Art History (2014 entry)

BA (Hons), 3 years, UCAS: V350
Typical A level offer: AAB-ABB

Subject overview

Why art history?

Art history is about how we see and have seen the world around us. Art historians explore buildings, paintings, sculptures and a variety of other types of objects including dining implements, clothing, furniture and ceramics. Looking closely at how such things were made, used and thought about, we consider how individual objects operate as works of art and we investigate the meanings objects have within their individual social contexts. 

We explore the ways in which certain works of art reflect and comment on social life, how they shape human interaction and how they offer visual pleasure. Studying the history of art provides us with vital tools not only for understanding how we communicated by visual means in the past, but also for comprehending how we communicate visually in our own time. In addition, the discipline is crucial for identifying key works of the past that require conservation and preservation in the present.

Why art history at Sussex?

Art history at Sussex is ranked in the top 10 in the UK in The Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2014, and in the top 20 in the UK in the Complete University Guide 2015 and The Guardian University Guide 2015.

Rated in the top 3 in the UK for research in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE). 100 per cent of our research was rated as recognised internationally or higher, with 70 per cent rated as internationally excellent or higher, including 45 per cent rated as world leading. 

Excellent facilities, including a comprehensive lab and student working space that is the envy of many larger institutions.

A small, friendly department with a close-knit community of students and staff.

All second-year students are encouraged to go on a supervised study trip abroad (an additional fee applies), providing opportunities to explore works of art in their original location. 

Unusually for a UK university, we cover a wide range of periods and places from Byzantium to Renaissance Italy and contemporary America. 

For more information, refer to Department of Art History: Showcase.

Course content

This single-honours degree provides a flexible and broad-ranging approach to the study of art history. It offers opportunities to develop practical skills that you will need for employment, while demanding a high level of intellectual engagement. 

In Year 1, you take core modules in art history that introduce you to the discipline. You look at a variety of objects, study various approaches to the history of art and consider art from the point of view of patrons, collectors and audiences. You work from images and also study at local sites of art.

In Year 2, you focus on key objects and moments in early modern, modern and contemporary art history. You also begin to specialise by choosing modules in special periods in art history. 

In your final year, you focus deeply in the subject, choosing from among options that look closely at art in context and art in themes. You complete two dissertations.

We continue to develop and update our modules for 2014 entry to ensure you have the best student experience. In addition to the course structure below, you may find it helpful to refer to the Modules tab.

Core content

Year 1

Modules lay the groundwork for your study and help you make informed choices in Years 2 and 3. Topics include art on site • methods and approaches in art history • objects of art • stories of art • visual cultures

Year 2 

You develop your study of methods and approaches and also study sites of art. Modules on periods in art history examine the art of an era from different critical views and perspectives. These special period options offer a range of subjects and current topics and currently include 19th-century art and society • art and society in the contemporary world • art and society in Renaissance Italy • art in 18th-century Europe • art in Late Antiquity • Dutch art of the 17th century • Surrealism to Conceptualism

The second-year trip abroad enables students to work together intensively on site in a European city (an additional fee applies)

Final year

The topic art in context allows the focus on a short period of art history, or a particular place. Options offered include subjects such as 16th-century Venice • art after 1945 • art in the time of Raphael and Michelangelo • Byzantine art 843-1204 • origins of Modernism • Paris 1904-14 • the image of slavery 

A thematic topic is also taken and leads to a dissertation and presentation. Choices currently include topics such as architecture and interiors • art and empire • art in its literary context • commemorative art • photography in context • pre-Raphaelitism • representing women

How will I learn?

Modules are taught by a mixture of lectures, seminars and workshops. In Year 1, you write essays, give presentations to the tutor and other students, keep portfolios of your work, and undertake group projects.

In Year 2, you keep a logbook during the fieldtrip abroad, recording your work with both text and illustration in preparation for writing it up once back home. In your second and final years, you write longer essays, work towards dissertations and do assessed oral presentations. All of these help to pull together your skills in using visual material, organising text, and communicating through written and oral means.

For more information, visit Studying at Sussex.

What will I achieve?

  • an understanding of the way different types of art have been made, used and discussed in a variety of historical and cultural contexts
  • experience of using different approaches, methods and theories of art in a critical fashion
  • knowledge of how institutions and structures such as museums or television series influence the production, consumption and display of works of art
  • a developed sense of the cultural diversity of things that we look at today and have looked at in the past
  • experience in communicating your ideas and arguments orally, and working effectively with others
  • an understanding of how you learn and how you can go on learning in the future.

Please note that these are the modules running in 2014.

Back to module list

Art on Site

15 credits
Spring teaching, Year 1

This module provides you with the opportunity to learn how to make in-depth studies of objects, across historical time and about particular centres of production. The spring term lectures prepare you for field work to be undertaken as part of the module. This will includes grasping the first principles of the relations that develop between artists and their patrons, the relationship between artistic production and a particular geographical site and the way that meanings can evolve in particular places.

Exhibition Studies

15 credits
Spring teaching, Year 1

This module will focus on the ways in which the objects of art history are described, displayed and made available to their audiences. You will deal with the practical elements of how to describe works of art and then go on to consider how exhibitions and displays work, considering the theoretical, methodological and practical aspects of all these topics.

Methods and Approaches to Art History I

15 credits
Autumn teaching, Year 1

Visual culture embraces a wide range of issues and meanings. This module provides an introduction to the study of visual material and the different approaches that scholars have taken in undertaking research into visual culture. Centred on a common module document, the module includes study skills workshops providing instruction on how to use visual analysis effectively, how to read primary and secondary sources critically, and how to synthesise, summarise and reference accurately. The generic skills teaching will arise from the teaching of thematic topics and will consider a range of objects and spaces from a variety of periods and cultures. The module assumes a high level of IT literacy.

Objects of Art

15 credits
Autumn teaching, Year 1

This module focuses on the objects of art history: specific paintings and works of art. Each session involves lecturers discussing a specific object within its visual, historical and art historical context.

Stories of Art I

15 credits
Autumn teaching, Year 1

This module is a 10-week lecture-based module. It aims to introduce you to a wide range of works of visual art across time and across cultures, considering many different kinds of works of art – paintings, sculptures, architecture, prints, drawings, and the so-called decorative and applied arts – and acknowledging that such objects raise a wide range of questions that can be answered in many different ways. The module is based on the principle that there are stories of art, rather than one single story of art.

Stories of Art II

15 credits
Spring teaching, Year 1

Stories of Art II is a 12-week lecture-based module. It continues from Stories of Art I in forming part of the first year teaching to provide a first experience of the study of the history of art at undergraduate level.

You will be intraduced to a wide range of works of visual art across time and across cultures. It considers many different kinds of works of art (including paintings, sculptures, architecture, prints, drawings and the so-called decorative and applied arts) and acknowledges that such objects raise a wide range of questions that can be answered in many different ways. The module is based on the principle that there are multiple stories, rather than one single story, of art.

Art and the City

15 credits
Spring teaching, Year 2

Sites of Art follows on from Stories of Art. The module is concerned with the physical and social contexts for the production and consumption of works of visual art and is built around two geographical case studies, the city of Rome and our local region of Brighton and Sussex.

Methods and Approaches to Art History 2

15 credits
Autumn teaching, Year 2

The interrelationship between text and image is one of the critical issues in visual culture from classical antiquity to the present day. From Chinese calligraphy, which blurs the divide between painting and writing, and medieval manuscripts where pictures appear in margins of the text to contemporary advertisements that use graphics and photography, these connections have influenced our attitudes towards images and information. This module asks how objects as diverse as Chinese porcelain or a Dyson vacuum cleaner, a pair of jeans or a designer dress, acquire meaning and value, both in the past and in the present. It raises questions about materials and techniques: how things were made and what form affects how they look. This module takes one or a number of places and periods to explore the way text and image functioned in society and the different interdisciplinary approaches required to study the two together.

Period in Art History: Statues to Saints: The Art of Late Antiquity

15 credits
Autumn teaching, Year 2

The module begins in 313, with the Edict of Milan, when Constantine the Great declared Christianity to be the official religion of the Roman Empire, and runs until 565, the death of the emperor Justinian I. This period covers what is known as "Late Antiquity" or "Early Christianity" or even "Early Byzantium". These labels indicate that what we are dealing with is a world in transition between "Roman" and "Byzantine", "pagan" and "Christian". The module revolves around the issue of the transformation from a pagan to a Christian Roman Empire in this period of Late Antiquity and asks whether "pagan" and "Christian" are the most useful labels to apply. Works of art from a variety of different media are considered, ranging from mosaics and wall paintings to ivories and manuscripts.

Period in Art History: Art and Society: Art after 1945

15 credits
Spring teaching, Year 2

This module examines developments in western art from 1945 to the present, placing them in a variety of social and cultural contexts. It begins with Pop Art and its relation to 1950s consumerism, before charting the rise of conceptual art practices in the context of 1960s counter-culture. It goes on to explore the emergence of post-modernism, and the challenge presented to a predominantly white, male, Eurocentric art establishment by identity politics and feminism in the 1980s. The module concludes by looking at `relational' art practices in the 1990s and 2000s, along with the rise of the art biennial.

Period in Art History: Dutch Art of the 17th Century

15 credits
Autumn teaching, Year 2

This module examines how the particular characteristics of the northern European schools of 17th-century art have been defined and argued about. The critical tradition has taken sides on a number of issues, namely how far an apparent attention to realism disguises complex meanings, whether religious painting was still important in a post-Reformation society, on the role of optical illusion, and on portraiture and landscape as evocations of the nation-state. All these issues are constantly referred back to a standard of quality and rules for debate set down elsewhere, in Renaissance Italy. The main body of material will be taken from 17th century Dutch painting, but with constant reference to the art of the Spanish Netherlands in order to examine how far the region to the south provided a conduit to the art and criticism of Italy and whether it makes sense to see the two countries as a cultural whole.

Period in Art History: Florence 1400-1500

15 credits
Spring teaching, Year 2

Florence 1400-1500 considers issues of making works of art in this Renaissance city, focussing on how works of painting and sculpture were designed and produced. We will look at the workshop tradition, asking what this means for our ideas about originality and art, and explore factors that impinged on the making of works in addition to skill and creativity (which were separate categories in the Renaissance), such as politics and economics. We will consider how the language and techniques we use to talk about works of art, and study how works, particularly paintings, were discussed in the period. In particular, we will think carefully about issues of quality and about how we characterise differences between one work and another.

Period in Art History: From Picasso to Warhol: Painting and Sculpture 1920-1970

15 credits
Spring teaching, Year 2

This module examines some of the major tendencies and practitioners of art in Europe and North America from the early 1920s to the 1970s. You will begin with exploring Surrealism and its artworks in relation to the writings and films of the movement, and continue through Action painting and Abstract Expressionism, to the figurative work of the 1940s and 1950s in Europe, to Pop, Minimal and Conceptual Art.

Key artists to be examined include Joan Miro, Andre Masson, Luis Bunuel, Salvador Dali, Pablo Picasso, Alberto Giacometti, Francis Bacon, Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, Andy Warhol, Gilbert and George and Robert Smithson.

Period in Art History: Selling yourself: 18th Century Art and Society

15 credits
Spring teaching, Year 2

This module considers the production of visual culture in the 18th century within its social contexts. Rather than simply looking at a list of artists, you will consider the visual arts against the backdrop of contemporary social and ideological issues: commerce and luxury, urbanization and the rise of industry, the impact of empire and colonialism.

The approach will be a thematic one, looking at topics such as the representation of labour, the image of the family, the cult of individualism, the representation of war, as well as the more conventional genres of portraiture, landscape or history painting. You will also relate the visual arts to 18th century literary culture: the rise of the novel, georgic and pastoral poetry, and developments in social philosophy.

Period in Art History: Victorian Art

15 credits
Autumn teaching, Year 2

You will examine art of the Victorian period and the themes of artistic identities and the art market, the global relations of culture and the representation of the body and of difference. It considers a wide range of images of modern life in paint and in print, including urban and rural spaces, domesticity, work and leisure and explores critical interpretations of the subject.

Period in Art History:Palaces, Churches, Piazzas: Art and Society in Renaissance Italy

15 credits
Autumn teaching, Year 2

This module examines Italian art of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, focusing particularly on its role in constructing and maintaining social relationships. It encompasses a range of Italian urban and courtly centres, exploring how distinctive regional contexts influenced the design, content and location of works of art. Investigating the networks of people involved in commissioning and creating art objects, it explores how viewers engaged with them in civic, sacred and domestic settings. The module considers the traditionally privileged 'art' of the Renaissance - painting and sculpture - in relation to luxury 'arts' - ceramics, glass, metalwork and textiles - to investigate the changing visual and material culture of Italy in this period. Finally, it addresses the term 'Renaissance', examining how this concept has been historically constructed and reinforced.

Art in Context: Art and Politics in Britain 1979-the present

30 credits
Autumn teaching, Year 3

This module examines the place of politics in recent British art. Starting with Thatcher's Britain, we will look at a number of critical art practices in the 1980s, including those associated with the new colour photography and black art movements. We will go on to address the self-professed entrepreneurialism of young British art against the backdrop of Thatcherism and the recession of the early 1990s. We will explore the co-option of the young British artists (yBas) as part of New Labour mythology and the impact of globalisation upon the perceived 'Britishness' of British art. The module concludes with the re-emergence of political art in the past ten years made in response to the Iraq War and to the current government's cuts to public spending.

Art in Context: Inhuman Bondage: the Image of Slavery 1750-1850

30 credits
Autumn teaching, Year 3

This module will focus on the impact of slavery and the slave trade on western visual culture, until recently a subject little considered in art-historical scholarship. You will consider not only the iconography of slavery and the representation of enslaved Africans and slave plantations, but also how the ideologies of slavery infused the commercial society that was the context for artistic production, asking to what extent art and aesthetics directly or indirectly were implicated in the slave trade. Of central concern will be the role of visual imagery in the campaign for the abolition of the slave trade in the late 18th century.

You will look at a wide variety of visual culture, not just works of 'fine' art, but also prints, textiles, applied and decorative arts, and furniture, to assess the significance of this conventionally overlooked, but important and problematic subject.

Art in Context: Michelangelo and Raphael: Art of the Papal Court in the 15th and 16th centuries

30 credits
Autumn teaching, Year 3

In Rome at the beginning of the 16th century Popes Julius II and Leo X, their courtiers and followers commissioned buildings, paintings and sculpture that politically argued the power of the Papacy and artistically sought to rival the achievements of the ancients. You will examine some of the major projects of the time, looking at the intellectual rationale for these works and their relationship to the contemporary discoveries of the fabric of the ancient city.

Art in Context: Paris the Crucible of Modernism 1900-20

30 credits
Autumn teaching, Year 3

This module concentrates on a single decade in one centre of art production: Paris during the forging of Modernism. You will track the careers of particular artists, critics, composers and writers in detail and examine appropriate critical and analytical frames of references for them in relation to the social and cultural history of the period.

Among those figures who to be examined are Henri Matisse, Claude Debussy, George Braque, Guillaume Apollinaire, Pablo Picasso, Constantin Brancusi, Andre Derain and Giorgio de Chirico.

Art in Context: The Museum and its Objects

30 credits
Autumn teaching, Year 3

This module uses the expertise of a specialist from one of the national museums, who will be present as part of an academic exchange. Currently the exchange is with the Victoria and Albert Museum, but it may include specialists from other museums in future years. The focus of the module will be on a particular body of material drawn from the collection of the museum, dating from a specific time and place. This will be employed as a basis to study issues in museology and museum history as well as in art history and the history of culture. You will undertake some general reading in the history of museums and debates in museology, with further reading provided by the specialist in the field addressed.

