Sussex Centre for Language Studies

Reference links

  • Oxford Dictionaries - the University Library subscribes to the full, unabridged bilingual Oxford dictionaries in Chinese, French, German, Italian and Spanish.
  • Google Translate offers free machine translation of web pages or texts between over 40 languages, as well as translated search and a translator's toolkit. Whilst machine translation could never match a human, there's plenty of useful and fascinating stuff here.
  • Oxford Reference Online - fully searchable access to 100 key dictionaries and reference works, including several bilinguals (try this link off-campus).
  • WordReference.com has the Pocket Oxford dictionaries available to all, alongside many others.
  • Lexicool.com is a search engine linking to over 7000 bilingual and multilingual dictionaries and glossaries freely available on the Internet.
  • alphaDictionary from Robert Beard - a comprehensive set of links to dictionaries in around 300 languages, as well as other dictionary-related pages. Dr Beard previously ran yourDictionary.com.
  • bab.la offers a range of user-generated dictionaries in many languages, alongside quizzes, games, vocabulary and conjugations.
  • Online Books Page at the University of Pennsyvania is a good starting point for browsing the treasure trove of online literature - there's a list of links to foreign language repositories.
  • Useful phrases and greetings in lots of languages.
  • Omniglot is an impressive guide to over 150 different alphabets, syllabaries and other writing systems, with plenty of background information and written samples.
  • Language Museum provides written samples of around 2000 world languages, together with a translation, number of speakers and linguistic classification.
  • Worldlanguage.com is a commercial site covering less languages, but provides much more information about certain languages, drawn from Katzner's Languages of the World book plus some audio samples.
  • Metaverse - Mark Rosenfelder's collection of linguistic oddments, featuring the numbers one to ten in over 5000 languages and the sci.lang FAQ.
  • Words of the World is a great little collection of bite-size videos about particular words by experts, mainly from the University of Nottingham School of Cultures, Languages and Area Studies.
  • Language Identifier from Xerox can help you work out what language a document is written in.
  • Keyboard layouts for many countries.
  • TypeIt provides a simple interface to help you type IPA phonemic symbols. IPA Typewriter and the Unicode Phonemic Typewriter do much the same thing for English sounds, whilst PhoTransEdit goes a step further and transcribes small English texts into broad phonetic transcriptions for you, as well as providing a phonetic keyboard and a library of phonetic transcriptions.
  • Map Machine from National Geographic gives you dynamic zoomable maps of the world (and Mars!). Less dynamically, the Perry-Castañeda Map Library has scanned thousands of paper maps. Nasa's Visible Earth gives the bigger picture...
  • The World Clock - current local times across the world.
  • Currency Converter - this pop-up window from xe.com shows you how much your money's worth in another country today.
  • Grant & Cutler - online catalogues of one of the UK's leading suppliers of foreign language books and media. You could also try Bay Language Books.