Business and Management

Marketing research seminars

Marketing research seminars take place on the following Thursdays from 12pm-2pm in Jubilee G30, unless otherwise specified. Click on the seminar title for more information about each seminar and the speaker(s).

Upcoming seminars

No items are currently available.

Past seminars

Spring term 2018
15 February
Getting real about the customer experience – Online service augmentation and shared decision-making with augmented reality (AR)
Tim Hilken (Maastricht University)

Abstract

A variety of firms increasingly leverage AR to enhance their customers’ online experiences. With AR, customers can better visualize offerings, for example by virtually placing IKEA furniture in their homes or trying on the latest style of Ray Ban sunglasses, GAP fashion, or L’Oreal makeup in a virtual mirror. In our first project, we draw on situated cognition theory to show that AR enhances customer value perceptions and decision-making by virtually embedding offerings into the physical environment and simulating a sense of physical control. In our second project, we turn to emerging social applications of AR; we explore how these improve shared decision-making by enabling customers to communicate in a highly visual, context-sensitive manner.

Bio

Tim Hilken is a PhD candidate in Marketing and Supply Chain Management at Maastricht University, School of Business and Economics. His research focuses on how emerging technologies, particularly Augmented Reality (AR), enhance the customer/user experience in B2C and B2B markets. He has published in leading academic journals such as the Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science. As part of the Augmented Research initiative, he works together with business and research partners to study the value potential of AR with the latest applications and devices. Tim teaches a range of marketing and supply chain courses at the Bachelor- and Master-level.

22 March
Elite competition drives the evolution of fashion-style cycles: Quantitative evidence from experiments and music-style data
Robert Kreuzbauer (University of Surrey)

Abstract

Human symbol systems such as art and fashion styles emerge from complex social processes that govern the continuous re-organization of modern societies. Efforts to understand the dynamics of art and fashion cycles have so far been dominated by status-signaling theories, where elite members signal their superior status by introducing new stylistic elements (e.g. fashion-styles) which at first are hard to adopt by low status groups. However, once these stylistic elements have been adopted by low-status groups, elite members would replace them with new ones so their superior status can again be signalled. We propose an alternative explanation based on counter-dominance signaling. There, elite members want others to imitate their symbols; changes only occur when outsider groups successfully challenge the elite by introducing signals that contrast those endorsed by the elite. We use experimental data as well as data containing almost 8 million musical albums released between 1956 and 2015 to provide clear evidence that style-cycles are based on our proposed mechanism of counter-dominance signaling.

Bio

Robert Kreuzbauer is Associate Professor (Reader) in Marketing at Surrey Business School, University of Surrey. He obtained his PhD in Marketing from the University of Innsbruck in Austria. Before joining Surrey Business School he worked at Nanyang Business School, Singapore and at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. Before working in academia he worked as a brand consultant and consumer researcher for one of the largest European industrial design firms. He published his research in leading academic journals such as the Journal of Product Innovation Management, Journal of Experimental Psychology: General; Current Directions in Psychological Science. His main research focuses on perception of strategic signaling to explain phenomena such as fashion-cycles, luxury consumption or how product procedures (e.g. machine- vs. hand-made, digital vs. analog) affect consumer product valuation.

10 May
Regret - Not Choice of a Vice - Characterizes Self-Control Failures
Irene Scopelliti (Cass Business School)

Abstract

In the consumer behavior literature, self-control conflicts are often operationalized as choices between vice and virtue foods. Vices—for example chocolate—are hedonic foods whose consumption is tempting and immediately gratifying but bad for one’s well-being in the long run. Virtues—for example fruit—are utilitarian foods whose consumption is little appealing in the moment but good for one’s health in the long run. Choosing the vice from a vice-virtue choice set is interpreted as a breakdown in self-control. We argue that this definition mischaracterizes self-control conflicts and severely limits the applicability of self-control theories, because it assumes a tradeoff between tastiness and healthiness, associates hedonic consumption with breakdowns in self-control, and does not allow for measuring the severity of self-control failures on the individual level. We suggest to abandon the a-priori categorization of foods into vices and virtues, and to define self-control failures by the anticipated regret of violating one’s long-term goals. We show that this definition accurately characterizes self-control conflicts irrespective of the conflicting short- and long-term goals involved (e.g., whether a consumer believes tastiness and healthiness to be negatively correlated or not). We discuss theoretical and methodological implications for researchers, and advise consumers on how to enhance self-control.