Art in Context: Titian, Tintoretto, Veronese: art in 16th Century Venice

30 credits
Autumn teaching, Year 3

This module will focus on the art produced in Venice during the 16th century. You will look at the particular context for the patronage of art in Venice and examine how Venice's important position within global trade networks influenced the art produced there. In addition to exploring particular qualities of light and colour in Venetian painting, you will investigate how architecture, textiles, metalwork and glass contributed to create a distinctive Venetian visual culture.

Topic in Art History: Architecture and Interiors

30 credits
Spring teaching, Year 3

This module examines the relationship between changes in architectural style and practice, and the concept of the interior in the European and American world from the 15th century to the present. How are the concepts of outside and inside related through architecture and how does architecture organise the interior in particular ways? The module takes a historical and social path, but you will be encouraged to build on this through dissertation and presentation.

Topic in Art History: Art and Empire

30 credits
Spring teaching, Year 3

This module consists of an in-depth consideration of the visual arts in relation to imperialism. It will thus pick up on Edward Said's important intervention in proposing a critical relation between 'culture and imperialism'. This module will look at the ways in which the visual arts were influenced and informed by the material processes and ideologies of empire – from imperial/colonial war to architectural settlement. It will consider not just how artists reacted, referred to and exploited empire in their work (by, for example, taking the opportunity to cultivate new markets in newly colonised territories), but how empire was represented to domestic audiences and informed visual and aesthetic dismodule.

Topic in Art History: Art and its Literary Context

30 credits
Spring teaching, Year 3

This module takes an interdisciplinary perspective on the links between visual and literary imaginations. Depending on the tutor, the module may look at any one of a variety of periods from the medieval to the 21st century. A typical module may focus on the late 19th century and the first half of the 20th century, in one of the great capitals of Modernist experimentation - London. The presence of international artists and writers such as Henry James, John Singer Sargent, Ezra Pound and Henri Gaudier-Brzeska will be examined, as well as the distinctive developments in painting and writing around the Bloomsbury Group, the Vorticists, the Camden Town Group and the London Surrealists.

Topic in Art History: Commemorative Art

30 credits
Spring teaching, Year 3

This module considers the visual culture of the death ritual and, in particular, examines how monumental art seeks to represent and sustain the memory of the deceased. The module moves freely between different cultures and periods, working towards the final dissertation and the assessed presentation, responding both to your individual interest and to the availability of primary and secondary material. In particular, you will be encouraged to consider the many and varied (but little-studied) resources in those subject areas which are available in local and national collections. The module starts with a consideration of a number of relevant theories: genres and hierarchies within art-historical discourse; the roles of mourning and commemoration within the contexts of theology and sociology; and, varied anthropological accounts. Case studies will include: war memorials and other public memorials; the church monument; the engraved headstone and other tomb-markers; monuments to princes and other rulers; mourning costume; the organising, representation and recording of funeral; coffins and their furniture; and cenotaphs and other empty tombs.

Topic in Art History: From Decorative Arts to Material Culture

30 credits
Spring teaching, Year 3

This module considers the traditional categorisations of the arts into 'fine' and 'decorative' and how this distinction has characterised scholarly approaches to them. Art history's recent engagement with methodologies from the field of material culture has revived interest in objects that had been relegated to the ranks of 'applied art', revealing original contexts and functions that had previously been overlooked. You will explore how the relationship between different art forms was conceived in the past, investigate the range of methods used by art historians to study art objects, and consider how these categories have informed their display in museums.

Topic in Art History: Photography in Context

30 credits
Spring teaching, Year 3

The module provides an interdisciplinary perspective on the place of photography in American and Western European culture from the medium's invention in the 1830s to the present. It pays particular attention to the relationship between photography as art and its applications within mass culture. We consider the different contexts in which photographs are encountered and how these affect issues of status and meaning, along with the impact of technological changes upon the production and dissemination of photographic images. We also examine how historic photographic traditions have been extended and disrupted by more recent practices.

Topic in Art History: Representing Women

30 credits
Spring teaching, Year 3

This module looks at attitudes to women as represented in art within an extended time period. It considers how concepts of gender and gender roles remain constant or change over time, and at how art and texts come together to form a composite picture of women's cultural status. It will also explore how feminist methodologies may or may not be of value in examining images.

Back to module list

At Sussex, subjects across the arts, sciences and social sciences offer electives in other subjects that are not necessarily related to your main subject.

As a student on most single-honours courses, you can broaden and enrich your studies by choosing to spend up to 25 per cent of your time in Years 1 and 2 of your course on electives, exploring other subject areas. 

Electives do not have specific entry requirements and are open to students on most single-honours courses, unless professional-body requirements do not provide sufficient space in the curriculum. 

Please note that these are the electives running in 2014.

Year 1

Term 1

Term 2

Year 2

Term 1

Term 2

Back to elective list

A Sociology of 21st Century Britain

15 credits
Year 1, Term 1

A sociology of 21st-century Britain will use Britain today as an empirical base for exploring wider sociological perspectives and the insights that social science can bring into key problems and debates about contemporary life. 

During the module you will explore the relationship between empirical research and theory, using examples from recent sociological work (drawing from studies no older than five years) to look at a range of issues in 21st-century Britain, including work and employment, family, sport, intimacy, life online, nationalism, death and wealth. 

The module is designed to demonstrate the capacity of sociology to explore the social world in interesting, challenging and critical ways, but will be relevant to anyone who wishes to learn more about contemporary Britain, from the perspective of insider or outsider.

American Identities

15 credits
Year 1, Term 1

Applied Psychology

15 credits
Year 1, Term 1

This module provides an insight into five areas of professional applied psychology: clinical psychology, health psychology, educational psychology, forensic psychology and occupational psychology.

You will learn some of the core psychological knowledge that underpins these applied areas, cover some detailed examples of the issues that professional applied psychologists deal with, and learn about some of the research and theories that support these applied areas.

Arabic Ab initio A

15 credits
Year 1, Term 1

This stage 1 module is an introduction to the foreign language for students with little or no prior knowledge of the target language (TL). The module aims to:
- enable you to understand basic information and to communicate effectively in the TL, in everyday situations at an elementary level
- provide opportunities across a variety of general topics for practice of understanding and communication in the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at an elementary level
- introduce fundamental elements of the TL language structures, vocabulary, syntax and pronunciation, and provide a solid foundation for progression in the TL
- introduce the background culture of the TL through a variety of contextualised activities and materials, in a range of media, e.g. text; audio; audio-visual; digital.

Successful completion of the module is equivalent to level A1 (Basic User) of the Common European Framework of Reference for languages.

Art and Artists I

15 credits
Year 1, Term 1

This is a twelve-week level-one module taught in the Autumn term. It deals with one of the central issues of the study of the subject: how did 'great artists' gain their reputation both during their lifetime and subsequently? Some artists' reputations have not been constant whilst others have been admired for very different reasons at different times.

This lecture series looks at a variety of cases presenting different 'histories' of the artist across a time-span from the ancient world to the Renaissance, and focusing on a particular set of issues surrounding the conceptualisation of the artist and artistic creativity in the classical, Byzantine and/or mediaeval periods, the issue of anonymity, the artist versus the craftsman, and related issues of historiography.

The module may cover painters, printmakers, sculptors as well as artists whose achievements were in the applied arts. It complements, but is not a pre-requisite for, Art and Artists II.

British Political History

15 credits
Year 1, Term 1

This module will give you an overview of the key questions, concepts and controversies in modern British political history, with a particular emphasis on the period since 1945.

You will gain an understanding of both academic and political debates on topics such as the postwar 'consensus', Thatcherism and New Labour, and will also be introduced to some of the ways in which politicians throughout this period have presented their own interpretations of British political history.

British Sign Language and Deaf Culture 1

15 credits
Year 1, Term 1

Education for Development: Aid, Policy and the Global Agenda

15 credits
Year 1, Term 1

Education, Education, Education; Theory, Practice and Politics

15 credits
Year 1, Term 1

English Language Teaching 1A

15 credits
Year 1, Term 1

This module will provide students with an introduction to the social, political, linguistic and pedagogic issues involved in the teaching of English to Speakers of Other Languages and the principles and practice of a range of methods and approaches.

Ethnographic Film

15 credits
Year 1, Term 1

This module introduces you to key themes in anthropology through ethnographic film. Central concerns of social and cultural anthropology are covered, including concepts of culture and society, sameness and difference, representation, fieldwork and ethnography.

A selection of films is used to introduce you to different regional concerns as well as to central theoretical debates in the discipline. Issues of representation are addressed by comparing ethnographic writing with visual material.

Film Analysis (E)

15 credits
Year 1, Term 1

This module draws upon both 20th-century and contemporary film texts to explore the diverse uses filmmakers have made of such key techniques of cinematic expression as narrative, cinematography, mise-en-scene, editing, sound, and special effects. We consider not simply how such techniques are accomplished (ie the creative choices available to filmmakers) but also the potential they have for generating meaning and pleasure when combined together to produce filmic texts. The module also examines links between technological change and film aesthetics.

French Ab initio A

15 credits
Year 1, Term 1

This stage module is designed for:

  • beginners, assuming no previous knowledge
  • false beginners with prior experience of French at an elementary level, including those who have up to grade C at GCSE

The module aims to:

  • enable you to understand basic information and to communicate effectively in French, in everyday situations at an elementary level 
  • provide opportunities across a variety of general topics for practice of understanding and communication in French, using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing at an elementary level 
  • introduce fundamental elements of the structures, vocabulary, syntax and pronunciation of French, and provide a solid foundation for progression
  • introduce French and Francophone culture through a variety of contextualised activities and materials in a range of media, eg text, audio, audiovisual, digital.

Successful completion of the course is equivalent to level A1 (Basic User) of the Common European Framework of Reference for languages.

French For Professional Purposes 1A

15 credits
Year 1, Term 1

This module is designed for advanced learners who have a good A-Level pass or equivalent.

The module aims to:

  • enable you to understand the main ideas within extended discourse and to communicate effectively in French, with increasing fluency, confidence and spontaneity, in a variety of contexts
  • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, including common professional themes, for practice of understanding and communication in French, using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at an advanced level
  • introduce and develop the range of complex elements of the structures, vocabulary, and syntax of French to allow continued progression
  • facilitate the analysis of some aspects of the general social, professional, political and/or cultural background of French and the Francophone world through a variety of contextualised activities and materials, in a range of media, eg text, audio, audiovisual, digital.

Your classes will consist of a variety of activities to develop your practical skill in all four communicative competencies (speaking, listening, reading and writing), and to encourage autonomous use of French. These will include presentations and discussion, text-handling and writing activities, such as summarising and reporting based on themes, grammatical structures and language skills.

Working individually and in groups, you will have opportunities to develop your knowledge and understanding of Francophone countries, society, and communities, through both authentic and specially prepared textual and audiovisual materials.

Seminar activities are complemented by guided independent study, and will make use of Study Direct and other technologies.

This module is at level B1-B2 (Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

French Intermediate A Year 1

15 credits
Year 1, Term 1

This stage 3 module is for students with some basic knowledge and experience of the target language (TL). Building on existing levels of proficiency at level A2 (Basic User) of the Common European Framework of Reference [CEFR] the module aims to:
- enable you to understand key information and to communicate effectively in the TL, sometimes spontaneously, in less routine situations, at a standard level
- provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at a standard level
- consolidate and develop the range of key elements of TL language structures, vocabulary, syntax and pronunciation, to allow progression in the TL
- present the background culture and society of the TL through a variety of contextualised activities and materials, in a range of media, e.g. text; audio; audio-visual; digital.

Successful completion of the module is equivalent to level A2-B1 (Basic-Independent User) of the CEFR for languages.

German Ab initio A

15 credits
Year 1, Term 1

This is a module for complete or near beginners, introduce you to basic skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening. A thorough grounding in grammatical functions will be undertaken. Elements of the culture and society of Germany will be introduced within the framework of the language module.

Global Issues

15 credits
Year 1, Term 1

The module aims to introduce you to the study of global politics and global political economy. To do so, we will examine problems, issues and dynamics that have come to shape contemporary political life at the international, transnational and global levels. This introduction will set the scene for later modules that offer an in-depth analysis of these issues, as well as a thorough examination of the theoretical and conceptual tools used by scholars.

International Business Environment

15 credits
Year 1, Term 1

Introduction to Accounting (Elective)

15 credits
Year 1, Term 1

This module is designed as an introduction to accounting and financial management for managers.

The module introduces accounting and financial management topics gradually, examining basic principles and underlying concepts before demonstrating how accounting statements and financial information can be used to improve business decision-making.

The module focus is for students of business and management as decision-makers and users of financial information.

Introduction to Financial Markets and Trading

15 credits
Year 1, Term 1

Italian Ab initio A

15 credits
Year 1, Term 1

This is a course for complete or near beginners, introducing you to basic skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening. A thorough grounding in grammatical functions will be undertaken. Elements of the culture and society of Italy will be introduced within the framework of the language course.

Japanese Ab initio A

15 credits
Year 1, Term 1

This is a module for complete or near beginners, introducing you to basic skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening. You will be introduced to Hiragana and Katakana. A thorough grounding in grammatical functions will be undertaken. Essential elements of cultural awareness in Japanese society will be introduced. An essential part of the module will be independent work carried out in the Language Learning Centre.

Key Concepts and Debates in Entrepreneurship

15 credits
Year 1, Term 1

Leadership Foundations

15 credits
Year 1, Term 1

Mathematics Demystified

15 credits
Year 1, Term 1

What makes the world work? Logic, algorithms, connected graphs (the London Underground), elementary number theory, encryption, error correction.

This module is suitable for anyone with GCSE-level maths and an interest in graphs and numbers.

Music and Society (E)

15 credits
Year 1, Term 1

Music does not exist in isolation from society. Many cultures in the world have no word for music conceived as an entity distinct from the contexts in which it takes place, contexts such as social or religious ritual, dance or performance. Only in modern western culture has the idea of art music as something autonomous and removed from the everyday world evolved. 

Why is music meaningful to us, and how can we understand how music has meaning at all? What is the function of art music in cultures dominated by commercial values? How can we grasp the relationships between the multiplicity of musical forms that are available in a modern globalised culture? How can we evaluate the impact of the different media and technologies by which music is disseminated and consumed? These are some of the questions that this module seeks to address.

The module also aims to introduce you to different intellectual approaches to these questions, and to broaden your engagement with the issues through independent research. The module charts recent musical history both in terms of technical innovation and social and aesthetic concerns of the composers involved. The aim of the module is to stimulate awareness of recent musical thinking and also to use that awareness to re-examine more conventional musical views and habits.

Our Place in the Universe(s)

15 credits
Year 1, Term 1

Astronomy, the study of space and its contents beyond the earth, is both the oldest science, and one in which new discoveries are being made on a daily basis. It is used to explain such familiar phenomena as the tides, eclipses and meteor showers, as well as much more exotic objects such as black holes and exoplanets. The observable universe also provides a laboratory for testing physical theories at extreme energies that are unachievable on earth.

This elective will provide non-science students with a broad, non-mathematical understanding of astronomy from our solar system, via stars and galaxies, to the universe as a whole, all to appreciate our place in the universe(s).

Papyrus to Pixel: Language and technology

15 credits
Year 1, Term 1

Paradox and Argument

15 credits
Year 1, Term 1

Reading as a Creative and Critical Writer

15 credits
Year 1, Term 1

Religion and Culture in the Middle East and North Africa 1700-2000

15 credits
Year 1, Term 1

Spanish Ab initio A

15 credits
Year 1, Term 1

This stage course is designed for:

  • beginners, assuming no previous knowledge
  • false beginners with prior experience of the language at an elementary level, including those who have up to grade C at GCSE

The course aims to:

  • enable you to understand basic information and to communicate effectively in Spanish, in everyday situations at an elementary level 
  • provide opportunities across a variety of general topics for practice of understanding and communication in Spanish using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at an elementary level 
  • introduce fundamental elements of the structures, vocabulary, syntax and pronunciation of Spanish, and provide a solid foundation for progression 
  • introduce the background culture of Spanish and the Spanish-speaking world through a variety of contextualised activities and materials in a range of media, eg text, audio, audiovisual, and digital.

