalaureate

Typical offer

Overall result of 80%

Additional requirements

Evidence of existing academic ability in Chemistry is essential (normally with a final grade of at least 8.0).

Other international qualifications

Australia

Typical offer

Relevant state (Year 12) High School Certificate, and over 85% in the ATAR or UAI/TER/ENTER. Or a Queensland OP of 5 or below.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Chemistry is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Austria

Typical offer

Reifeprüfung or Matura with an overall result of 2.2 or better for first-year entry. A result of 2.5 or better would be considered for Foundation Year entry.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Chemistry is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Belgium

Typical offer

Certificat d'Enseignement Secondaire Supérieur (CESS) or Diploma van Hoger Secundair Onderwijs with a good overall average. 

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Chemistry is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Bulgaria

Typical offer

Diploma za Sredno Obrazovanie with excellent final-year scores (normally 5.5 overall with 6 in key subjects).

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Chemistry is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Canada

Typical offer

High School Graduation Diploma. Specific requirements vary between provinces.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Chemistry is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

China

Typical offer

We usually do not accept Senior High School Graduation for direct entry to our undergraduate courses. However, we do consider applicants who have studied 1 or more years of Higher Education in China at a recognised degree awarding institution or who are following a recognised International Foundation Year.

If you are interested in applying for a course which requires an academic ability in Mathematics, such as a Business related course, you will normally also need a grade B in Mathematics from the Huikao or a score of 90 in Mathematics from the Gaokao.

Applicants who have the Senior High School Graduation may be eligible to apply to our International Foundation Year, which if you complete successfully you can progress on to a relevant undergraduate course at Sussex. You can find more information about the qualifications which are accepted by our International Study Centre at  http://isc.sussex.ac.uk/entry-requirements/international-foundation-year .

 

 

 

 

 

 

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Chemistry is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Croatia

Typical offer

Maturatna Svjedodžba with an overall score of at least 4-5 depending on your degree choice.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Chemistry is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Cyprus

Typical offer

Apolytirion of Lykeion with an overall average of at least 18 or 19/20 will be considered for first-year entry.

A score of 15/20 in the Apolytirion would be suitable for Foundation Year entry. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Chemistry is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Czech Republic

Typical offer

Maturita with a good overall average.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Chemistry is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Denmark

Typical offer

Højere Forberedelseseksamen (HF) or studentereksamen with an overall average of at least 7 on the new grading scale.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Chemistry is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Finland

Typical offer

Finnish Ylioppilastutkinto with an overall average result in the final matriculation examinations of at least 6.5.

Additional requirements

Evidence of existing academic ability in Chemistry is essential.

France

Typical offer

French Baccalauréat with an overall final result of at least 14/20.

Additional requirements

You will need to be taking the science strand within the French Baccalauréat with a good result (13/20) in Chemistry.

Germany

Typical offer

German Abitur with an overall result of 1.8 or better.

Additional requirements

You will need a very good final result in Chemistry (at least 12/15).

Greece

Typical offer

Apolytirion with an overall average of at least 18 or 19/20 will be considered for first-year entry.

A score of 15/20 in the Apolytirion would be suitable for Foundation Year entry. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Chemistry is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Hong Kong

Typical offer

Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education (HKDSE) with grades of 5, 4, 4 from three subjects including two electives. 

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Chemistry is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Hungary

Typical offer

Erettsegi/Matura with a good average.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Chemistry is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

India

Typical offer

Standard XII results from Central and Metro Boards with an overall average of 75-80%. 

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Chemistry is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Iran

Typical offer

High School Diploma and Pre-University Certificate.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Chemistry is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Ireland

Typical offer

Irish Leaving Certificate (Higher Level) at H1,H1,H2,H2,H3.

Additional requirements

Highers will need to include Chemistry, normally grade H1.

You must also have at least grade O5 in Mathematics and English.

Israel

Typical offer

Bagrut, with at least 8/10 in at least six subjects, including one five-unit subject.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Chemistry is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Italy

Typical offer

Italian Diploma di Maturità or Diploma Pass di Esame di Stato with a Final Diploma mark of at least 85/100.

