Wood-engraved Pictorial Initials in Victorian Periodicals: Some Assembly Required, by Lorraine Janzen Kooistra

Lorraine Janzen Kooistra is Professor of English and the Co-director of the Centre for Digital Humanities at Ryerson University, Toronto. She is co-investigator on the Children’s Literature Archive (CLA) project and the founder and principal investigator of the Yellow Nineties Online, a digital research environment for the study of aesthetic periodicals of 1890s Great Britain.…

Uncovering the Coalbrookdale Company catalogues: Ironware and Illustration, by Georgina Grant

Georgina is a Curator for the Ironbridge Gorge Museum Trust, based at Blists Hill Victorian Town. Her role is varied, ranging from the development and delivery of the interpretation of the 52-acre site, to installing Quaker costume displays and giving talks on a traditional Victorian Christmas. Georgina will be speaking further on the research presented…

‘Magic into Print’ – some thoughts on the history of wood engraving, by Brian Maidment

Brian Maidment is Professor of the History of Print at Liverpool John Moores University. His research interests are focused on the nineteenth century, especially mass circulation, popular and illustrated literature, and he has published widely on a broad range of topics, although more recently he has concentrated his interests on Victorian periodicals and early nineteenth-century…

Through the Looking Glass: Wood Engraving, Photography and Telegraphy, by Natalie Hume

Natalie Hume is a PhD candidate at the Courtauld Institute of Art. Her thesis, ‘The Graphic Representation of America in Britain, 1865–1880’ is undertaken as part of Scrambled Messages – the Telegraphic Imaginary 1857–1900, an intercollegiate research project with Kings College London and the Institute of Making, UCL. Natalie will be speaking at the Woodpeckings…

Knight and Beggar, by Huddie Hamper

We collaborated with UCA Rochester on a project for 16 to 18-year-old art students. Huddie Hamper created a woodcut inspired by ‘Prince Bahman and the Dervish’ in Dalziel’s Arabian Nights’ Entertainments (i.e. The Thousand and One Nights), 1865. Here, Hamper reflects on the creative process behind his woodcut ‘Knight and Beggar’: This work was heavily influenced by the…

“Who cares for you? You’re nothing but a pack of cards!” By Maisy Plummer

We collaborated with UCA Rochester to pilot a project for 16 to 18-year-old art students. Here we publish Maisy Plummer’s reimagining of the Dalziel Brothers: a coruscating satire that brings Victorian illustrations into dialogue with our contemporary moment. The illustrations Plummer used are from Carroll’s Alice books, Valentine’s Warne’s Home Annual, Rowley’s Gamosagammon, and the magazine London Society. Scroll down…