Bio

Irene Scopelliti is a Reader in Marketing at Cass Business School. Her research interests are in the domain of consumer psychology, judgment, and decision making.

Irene holds a Ph.D. in Management from Bocconi University, and before joining Cass she was a Post Doctoral Research Fellow at Carnegie Mellon University, where she worked on the analysis of individual differences in susceptibility to decision making biases and of strategies to mitigate the incidence of these biases in judgment.

Her research has been published in Management Science, Psychological Science, Journal of Product Innovation Management, Psychology & Marketing, and has been featured by major news organizations including Forbes, Time Magazine, BBC News, the New York Times, the Independent, and the Huffington Post.

17 May
Organisational Design and Integration of Successful Service Infusion
Nima Heirati (Queen Mary, University of London)

Abstract

Service infusion is a global trend in manufacturing, where manufacturers increasingly move from an emphasis on products to an emphasis on services and solutions for customers. Although the recent literature emphasised the importance of service infusion, understanding the drivers of successful service infusion is a complex process. Using interview with 20 managers, we show that manufacturers organise service infusion delivery through one or combination of distinct design choices: product business unit responsibility, specialised service business unit, or an external service provider. Using an empirical research from 161 firms and the configuration perspective, we also show there are different constellations of drivers for successful service infusion across distinct organisational design choices. In particular, we employed fuzzy set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA) to investigate how service infusion type, service provider integration, and product complexity interplay in affecting service infusion delivery success and failure. Our findings reveal equifinal configurations to succeed with service infusion across different organisational design choices. For managers, our study highlights the importance of assessing the complexity of services infusion and products to deciding on how to infuse services.

Bio

Dr Nima Heirati is a lecturer in Marketing and Innovation Strategy at the Queen Mary University of London, School of Business and Management. His research relates predominantly to the field of Innovation Strategy, Service Marketing, and Business Relationships with the special focus on Innovation Networks and the Dark-side of Collaboration with Suppliers and Customers. Nima has published in many journals such as Industrial Marketing Management, Journal of Strategic Marketing, Journal of Business and Industrial Marketing, among others. He is currently engaged in different research projects on Service Infusion in Business Networks in collaboration with BERG at the Queen Mary University of London and IfM at the University of Cambridge.

Autumn term 2017
12 October
Eye Buy: Visual Exploration Affects Product Choice
Zachary Estes (Bocconi University)

Abstract

Shoppers prefer centrally-located products, but this can constrain shoppers’ choices and retailers’ sales. So, how can shoppers’ fixation on central products be overcome, and what are the consequences for product choice? We show that attentional priming influences visual exploration of a product display, thereby restricting or broadening product consideration and choice. In a series of studies, priming attention to the periphery (vs. center) affected eye movements toward, mouse clicks on, choice of, and memory of peripherally-located products, and this effect of visual exploration on peripheral product choice was accentuated among impulsive buyers. These results complement and constrain prior theorizing on location-based product choice: Central product choice may be the default, but it is easily and strongly counter-acted by priming broad attention, which impulsive shoppers tend to exhibit naturally.

Bio

Zachary Estes (PhD in Psychology, Princeton University) is Associate Professor of Marketing at Bocconi University in Milan, Italy. He has served as Associate Editor of the Journal Cognitive Science, and has served on the editorial boards of other journals and on the program committees of academic organizations in both psychology and marketing. His theoretical and applied research on cognition, emotion, and consumer behavior has been awarded funding by international granting agencies, and has been published in psychology and marketing journals including Cognitive Psychology, Emotion, Journal of Consumer Psychology, Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, and Psychological Science. He is also the proud winner of teaching awards at the University of Warwick (UK) and Bocconi University (Italy).