Sussex Humanities Lab

Digital Methods Open Workshop Series

This workshop series is aimed at staff and doctoral students, particularly researchers in the humanities and social sciences. The workshops take place on Wednesdays in the Digital Humanities Lab, Silverstone 4-6pm.

Open Workshops Autumn 2018

Registration for the Autumn 2018 workshops is now open.

3 October: ‘Nomad’ / Photogrammetry Workshop (Abira Hussein)

Join us for a demonstration of ‘Nomad’ a Mixed Reality project by Abira Hussein and Sophie Dixon (Mnemoscene) from 1 - 3pm inviting you to explore Somali cultural heritage and tradition in a uniquely immersive way. Wearing the Microsoft HoloLens, you will experience sound recordings from the British Library, digitised objects from the British Museum, and people presented as 3D holograms. From a herdsman sleeping under the night’s sky to a woman winnowing grain to the rhythm of a traditional song, you will be able to encounter heritage objects in the context from which they came.

The afternoon from 4 - 6pm will be filled with a photogrammetry workshop in which participants will learn how to turn 2D photographs into highly realistic 3D models, the same method used to create assets for ‘Nomad’

Please bring along a laptop and be prepared to install a free version of the relevant software prior to the event.

Register at Eventbrite

(Friday) 19 October 11am-1pm: A Media Archaeology of Vector Graphics (Derek Holzer, co-with EMUTE)

The development of any kind of technology combines utopian and dystopian tendencies, and nowhere is that more true than in the development of computer vector graphics. Taking the activation of the AN/FSQ-7 computers at the heart of the SAGE (Semi-Automatic Ground Environment) defense stations in the United States in 1958 as its starting point, this talk explores the military/scientific legacy at the heart of modern computing and attempts by artists of the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s to decouple these tools from their destructive origins. Following this, I would like to invite students to speculate within workgroups on the nature of contemporary techno-scientific developments such as Virtual or Augmented Reality, Artificial Intelligence, location aware devices and so on, in light of their obvious and not so obvious utopian/dystopian qualities.

Register at Eventbrite

7 November: Hands-on computer vision for the digital humanities – match, classify, annotate and compare (Giles Bergel, Oxford)

Computer vision has made fundamental advances in recent years, but has only just begun to be adopted by digital humanists. This workshop will allow participants to try out four open-source software tools developed by the Visual Geometry Group in the University of Oxford. Participants will gain a knowledge of how to perform both instance-based image recognition (matching the same thing) and content-based classification (how to find the same kind of thing) in their own and in sample images, as well as try tools for comparison and annotation

Register at Eventbrite

14 November: Text Analysis using AntConc (Andrew Salway, SHL)

This workshop is for researchers who would like to use automated techniques to analyse the content of one or more text data sets (corpora), and to identify potentially interesting differences between them. The text data could comprise thousands to millions of words of e.g. news stories, novels, survey responses, social media posts, etc.

Participants will use AntConc to make frequency lists, keyword analyses, sorted concordances, n-grams and word clusters, and collocation data. We will also discuss what can be interpreted from the results of such analyses, e.g. under the rubrics of discovery science and corpus-based discourse analysis.

This workshop complements “Advanced Text Analysis” (April 2018), but it is not necessary to have attended that. Participants will need a laptop with AntConc installed and some example text data to work with. Instructions for installing AntConc and example text data will be circulated before the workshop, although participants are encouraged to bring their own data too. Technical assistance will be available in advance of the workshop.

AntConc: http://www.laurenceanthony.net/software/antconc/

Register at Eventbrite

21 November: Digital Forensics in the Archive: Hard Drive Philology and Historical Perspectives  (Thorsten Ries, Gent)   

The workshop will introduce participating archivists, philologists and re­sear­chers from the humanities into basics of forensic imaging / digital preservation of hard drives, and will especially focus on forensic inspection and ana­ly­sis of fo­ren­sic images. During an introductory section, forensic methods and the relevance of historically specific fea­tu­res of legacy hard- and software will be addressed. In the second half of the two-hour workshop, participants will work with a forensic Linux distribution, try out some of the methods, tools and discover some of the historical phenomena embedded in digital materiality.                

Participants will need their own laptop with wireless internet con­nec­ti­vi­ty. In pre­paration for the workshop, everyone will be asked to install and set up a virtual machine with a current version of Caine Linux live system (Virtualbox, VMware, KVM/ Qemu should all work fine). If you don’t feel confident doing this we can offer assistance in the hour before the workshop starts (3-4) in the Digital Humanities Lab. We will load the “evidence” to be analysed during the workshop into the virtual machine.

Register at Eventbrite

 

You should bring a laptop computer to the workshop. The workshop leader may contact you to advise you to install particular software before the session. If you come to the Digital Humanities Lab at 3.30 (half an hour before the session) one of our technical staff can assist you with this.

If you have any questions about this workshop series please email the series convenor, Ben Roberts, in the first instance: b.l.roberts@sussex.ac.uk

Open Workshops Spring 2018

14 Feb: Dataset Publishing and Compliance (Sharon Webb)

This workshop is a practical introduction to datasets, their creation and their publication. It will consider best practice and practical approaches to research data management and introduce participants to the concept of metadata and its importance to describing and archiving digital objects and data. The workshop will also touch upon the importance of digital preservation and introduce participants to current university infrastructures that can help you publish data and therefore help you comply with funding and grant applications requirements.