Successful completion of the course is equivalent to level A1 (Basic User) of the Common European Framework of Reference for languages.

Spanish for Professional Purposes 1A

15 credits
Year 1, Term 1

This module is designed for advanced learners who have a good A level pass, or equivalent.

The module aims to:

  • enable students to understand the main ideas within extended discourse and to communicate effectively in Spanish with increasing fluency, confidence and spontaneity in a variety of contexts
  • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, including common professional themes, for practice of understanding and communication in Spanish using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at an advanced level;
  • introduce and develop the range of complex elements of the structures, syntax, and vocabulary in Spanish to allow continued progression
  • facilitate the analysis of some aspects of the general social, professional, political and/or cultural background of the language through a variety of contextualised activities and materials in a range of media, eg text, audio, audiovisual, and digital.

Your classes will consist of a variety of activities to develop your practical skill in all four communicative competencies (speaking, listening, reading and writing) and to encourage autonomous use of Spanish. These will include presentations and discussion, text-handling and writing activities such as summarising and reporting, based on themes, grammatical structures and language skills.

Working individually and in groups, you will have opportunities to develop your knowledge and understanding of Spanish-speaking countries, society, and communities through both authentic and specially prepared textual and audiovisual materials.

Seminar activities are complemented by guided independent study, and will make use of Study Direct and other technologies.

This module is at level B1-B2 (Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

Spanish Intermediate A Year 1

15 credits
Year 1, Term 1

This module is designed for:

  • lower-intermediate learners who have a recent grade A/B at GCSE, or a D/E pass at AS-Level, or equivalent
  • intermediate learners who have a good AS grade, or perhaps a low D/E pass at A-Level, or equivalent

The module aims to:

  • enable you to understand key information and to communicate effectively in Spanish, sometimes spontaneously, in less routine situations at a standard level 
  • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in Spanish using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at a standard level 
  • consolidate and develop the range of key elements of the structures, vocabulary, syntax and pronunciation of Spanish, to allow progression
  • present the background culture and society of the Spanish-speaking world through a variety of contextualised activities and materials in a range of media, eg text, audio, audiovisual, and digital.

Successful completion of the module is equivalent to level A2-B1 (Basic-Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

The Making of Modern Europe

15 credits
Year 1, Term 1

This module provides you with an understanding of the historical development of the idea of Europe as it has evolved from the middle ages until the present day. In particular we shall trace the relationship between, on the one hand, ideas and ideals of European cooperation, integration and unity and, on the other, the realities of European economic, political and social development and conflict.

The module explains the different dimensions of the idea of Europe and places them in their contemporary context, highlighting aspects of continuity and change. It further examines the inherent tension between unity and diversity in European history and explores how this tension has been manifest in the political struggles and the philosophical arguments which have characterised Europe over time.

The first half of the module considers the development of Europe as idea and reality over the long run while the second half examines how these aspects have interacted in the 20th and 21st centuries.

Thinking Like a Criminologist

15 credits
Year 1, Term 1

Understanding Law

15 credits
Year 1, Term 1

This module introduces students to English law by exploring the way in which law is made, interpreted and applied within the broader context of human rights and EU law. It also provides you with an opportunity to critically examine the structures and personnel of the English legal system.

What is Cultural Studies? (E)

15 credits
Year 1, Term 1

This module introduces the relevance and excitement of using cultural studies approaches to explore pertinent aspects of life in the globalised world of the 21st century. The first few weeks are devoted to describing, debating and historicising key areas of cultural life: home, work, leaisure, city. In the second half of the term you are introduced to cultural concepts that are fundamentally contested within society. Concepts such as taste, individualism, and humanity will be discussed and debated, and you will use your crosscultural and historical skills (developed in the first half of the module) to explore issues pertinent to these concepts. You will be guided to undertake focused interdisciplinary study through carefully directed research tasks and reading on these topics. Teaching and learning will involve a mix of lectures, seminars, workshops, screenings, individual and group work.

Advertising (E)

15 credits
Year 1, Term 2

This module engages with the historical development of advertising and opens up a critical understanding of its contemporary place within the media (and its economies), culture and society.

In the 21st century advertising has been transformed by the rise of branding, the maturing of the internet and the emergence of new media forms like social media. Traditional advertising forms and the funding model for media which advertising has provided are now under threat.

This module will introduce you to current thinking about advertising and demonstrate various approaches to the analysis of its many forms.

Arabic Ab initio B

15 credits
Year 1, Term 2

This stage 2 module is a post-beginner module for students with basic prior knowledge of the target language (TL). Building on existing levels of proficiency at level A1 (Basic User) of the Common European Framework of Reference [CEFR] the course aims to:
- enable you to understand basic information and to communicate effectively in the TL in everyday situations, at a simple level
- provide opportunities across a variety of general topics for practice of understanding and communication in the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at a basic level
- introduce fundamental elements of the TL language structures, vocabulary, syntax and pronunciation, and continue to provide a solid foundation for progression in the TL
- present the background culture of the TL through a variety of contextualised activities and materials, in a range of media, e.g. text; audio; audio-visual; digital.

Successful completion of the module is at least equivalent to level A2 (Basic User) of the CEFR for languages.

Art and Artists II

15 credits
Year 1, Term 2

Art and Artists is a twelve-week level-one module taught in the Spring term. It deals with one of the central issues of the study of the subject: how did 'great artists' gain their reputation both during their lifetime and subsequently? Some artists' reputations have not been constant whilst others have been admired for very different reasons at different times. This lecture series looks at a variety of cases presenting different 'histories' of the artist across a time-span largely from the early-modern period to the present day, and considers particular sets of issues relating to the construction of the idea of the artist: the role of biography and autobiography; the creation of a canon of 'great artists'; the relation of artists' reputations to the rise of the academy; artists' reputations as created through text, film or other media; the role of self-promotion. The module may cover painters, printmakers, sculptors as well as artists whose achievements were in the applied arts. It follows on from Communicating Art I, but may be taken as a free-standing module.

British Sign Language and Deaf Culture 2

15 credits
Year 1, Term 2

Chinese Ab initio B

15 credits
Year 1, Term 2

This module builds on the basic grammatical structures taught in Foundation Chinese 1A to improve grammatical accuracy, oral and written fluency, lexis, and listening and reading comprehension in a variety of everyday situations. You will gain an insight into the culture and society of China appropriate to the framework of your language studies and, wherever possible, through authentic materials.

 

Comedy

15 credits
Year 1, Term 2

Contemporary Issues in Psychology

15 credits
Year 1, Term 2

Contemporary Issues in Psychology will introduce both psychology students and non-psychology majors to a variety of contemporary topics in psychology. Topics might vary from year to year, but would typically include, for example, modules on evolutionary psychology, comparative psychology, polylinguilism, brain imaging and gender differences. The module does not require any prior knowledge of psychology.

Creativity, Innovation and Technology

15 credits
Year 1, Term 2

Cross Cultural Perspectives on Teaching, Learning and Assessment

15 credits
Year 1, Term 2

Culture in Global Contexts: Debating the Postcolonial

15 credits
Year 1, Term 2

English Language Teaching 1B

15 credits
Year 1, Term 2

This module will focus primarily on supervised lesson planning and teaching practice. A small number of plenary sessions will further address the evaluation and selection of teaching materials and the principles of lesson planning as well as generally exploring issues arising out of the teaching practice classes. You will be invited to reflect on and evaluate their own classroom practice and that of their peers.

Everyday Life: Ordinary and Extraordinary (E)

15 credits
Year 1, Term 2

Everyday life is something we take for granted. The phrase tends to refer to the ordinary and unremarkable, to the bedrock activities constitutive of how we live but which are often regarded as tedious or a chore. This module opens up this notion offering an understanding of the everyday as simultaneously ordinary and extraordinary, localised and tied into the bigger dynamics of capitalism and globalisation.

Introducing you to the interdisciplinary perspectives of cultural studies, you will explore everyday life through a series of case studies. These may include dressing or exercising the body, food, car culture, 'going green', love, 'living through media', and shopping. Each case study variously explores the historical development of everyday life, its textures and experiences, hardships and highs. If the emphasis is so-called modern everyday life in the rich global north, you will be encouraged to understand the ways our everyday life is tied to and impacts on the everyday lives of those in the much poorer global south. 

Emphasis is placed on the ways everyday life practices may be conservative (reproducing gender relations for example) or utopian – in their creativity suggesting other ways of living beyond the constraints of neoliberal capitalism. What happens in the everyday – its struggles and its changes – is integral to a bigger global politics.

This module gives you opportunity to reflect on your own lives and those of others. It encourages you to develop an anthropological eye and feel for the details of everyday life, to collect media and other material that speaks about everyday life, and above all to be self-reflective and critical about the specificity of your own ways of doing things. Assessment is through an illustrated learning diary, which allows you to demonstrate your creative as well as academic skills. 

French Ab initio B

15 credits
Year 1, Term 2

This module builds on the basic grammatical structures taught in Foundation French 1A  to improve grammatical accuracy, oral and written fluency, lexis, and listening and reading comprehension in a variety of everyday situations. You will gain an insight into the culture and society of France within the framework of your language studies and, wherever possible, through authentic materials.

 

French For Professional Purposes 1B

15 credits
Year 1, Term 2

This module is designed for advanced learners who have completed French for Professional Purposes 1A.

Building on existing levels of proficiency, the module aims to:

  • enable you to understand the main ideas within extended discourse and to communicate effectively in French with increasing fluency, confidence and spontaneity in a variety of contexts;
  • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, including common professional themes, for practice of understanding and communication in French, using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at an advanced level
  • consolidate and develop the range of complex structures, syntax, and specialised vocabulary in French to allow further accuracy and control in use
  • facilitate the analysis of some aspects of the general social, professional, political and/or cultural background of the language through a variety of contextualised activities and materials, in a range of media, eg text, audio, audio,visual, digital.

Your classes will consist of a variety of activities to develop your practical skill in all four communicative competencies (speaking, listening, reading and writing), and to encourage autonomous use of French. These will include presentations and discussion, text-handling and writing activities such as summarising and reporting, based on themes, grammatical structures and language skills.

Working individually and in groups, you will have opportunities to develop your knowledge and understanding of Francophone countries, society, and communities, through both authentic and specially prepared textual and audiovisual materials. In this module you will have the opportunity to focus on a topic or text of special interest to you.

Seminar activities are complemented by guided independent study, and will make use of Study Direct and other technologies.

This module is at level B2 (Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

French Intermediate B Year 1

15 credits
Year 1, Term 2

This module is desigend for intermediate learners who have completed an intermediate A module.

The module aims to:

  • enable you to understand key information and to communicate effectively in French, sometimes spontaneously, in less routine situations at a standard level 
  • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in French, using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at a standard level
  • consolidate and develop the range of key elements of structures, vocabulary, syntax and pronunciation of French, to allow continued progression
  • present the background culture and society of French and the Francophone world through a variety of contextualised activities and materials in a range of media, eg text, audio, audiovisual, and digital.

Successful completion of the module is equivalent to level B1 (Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

From Quarks to the Cosmos

15 credits
Year 1, Term 2

This elective provides an overview of state-of-the-art research in fundamental physics for non-physicists, covering:

  1. Physics of the quantum world
  2. Particle physics and the search for the fundamental constituents of matter
  3. Cosmology and the large-scale structure of our world
  4. The quest for the fundamental forces of nature.

The elective is non-mathematical and suitable for non-scientists as well as scientists from other disciplines.

Gender Across Cultures

15 credits
Year 1, Term 2

This module focuses on the centrality of gender as a factor structuring, ultimately, all social relations.

The module will therefore explore:

1. Relationships between men and women, men and men, women and women, as personal and sexual relations, within the household, the labour market, the state
2. How gender relations and practices are performed in different cultures
3. The role of gender in processes of social transformation
4. The impact of industrialisation and migration on gender relations

Gender and the Life Course

15 credits
Year 1, Term 2

You will learn to think critically about inequalities in our societies as they emerge across the life course, especially those relating to gender. Through engaging with key moments in the life course (including birth and the ascription of gender identity, childhood and education, sexual reproduction, parenting and families, paid and unpaid work, illness and health, old age) you will build on ypur own experiences and observations to develop new perspectives and insights into this key issue in contemporary society.

Throughout the module, we will explore key theoretical frameworks as well as a series of concrete cases and problems in which researchers apply such theories to gender issues in social policy, health, education and psychology. By the end of the module you should have gained an understanding of gender and the concept of inequality and be able to provide critical accounts of the links between gendered social relations, cultural settings and individual behaviour and experiences.

German Ab initio B

15 credits
Year 1, Term 2

You build on the basic grammatical structures taught in part one to improve grammatical accuracy, oral and written fluency, lexis and listening and reading comprehension in a variety of everyday situations. You will gain an insight into the culture and society of Germany within the framework of your language studies and, wherever possible, through authentic materials.

Historical Controversy

15 credits
Year 1, Term 2

International Business Strategy (Elective)

15 credits
Year 1, Term 2

Introduction to Business and Management (Elective)

15 credits
Year 1, Term 2

This module in an introductory study of contemporary organisations and their management. It explores the types of purposes of organisations, their stakeholders and changing environments, together with their key managerial processes – entrepreneurship, organisational structure, leading, strategic planning and change. The focus throughout is on the fostering of a critical and reflective approach and the application of relevant concepts, tools and models. 

The coursework component of assessment requires you to choose an organisation which is of interest to you and to explore, critically, the way in which it handles a process of your choice. You are supported in this by the submission of a structured proposal on which formative feedback is given. An unseen examination completes the assessment profile, and you tackle a case study (which revisits keys concepts) in the final seminar as a formative exercise.

Seminar activities are participative and require preparatory work that is signposted though downloads and links on Study Direct well in advance. Lectures are interactive through the use of quizzes and also feature clips form YouTube such as Dragons' Den excerpts.

The module provides a platform for later study by encouraging skills in critical thinking, academic writing, concept acquisition and research. It aims to facilitate the transition into HE-learning smoothly, meaningfully and enjoyably.

Introduction to English Language Teaching and Learning

15 credits
Year 1, Term 2

This module will provide you with an introduction to the social, political, linguistic and pedagogic issues involved in English language teaching and learning, and will explore the principles and practice of a range of methods and approaches.

Introduction to the European Union

15 credits
Year 1, Term 2

This module will provide an introduction to the origins, institutions and main policies of the European Union, including the introduction of European citizenship and attempts by EU institutions to forge a European identity.

Issues in Global Cinema E

15 credits
Year 1, Term 2

The module will introduce you to a range of film studies skills and methods, including ways of conducting and presenting historically based film research afforded by multimedia technology. You will analyse a specific film and its possible connections with other films, and explore your ideas and research methods under the close supervision of a tutor, as well as present your work in progress.

Italian Ab initio B

15 credits
Year 1, Term 2

This course builds on the basic grammatical structures taught in part one to improve your grammatical accuracy, oral and written fluency, lexis, and listening and reading comprehension in a variety of everyday situations. You will gain an insight into the culture and society of Italy appropriate to the framework of your language studies and, wherever possible, through authentic materials.

 

Japanese Ab initio B

15 credits
Year 1, Term 2

The module builds on the basic grammatical structures taught in part one to improve grammatical accuracy, oral and written fluency, lexis, and listening and reading comprehension in a variety of everyday situations. You will work in Hiragana and Katakana and begin studying Kanji characters. You will gain an insight into the culture and society of Japan within the framework of your language studies, and, wherever possible, through authentic materials. An essential part of the module is independent work carried out in the Language Learning Centre.

Justice, Equality and Society

15 credits
Year 1, Term 2

In this module, special attention is given to justice, equality and rights. You are introduced to theory, which is then explored though a number of case studies focusing in particular on the development of non-discrimination and equality law in English law. The module will encourage you to think about contemporary issues from the perspectives of justice, equality and rights.

