Department of Economics

photo of L. Alan Winters

Prof L. Alan Winters

Post:Professor of Economics (Economics, Sussex Centre for Migration Research)
Location:JUBILEE BUILDING Room 280
Email:L.A.Winters@sussex.ac.uk

Telephone numbers
Internal:8332
UK:01273 678332
International:+44 1273 678332

Research expertise:
download vCarddownload vCard to your mobile

Biography

L Alan Winters is Professor of Economics in the University of Sussex. He is a Research Fellow and former Programme Director of the Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR, London) and Fellow of IZA, Munich. From 2008 to 2011 he was Chief Economist at the British government’s Department for International Development (DFID), and from 2004 to 2007 Director of the Development Research Group of the World Bank, the world’s largest and leading group of development economists. He has previously worked as Division Chief and Research Manager (1994-99) and Economist (1983-85) in the World Bank and in the Universities of Cambridge, Bristol, Bangor and Birmingham.  He has been editor of the World Bank Economic Review, associate editor of the Economic Journal, and is now editor of The World Trade Review; heserves on several editorial boards. He has also advised, inter alia, the OECD, DFID, the Commonwealth Secretariat, the European Commission, the European Parliament, UNCTAD, the WTO, and the Inter-American Development Bank.

 

L Alan Winters is a leading specialist on the empirical and policy analysis of international trade, especially in developing countries, and has recently also worked on migration, the brain drain and economic growth. He has published over two hundred articles and chapters and thirty books in areas such as regional trading arrangements, non-tariff barriers, European integration, transition economies’ trade, international labour migration, agricultural protection, trade and poverty, and the world trading system. He has also published on small economies, global warming, pricing behavior and econometrics. His current programme includes work on migration, trade and poverty, growth and China and the World Trading System.