Additional requirements

Evidence of existing academic ability in Chemistry is essential.

Japan

Typical offer

Upper Secondary Leaving Certificate is suitable for entry to our Foundation Years. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Chemistry is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Latvia

Typical offer

Atestats par Visparejo videjo Izglitibu with very good grades in state exams.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Chemistry is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Lithuania

Typical offer

Brandos Atestatas including scores of 80-90% in at least three state examinations (other than English).

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Chemistry is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Luxembourg

Typical offer

Diplôme de Fin d'Etudes Secondaires.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Chemistry is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Malaysia

Typical offer

Sijil Tinggi Persekolahan Malaysia (STPM). As well as various two or three-year college or polytechnic certificates and diplomas.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Chemistry is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Netherlands

Typical offer

Voorereidend Wetenschappelijk Onderwijs (VWO), normally with an average of at least 7.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Chemistry is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Nigeria

Typical offer

You are expected to have one of the following:

  • Higher National Diploma
  • One year at a recognised Nigerian University
  • Professional Diploma (Part IV) from the Institute of Medical Laboratory Technology of Nigeria
  • Advanced Diploma

You must also have a score of C6 or above in WAEC/SSC English.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Chemistry is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Norway

Typical offer

Norwegian Vitnemal Fra Den Videregaende Skole - Pass with an overall average of at least 4.5.

Additional requirements

Evidence of existing academic ability in Chemistry is essential.

Pakistan

Typical offer

Bachelor (Pass) degree in arts, commerce or science.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Chemistry is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Poland

Typical offer

Matura with three extended-level written examinations, normally scored within the 7th stanine.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Chemistry is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Portugal

Typical offer

Diploma de Ensino Secundario normally with an overall mark of at least 16/20. 

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Chemistry is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Romania

Typical offer

Diploma de Bacalaureat with an overall average of 8.5-9.5 depending on your degree choice.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Chemistry is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Singapore

Typical offer

A-levels, as well as certain certificates and diplomas.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Chemistry is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Slovakia

Typical offer

Maturitna Skuska or Maturita with honours, normally including scores of 1 in at least three subjects.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Chemistry is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Slovenia

Typical offer

Secondary School Leaving Diploma or Matura with at least 23 points overall.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Chemistry is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

South Africa

Typical offer

National Senior Certificate with very good grades. 

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Chemistry is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Spain

Typical offer

Spanish Título de Bachillerato (LOGSE) with an overall average result of at least 8.0.

Additional requirements

Evidence of existing academic ability in Chemistry is essential.

Sri Lanka

Typical offer

Sri Lankan A-levels.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Chemistry is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Sweden

Typical offer

Fullstandigt Slutbetyg with good grades.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Chemistry is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Switzerland

Typical offer

Federal Maturity Certificate.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Chemistry is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

Turkey

Typical offer

Devlet Lise Diplomasi or Lise Bitirme is normally only suitable for Foundation Years, but very strong applicants may be considered for first year entry. Find out more about Foundation Years.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Chemistry is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

USA

Typical offer

We look at your full profile taking into account everything you are studying. You must have your high school graduation diploma and we will be interested in your Grade 12 GPA. However, we will also want to see evidence of the external tests you have taken. Each application is looked at individually, but you should normally have one or two of the following:

  • APs (where we would expect at least three subject with 4/5 in each)
  • SAT Reasoning Tests (normally with a combined score of 1300) or ACT grades
  • and/or SAT Subject Tests (where generally we expect you to have scores of 600 or higher). 

We would normally require APs or SAT Subject Tests in areas relevant to your chosen degree course.

Subject-specific knowledge

Evidence of existing academic ability in Chemistry is essential.

Please note

Our entry requirements are guidelines and we assess all applications on a case-by-case basis.

My country is not listed

If your qualifications aren’t listed or you have a question about entry requirements, email ug.enquiries@sussex.ac.uk.

English language requirements

IELTS (Academic)

6.5 overall, including at least 6.0 in each component

IELTS scores are valid for two years from the test date. Your score must be valid when you begin your Sussex course. You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test.

