Centre for Life History and Life Writing Research

Life history and life writing research uses life story - whether in the form of oral history, personal narrative, autobiography or biography - as a primary source for the study of history and culture.

Life history and life writing research uses life story - whether in the form of oral history, personal narrative, autobiography or biography - as a primary source for the study of history and culture. Life stories capture the relation between the individual and society, the local and the national, the past and present and the public and private experience. Research involves grappling with theories of memory, relationship and self representation, and with debates about literacy and orality. Many disciplines contribute to the field, including history, sociology, anthropology, literary philosophy, cultural studies and psychology. Life history and life writing researchers present their work in many forms. As well as academic publications, we contribute to radio and television documentaries, auto/biographical drama, reminiscence work, digital and video presentations and exhibitions. Life history and life writing research is, of necessity, concerned with ethics and power relationships, and with the potential for advocacy and empowerment.

Director of CLHLWR Dr Margaretta Jolly co-edits new book on life writing and human rights work:

We Shall Bear Witness: Life Narratives and Human Rights We Shall Bear Witness cover Sept 2014

  Edited by Meg Jensen and Margaretta Jolly  

Wisconsin Studies in Autobiography

Published in July 2014, University of Wisconsin Press

Personal testimonies are the life force of human rights work, and rights claims have brought profound power to the practice of life writing. This volume explores the connections and conversations between human rights and life writing through a dazzling, international collection of essays by survivor-writers, scholars, and human rights advocates.

Download the flyer HERE.

 

 

'With God Against Man'

UK premiere of a new documentary film by Russian-American filmmaker Semyon Pinkhasov

30 September 2014
Jubilee 144 (please note room change)
4pm
University of Sussex
Falmer, Brighton, BN1 9RH

FREE EVENT

 Autumn term ‘With God Against Man’ UK première 30 September 2014 Jubilee 144 4pm University of S2014

Tracing the footsteps of the refugees of 1940, the film follows a group of families who received visas from Aristides de Sousa Mendes – Portuguese consul in Bordeaux in June 1940 – on a June 2013 remembrance "journey on the road to freedom" from Paris to Lisbon. This documentary includes a lot of fresh archival footage of June 1940 and raises important questions about how, beyond public commemoration, the events of June 1940 remain for many an integral part of an intensely experienced private family memory. 

This film screening is sponsored by the Centre for Life History and Life Writing Research with the support of the Centre for the History of War and Society and the Sousa Mendes Foundation.

Mailing list

If you would like to join the Centre for Life History and Life Writing Research mailing list and receive regular updates about events, conferences and publication opportunities in the field of life history, life writing and oral history, please email: M.Jolly@sussex.ac.uk

Twitter

The Centre for Life History & Life Writing Research at the University at Sussex explores life narrative as art, history and social practice.

RT @CRMNH: The Brighton 'Grand Hotel' Bombing: 30th anniversary symposium & drama, 15-16/10 @artsbrighton @WildsparkT tinyurl.com/oc6fkr2

RT @TransBrighton: Drum roll please... The #Brighton #Trans*formed Exhibition launches today! Full details at Facebook.com/BrightonTransf…

Family Ties: Reframing Memory - last day today! Free closing event: film by Lizzie Thynne et al at #PeltzGallery 5pm pic.twitter.com/YAhG63Q1Zt

New website launched, via @SSPLeeds : USING ARCHIVES TO TEACH GENDER gender-archives.leeds.ac.uk pic.twitter.com/ANAVgU8xwh pic.twitter.com/uViOPHHK7p

Exciting new website available, via University of Leeds: USING ARCHIVES TO TEACH GENDER gender-archives.leeds.ac.uk pic.twitter.com/ANAVgU8xwh

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