Language, Mind and Brain

15 credits
Year 1, Term 2

Leading Groups and Teams

15 credits
Year 1, Term 2

Philosophy, Politics and the Middle East

15 credits
Year 1, Term 2

Contemporary Middle Eastern politics raises many intricate philosophical questions. The aim of this course is to address some of them. Topics to be studied include:

  • jihad and just war theory
  • liberalism vs Islam
  • democracy and freedom of speech
  • freedom of belief
  • what, if anything, is wrong with extremist beliefs?
  • what, if anything, is wrong with conspiracy theories?
  • democracy and religion
  • patriotism and personal identity
  • the ethics of immigration.

Society, State and Humanity

15 credits
Year 1, Term 2

Spanish Ab initio B

15 credits
Year 1, Term 2

This module is designed for for post-beginners who have completed the ab-initio A module.

The course aims to:

  • enable you to understand basic information and to communicate effectively in Spanish in everyday situations, at a simple level 
  • provide opportunities across a variety of general topics for practice of understanding and communication in Spanish using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at a basic level 
  • introduce fundamental elements of the structures, vocabulary, syntax and pronunciation of Spanish, and continue to provide a solid foundation for progression
  • present the background culture of Spanish and the Spanish-speaking world through a variety of contextualised activities and materials in a range of media, eg text, audio, audiovisual, and digital.

Successful completion of the course is at least equivalent to level A2 (Basic User) of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

Spanish for Professional Purposes 1B

15 credits
Year 1, Term 2

This module is designed for advanced learners who have completed Advanced for Professional Purposes 1A.

Building on existing levels of proficiency the module aims to:

  • enable students to understand the main ideas within extended discourse and to communicate effectively in Spanish with increasing fluency, confidence and spontaneity in a variety of contexts
  • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, including common professional themes, for practice of understanding and communication in Spanish using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at an advanced level
  • consolidate and develop the range of complex the structures, syntax, and specialised vocabulary in Spanish to allow further accuracy and control in use
  • facilitate the analysis of some aspects of the general social, professional, political and/or cultural background of the language through a variety of contextualised activities and materials in a range of media, eg text, audio, audiovisual, and digital.

Your classes will consist of a variety of activities to develop your practical skill in all four communicative competencies (speaking, listening, reading and writing) and to encourage autonomous use of Spanish. These will include presentations and discussion, text-handling and writing activities such as summarising and reporting, based on themes, grammatical structures and language skills.

Working individually and in groups, you will have opportunities to develop your knowledge and understanding of Spanish-speaking countries, society, and community through both authentic and specially prepared textual and audiovisual materials. In this module you will have the opportunity to focus on a topic or text of special interest to you.

Seminar activities are complemented by guided independent study, and will make use of Study Direct and other technologies.

This module is at level B2 (Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

Spanish Intermediate B Year 1

15 credits
Year 1, Term 2

This module is desigend for intermediate learners who have completed an intermediate A module.

The module aims to:

  • enable you to understand key information and to communicate effectively in Spanish, sometimes spontaneously, in less routine situations at a standard level 
  • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in Spanish using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at a standard level
  • consolidate and develop the range of key elements of the structures, vocabulary, syntax and pronunciation of Spanish, to allow continued progression
  • present the background culture and society of the Spanish-speaking world through a variety of contextualised activities and materials in a range of media, eg text, audio, audiovisual, and digital.

Successful completion of the module is equivalent to level B1 (Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

The Look of America

15 credits
Year 1, Term 2

The Look of America takes as its premise the notion that ever since the explosion of mass media and mass society in the industrial age, the United States has taken an increasingly dominant place in the global visual imagination. This process reached its peak at the beginning of the 20th century, America henceforth generating for the world innumerable iconic and hegemonic visual representations of its own cultural narratives.

The task of the module will be to investigate and deconstruct some of the products of this visual field, along with the ideologies and narratives that sustain and refract them. Hence we begin by introducting you to visual theory, especially as it applies to the American context, and provide you with the critical tools necessary for the module. We then locate the period under scrutiny (1860-2001) within a broader visual and cultural prehistory, illuminating the roots of the modern world and its visual scene. After this, the module concentrates more particularly on the culture of the late-19th and 20th centuries.

Following a more or less thematic pattern, The Look of America examines the issues that emerge over the course of the 20th century, referring forwards and backwards in order to generate connections where appropriate (for example, linking the Farm Security Administration projects to Matthew Brady's Civil War photographs). The intention here is to introduce you to aspects of visual culture and its criticism, as well as to defamiliarise and explore some of the more familiar American iconography surrounding us.

The World Economy Since 1945

15 credits
Year 1, Term 2

Trading Strategies I

15 credits
Year 1, Term 2

Understanding the Criminal Justice System

15 credits
Year 1, Term 2

A Sociology of 21st Century Britain

15 credits
Year 2, Term 1

A sociology of 21st-century Britain will use Britain today as an empirical base for exploring wider sociological perspectives and the insights that social science can bring into key problems and debates about contemporary life. 

During the module you will explore the relationship between empirical research and theory, using examples from recent sociological work (drawing from studies no older than five years) to look at a range of issues in 21st-century Britain, including work and employment, family, sport, intimacy, life online, nationalism, death and wealth. 

The module is designed to demonstrate the capacity of sociology to explore the social world in interesting, challenging and critical ways, but will be relevant to anyone who wishes to learn more about contemporary Britain, from the perspective of insider or outsider.

American Identities

15 credits
Year 2, Term 1

Applied Psychology

15 credits
Year 2, Term 1

This module provides an insight into five areas of professional applied psychology: clinical psychology, health psychology, educational psychology, forensic psychology and occupational psychology.

You will learn some of the core psychological knowledge that underpins these applied areas, cover some detailed examples of the issues that professional applied psychologists deal with, and learn about some of the research and theories that support these applied areas.

Arabic Intermediate A

15 credits
Year 2, Term 1

This stage 3 module is for students with some basic knowledge and experience of the target language (TL). Building on existing levels of proficiency at level A2 (Basic User) of the Common European Framework of Reference [CEFR] the module aims to:
- enable you to understand key information and to communicate effectively in the TL, sometimes spontaneously, in less routine situations, at a standard level
- provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at a standard level
- consolidate and develop the range of key elements of TL language structures, vocabulary, syntax and pronunciation, to allow progression in the TL
- present the background culture and society of the TL through a variety of contextualised activities and materials, in a range of media, e.g. text; audio; audio-visual; digital.

Successful completion of the module is equivalent to level A2-B1 (Basic-Independent User) of the CEFR for languages.

Art and Artists I

15 credits
Year 2, Term 1

This is a twelve-week level-one module taught in the Autumn term. It deals with one of the central issues of the study of the subject: how did 'great artists' gain their reputation both during their lifetime and subsequently? Some artists' reputations have not been constant whilst others have been admired for very different reasons at different times.

This lecture series looks at a variety of cases presenting different 'histories' of the artist across a time-span from the ancient world to the Renaissance, and focusing on a particular set of issues surrounding the conceptualisation of the artist and artistic creativity in the classical, Byzantine and/or mediaeval periods, the issue of anonymity, the artist versus the craftsman, and related issues of historiography.

The module may cover painters, printmakers, sculptors as well as artists whose achievements were in the applied arts. It complements, but is not a pre-requisite for, Art and Artists II.

Before Modern Art (circa 27BC - circa AD1700)

15 credits
Year 2, Term 1

This module considers artistic production over the period 27BC–AD1700. It explores the role of art within society, raising questions about the nature and function of images and art objects within their social, political, economic and historical contexts, and dealing with a variety of theoretical and conceptual issues about the production and perception of art in this period, such as gender, class and imperialism.

British Political History

15 credits
Year 2, Term 1

This module will give you an overview of the key questions, concepts and controversies in modern British political history, with a particular emphasis on the period since 1945.

You will gain an understanding of both academic and political debates on topics such as the postwar 'consensus', Thatcherism and New Labour, and will also be introduced to some of the ways in which politicians throughout this period have presented their own interpretations of British political history.

British Sign Language and Deaf Culture 3

15 credits
Year 2, Term 1

Business in World Politics

15 credits
Year 2, Term 1

This module will explore the role of business in world politics from the perspectives of both International Relations and Management Studies. Drawing on the literature on global governance, non-state actors, co-regulation, and private governance the module will explore different roles that businesses play in world politics, including as lobbyists, partners in governance and agents of implementation. It will also examine whether and, if so, why the role of business in world politics has increased.

Drawing on Management Studies literature on non-market strategy, corporate political activity and international business, the module will explore the role of the political environment for corporate strategy, and analyse what the non-market environment of business consists of. It will address questions such as why companies engage in world politics, how they choose specific strategies of political engagement, and what the challenges and opportunities of 'thin' regulation at the global level are.

Constructing Sexuality

15 credits
Year 2, Term 1

In this elective you will explore and analyse theories of sexuality and sexual politics, both historically and across cultures, and current debates within feminism and postmodernism. Connections will also be made between lived experiences and cultural representations and expectations.

We investigate theories concerning the social construction of gender, biological essentialism, patriarchy, the conceptualisations of the identity 'woman' and 'man', sexuality and sexual practices and the ways these are affected by class, race, disability and age. Specific cases and themes investigated include pre-20th century legal, medical and scientific constructions of sexuality; the development of theories of sexuality since the 1960s; current debates relating to sexuality such as heterosexual/homosexual/lesbian/bisexual identities; femininities and masculinities; and love and romance and pornography.

Contemporary Debates in Social Policy: Theory and Practice

15 credits
Year 2, Term 1

Crime and Criminal Justice

15 credits
Year 2, Term 1

English Language Teaching 2A

15 credits
Year 2, Term 1

This module will build on and further develop knowledge and awareness of lexical, grammatical, functional and phonological issues in the teaching and learning of English, and will explore the formal and informal assessment of language knowledge and language skills. The module will also review and further explore principles and best practice in lesson and module planning and delivery in a variety of teaching contexts.

Ethnographic Film

15 credits
Year 2, Term 1

This module introduces you to key themes in anthropology through ethnographic film. Central concerns of social and cultural anthropology are covered, including concepts of culture and society, sameness and difference, representation, fieldwork and ethnography.

A selection of films is used to introduce you to different regional concerns as well as to central theoretical debates in the discipline. Issues of representation are addressed by comparing ethnographic writing with visual material.

Film Analysis (E)

15 credits
Year 2, Term 1

This module draws upon both 20th-century and contemporary film texts to explore the diverse uses filmmakers have made of such key techniques of cinematic expression as narrative, cinematography, mise-en-scene, editing, sound, and special effects. We consider not simply how such techniques are accomplished (ie the creative choices available to filmmakers) but also the potential they have for generating meaning and pleasure when combined together to produce filmic texts. The module also examines links between technological change and film aesthetics.

Forensic and Applied Cognitive Psychology

15 credits
Year 2, Term 1

This module is concerned with the application of theories of attention, perception and memory in criminological and forensic contexts. It will consider issues such as:

  • What are the problems with current face-recall systems such as E-Fit?
  • Can people be recognised reliably from ID cards, passports and CCTV? 
  • How reliable are eyewitnesses to a crime?
  • Can children make good witnesses?
  • How valid are techniques such as criminal profiling?
  • How do theories of perception and attention explain why some road accidents occur? What effect do age, fatigue and technological innovations such as mobile phones have on drivers' performance?
  • Why do some drivers behave more riskily than others?

The module does not require any prior knowledge of psychology.

French Advanced A

15 credits
Year 2, Term 1

This module is designed for students who have completed both intermediate A and B modules.

The module aims to:

  • enable you to understand the main ideas within extended discourse and to communicate effectively in French with increasing fluency, confidence and spontaneity, in a variety of contexts
  • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in French, using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing at an advanced level
  • introduce and develop the range of complex elements of the structures, syntax, and vocabulary of French to allow continued progression
  • facilitate the analysis of some aspects of the general social, political and/or cultural background of French and the Francophone world through a variety of contextualised activities and materials, in a range of media, eg text, audio, audiovisual, digital. 

Successful completion of the module is equivalent to level B1-B2 (Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

French Intermediate A

15 credits
Year 2, Term 1

This module is designed for:

  • lower-intermediate learners who have a recent grade A/B at GCSE, or a D/E pass at AS-Level, or equivalent
  • intermediate learners who have a good AS grade, or perhaps a low D/E pass at A-Level, or equivalent

The module aims to:

  • enable you to understand key information and to communicate effectively in French, sometimes spontaneously, in less routine situations at a standard level 
  • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in French using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at a standard level
  • consolidate and develop the range of key elements of the structures, vocabulary, syntax and pronunciation of French, to allow progression
  • present the background culture and society of French and the Francophone world through a variety of contextualised activities and materials in a range of media, eg text, audio, audiovisual, digital.

Successful completion of the module is equivalent to level A2-B1 (Basic-Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

Global Issues

15 credits
Year 2, Term 1

The module aims to introduce you to the study of global politics and global political economy. To do so, we will examine problems, issues and dynamics that have come to shape contemporary political life at the international, transnational and global levels. This introduction will set the scene for later modules that offer an in-depth analysis of these issues, as well as a thorough examination of the theoretical and conceptual tools used by scholars.

Ideas in History

15 credits
Year 2, Term 1

This core module is taken by all second-year students on the BA in History. It offers an introduction to key analytical concepts, schools of historiography, and influential historians through the centuries, and explores the major theories, methods, and historical interpretations that characterize historical scholarship.

The module is an essential intellectual pivot in your degree. On the one hand, it picks up themes rehearsed in the first year 'Historical Controversies' modules, where the nature of an individual instance of historical disputation was explored; equally, it looks forward to the third-year 'Special Subjects' with their accompanying dissertations, where a sound grasp of historiographical context is essential.

The module is taught by means of lectures and seminar readings designed to illuminate not simply different schools of historical thought, but also the social, cultural and intellectual environments that produced them. By the end of the course you should have an understanding of both the philosophy of history and the way the practice of historical enquiry has developed over the centuries.

Introduction to Accounting (Elective)

15 credits
Year 2, Term 1

This module is designed as an introduction to accounting and financial management for managers.

The module introduces accounting and financial management topics gradually, examining basic principles and underlying concepts before demonstrating how accounting statements and financial information can be used to improve business decision-making.

The module focus is for students of business and management as decision-makers and users of financial information.

Introduction to Sustainability

15 credits
Year 2, Term 1

Italian Intermediate A

15 credits
Year 2, Term 1

You build on basic grammatical structures to improve your grammatical accuracy, oral and written fluency, lexis and listening and reading comprehension in a variety of everyday situations. You will gain an insight into the culture and society of Italy within the framework of your language studies and, wherever possible, through authentic materials.

Mathematics Demystified

15 credits
Year 2, Term 1

What makes the world work? Logic, algorithms, connected graphs (the London Underground), elementary number theory, encryption, error correction.

This module is suitable for anyone with GCSE-level maths and an interest in graphs and numbers.

Migrant and Refugee Well-Being: Theory and Practice

15 credits
Year 2, Term 1

Music and Society (E)

15 credits
Year 2, Term 1

Music does not exist in isolation from society. Many cultures in the world have no word for music conceived as an entity distinct from the contexts in which it takes place, contexts such as social or religious ritual, dance or performance. Only in modern western culture has the idea of art music as something autonomous and removed from the everyday world evolved. 

Why is music meaningful to us, and how can we understand how music has meaning at all? What is the function of art music in cultures dominated by commercial values? How can we grasp the relationships between the multiplicity of musical forms that are available in a modern globalised culture? How can we evaluate the impact of the different media and technologies by which music is disseminated and consumed? These are some of the questions that this module seeks to address.