If you are applying for degree-level study we can consider your IELTS test from any test centre, but if you require a Confirmation of Acceptance for Studies (CAS) for an English language or pre-sessional English course (not combined with a degree) the test must be taken at a UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI)-approved IELTS test centre.

Find out more about IELTS.

Other English language requirements

Proficiency tests

Cambridge Advanced Certificate in English (CAE)

For tests taken before January 2015: Grade B or above

For tests taken after January 2015: 176 overall, including at least 169 in each skill

We would normally expect the CAE test to have been taken within two years before the start of your course.

You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Cambridge English: Advanced.

Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE)

For tests taken before January 2015: grade C or above

For tests taken after January 2015: 176 overall, including at least 169 in each skill

We would normally expect the CPE test to have been taken within two years before the start of your course.

You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Cambridge English: Proficiency.

Pearson (PTE Academic)

62 overall, including at least 56 in all four skills.

PTE (Academic) scores are valid for two years from the test date. Your score must be valid when you begin your Sussex course. You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about Pearson (PTE Academic).

TOEFL (iBT)

88 overall, including at least 20 in Listening, 19 in Reading, 21 in Speaking, 23 in Writing.

TOEFL (iBT) scores are valid for two years from the test date. Your score must be valid when you begin your Sussex course. You cannot combine scores from more than one sitting of the test. Find out more about TOEFL (iBT).

The TOEFL Institution Code for the University of Sussex is 9166.

English language qualifications

AS/A-level (GCE)

Grade C or above in English Language.

Hong Kong Advanced Level Examination (HKALE)/ AS or A Level: grade C or above in Use of English

French Baccalaureat

A score of 12 or above in English.

GCE O-level

Grade C or above in English.

Brunei/Cambridge GCE O-level in English: grades 1-6.

Singapore/Cambridge GCE O-level in English: grades 1-6.

GCSE or IGCSE

Grade C or above in English as a First Language.

Grade B or above in English as a Second Language

German Abitur

A score of 12 or above in English.

Ghana Senior Secondary School Certificate

If awarded before 1993: grades 1-6 in English language.

If awarded between 1993 and 2005: grades A-D in English language.

Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education (HKDSE)

 Level 4, including at least 3 in each component in English Language.

Indian School Certificate (Standard XII)

The Indian School Certificate is accepted at the grades below when awarded by the following examination boards:

Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) – English Core only: 70%

Council for Indian School Certificate Examinations (CISCE) - English: 70% 

International Baccalaureate Diploma (IB)

English A or English B at grade 5 or above.

Malaysian Certificate of Education (SPM) 119/GCE O-level

If taken before the end of 2008: grades 1-5 in English Language.

If taken from 2009 onwards: grade C or above in English Language.

The qualification must be jointly awarded by the University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES).

West African Senior School Certificate

Grades 1-6 in English language when awarded by the West African Examinations Council (WAEC) or the National Examinations Council (NECO).

Country exceptions

Select to see the list of exempt English-speaking countries

If you are a national of one of the countries below, or if you have recently completed a qualification equivalent to a UK Bachelors degree or higher in one of these countries, you will normally meet our English requirements. Note that qualifications obtained by distance learning or awarded by studying outside these countries cannot be accepted for English language purposes.

You will normally be expected to have completed the qualification within two years before starting your course at Sussex. If the qualification was obtained earlier than this we would expect you to be able to demonstrate that you have maintained a good level of English, for example by living in an English-speaking country or working in an occupation that required you to use English regularly and to a high level.

Please note that this list is determined by the UK’s Home Office, not by the University of Sussex.

List of exempt countries

  • Antigua and Barbuda
  • Australia
  • Bahamas
  • Barbados
  • Belize
  • Canada**
  • Dominica
  • Grenada
  • Guyana
  • Ireland
  • Jamaica
  • New Zealand
  • St Kitts and Nevis
  • St Lucia
  • St Vincent and the Grenadines
  • Trinidad and Tobago
  • United Kingdom
  • USA

** Canada: you must be a national of Canada; other nationals not on this list who have a degree from a Canadian institution will not normally be exempt from needing to provide evidence of English.

