Crowds and Identities: John Drury’s Research Group

People

 

Photo of John Drury
John Drury

Reader in Social Psychology 
John conducts research on crowds, collective action, social movements, mass emergencies and disasters, crowding and crowd safety.
EJ.Drury@sussex.ac.uk

Photo of Sanj ChoudhurySanj Choudhury

Research Assistant 
Sanj completed her MSc and BSc dissertations under John's supervision, and is now the Project Support Assistant for the ESRC-funded Beyond Contagion project. 
Esanj@sussex.ac.uk

Photo of Selin Tekin.Selin Tekin

PhD Student
Selin's research will be looking at how marginalized groups succeed or fail in mobilizing support from the wider public following a disaster (especially Grenfell Tower).
E: st440@sussex.ac.uk

Photo of Patricio SaavedraPatricio Saavedra 

PhD Student  
Patricio focuses his research on protesters' behaviour, and how it can be affected by the perceptions of the political context.  
EP.Saavedra-morales@sussex.ac.uk

Photo of Evangelos NtontisEvangelos Ntontis

PhD Student 
Evangelos uses the social identity approach to study group processes in community responses to flooding, community resilience, and well-being. 
EE.Ntontis@sussex.ac.uk

Photo of Khalifah AlfadhliKhalifah Alfadhli

PhD Student 
Khalifah is conducting a research project about psycho-social support among the Syrian refugees in Jordan, using the social identity approach. 
Ekhta20@sussex.ac.uk

 

Photo of Sara VestergrenSara Vestergren

PhD Student  
Sara's research lies within the social identity tradition with a focus and interest in crowds and collective action.  
Esara.vestergren@liu.se

Photo of Roger Ball.Roger Ball 

Research Fellow
Roger is currently working on the ESRC-funded 'Beyond Contagion' project. 

Photo of Fergus Neville.Fergus Neville 

Research Fellow
Fergus is currently working on the ESRC-funded 'Beyond Contagion' project. 

Photo of Peanut.Peanut

Mascot  
Peanut is the offical mascot for the Crowds & Identities research group and also happens to be the best dog in the world. Due to the fact that she is a doggo, it is unlikely Peanut will produce any publishable research. However, she remains a valued member of the team as she is so adorable.