The module also aims to introduce you to different intellectual approaches to these questions, and to broaden your engagement with the issues through independent research. The module charts recent musical history both in terms of technical innovation and social and aesthetic concerns of the composers involved. The aim of the module is to stimulate awareness of recent musical thinking and also to use that awareness to re-examine more conventional musical views and habits.

New Venture Creation and Business Planning (Elective)

15 credits
Year 2, Term 1

This module delivers a systematic understanding of the integrated component parts that constitute a start-up enterprise. It begins with an overview of the entrepreneurial attributes that underpin the development and implementation of an enterprise. Theoretical perspectives of entrepreneurship and models for assessing added value will form the basis of analysis of the process of start-ups.

The module assists understanding strategic issues, using appropriate frameworks to critically evaluate how entrepreneurs undertake the development of functional processes and to make informed strategic decisions. The theoretical underpinnings will also facilitate analysis of start-ups in a global market environment. Leading on from this, you will develop a critical understanding of the key processes involved in start-ups including web design, marketing, customer relationships, security and legal and ethical issues. The academic rigour of the module is enhanced by the linking application with the use of theory as presented in business models, and business plans.

Topics covered include:

  • the business planning process 
  • idea generation, development, and evaluation
  • market identification, including exposure to market players
  • researching the resources required, including equipment, people, funding, seed corn, angle funds
  • segmentation, positioning and differentiation, and targeting
  • developing the marketing mix (seven 'P's) 
  • use of technology to enable the business
  • financial planning leading to the development of financial statements and realistic related assumptions
  • government, regional and professional organisations, body support systems

Our Place in the Universe(s)

15 credits
Year 2, Term 1

Astronomy, the study of space and its contents beyond the earth, is both the oldest science, and one in which new discoveries are being made on a daily basis. It is used to explain such familiar phenomena as the tides, eclipses and meteor showers, as well as much more exotic objects such as black holes and exoplanets. The observable universe also provides a laboratory for testing physical theories at extreme energies that are unachievable on earth.

This elective will provide non-science students with a broad, non-mathematical understanding of astronomy from our solar system, via stars and galaxies, to the universe as a whole, all to appreciate our place in the universe(s).

Papyrus to Pixel: Language and technology

15 credits
Year 2, Term 1

Political and Social Change in Contemporary Europe

15 credits
Year 2, Term 1

This module analyses the broad social changes which have occurred in Western Europe since 1945, and in postcommunist European countries since the collapse of communism. It does this by using the social scientist's notion of 'cleavages', to explore divisions in society derived from factors such as religion, class, gender and ethnicity, and their impact on political behaviour. It also looks at the role played by nationalism, populism, regionalism and postmaterialism in driving social change and political affiliation. We also consider recent demographic trends such as declining birth rates and ageing populations, and the impact of these trends on social and political behaviour.

Whilst the module has a theoretical underpinning in social science, it is taught in a way which is accessible to students from any discipline. It is particularly enriched by the participation of students from a wide range of nationalities and cultures, and visiting and exchange students are most welcome on this module.

Private Lives: Servitude, Power and Identity

15 credits
Year 2, Term 1

Project Management (Elective)

15 credits
Year 2, Term 1

The aim of this module is to introduce you to the concept of project management as a way of managing. The role of project management as a key resource in the process of managing at the strategic level and the management of change in general will be examined and developed.

Project management concepts, the roles and responsibilities of project managers, organisational structures within which project management operates, project implementation, project teams, project leadership, project communication, relationships with clients, end-users and funding bodies, client briefing and network analysis will all be scrutinised. Qualitative and quantitative aspects and approaches will also be introduced and critically examined and developed.

The syllabus covers:

  • Projects and project management
    • Definition of a project, the nature of projects, types of projects and examples of project management in action

  • Strategy and project management
    • Managing change through projects, selecting projects and alignment with the strategy of the organisation, project management as a strategic capability/resource

  • Project definition and objectives
    • Developing the concept, purpose, scope and objectives; process mapping; cost, quality, time and risk

  • Organising for project management
    • Project management culture, project organisation, project structures and project teams

  • Project authority and stakeholder management
    • Stakeholders and their management, project-customer relations

  • Project planning
    • Planning model, cost, quality, time and risk, process and considerations, scheduling techniques, network techniques, life-cycle planning, key planning elements.

  • Project control
    • Control cycle, cost, quality, time and risk, management function and evaluation, monitoring and evaluation, project auditing

  • Project completion and review
    • Handover, improvement, post-project audit and review, lessons learned and knowledge management

Reading as a Creative and Critical Writer

15 credits
Year 2, Term 1

Second Language Acquisition

15 credits
Year 2, Term 1

This elective module offers an overview of various perspectives on how second or foreign languages are learnt. Linguistic, psychological and social models of second language acquisition (SLA) are examined, along with some of the implications for our broader understanding of the nature of language and communication. Applications for language teaching and learning are considered, in both naturalistic contexts and classroom settings.

Spanish Advanced A

15 credits
Year 2, Term 1

This module is designed for studens who have completed both intermediate A and B modules.

The module aims to:

  • enable you to understand the main ideas within extended discourse and to communicate effectively in Spanish with increasing fluency, confidence and spontaneity in a variety of contexts
  • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in Spanish using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at an advanced level
  • introduce and develop the range of complex elements of the structures, syntax, and vocabulary of Spanish to allow continued progression
  • facilitate the analysis of some aspects of the general social, political and/or cultural background of the language through a variety of contextualised activities and materials in a range of media, eg text, audio, audiovisual, digital. 

Successful completion of the module is equivalent to level B1-B2 (Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

Spanish for Professional Purposes 2A

15 credits
Year 2, Term 1

This module is designed for advanced learners who have completed Advanced for Professional Purposes 1B.

Building on existing levels of proficiency the module aims to:

  • enable students to understand the main ideas within extended discourse and to communicate effectively in Spanish with fluency, confidence and spontaneity in a variety of contexts;
  • provide opportunities, across a range of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in Spanish using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at a proficient level
  • consolidate and develop the range of the complex structures, syntax, and specialised vocabulary in Spanish to allow consistent accuracy and control in use
  • facilitate the analysis of important aspects of the general social and cultural background of the language in a professional context through a variety of contextualised activities and materials in a range of media, eg text, audio, audio,visual, and digital.

Your classes will consist of a variety of activities to develop your practical skill in all four communicative competencies (speaking, listening, reading and writing), and to encourage autonomous use of Spanish. These will include subject-specific presentations and discussion, text-handling and analysis, writing activities such as letter-writing, summarising and reporting.

Working individually and in groups, you will have opportunities to develop your knowledge and understanding of Spanish-speaking countries, society, and communities through both authentic and specially prepared textual and audiovisual materials. In this module you will have the opportunity to focus on your employment profile and/or workplace simulation activities.

Seminar activities are complemented by guided independent study, and will make use of Study Direct and other technologies.

This module is at level B2 (Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

Spanish Intermediate A

15 credits
Year 2, Term 1

This module is designed for:

  • lower-intermediate learners who have a recent grade A/B at GCSE, or a D/E pass at AS-Level, or equivalent.
  • intermediate learners who have a good AS grade, or perhaps a low D/E pass at A-Level, or equivalent

The module aims to:

  • enable you to understand key information and to communicate effectively in Spanish, sometimes spontaneously, in less routine situations at a standard level 
  • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in Spanish using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at a standard level 
  • consolidate and develop the range of key elements of the structures, vocabulary, syntax and pronunciation of Spanish to allow progression
  • present the background culture and society of Spanish and the Spanish-speaking world through a variety of contextualised activities and materials in a range of media, eg text, audio, audiovisual, digital.

Successful completion of the module is equivalent to level A2-B1 (Basic-Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

The African American Experience

15 credits
Year 2, Term 1

This module examines the history of African-American political, cultural, and social developments from 1863 to the present. Its principal goal is to familiarise you with the debates that African-Americans have had among themselves between emancipation and the present day, thus establishing a deep historical understanding of the ongoing freedom struggle in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. It assesses intraracial arguments over the relationship of blacks to the US government in war and peace, over racial and class identities, and over diverse tactics and strategies for the advancement of the race.

Although particular attention is given to the longrunning campaign to destroy de jure segregation in the southern states (culminating in the successful nonviolent direct action campaigns of the 1960s), the course is predicated on the demonstrable fact that racial prejudice was a national, not a regional, phenomenon.

Lectures and seminars interrogate the connections between African-American history and culture. Emphasis is given to well-known black leaders like Booker T. Washington, Marcus Garvey, and Martin Luther King, but female activists and the unsung black masses themselves also receive close attention.

The Anthropology of Sexuality

15 credits
Year 2, Term 1

The module will familiarise you with anthropological work on sexuality, and will develop your understanding of this in respect to themes such as gender, health, heteronormativity and social change. The module will examine the history of sexuality as a contested subject within anthropology, and also in terms of new and emerging scholarship in the field. In particular the module will seek to widen your understanding of sexuality as implicated in a wide range of social issues – beyond the biology of sexuality per se, and as relevant to core anthropological/social scientific concepts, such as culture, kinship, globalisation and political economy.

Teaching will be organised in respect of the following subject matter:

  1. Sex, sexuality and anthropology
    • This section will examine key themes and module content, eg social constructionism and sexuality, emphasis on and denial of sexuality in anthropology, and the history of sexuality. 

  2. Researching the sexual
    • This section will locate anthropological debates on sexuality within wider research. It will cover critical sexuality studies and research methods.

  3. Sexuality, subjectivity and embodiment
    • You will be introduced to theories of sexual identity and sexual acts. You will learn about phenomenology and theories of sexual subjectivity, exploring ways of conceptually engaging with 'the body' and 'the sexual'.

  4. Sexuality, globalisation and neoliberalism
    • You will explore sexuality as associated with modernity and social changes and will consider why changes in sociosexual values are so accented in studies of globalisation. Associations between sexual individualism and modernity will be questioned.

  5. Development and sexual rights
    • The promotion of sexuality in development work will be explored, as connected to gender and development and feminism. International mechanisms for the promotion of sexual rights will be critically explored with an emphasis on women's sexualities as subjects of development discourses and an examination of sex workers' rights.

  6. Governance, biopolitics and sexuality
    • This section will consider sexualities as linked to forms of surveillance in societies both new and old. You will examine sexuality as related to moral control and 'technologies of the self'.

  7. Sexuality, kinship and care
    • This section will examine intimate connections between, and transgressions beyond, kinship and sexuality. We will consider whether anthropology has tended to ignore sexuality in favour of kinship. You will examine non-heteronormative analyses of kinship and their implications for anthropological theories of care and relatedness.

  8. Same-sex sexualities
    • Students will examine ethnographic material pertaining to the study of same-sex sexual subjectivities and practices, and will consider the broader relevance of this literature. We will explore new discourses of homophobia (eg in Uganda) along with new and positive changes in laws and rights pertaining to same-sex sexualities globally.

  9. Religion, morality and sexuality
    • This section will examine the relationship between sexuality and moral crises in past and contemporary societies, particularly those associated with religious belief. You will examine ways in which normative and 'alternative' sexualities have complex relations to practical contexts of religious morality.

  10. Media, sexuality, and social change
    • This final section will ask whether globalising and democratising media are changing attitudes toward sexualities. You will examine whether exploring and charting changes in beliefs and attitudes regarding sexuality may offer wider and productive insights into the enduring and changing characteristic of cultures and societies.

The Making of Modern Europe

15 credits
Year 2, Term 1

This module provides you with an understanding of the historical development of the idea of Europe as it has evolved from the middle ages until the present day. In particular we shall trace the relationship between, on the one hand, ideas and ideals of European cooperation, integration and unity and, on the other, the realities of European economic, political and social development and conflict.

The module explains the different dimensions of the idea of Europe and places them in their contemporary context, highlighting aspects of continuity and change. It further examines the inherent tension between unity and diversity in European history and explores how this tension has been manifest in the political struggles and the philosophical arguments which have characterised Europe over time.

The first half of the module considers the development of Europe as idea and reality over the long run while the second half examines how these aspects have interacted in the 20th and 21st centuries.

Theory, Taste and Trash (E)

15 credits
Year 2, Term 1

What is Cultural Studies? (E)

15 credits
Year 2, Term 1

This module introduces the relevance and excitement of using cultural studies approaches to explore pertinent aspects of life in the globalised world of the 21st century. The first few weeks are devoted to describing, debating and historicising key areas of cultural life: home, work, leaisure, city. In the second half of the term you are introduced to cultural concepts that are fundamentally contested within society. Concepts such as taste, individualism, and humanity will be discussed and debated, and you will use your crosscultural and historical skills (developed in the first half of the module) to explore issues pertinent to these concepts. You will be guided to undertake focused interdisciplinary study through carefully directed research tasks and reading on these topics. Teaching and learning will involve a mix of lectures, seminars, workshops, screenings, individual and group work.

Advertising (E)

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

This module engages with the historical development of advertising and opens up a critical understanding of its contemporary place within the media (and its economies), culture and society.

In the 21st century advertising has been transformed by the rise of branding, the maturing of the internet and the emergence of new media forms like social media. Traditional advertising forms and the funding model for media which advertising has provided are now under threat.

This module will introduce you to current thinking about advertising and demonstrate various approaches to the analysis of its many forms.

American Cities: New York City

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

From New Amsterdam to 9/11 and beyond, New York has always been iconic. We experience the Big Apple through the sight and sounds that came before us: the movies, the music, the literature, the songs. But what goes on behind these images of ceaseless activity and glamour?

Now the hub of global finance, New York was also a haven for immigrants, with Ellis Island and the Statue of Liberty sitting right there in its harbour. As a result of its diversity of population and ever-changing urban development, in this module we will be looking at the city from many perspectives, and find that to study its history and culture is to discover that the city that never sleeps never ceases to pose questions either.

Arabic Intermediate B

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

This stage 4 intermediate module is for students who have already acquired the capacity to function with some independence in the target language (TL). Building on existing levels of proficiency at level A2-B1 (Basic/Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference [CEFR] the module aims to:
- enable you to understand key information and to communicate effectively in the TL, sometimes spontaneously, in less routine situations, at a standard level
- provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in the TL using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at a standard level
- consolidate and develop the range of key elements of TL language structures, vocabulary, syntax and pronunciation, to allow continued progression in the TL
- present the background culture and society of the TL through a variety of contextualised activities and materials, in a range of media, e.g. text; audio; audio-visual; digital.

Successful completion of the module is equivalent to level B1 (Independent User) of the CEFR for languages.

Art and Artists II

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

Art and Artists is a twelve-week level-one module taught in the Spring term. It deals with one of the central issues of the study of the subject: how did 'great artists' gain their reputation both during their lifetime and subsequently? Some artists' reputations have not been constant whilst others have been admired for very different reasons at different times. This lecture series looks at a variety of cases presenting different 'histories' of the artist across a time-span largely from the early-modern period to the present day, and considers particular sets of issues relating to the construction of the idea of the artist: the role of biography and autobiography; the creation of a canon of 'great artists'; the relation of artists' reputations to the rise of the academy; artists' reputations as created through text, film or other media; the role of self-promotion. The module may cover painters, printmakers, sculptors as well as artists whose achievements were in the applied arts. It follows on from Communicating Art I, but may be taken as a free-standing module.

Art of the Modern Era (c1700 - the present)

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

This module considers artistic production over the period 1700–the present. It explores the role of art within society, raising questions about the nature and function of images and art objects within their social, political, economic and historical contexts, and dealing with a variety of theoretical and conceptual issues about the production and perception of art in this period, such as gender, class and imperialism.

British Sign Language and Deaf Culture 4

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

Chinese Intermediate B

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

This module will build on the skills and structures studied in part 2A. Your aim is to improve elementary/intermediate skills inreading, writing, speaking and listening. You study Chinese characters, Pinyin and grammatical functions in more depth. Essential elements of cultural awareness in Chinese society are studied within the framework of the language module and using authentic materials. This part of the module will involve more independent learning.