Admissions information for applicants

Transfers into Year 2

Yes. Find out more about transferring into Year 2 of this course. We don’t accept transfers into the third or final year.

If your qualifications aren’t listed or you have a question about entry requirements, email ug.enquiries@sussex.ac.uk.

Why choose this course?

  • 1st for Chemistry in the UK (The Guardian University Guide 2017).
  • 1st in the UK for graduate prospects (The Guardian University Guide 2017).
  • 96% for overall satisfaction (National Student Survey 2016).

Course information

How will I study?

You learn through lectures, practical classes, seminars, student-directed learning and tutorials, supported by digital resources.

You develop core laboratory skills at the beginning of your studies, and apply these during your research projects. You explore:

  • the fundamentals of atomic structure
  • chemical bonding
  • reactivity.

Assessment is by unseen exams and coursework, which may include laboratory reports, presentations, essays and problem sets. 

Modules

These are the modules running in the academic year 2016. Modules running in 2018 may be subject to change.

Core modules


Customise your course

Our courses are designed to broaden your horizons and give you the skills and experience necessary to have the sort of career that has an impact.

Gain programming skills and apply them to areas such as digital media, business and interactive design. Find out about our Year in Computing

How will I study?

You cover topics such as:

  • quantum theory
  • spectroscopy
  • organometallic and co-ordination chemistry
  • organic reactions
  • synthetic strategies.

Modules

These are the modules running in the academic year 2016. Modules running in 2018 may be subject to change.

Core modules


Customise your course

Our courses are designed to broaden your horizons and give you the skills and experience necessary to have the sort of career that has an impact.

Gain programming skills and apply them to areas such as digital media, business and interactive design. Find out about our Year in Computing

Study abroad (optional)

Apply to study abroad – you’ll develop an international perspective and gain an edge when it comes to your career. Find out where your course could take you.

Industrial placement year (optional)

You can apply to spend up to one year away from the University on an industrial placement, normally either in the UK or Europe.

During this year you take three distance-learning modules, supported by regular contact with a designated tutor.

Recent Life Sciences students have gone on placements at:

  • Sealed Air
  • Oroboros Instruments
  • Pfizer.

Find out more about placements and internships.

My colleagues have helped me work out what I want to do for a job, deciding that I want to work in a research environment similar to where I did my placement.”Ben Fry
Chemistry (with an industrial placement year) MChem
AkzoNobel

How will I study?

You start to specialise and choose options on topics such as lasers and synthetic methods.

Requisite projects allow you to develop and apply your own ideas, along with an analytical investigation.

You select options to prepare you for your work in Year 4.

Modules

These are the modules running in the academic year 2016. Modules running in 2018 may be subject to change.

Core modules

Options

How will I study?

In this year you work towards your integrated Masters degree.

This is chemistry at the cutting edge. A large part of this year is focused on your independent research project, taken in one of the Department’s research groups.

In addition, advanced modules cover in-depth techniques and concepts at the forefront of modern chemistry.

Modules

These are the modules running in the academic year 2016. Modules running in 2018 may be subject to change.

Core modules

Options

 

Research in my area of chemistry is exciting because we are using surface science techniques to understand the formation of molecules in space.”Professor Wendy Brown
Senior Lecturer and Professor of Physical Chemistry

Fees

Fees are not yet set for entry in the academic year 2018. Note that your fees, once they’re set, may be subject to an increase on an annual basis.

The UK Government has confirmed that, if you’re an EU student applying for entry in the academic year 2018, you'll remain eligible for financial support. This applies even if your course ends after the UK’s exit from the EU. Find out more on the UK Government website.

Find out about typical living costs for studying at Sussex

Scholarships

Details of our scholarships are not yet set for entry in the academic year 2018.

Careers

Graduate destinations

Recent graduates now work as:

  • research and development scientist, Anglo Carbon
  • executive officer, Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA)
  • chemist, Bio-Productions.

(Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey 2015)

Your future career

Transferable skills such as time management, communication and analytical skills are embedded in the modules throughout your course. Many of our graduates go on to PhD study and research careers in organic, inorganic, physical or computational chemistry. You can also pursue careers in a range of fields such as:

  • medicinal chemistry
  • drug discovery and chemical industries
  • management consultancy and marketing. 

Working while you study

Our Careers and Employability Centre can help you find part-time work while you study. Find out more about career development and part-time work

Without education in a science discipline, I wouldn’t have had the opportunity to progress into a development role.”Katie Porter
Analytical Scientist, Mylan Global Respiratory Group 

Functional Group Chemistry

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

The aim of the module is to describe and introduce the chemistry of the carbonyl functional moiety, which is found in an extremely diverse range of molecules that are important in the chemical industry.

In this module, you examine in detail the chemistry of the carbonyl functional group, allowing the chemical behavior of more complex molecules to be understood and predicted.

You also study the synthesis, chemical reactivity and electronic structure of alkenes and aromatic compounds.

Introduction to Materials

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

One of the main justifications for investment in chemistry over the last century has been the development of new materials. The very rapid growth in polymers, glasses, ceramics and alloys has fuelled growth in every area of technology, and materials science has emerged as a separate discipline over the last 50 years.

The aim of this module is to provide an introduction to materials in terms of their atomic, molecular and electronic structures and how these influence bulk properties.

About half of the module focuses on solid materials in general. This concentrates on the three principal types of bonding for perfect solids and their effect on mechanical and electrical properties. You discuss the effects of imperfections, with special reference to defects and alloys.

The other half of the module focuses specifically on organic materials, particularly polymers, which are by far the largest volume products of the chemical industry. The usefulness of the science is emphasised by reference to contemporary materials, including nanoscience.

Introduction to Organic Chemistry

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

The aim of the module is to introduce you to organic chemistry and develop the ground-work needed for further study.

This includes the structures of organic molecules, bonding and an introduction to chemical transformations

Maths and Data Analysis for Chemists

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

This module aims to ensure that your mathematical knowledge is brought to a standard whereby you will be able to apply it, with confidence, to scientific problems encountered in subsequent modules. The module will also introduce you to the concepts of accuracy and precision. Problem-solving abilities will be obtained, and the art of translating a scientific problem into a well-structured mathematical one. Youwill be confident with the maths, and be able to see its relevance in the context of the chemistry, and develop an appreciation for the sources of and propagation of experimental errors.

Molecular Symmetry

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

In this module, you develop a firm physical foundation for future applications of the more mathematical aspects of chemistry, and explore the important role that visualization and computer simulation play in understanding, interpreting and predicting experimental observation.

As part of the module, you undertake an in-depth exploration of molecular symmetry and its quantitative application to bonding and spectroscopy.

You are also introduced to the role of Molecular Computer Graphics in structural biology and biochemistry.

Reaction Energetics and Kinetics

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

This module provides an overview of understanding the energetic drive of phase transition and chemical reactions.

You gain valuable insight into why the transformation is energetically favorable and what is the equilibrium point of reactions. Quantitative analysis of correlation between elementary reaction and reaction order, as well as the correlation between the activation energy and rate constant will be established. A successful student will also be able to predict the reaction direction and reaction rate.

Reactivity of the Elements

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 1

This module, Chemical and Electrochemical Reactivity of the Elements, provides an overview of the chemistry of all of the elements and interprets the observed chemical behaviour at both the microscopic level, in terms of fundamental atomic properties, and the macroscopic level, in terms of thermodynamics and electrochemistry.

For each element, the trends in molecular, solution phase and solid state behaviour is given, together with archetypal reactions.

Structure, Bonding and the Periodic Table

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 1

In this module, you look at origins of the elements and you are introduced to a series of models used to describe bonding in simple molecules.

You use basic mathematical equations and experimental techniques to develop your understanding of the structure and bonding that occurs at a molecular level and you are introduced to a range of basic spectroscopic techniques and the theory that underpins them.

You then go on to discuss the periodic trends in the physical and chemical properties of elements, and the structures of the extended inorganic solids formed from them.