Cities and Urban Lives

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

This module introduces literature and debates in the fields of urban anthropology and anthropology of the city. It explores historical processes of urbanisation, focusing on the spatial, cultural, political and social characteristics of the modern cities, as well as on the experiences of everyday urban life in cities across the world. A comparative analysis of the diversity of urban forms and experiences based on specific case studies is deployed to engage with theories ascribing universal characteristics to modern urban society and culture.

Topics covered in this module include:

  • Urban anthropology and anthropology of the city: methodological and epistemological challenges
  • From nomadism to modern city: the long march of urbanisation
  • Pre-modern cities: spiritual economies and cosmopolitan spaces
  • The colonial and the colonised city: the spatialisation of hierarchies
  • Capitalism, (de)industrialisation and the modern city: urban economies
  • Modern urban cultures: from street corner society to urban gangs
  • Modern urban politics: revolutions, revolts and protests
  • Globalisation, neoliberalism and the city: the (re)making of class privilege and exclusion
  • Post-modern cityscapes: skyscrapers, shopping malls and slums
  • Materialities of urban lifeworlds: crowds, traffic, leisure, etc.

Comedy

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

Contemporary Issues in Law

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

Contemporary Issues in Psychology

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

Contemporary Issues in Psychology will introduce both psychology students and non-psychology majors to a variety of contemporary topics in psychology. Topics might vary from year to year, but would typically include, for example, modules on evolutionary psychology, comparative psychology, polylinguilism, brain imaging and gender differences. The module does not require any prior knowledge of psychology.

Culture in Global Contexts: Debating the Postcolonial

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

English as an International Language

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

This elective module addresses current issues concerning the spread and use of English in various forms and for diverse purposes around the world. The increasingly international profile of the language, its learners and teachers are reflected in higher education, business and research, and raises challenging questions. Linguistic issues of standards, variation and models are considered, as well as more sociocultural aspects relating to language and identity, lingua franca communication, multilingualism, intercultural competence, technology and language education policy.

English Language Teaching 2B

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

This module will focus primarily on lesson planning and teaching practice. Plenary sessions will cover the evaluation, selection and use of published teaching materials and the principles of lesson and module planning, as well as addressing key issues in teaching and learning arising from their classes. You will be required to reflect on and critically evaluate their own classroom practice and that of their peers.

Ethnography of the Middle East and Central Asia

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

Europe in the International Economic Order

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

This module introduces you to main developments in the world economy and its governance arrangements since 1945 as they affect Europe, including its relations with the US and the developing world. Debates on globalisation, the role of multinational firms and the role of the World Trade Organisation will be covered, and we will follow the evolving international financial crisis.

Everyday Life: Ordinary and Extraordinary (E)

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

Everyday life is something we take for granted. The phrase tends to refer to the ordinary and unremarkable, to the bedrock activities constitutive of how we live but which are often regarded as tedious or a chore. This module opens up this notion offering an understanding of the everyday as simultaneously ordinary and extraordinary, localised and tied into the bigger dynamics of capitalism and globalisation.

Introducing you to the interdisciplinary perspectives of cultural studies, you will explore everyday life through a series of case studies. These may include dressing or exercising the body, food, car culture, 'going green', love, 'living through media', and shopping. Each case study variously explores the historical development of everyday life, its textures and experiences, hardships and highs. If the emphasis is so-called modern everyday life in the rich global north, you will be encouraged to understand the ways our everyday life is tied to and impacts on the everyday lives of those in the much poorer global south. 

Emphasis is placed on the ways everyday life practices may be conservative (reproducing gender relations for example) or utopian – in their creativity suggesting other ways of living beyond the constraints of neoliberal capitalism. What happens in the everyday – its struggles and its changes – is integral to a bigger global politics.

This module gives you opportunity to reflect on your own lives and those of others. It encourages you to develop an anthropological eye and feel for the details of everyday life, to collect media and other material that speaks about everyday life, and above all to be self-reflective and critical about the specificity of your own ways of doing things. Assessment is through an illustrated learning diary, which allows you to demonstrate your creative as well as academic skills. 

French Advanced B

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

This module is designed for students who have completed and advanced A module.

The module aims to:

  • enable students to understand the main ideas within extended discourse and to communicate effectively in French, with increasing fluency, confidence and spontaneity, in a variety of contexts
  • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in French, using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at an advanced level
  • consolidate and develop the range of complex structures, syntax, and specialised vocabulary of French to allow further accuracy and control in use
  • facilitate the analysis of some aspects of the general social, political and/or cultural background of French and the Francophone world through a variety of contextualised activities and materials, in a range of media, eg text, audio, audiovisual, digital.

Successful completion of the course is equivalent to level B2 (Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

French for Professional Purposes 2B

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

This module is designed for advanced learners who have completed Advanced for Professional Purposes 2A.

Building on existing levels of proficiency, this module aims to:

  • enable you to understand the main ideas and detail within extended discourse and to communicate effectively in French with fluency, confidence and spontaneity in a variety of contexts
  • provide opportunities, across a range of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in French using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at a proficient level
  • consolidate and develop the range of complex structures, syntax, and specialised vocabulary in French to allow consistent accuracy and control in use
  • facilitate the analysis of important aspects of the general social and cultural background of the language in a professional context through a variety of contextualised activities and materials in a range of media, eg text, audio, audiovisual, and digital.

Your classes will consist of a variety of activities to develop your practical skill in all four communicative competencies (speaking, listening, reading and writing) and to promote autonomous use of French. These will include subject-specific presentations and discussion, text-handling and analysis, writing activities such as letter-writing, summarising and reporting, based on themes, grammatical structures and language skills.

Working individually and in groups, you will have opportunities to develop your knowledge and understanding of Francophone countries, society, and community through both authentic and specially prepared textual and audiovisual materials. In this module you will have the opportunity to specialise and report on professional matters or on topics in your field of expertise.

Seminar activities are complemented by guided independent study, and will make use of Study Direct and other technologies.

This module is at level B2-C1 (Independent-Proficient User) of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

French Intermediate B

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

You will be introduced to more complex grammatical structures. You will improve grammatical accuracy, oral and written fluency, lexis, and listening and reading comprehension through the study of a variety of topics and integrated grammar. There is an emphasis on the summarising and handling of authentic texts and a chance to study the literature, culture and society of France.

From Quarks to the Cosmos

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

This elective provides an overview of state-of-the-art research in fundamental physics for non-physicists, covering:

  1. Physics of the quantum world
  2. Particle physics and the search for the fundamental constituents of matter
  3. Cosmology and the large-scale structure of our world
  4. The quest for the fundamental forces of nature.

The elective is non-mathematical and suitable for non-scientists as well as scientists from other disciplines.

Gender Across Cultures

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

This module focuses on the centrality of gender as a factor structuring, ultimately, all social relations.

The module will therefore explore:

1. Relationships between men and women, men and men, women and women, as personal and sexual relations, within the household, the labour market, the state
2. How gender relations and practices are performed in different cultures
3. The role of gender in processes of social transformation
4. The impact of industrialisation and migration on gender relations

Gender and the Life Course

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

You will learn to think critically about inequalities in our societies as they emerge across the life course, especially those relating to gender. Through engaging with key moments in the life course (including birth and the ascription of gender identity, childhood and education, sexual reproduction, parenting and families, paid and unpaid work, illness and health, old age) you will build on ypur own experiences and observations to develop new perspectives and insights into this key issue in contemporary society.

Throughout the module, we will explore key theoretical frameworks as well as a series of concrete cases and problems in which researchers apply such theories to gender issues in social policy, health, education and psychology. By the end of the module you should have gained an understanding of gender and the concept of inequality and be able to provide critical accounts of the links between gendered social relations, cultural settings and individual behaviour and experiences.

Gender, Space and Culture (E)

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

Gender: Rethinking Politics

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

This module interrogates how an understanding of gender helps us ask critical questions about the spaces and practices of politics, indeed about the nature and emergence of 'the political'. In order to achieve this, it examines a number of theories of gender, including biological, psychological, social constructivist perspectives. Moreover, it surveys the historical evolution of feminism as critical theory and practice and the theorisation of masculinity. From such theoretical bases it then examines the gendered nature of central political institutions, such as 'the state', law, democracy, citizenship, as well as political practices: war, security, the extension of human rights, development.

German Intermediate B

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

You will be introduced to more complex grammatical structures. You will improve grammatical accuracy, oral and written fluency, lexis, and listening and reading comprehension through the study of a variety of topics and integrated grammar. There is an emphasis on the summarising and handling of authentic texts and a chance to study the literature, culture and society of Germany.

Global History 1500-2000: Trade, Science, Environment and Empire

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

Global history has emerged as an innovative and powerful approach to understanding the past and its implications for the present and future. Global history is a history of connections. It addresses the contexts and the structures through which societies and communities interacted with one another. The overarching theme of global history is the emergence of an ever-more integrated global society, but the field looks to explain and understand particular circumtances as well as universal experiences.

The topics of global history transcend any particular national or local history. You study a theme for between two and three weeks, and lectures support the thematic concerns of the topics. The module looks at several topics in detail:

  • communication and war
  • race, slavery and anti-slavery
  • colonial encounters and environments
  • civil and human rights
  • global order and disorder
  • empire, science, trade and environment.

Alongside these themes the course addresses particular questions such as the emergence of the 'great divergence': the widening gap in the 19th century between living standards in the Atlantic basin and those in the rest of the world and the global expansion of European empires.

Global Politics of the Environment

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

The question of whether current forms of economic and political organisation in international society are capable of responding to the challenge of sustainable development is more pertinent than ever before. Questions are being asked about how development can be redefined to accommodate ecological challenges or whether we need to fundamentally rethink notions of growth and progress.

This module takes a critical look at the actors and issues implicated in the emerging global debate on sustainable development. It engages with competing theoretical perspectives about the drivers of environmental change and how best to explain the nature of international cooperation on the environment and its limits, but also aims to provide you with a detailed understanding of the defining issues and tensions that constitute the struggle to define future notions of development.

The module will address empirical case studies such as climate change, biodiversity and biotechnology and deforestation, as well as the relationship between trade and the environment, finance and the environment and production and the environment in a context of globalisation. You will gain an understanding of the key actors in these debates from governments and international institutions to civil society organisations and corporations and the ways their power and influence can best be understood.

The module begins with an overview of the shifting nature of the relationship between environment and development in world politics before looking at the key actors in global debates about sustainable development. From there it sets out a range of theoretical tools for understanding the global politics of these issues, before focusing in on a range of issue areas (listed above). It concludes with reflection on prospects for change and the viability of alternative proposals for better addressing the environment and development in world politics.

Introduction to Business and Management (Elective)

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

This module in an introductory study of contemporary organisations and their management. It explores the types of purposes of organisations, their stakeholders and changing environments, together with their key managerial processes – entrepreneurship, organisational structure, leading, strategic planning and change. The focus throughout is on the fostering of a critical and reflective approach and the application of relevant concepts, tools and models. 

The coursework component of assessment requires you to choose an organisation which is of interest to you and to explore, critically, the way in which it handles a process of your choice. You are supported in this by the submission of a structured proposal on which formative feedback is given. An unseen examination completes the assessment profile, and you tackle a case study (which revisits keys concepts) in the final seminar as a formative exercise.

Seminar activities are participative and require preparatory work that is signposted though downloads and links on Study Direct well in advance. Lectures are interactive through the use of quizzes and also feature clips form YouTube such as Dragons' Den excerpts.

The module provides a platform for later study by encouraging skills in critical thinking, academic writing, concept acquisition and research. It aims to facilitate the transition into HE-learning smoothly, meaningfully and enjoyably.

Introduction to Energy Transitions

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

Introduction to English Language Teaching and Learning

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

This module will provide you with an introduction to the social, political, linguistic and pedagogic issues involved in English language teaching and learning, and will explore the principles and practice of a range of methods and approaches.

Introduction to the European Union

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

This module will provide an introduction to the origins, institutions and main policies of the European Union, including the introduction of European citizenship and attempts by EU institutions to forge a European identity.

Issues in Global Cinema E

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

The module will introduce you to a range of film studies skills and methods, including ways of conducting and presenting historically based film research afforded by multimedia technology. You will analyse a specific film and its possible connections with other films, and explore your ideas and research methods under the close supervision of a tutor, as well as present your work in progress.

Italian Intermediate B

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

You will be introduced to more complex grammatical structures. You will improve grammatical accuracy, oral and written fluency, lexis, and listening and reading comprehension through the study of a variety of topics and integrated grammar. There is an emphasis on the summarising and handling of authentic texts and some chance to study the literature, culture and society of Italy.

Japanese Intermediate B

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

This module will build on the skills and structures studied in part 2A, aiming to improve elementary/intermediate skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening. You study Japanese characters in more depth and grammatical functions are studied in greater detail in this part. Essential elements of cultural awareness in Japanese society are studied within the framework of the language module and using authentic materials.

Language, Mind and Brain

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

Management of Innovation (Elective)

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

This module aims to equip you with the knowledge to understand and the skills to manage innovation at the operational level. The management of innovation is inherently interdisciplinary and multifunctional, so we aim here to provide an integrative approach to the management of innovation and how this influences and is influenced by the business models and value propositions. Specifically, we aim to integrate the management of market, technological and organisational change to improve the competitiveness of firms and effectiveness of other organisations.

We shall argue that the process of innovation management is essentially generic, although organisation, technological and market specific factors will constrain choices and actions. The module explores process, product/service, postion- and paradigm-based innovations; the management of and for innovation to happen; new product- and service-based approaches; social and green innovation; innovation commericalistion, diffusion and networks, and innovation forecasting from a managerial and organisational perspective.

Philosophy, Politics and the Middle East

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

Contemporary Middle Eastern politics raises many intricate philosophical questions. The aim of this course is to address some of them. Topics to be studied include:

  • jihad and just war theory
  • liberalism vs Islam
  • democracy and freedom of speech
  • freedom of belief
  • what, if anything, is wrong with extremist beliefs?
  • what, if anything, is wrong with conspiracy theories?
  • democracy and religion
  • patriotism and personal identity
  • the ethics of immigration.

Postcolonial Africa

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

The module explores debates over key postcolonial political, economic and sociocultural dynamics in sub-Saharan Africa. It encourages you to think critically about dominant representations of the subcontinent in the West, and to understand different, often conflicting accounts of postcolonial continuities and transformations.

Topics include debates over some of the following:

  • the character of the postcolonial state and governance, nationalism and ethnicity
  • borders
  • the politics of land and natural resources
  • processes of urbanisation
  • mobility and new forms of transnational connection between Africa, Europe and China.

Sociology of Deviance (elective)

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

This elective will be relevant to a wide range of students interested in social problems and social control, criminology, education, health and social policy more generally.

In the first part of the module we look at concepts of crime, deviance and social control alongside sociological explanations for the existence of crime and deviance as phenomena in different societies. We will also critically examine the data sources used to support these perspectives.

In the second part, these perspectives will be applied to the study of substantive areas of deviance comprising institutions of social control (the police, the courts and prisons), the distribution of crime and the use of official statistics, the mass media, juvenile delinquency, mental illness, and sexuality.

Spanish Advanced B

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

This module is designed for students who have completed and advanced A module.

The module aims to:

  • enable you to understand the main ideas within extended discourse and to communicate effectively in Spanish with increasing fluency, confidence and spontaneity in a variety of contexts
  • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in Spanish using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at an advanced level
  • consolidate and develop the range of the complex structures, syntax, and specialised vocabulary in Spanish to allow further accuracy and control in use
  • facilitate the analysis of some aspects of the general social, political and/or cultural background of the language through a variety of contextualised activities and materials in a range of media, eg text, audio, audiovisual, digital.

Successful completion of the module is equivalent to level B2 (Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

Spanish for Professional Purposes 2B

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

This module is designed for advanced learners who have completed Advanced for Professional Purposes 2A.

Building on existing levels of proficiency the module aims to:

  • enable you to understand the main ideas within extended discourse and to communicate effectively in Spanish with fluency, confidence and spontaneity in a variety of contexts
  • provide opportunities, across a range of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in Spanish using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at a proficient level
  • consolidate and develop the range of complex structures, syntax, and specialised vocabulary in Spanish to allow consistent accuracy and control in use
  • facilitate the analysis of important aspects of the general social and cultural background of the language in a professional context through a variety of contextualised activities and materials in a range of media, eg text, audio, audiovisual, and digital.

Your classes will consist of a variety of activities to develop your practical skill in all four communicative competencies (speaking, learning, reading and writing) and to encourage autonomous use of Spanish. These will include subject-specific presentations and discussion, text-handling and analysis, writing activities such as letter-writing, summarising and reporting.

Working individually and in groups, you will have opportunities to develop your knowledge and understanding of Spanish-speaking countries, society, and communities through both authentic and specially prepared textual and audiovisual materials. In this module you will have the opportunity to focus on your employment profile and/or workplace simulation activities.

Seminar activities are complemented by guided independent study, and will make use of Study Direct and other technologies.

This module is at level B2 (Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

Spanish Intermediate B

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

This module is desigend for intermediate learners who have completed an intermediate A module

The module aims to:

  • enable you to understand key information and to communicate effectively in Spanish, sometimes spontaneously, in less routine situations at a standard level 
  • provide opportunities, across a variety of topics, for practice of understanding and communication in Spanish using the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, at a standard level 
  • consolidate and develop the range of key elements of the structures, vocabulary, syntax and pronunciation of Spanish, to allow continued progression
  • present the background culture and society of the Spanish-speaking world through a variety of contextualised activities and materials in a range of media, eg text, audio, audiovisual, and digital.

Successful completion of the module is equivalent to level B1 (Independent User) of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

The Far Right and the Politics of Immigration

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

This module explores the far right and the increasingly contested politics of immigration in liberal democracies. The module begins by looking at the rise of the far right political parties in contemporary Europe and their relationship to public opinion, mainstream parties and immigration policies. It then examines a number of cases including countries in which the far right has been more and less successful. You will gain an understanding of the causes and consequences of the rise of far right parties and an understanding of their impact on immigration politics and policies.

The Look of America

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

The Look of America takes as its premise the notion that ever since the explosion of mass media and mass society in the industrial age, the United States has taken an increasingly dominant place in the global visual imagination. This process reached its peak at the beginning of the 20th century, America henceforth generating for the world innumerable iconic and hegemonic visual representations of its own cultural narratives.

The task of the module will be to investigate and deconstruct some of the products of this visual field, along with the ideologies and narratives that sustain and refract them. Hence we begin by introducting you to visual theory, especially as it applies to the American context, and provide you with the critical tools necessary for the module. We then locate the period under scrutiny (1860-2001) within a broader visual and cultural prehistory, illuminating the roots of the modern world and its visual scene. After this, the module concentrates more particularly on the culture of the late-19th and 20th centuries.

Following a more or less thematic pattern, The Look of America examines the issues that emerge over the course of the 20th century, referring forwards and backwards in order to generate connections where appropriate (for example, linking the Farm Security Administration projects to Matthew Brady's Civil War photographs). The intention here is to introduce you to aspects of visual culture and its criticism, as well as to defamiliarise and explore some of the more familiar American iconography surrounding us.

The Transformation of Contemporary Europe

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

This module examines the changes in the political and economic systems of Europe, East and West, since 1945, with particular reference to the impact of the Cold War and its aftermath.

Understanding Education: UK, European and Global Perspectives

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

Understanding Global Migration

15 credits
Year 2, Term 2

This interdisciplinary module focuses on the profound impact of human migration on the world we live in. You explore a range of geographical, economic, political, social and cultural issues surrounding migration. The module introduces the key theories, concepts and ideas used to define and understand migration, and covers the main types, causes and consequences of migration. Following a roughly chronological sequence in order to foster a sense of historical continuity and change, you covers topics such as labour migration, refugees, irregular migration, integration and exclusion, migration and development, and the impact of gender on the migration process.

Back to elective list

On most single-honours courses, you may choose to study a pathway – a coherent programme of study in a single subject – taking up 25 per cent of your time in Years 1 and 2 of your course. Once you have successfully completed a pathway, this is recorded on your degree certificate, allowing you to stand out from the crowd. 

Pathways are delivered over the first two years of a course so you can explore your interests early on in your studies, while allowing you to focus on your core subject in the final year. 

Pathways do not have specific entry requirements and are open to students on most single-honours courses, unless professional-body requirements do not provide sufficient space in the curriculum. 

American Studies Pathway

This pathway introduces you to key topics in American studies. You gain in-depth knowledge of African-American history and American visual culture. You also analyse the complex ways in which Americans define their racial and cultural identities. You have the opportunity to study New York City in an interdisciplinary manner, ‘reading’ the city as a site of politics, art, music and literature.

To learn how to 'do' American studies is to gain experience in working with scholarly materials in an interdisciplinary way. You might study both the history of slavery and the Black Power movement; or read American visual culture by analysing Andy Warhol's silkscreens, Dorothea Lange's photographs of migrant workers, and the iconography of the Brooklyn Bridge. This pattern, combining depth and diversity of intellectual interests, recognises that areas of knowledge are interdependent and mutually illuminating. 

What will I achieve?

This pathway ensures that you become aware, critically, of how film speaks to music speaks to poetry speaks to history. With this in mind, you learn to interpret American literary and historical texts, images, and film rigorously and sensitively, all the while sharpening your ability to communicate orally and in writing with your peers and tutors.

Anthropology Pathway (starts in September 2015)

This pathway familiarises you with anthropological studies of cultures and societies around the world – from Africa and Asia to Latin America and Europe. It introduces you to anthropological debates concerning exchange, religion and ritual, and everyday culture. You gain expertise on similarities and differences between human societies. You join a vibrant community of anthropologists who are engaged in research and public debates about real-world problems. 

Criminology Pathway

This pathway – taught in the interdisciplinary School of Law, Politics and Sociology – introduces you to the main concepts and theories in criminology, including historical and contemporary perspectives. It enables you to ‘think like a criminologist’ in relation to important key themes and ideas. You learn about the structure of the criminal justice system and also address issues in relation to punishment, social control and deviance, together with a variety of contemporary criminological perspectives that explore the relationship between crime and society.

What will I achieve?

This pathway gives you a well-developed understanding of recent debates in criminology and a good overview of the type of research that criminologists carry out. In addition to equipping you with a sound knowledge of theories of crime and punishment and the workings of the criminal justice system, the pathway helps you develop a range of transferable skills, such as critical thinking and analysis, and teaches you how to bring a questioning perspective to significant social issues. During seminars, you learn how to work effectively with others during discussion and group presentations. You also learn to work independently and to plan your own work.

Career paths

The pathway is a great way to signal to employers that you are interested in careers in the criminal justice system (such as the police, probation work, prisons, youth justice). You may decide to pursue criminology at postgraduate level here at Sussex. 

Education Pathway

This pathway – offered by the School of Education and Social Work – provides a historical, political and theoretical background to current educational policy and practice in the UK. It introduces you to how curricula are constructed, and to how teaching, assessment and learner identity are framed by this. The pathway also critically looks at how schools and other educational institutions include and exclude particular groups of children and youth. Seminal educational theories and philosophies are discussed. The pathway allows you to follow, understand and critically assess what is happening at primary, secondary and tertiary level in the UK today and how you as a student have been and are affected by educational policy and practice.

The Department of Education at Sussex has been a pioneer of school-based teacher education and educational research for over 40 years. We continue to work closely with primary and secondary schools in the region through cutting-edge research and training programmes. Our provision was graded ‘outstanding’ in primary and ‘good’ in secondary in our 2014 Ofsted inspection. All this informs our scholarship and teaching, which foregrounds a social justice approach to education.

Our well-known professors and lecturers are also great teachers excited about offering this wide-ranging academic pathway relevant to undergraduate students from many disciplines and backgrounds.

What will I achieve?

This pathway provides you with knowledge and understanding of different education systems, the ability to discuss and critically assess policy and practice, to reflect on your own learning and to use research to back up your opinions. 

Career paths

The Education Pathway helps you start your career in teaching at either primary or secondary level, in counselling, youth work, educational psychology or in educational environments such as charities, Children’s Services or Children’s Rights in the UK or overseas. 

English Language Teaching Pathway

This pathway – offered by the Sussex Centre for Language Studies – provides a comprehensive and rigorous introduction to the principles of effective language teaching. You explore the principles of second language acquisition and gain a wide range of practical skills for teaching English to adults. You also receive valuable hands-on teaching experience in live classes with volunteer adult learners as an integral part of the pathway, working closely with their peers under the guidance of an experienced tutor to deliver a coherent series of lessons. Observation and feedback of both peers and experienced tutors within the Sussex Centre for Language Studies are key components of the pathway, providing an ongoing opportunity to relate theory to the realities of the classroom and facilitating reflective practice. In addition, you experience language learning from the learner’s perspective through a series of lessons in an unknown natural language delivered in the first term.

The pathway is taught by practising teachers and trainers in the Centre for Language Studies who, between them, have decades of experience teaching English in a wide range of contexts in the UK and overseas.

What will I achieve?

On successful completion of the pathway, you are eligible for the award of a widely recognised professional ELT qualification: the Trinity College London Level 5 Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (Trinity Cert TESOL). This is recognised by the British Council as an initial qualification for teaching for accredited language course providers in the UK, and is widely recognised overseas as evidence of competence to practise. It is a qualification typically required by organisations such as the British Council and International House for teaching in their affiliates overseas.

Career paths

This pathway will appeal to students with an interest in language and teaching, and a desire to work in a people-centred profession where opportunities for creativity and variety are almost limitless.

Professional training in ELT can lead to a number of career options. For many, their qualification provides a ‘licence to travel’, allowing them to travel to and work in destinations such as South America or the Far East. Others may seek employment as language teachers closer to home, or move into materials writing, ELT publishing or marketing. Alternatively, further experience and qualifications may lead to a career in teacher training or academic management.  

Entrepreneurship Pathway

This pathway introduces you to the different aspects of entrepreneurial behaviour. You gain knowledge of core business and management concepts and frameworks, guiding you through the process of starting up a venture to the management of maturing organisations. The pathway also sheds light on the technological, environmental, international and social aspects of entrepreneurship. 

Global Studies Pathway (starts in September 2015)

This pathway offers you the opportunity to study global processes of political, economic, social and cultural transformation with a specialist focus on sub-Saharan Africa or South Asia in the School of Global Studies. You join an interdisciplinary community of world-leading faculty who are actively involved in understanding global transformations and the role of sub- Saharan Africa and South Asia in the contemporary world, and gain a dynamic understanding of these fascinating and fast-changing regions. 

Heritage Pathway (starts in September 2015)

This pathway focuses on the objects, monuments and institutions that make up cultural heritage, and considers the issues in presenting and exhibiting heritage. It looks at material from the past and also at relatively recent objects and monuments. Heritage now occupies a significant part of our cultural industries and familiarity with the scope and problems of heritage increases your opportunities for employment in various aspects of the heritage industry. 

Human Rights Pathway (starts in September 2015)

This pathway introduces the principles and practice of human rights in an international context. It examines how human rights are understood by different kinds of organisations, from social movements to international agencies like those of the United Nations. Applying these understandings to contexts of conflict and mass displacement, and looking at the role of the state, at law and at people’s own sense of morality and justice at the local level, the pathway will enable you to understand how human rights work at the international and regional level. 

International Business Pathway 

This pathway aims to provide you with an understanding of the international business environment and to introduce strategies managers can use to seek opportunities and deal with challenges in overseas environments.

Sussex is a great place to study this pathway:

  • our faculty in the field of international business are passionate about their subject and and highly research active
  • our diverse student community acts as a practical laboratory for this pathway. Throughout your studies, you can apply concepts while communicating with others from different backgrounds and learn to adjust to cultural differences as a first step to becoming a successful international business manager
  • our Library provides access to a wide variety of books, academic and non-academic journals, newspapers, magazines and online databases to help you gain a solid understanding of international business.

What will I achieve?

The global business content is continuously developing and this pathway aims to equip you with skills such as critical thinking, analysis and evaluation. You develop:

  • qualitative skills from the analysis of specific country and company cases discussed during lectures and seminars
  • quantitative skills from statistical analysis of data that can be used to showcase new trends and patterns.

Career paths

This pathway enables you to understand the vagaries of doing business in an international context. It exposes you to political and economic developments in international environments that pose opportunities and challenges for international business. It also enables you to understand differences in culture that act as barriers in communicating and negotiating with managers from foreign countries and firms.

Our graduates start their careers well equipped with knowledge about the global business context and can take informed decisions while working as managers in multinational companies, or as international entrepreneurs. 

International Education and Development Pathway (starts in September 2015)

This pathway – drawing on research in the Centre for International Education – engages critically with contemporary educational issues, focusing on the challenges facing resource-constrained and rapidly expanding educational systems. This pathway is for you if you are interested in broadening your views on education, working internationally in an NGO, development or multilateral agency, or working as a teacher. 

Language Pathway

This pathway enables you to study a language (Arabic, British Sign Language, Mandarin Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese or Spanish) and develop a deep understanding and grasp of that language and its associated culture(s). You can start each language from beginner level or – for French and Spanish – at intermediate or advanced level if you have prior knowledge.

You are taught in small seminar groups by experienced native or near-native speakers of the language. You practise, and are assessed on, your spoken and written production and understanding of your chose language. You build close working relationships with other students on your pathway as you progress in your studies.

Each term you have two classes for three or four hours per week. Additionally, you study independently for an average of a further four to six hours per week. This may entail working in groups outside the classes to prepare for assessed coursework tasks. You are encouraged to make use of the virtual learning platform (Study Direct), the Language Learning Centre and the Language Café.

What will I achieve?

You develop your communication skills and your intercultural awareness. An understanding of another language enriches your understanding of your first language and develops your confidence.

On completion of a Language Pathway, you can opt for the award of ‘... with proficiency in (a language)’ at intermediate or advanced level, or advanced for professional purposes, to be recorded on your degree certificate as a named part of your single-honours course, for example:

  • BA (Hons) in International Relations with proficiency in Arabic (Intermediate)
  • BSc (Hons) in Business and Management Studies with proficiency in Mandarin Chinese (Intermediate)
  • BA (Hons) in Film Studies with proficiency in French for Professional Purposes (Advanced).

Career paths

Language competence is a transferable skill and knowledge of a language – even at beginner level – enhances any employment profile. Students who have studied a language are confident communicators and valued by employers. They find seasonal and part-time work in fields such as charity work, communications, entertainment, marketing and sales, sporting events, travel and tourism.

Graduates can use their language skills in numerous occupations in business, the care industries, event management, finance, import and export, distribution, information technologies, the media, public services, web design and optimisation, and many others. 

Legal Studies Pathway

This pathway – offered by the School of Law, Politics and Sociology – offers an exciting opportunity for you to learn about the law and its effect and importance to society. It introduces you to the English legal system and aspects of international law, and the relationship between law, morality and politics.

The pathway will appeal to those interested in exploring the big questions of how we order society and the importance of the role of law in society, and to those who wish to boost their employability.

What will I achieve?

The pathway provides you with important skills such as being able to analyse key cases and statutes. It also helps you develop your ability to construct an argument and present your opinions. All of these skills are incredibly attractive to prospective employers. In addition, knowledge of the law and how it works is of interest to a wide range of employers in fields such as business, public relations, human resources, broadcast media, policy development or politics.

Career paths

The study of law is an enriching, stimulating and fascinating experience, whether you wish to become a lawyer or not: graduates embark on a huge range of different careers.