Applications of Organic and Bioinorganic Chemistry

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

The aim of this module is to give you an overview of medicinal chemistry and metal ions in biochemistry.

You learn about the basic principles of medicinal chemistry, from the shape of biomolecules and target complexes, to the development of new drugs - exploring two case studies.

You also explore the importance of metal ions in biological systems, the transport of metals and the biosynthesis of metal binding sites - looking at a few metal-containing proteins and enzymes in detail.

Atmospheres and Interfaces

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

In this module, you are introduced to concepts and principles in atmospheric chemistry and surface science.

Many properties of atmospheres are governed by mass transport and chemical cycles that are readily understood by application of fundamental physical and chemical principles.

As well as key physical laws governing atmospheric behaviour, you explore homogeneous reactions that give rise to important atmospheric constituents and the role of aerosols in heterogenous reactions.

In the second part of the module, you focus on a more detailed view of the structures and properties of surfaces. And you develop a fundamental understanding of heterogeneous catalysis and modern nanochemistry.

Bonding and Spectroscopy

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

In this module, you develop an understanding of the relationship between molecular structure and state energies - how these energies and molecular constants are determined by spectroscopic studies and through quantum mechanical calculations.

This module includes a practical component, which draws on and reinforces the lectures.

In the first part of the module, you focus on the information rich content of spectra and how molecular constants can be obtained from spectra.

In the second part, you are introduced to the postulates of quantum mechanics, and the principles underlying quantum mechanical calculations are laid out.

Co-ordination Chemistry

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

This module, Co-ordination Chemistry, provides a complete description of the non-organometallic molecular chemistry of the transition metals.

The module includes:

  • structure and bonding of coordination compounds
  • aspects of symmetry
  • inorganic reaction mechanisms
  • applications of NMR to inorganic systems
  • magnetochemistry.

Organic Reaction Mechanisms

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 2

This module aims to show the importance of organic reaction mechanisms as a foundation in understanding organic chemistry.

You discuss, the most important types of mechanisms, including relevant name reactions.

In addition, you are introduced to methods to determine organic reaction mechanisms, and the relationship of frontier orbital theory with concerted reaction mechanisms is described.

Organometallic Chemistry 1

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

This module focuses on the chemistry of organometallic compounds of the elements - that is molecular complexes containing metal-carbon bonds and/or metal-hydrogen bonds.

You will look at the principles which govern the synthesis, structure, bonding, and industrially important catalytic chemistry of this class of compounds, and the reaction mechanisms associated with the latter.

Phases, Change and Rates

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

The aim of this module is to describe more advanced applications of equilibrium thermodynamics, describing evens such as phase transitions, thermodynamics of mixing and properties of other forms of matter such as quasi-crystals and liquid crystal phases.

Combined with this is more detailed chemical kinetics in which reactions are explained in terms of simple collision theory. These ideas are then extended to more detailed collision theory models, transition state theory and the temperature dependence of rates of reactions.

Basic statistical mechanics are used to explain the link between populations of states and their thermodynamic properties.

Strategy in Organic Synthesis

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 2

This module focuses on strategy in organic synthesis and the disconnection approach.

You are required to take a different approach to your entire knowledge of synthetic chemistry accumulated hitherto. You learn novel reactions, understand the relevance of solvents and reagents, but also to modify your way of thinking about transformations so as to predict shortfalls and be able to come up with more efficient tactics.

The aim of this module is to describe the unifying principles which underline the diverse structures of natural product synthesis and the design of a total synthesis through a disconnective strategy. This includes introductioning you to the concept of retrosynthetic analysis, the synthesis of complex cycles and heterocycles, alkenes and alkynes, the formation of carbon-carbon bonds and carbon-heteroatom bonds, pericyclic reactions, radicalar reactions, aromatic chemistry.

Chemical Principles

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

In the first two years of study, Chemistry is conventionally taught in three streams, organic, inorganic and physical chemistry, with relatively few requirements on you to cross the boundaries between the sub-disciplines. This module is a broadly based, capstone module, designed for all chemistry majors, whatever their area of interest. It will demonstrate and explore the connections and synergies between various areas of core material, drawing on topics from all three years of the degree course.

Chemistry Project (Year 3)

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

This chemistry project consists of two original five-week investigations, normally in the general area of chemical synthesis and analysis.

You design your own projects in consultation with a relevant member of faculty.

In some exceptional circumstances, you may be able to do a single 10-week investigation, although greater depth will then be expected.

Instrumental Analysis

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

This module gives an overview of a variety of different analytical techniques used by chemists. You will gain valuable insight into the techniques used in industry as well as the necessary practical skills to be able to perform accurate chemical analyses.

You will also be able to differentiate between the techniques and be able to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of the various techniques in a range of different circumstances.

 

Bio-organic Chemistry

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

The aim of this module is to describe the unifying biosynthetic principles which underlay the diverse structures of natural products and to show the relevance for the primary structures of proteins to their shape and to the catalytic properties of enzymes.

You are introduced to a basic set of chemical transformations applied in the chemical synthesis of the major classes of biomolecules such as nucleic acids,
peptides and glycans.

Chemistry of the Non-Transition Elements

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

In this module, you explore selected areas of Main Group Chemistry and you're introduced to the chemistry of the lanthanide and actinide elements - in both cases highlighting differences with the chemistry of elements from the transition series.

As part of the module, you cover topics such as:

  • aspects of bonding in the p-block elements
  • NMR spectroscopy of the p-block elements
  • main group cluster species
  • introduction to lanthanides and their chemistry
  • coordination chemistry and applications of lanthanide complexes
  • actinide chemistry.

Computational Chemistry

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

The aim of the module is to provide a guide to the various levels of theory (with their associated acronyms) appearing in the rapidly expanding field of computational chemistry, with a particular emphasis on quantum chemical methods.

The module will start with the concept of a potential energy surface (stationary points, the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, etc), the types of computation normally performed, and the basic quantum mechanics of electrons and nuclei in molecules. The solution of the Schrodinger equation under different approximations will then be explored.

Introduction to Drug Design

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

Building on a solid understanding of chemical principles,you cover the fundamental knowledge required to critically analyse the structure of drug molecules and use the skills developed to design potential new, improved medicines.

The second part of the course is a practical introduction to the basic concepts of computational chemistry, molecular modelling and structure-based drug design.

Lasers in Chemistry

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

You learn the fundamental principles of lasers and their application in chemistry, chemical physics and biophysics.

Building on a basic understanding of spectroscopy, you examine both the theoretical and practical aspect of lasers and the properties of coherent light.

Differences between continuous wave and ultra-fast lasers are explored through applications to steady-time and time-resolved spectroscopy.

The importance of lasers in chemistry and related disciplines is highlighted through the analysis of results from studies in molecular dynamics and energy transfer, coherent control of chemical reactions, atmospheric chemistry and laser based microscopy techniques.

Modern Inorganic Materials

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

You explore the fundamental electronic and magnetic properties of modern materials, including cooperative magnetism, electronic structure and conductivity and the applications of these materials.

You are introduced to the correlated application of advanced physical techniques, including SQUID magnetometry, X-ray diffration, transport measurement, EPR and Mössbauer spectroscopies.

In the second part of the module, you focus on presenting examples of modern inorganic materials. This includes metal organic frameworks – coordination polymers and polynuclear coordination clusters to which the particular technique(s) can be applied and their properties with particular emphasis on:

  • absorption
  • molecular magnetism
  • catalysis
  • drug delivery
  • fluorescence.

Organometallic Chemistry 2

  • 15 credits
  • Autumn Teaching, Year 3

This module builds substantially on areas and concepts which were introduced in the second year Organometallic module.

The emphasis will be mainly descriptive rather than deeply theoretical, but some of the fundamental aspects of bonding and electronic structure will also be discussed.

Specific topics covered in the module include: organometallic compounds of the transition metals and f-elements containing -bound 5-, 6-, 7-, and 8-membered aromatic rings, the application of organometallic compounds of main group and transition metals in the polymerisation of alpha-olefins, and the activation of H-H, C-H, and N-N bonds by organometallic complexes.