The Legal Studies Pathway provides an excellent introduction to the law for those considering pursuing the Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL), a one-year graduate course you can take to pursue a legal career after your first degree, at Sussex or elsewhere. 

Middle Eastern Studies Pathway

This pathway offers you the opportunity to study the modern Middle East, including its history, culture, politics and religion. It aims to significantly expand your understanding by challenging media stereotypes and by introducing you to the complexities of the region.

The pathway looks at the core of the Middle East – the Arab provinces of the Ottoman Empire – as well as Israel and North Africa. It also includes consideration of Islam and its relationship to other religious traditions represented in the region, as well as the social and cultural dynamics that underlie the politics of the region. 

As a student on this pathway, you are part of a dynamic community of world-leading scholars studying the Middle East and related regions from within a wide range of academic disciplines.

What will I achieve?

This pathway furthers your awareness of other cultures, a skill highly valued by employers.

Organisational Leadership Pathway

This pathway – offered by the School of Business, Management and Economics – offers business-related training to students on non-business single-honours courses. It is a great opportunity to enhance knowledge sharing between students across disciplines at the University of Sussex.

Leadership is required to achieve organisational goals. To initiate changes, leaders adopt skills enabling them to influence people to work towards the same direction in achieving anticipated goals. This pathway focuses on various styles of leadership and current debate in both research and practice. You address contemporary issues faced by leaders and enhance your personal development to become an effective leader on your future career path.

Our Organisational Leadership team consists of members who have extensive experience of research and practice in industry. We are looking forward to sharing our expertise with undergraduate students from different disciplines.

What will I achieve?

Through the use of learning activities such as case studies, simulations and role-playing, we equip you with relevant skills enabling you to work effectively with people, to solve complex problems and to make efficient decisions, all of which are skills expected of an effective leader. To enhance your problem-solving skills, you learn how to critically analyse a problem, objectively evaluate the problem, and constructively synthesise solutions to the problem. Most importantly, this pathway aims to help you work towards self-development to gain insights about your strengths and weaknesses – areas where your potential can be enhanced – and how you can go about maximising your potential as a leader.  

Career paths

This pathway allows you to gain complementary skills from an area that is outside your single-honours course, helping you become a more viable candidate in an increasingly competitive job market.

As you go through this pathway, you gain confidence communicating your ideas to others, obtain skills to effectively managing high-performing groups and teams, and become better negotiators when dealing with any complex dilemmas. You are well prepared to take on leadership positions in any career path you aspire to follow. 

Philosophy Pathway

This pathway gives you a grounding in philosophical thinking, introduces you to major historical philosophers and enables you to examine key questions in four major and complementary areas: human nature, politics, religion and science. On this pathway, you learn to think and argue clearly, which is highly valued by employers and will help you in your future career. 

Psychology Pathway (starts in September 2015)

This pathway engages you in a wide-ranging and lively examination of psychological research and its applications, shedding light on a fascinating interplay of behaviour, cognition, motivation, emotion and social relationships. You are also introduced to key applications in professional contexts – from organisational and forensic analysis to educational, health and clinical practice. 

Strategic Management Pathway (starts in September 2015)

This pathway introduces you to the thinking and tools around strategic analysis, design and execution. You gain knowledge on core business and management concepts and sharpen your analytical skills towards a holistic understanding of the business environment. The pathway focuses on competition in dynamic environments, and on creating strategies to adapt to changes and to develop an advantage. 

Trading Pathway 

This pathway looks at financial markets trading. It focuses on the processes that form the trade lifecycle and helps you develop key skills such as technical analysis. Sussex is the only university in the UK to offer such a pathway and you are taught by expert faculty with leading industry status. This makes the pathway a very attractive choice compared to high-cost intern training offered by third-party professional institutions. This pathway could lead you into employment in financial institutions such as investment banks, execution-only brokers, advisory brokers, hedge funds, exchanges and clearing houses. 

The University is expanding the range of opportunities it offers to undertake placements as part of your studies. Placements provide you with the opportunity to gain new perspectives, experience and skills that employers are looking for. 

Voluntary placements 

Some subject areas offer you an opportunity to choose to undertake a placement (for one full year) that you can apply for once you have started your course here. Normally, full-year placements occur between the second and final year of a course. It is University policy that students on a year-long placement (usually 40 weeks) should normally receive payment for their work. For voluntary placements, the University organises and manages the process through which students apply for and undertake placements. To support you, our Careers and Employability Centre runs an eight-week Placement Preparation Programme

Research placements 

Some courses in the sciences – such as the MChem in Chemistry (research placement), the MPhys in Physics (research placement) or the MSci in Zoology (research placement) – offer research placements for high-performing students, where you spend the summer vacations throughout your studies working in research groups at Sussex, giving you the opportunity to get involved in research from the very start of your studies. You receive a stipend to cover living expenses during your summer vacation placement each year. 

Integrated placements 

Some subject areas require you to take a professional/industrial placement as an integrated and pre-defined part of a course. Normally, full-year placements occur between the second and final year of a course. Other subject areas offer opportunities for students to gain work experience, focused on a particular topic, as part of some taught modules. 

Key facts

  • enhance your employability: more than 80 per cent of employers surveyed said they actively sought graduates who had studied abroad (QS Global Employer Survey Report 2011)
  • one of the best-supported study abroad programmes in the UK
  • develop an international perspective at an overseas university in Asia, Australia, Europe or North, Central and South America 

Visit International and Study Abroad: Destinations

Career benefits of studying abroad

Studying abroad makes you stand out from other students when entering the job market. Following a period living and studying abroad, you will return with increased confidence and independence, adept at problemsolving and decision-making. You will have made a new network of friends and may have improved your current language skills or learnt a new language. Employers highly rate these skills as they can be applied in today’s global career paths.

Sussex recognises the value of language skills in preparing its students to become global citizens: as well as our dual-language courses (vist the Languages subject area), we offer students in most subjects the opportunity to take language electives as part of their single-honours courses (visit Sussex Choice: make the most of your course).

After studying abroad, some of our graduates have gone on to careers as translators • sales and marketing professionals • international recruitment consultants • Refugee Projects co-ordinator for the British Red Cross abroad • a CNN presenter • international mortgage administrators • teachers of English in Venezuela, Spain, Germany, Japan and France.

We offer a huge range of destinations across Asia, Australia, Europe, and North, Central and South America. 

Erasmus+

Erasmus +We offer one of the best-supported European study abroad programmes of any UK university. Pioneered independently by Sussex in the 1960s, our study abroad scheme is supported by the European Commission through Erasmus+. Students on this programme usually benefit from nonmeans- tested grants. 

Visit British Council: Erasmus

Study abroad duration and destinations

If you are taking a course with an American Studies component, a dual-language course, or one of our joint courses involving a language, you spend Year 3 of your four-year course abroad. Students from most other courses can apply to do a study-abroad period during their degree. 

View our course listings at Undergraduate study

American Studies students study at one of a range of universities across North America. Language-degree students study at a university in Europe (or La Réunion or Québec, Canada, for French, and Latin America for Spanish) where their language of study is spoken. Language students can also apply to the language assistant scheme managed by the British Council for their year abroad.

Visit British Council: Language assistants

A growing number of overseas universities now have courses taught in English, which enables Sussex students without the necessary language skills to study abroad. Students can also take Erasmus Intensive Language Courses in-country before their term starts.

The University is increasing the opportunities for students to go on short-term non-credit-bearing Summer Schools overseas. In 2013, a number of students benefitted from summer programmes in China and Hong Kong.

For more information on study abroad opportunities, email sussexabroad@sussex.ac.uk

Visit Study abroad for Sussex students

Entry requirements

Sussex welcomes applications from students of all ages who show evidence of the academic maturity and broad educational background that suggests readiness to study at degree level. For most students, this will mean formal public examinations; details of some of the most common qualifications we accept are shown below. If you are an overseas student, refer to Applicants from outside the UK.

All teaching at Sussex is in the English language. If your first language is not English, you will also need to demonstrate that you meet our English language requirements.

A level

Typical offer: AAB-ABB

International Baccalaureate

Typical offer: 34 points overall

For more information refer to International Baccalaureate.

Access to HE Diploma

Typical offer: Pass the Access to HE Diploma with at least 45 credits at Level 3, of which 30 credits must be at Distinction and 15 credits at Merit or higher.

Specific entry requirements: The Access to HE Diploma should be in the humanities or social sciences.

For more information refer to Access to HE Diploma.

Advanced Diploma

Typical offer: Pass with grade B in the Diploma and A in the Additional and Specialist Learning.

Specific entry requirements: The Additional and Specialist Learning must be an A-level (ideally in a humanities or social science subject).

For more information refer to Advanced Diploma.

BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma

Typical offer: DDD-DDM

For more information refer to BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma.

European Baccalaureate

Typical offer: Overall result of at least 77%

For more information refer to European Baccalaureate.

Finnish Ylioppilastutkinto

Typical offer: Overall average result in the final matriculation examinations of at least 6.0

French Baccalauréat

Typical offer: Overall final result of at least 13/20

German Abitur

Typical offer: Overall result of 2.0 or better

Irish Leaving Certificate (Higher level)

Typical offer: AAAABB-AABBBB

Italian Diploma di Maturità or Diploma Pass di Esame di Stato

Typical offer: Final Diploma mark of at least 81/100

Scottish Highers and Advanced Highers

Typical offer: AAABB-AABBB

For more information refer to Scottish Highers and Advanced Highers.

Spanish Titulo de Bachillerato (LOGSE)

Typical offer: Overall average result of at least 8.0

Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma

Typical offer: Pass the Core plus AB in two A-levels

For more information refer to Welsh Baccalaureate.

English language requirements

IELTS 6.5 overall, with not less than 6.0 in each section. Pearson's Test of English (Academic) with 62 overall with at least 56 in all four skills.

For more information, refer to alternative English language requirements.

For more information about the admissions process at Sussex:

Undergraduate Admissions,
Sussex House,
University of Sussex, Falmer,
Brighton BN1 9RH, UK
T +44 (0)1273 678416
F +44 (0)1273 678545
E ug.enquiries@sussex.ac.uk

Fees and funding

Fees

Home/EU students: £9,0001
Channel Island and Isle of Man students: £9,0002
Overseas students: £17,0003

1 The fee shown is for the academic year 2014.
2 The fee shown is for the academic year 2014.
3 The fee shown is for the academic year 2014.

To find out about your fee status, living expenses and other costs, visit further financial information.

Funding

The funding sources listed below are for the subject area you are viewing and may not apply to all degrees listed within it. Please check the description of the individual funding source to make sure it is relevant to your chosen degree.

To find out more about funding and part-time work, visit further financial information.

Care Leavers Award (2014)

Region: UK
Level: UG

For students have been in council care before starting at Sussex.

First-Generation Scholars Scheme (2014)

Region: UK
Level: UG

The scheme is targeted to help students from relatively low income families – ie those whose family income is up to £42,620.

First-Generation Scholars Scheme EU Student Award (2014)

Region: Europe (Non UK)
Level: UG

£3,000 fee waiver for UG Non-UK European Union (EU) students whose family income is below £25,000

Sussex Excellence Scholarship (2014)

Region: UK, Europe (Non UK), International (Non UK/EU)
Level: UG

Merit-based scholarship for undergraduate students

For more information on scholarships go to the Scholarships web pages.

Careers and profiles

This course prepares you for employment in museums and galleries, and for fields such as publishing, the media and public relations.

Recent graduates have taken up a wide range of posts with employers including: event organiser at the Watts Gallery • exhibition assistant at Momart • music intern at the Whitechapel Gallery • patrons administrator at the Tate • personal assistant to managing director at R Holt & Co Ltd • trade analyst at AKA Events • social media intern at Loudhouse • account executive at Katch PR • freelance director at RSA UK (Ridley Scott Associates).

Specific employer destinations listed are taken from recent Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education surveys, which are produced annually by the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

Careers and employability

For employers, it’s not so much what you know, but what you can do with your knowledge that counts. The experience and skills you’ll acquire during and beyond your studies will make you an attractive prospect. Initiatives such as SussexPlus, delivered by the Careers and Employability Centre, help you turn your skills to your career advantage. It’s good to know that 92 per cent of our graduates are in work or further study (Which? University).

For more information on the full range of initiatives that make up our career and employability plan for students, visit Careers and alumni.

Charlotte's student perspective

Charlotte Sluter

‘At Sussex you have a wide choice of options, ranging from Byzantine art to contemporary African art, plus more theory-based modules focusing on the wider visual culture.

‘The art history professors and tutors at Sussex are very friendly and welcoming. I’ve had a fantastic experience studying art history at Sussex, gaining lifelong friends and happy memories.’

Charlotte Sluter
Art History Graduate

Isabella's student perspective

Isabella Smith

'During my time studying Art History at Sussex, I’ve taken core modules that introduced me to movements and periods initially outside my comfort zone but that I’ve ended up finding very interesting, alongside modules on topics that I loved already and wanted to learn more about.

‘The Art History faculty is research led, so we’ve occasionally had lectures on subjects where papers hadn’t even been published yet, which I found exciting. There’s a good amount of support available from tutors through the weekly office hours, and great resources available in both the main Library and the Art History Slide Library.

‘I’ve also just completed a course provided by the University’s Widening Participation scheme that has trained me as a gallery educator, allowing me to lead workshops during the Brighton Photo Biennial, which has been invaluable in preparing for a future career in the arts.’

Isabella Smith
BA in Art History

Colin's career perspective

Colin McKenzie

‘My three years at Sussex couldn’t have been happier. I made some of my closest friends there and the Art History course was more fulfilling than I had thought possible.

‘Then, as now, Sussex enjoyed a fantastic reputation for art history. It was an incredibly strong department where I experienced some inspirational teaching.
I particularly enjoyed and benefited from the contextual options I took alongside my main subject – an approach that really broadened my outlook and interests.

‘My degree has served me very well, giving me skills and knowledge that have proved invaluable throughout my career. But of equal importance,
I think, is the way that Sussex influenced my life view, as a place that was liberal, passionate, caring, political and truly international.’

Colin McKenzie
Director of the Charleston Trust

Contact our School

School of History, Art History and Philosophy

The School of History, Art History and Philosophy brings together staff and students from some of the University's most vibrant and successful departments, each of which is a locus of world-leading research and outstanding teaching. Our outlook places a premium on intellectual flexibility and the power of the imagination.

How do I find out more?

For more information, contact the subject coordinator:
Art History, Arts A, 
University of Sussex, Falmer, 
Brighton BN1 9QN, UK
E ug.admissions@arthistory.sussex.ac.uk
T +44 (0)1273 678001 
F +44 (0)1273 678434
Department of Art History

Visit us

Campus tours

Not able to attend one of our Open Days? Then book on to one of our weekly guided campus tours.

Mature-student information session

If you are 21 or over, and thinking about starting an undergraduate degree at Sussex, you may want to attend one of our mature student information sessions. Running between October and December, they include guidance on how to approach your application, finance and welfare advice, plus a guided campus tour with one of our current mature students.

Self-guided visits

If you are unable to make any of the visit opportunities listed, drop in Monday to Friday year round and collect a self-guided tour pack from Sussex House reception.

Jonathan's staff perspective

Jonathan Bridges

‘Sussex provides world-leading teaching and excellent academic facilities, with a vibrant student life in a fantastic location. All of this meant that I left Sussex with a unique set of experiences and a degree that has prepared me for my future.

‘Joining Student Recruitment Services at the University has enabled me to share my experiences of Sussex with others. Coming to an Open Day gives you the opportunity to meet our research-active academics and our current students, while exploring our beautiful campus. But don’t worry if you can’t make an Open Day, there’s plenty of other opportunities to visit Sussex. Check out our Visit us and Open Days pages or our Facebook page to find out more.

‘I’ve loved every moment of my time at Sussex – these have been the best years of my life.’

Jonathan Bridges
Graduate Intern, Student Recruitment Services

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