Protein Form and Function

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

Protein Form and Function provides a sense of how protein structures are related to each other and of how these structures relate to protein function. On this module you will be equipped with the necessary knowledge and skills to learn about and appreciate this class of molecule. This module covers aspects of protein structure in detail and introduces computational and experimental techniques that are essential for studying proteins, and provides the basis for the in depth discussion of more topical issues such as protein engineering and design, protein folding, chaperones and protein folding diseases.

Surface Analysis Techniques

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

This module describes various techniques used to analyse surfaces in order to obtain information about surface reactions in general.

The module will explore the use of techniques to determine surface and adsorbate structure, energetics, vibrational spectra and also microscopy.

The techniques of low energy electron diffraction, surface vibrational spectroscopy (reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy), temperature programmed desorption, electronic spectroscopies (X-ray and ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy), sticking probability measurements and surface scanning probe microscopy will be described.

In all cases, examples will be given to which the particular technique(s) can be applied.

Synthetic Methods in Organic Chemistry

  • 15 credits
  • Spring Teaching, Year 3

This module aims to familiarise students with the important modern methods used in industry and academia for the synthesis of carbon-carbon bonds in organic compounds.

A mechanistic understanding of the underlying chemistry will be described for each method. Each case will be illustrated with examples taken from methods reported in the scientific literature.

By the end of the module you will be in a position to design a synthetic route to novel chemical structures, and this will be assessed by means of four problem sheets and an unseen examination.

Chemistry Advanced Project (MChem)

  • 60 credits
  • Autumn & Spring Teaching, Year 4

For this advanced project, you undertake a piece of original research in an area at the forefront of chemistry. After consultation with a member of faculty, you undertake research on a topic of your choice.

An individual project will usually involve the use of experimental/computational procedures to investigate a specific chemical/biological problem.
Experimental strategies will be designed and executed followed by data collection and analysis.
The data may be generated using a combination of computation and/or laboratory experiments.

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn & Spring Teaching, Year 4

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry is a module which explores the latest advances in Inorganic Chemistry. It combines lectures with research talks, directed and independent-reading, class discussion and critical review of the literature.

Split into four discrete sections, each part of the module commences by introducing fundamentals of the area, including advanced physical and spectroscopic techniques, and relevant conceptual models. Later lectures in each unit then discuss advanced recent developments, where controversy still exists, and encourage students to debate and critically assess the key points.

In parallel with these lectures, a series of departmental research talks ensure that students are exposed to topics at the forefront of modern Inorganic Chemistry.

Advanced Organic Chemistry

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn & Spring Teaching, Year 4

Advanced Organic Chemistry is a module which explores the latest advances in Organic Chemistry. It is based on recent advances in the subject, combining lectures with research talks, directed and independent-reading, and student presentations.

After an introduction to the module the initial lectures will deal with strategy in advanced organic synthesis and the use of new organometallic reagents and
catalysts for the formation of carbon-carbon bonds.

A discussion will follow on the mechanisms involved in key chemical transformations and workshops will provide a discussion forum for the analysis of the key transformations and their application to new areas of asymmetric synthesis.

In the final section, advanced topics in areas of Organic Chemistry, where controversy still exists, will be presented. In parallel with these lectures a series of research talks ensure that students are exposed to topics at the forefront of modern Organic Chemistry.

Advanced Physical Chemistry

  • 30 credits
  • Autumn & Spring Teaching, Year 4

Advanced Physical Chemistry is a module which explores the latest advances in Physical Chemistry. It is based on recent advances in the subject, combining lectures with research talks, directed and independent-reading, and student presentations.

The module will commence with a series of introductory material, covering the structure of the module, and expectations, together with a summary of the sources of information and their use.

The module will also take specific topics that are the subject of present day research, and examine these from various angles to highlight the controversies that still remain, and the rationale behind the directions for further research.

In parallel with these lectures a series of research talks ensure that students are exposed to topics at the forefront of Advanced Physical Chemistry.

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