More details and registration at https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/shl-open-workshop-dataset-publishing-and-compliance-tickets-42861153865

 21 Feb: 3D Visualisation (Ben Jackson)

This workshop will explore the use of 3D visualisation for presenting information to a range of audiences and simulations. The session will be illustrated with current 3D visualisation work in the Sussex Humanities Lab and will conclude with a workshop session intended to demonstrate the practicalities of integrating 3d with interactive online content. 3D visualisation is a large area with wide ranging skill requirements depending on project needs. The intended outcome for newcomers to the area is to illuminate the subject and support discussion with trans disciplinary teams, attendees already familiar with CAD will learn how to incorporate their work into online and interactive presentations.

More details and registration at https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/shl-open-workshop-3d-visualisation-tickets-42861200003

**CANCELLED** 28 Feb: Hands-on computer vision for the digital humanities – match, classify, annotate and compare (Giles Bergel, Oxford)

Computer vision has made fundamental advances in recent years, but has only just begun to be adopted by digital humanists. This workshop will allow participants to try out four open-source software tools developed by the Visual Geometry Group in the University of Oxford. Participants will gain a knowledge of how to perform both instance-based image recognition (matching the same thing) and content-based classification (how to find the same kind of thing) in their own and in sample images, as well as try tools for comparison and annotation

More details and registration at https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/shl-open-workshop-hands-on-computer-vision-for-the-digital-humanities-match-classify-annotate-and-tickets-42862000397

14 Mar: Augmented Reality (Ben Jackson)

This workshop will provide an introduction to the past, present and future of graphical augmented reality (AR) and the technologies associated with it. An introductory presentation will be followed by a practical session exploring simple practical techniques to create AR content using freely available mobile and online tools. The intended outcome of the session is to equip attendees with the ability to create their own content and provide enough background to support researchers wishing to engage with advanced implementations of this technology.

More details and registration at  https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/shl-open-workshop-augmented-reality-tickets-42861408627

21 Mar: How to Fix Absolutely Anything (Alex Peverett)

From contemporary historians and archivists working with born digital data to media archaeologists, there is an increasing academic interest in accessing and using old equipment and media apparatus. Needs vary. Some have a pragmatic need to access files on a microcomputer incompatible with modern machines. Others seek to recreate the sensory experience of previous media forms. These goals create a requirement for researchers to obtain, fix and maintain old machines. This workshop will cover how best to approach these activities, where to source information and parts, and a hands-on introduction to carrying out some common repairs. The aim of this workshop is to give participants an overview of repairability to enable them to judge the specific demands their research may present.

More details and registration at  https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/shl-open-workshop-how-to-fix-absolutely-anything-tickets-42861461786

11 Apr: Advanced Text Analysis (Justyna Robinson)

Details to follow

19 Apr: Connected Concept Analysis (Simon Lindgren, Umeå University)

As society and culture have been transformed through digital communications, conditions
surrounding the collection of data on social and cultural interactions have changed dramatically.
Facing the ready availability online of complex, text-based, large-scale datasets there is an
inescapable need of finally coming to terms with the qualitative-quantitative divide in text analysis.
This workshop introduces Connected Concept Analysis (CCA) which is an integrated and
oscillating method tying qualitative and quantitative considerations together in one unified model
that results in a graphic visualization of discourse.

More details and registration at https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/shl-open-workshop-connected-concept-analysis-tickets-42861790770

25 Apr: Research Projects and Wordpress (Dave Banks)

Presenting the results of your research on the Internet can be crucial for connecting with other researchers and the public at large. This workshop will demonstrate the use of well-known platform WordPress to create and administer a personal web site for your research project. Topics covered include installation, visual presentation, integration with social networking sites, search engine optimization, metadata, site search, and audiovisual content. No experience necessary.

More details and registration at  https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/shl-open-workshop-research-projects-and-wordpress-tickets-42862096685

2 May: Data Representation and Data Modelling (Text Encoding) (Sharon Webb)

This workshop follows on from last semester’s ‘Data Modelling and Data Representation’ workshop. However, anyone can join and attendance at the last workshop is not mandatory. This workshop will introduce participants to the theory and practice of text encoding (e.g. XML and TEI) and will be a practical, hands-on, session.

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/shl-open-workshop-data-representation-and-data-modellingtext-encoding-tickets-42861551053

Open Workshops Autumn 2017

Workshop 1: (18 October) Processing and Cleaning Data

Workshop Leader: Ben Jackson

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/shl-open-workshop-series-workshop-1-processing-cleaning-data-tickets-38538702296

This workshop will present techniques for preparing text data for use with text analysis and visualisation tools. The techniques demonstrated will include batch processing of large datasets and will conclude with an introduction to some free tools for analysis and visualisation. The session will focus on practical methods for manipulating texts using examples drawn from activities carried out to support work in the Sussex Humanities Lab. Sample material will be supplied for the session; however, participants are welcome to use their own datasets and time permitting we will attempt to assist with your challenges.
By the end of the session participants should be equipped with a range of text preparation and processing techniques along with a familiarity of tools that can be used to achieve this. Participants will also gain an understanding of limitations and considerations related to these operations.

Workshop 2: (25 October) Custom Datavisualisation

Workshop Leader: Alex Butterworth

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/shl-open-workshop-2-custom-datavisualisation-tickets-38539000187

The language of data visualisation is becoming increasingly familiar and its methods ever more accessible to humanities researchers, thanks to the availability of online tools such as Rawgraphs or Tableau. Whilst these tools allow for easy testing of data, and experimentation with its representation, there are situations and data sets that suggest or demand more bespoke treatment. This workshop will approach data visualisation primarily as a method of communication rather than analysis. A survey of recent innovation in the field, broadly defined - encompassing polemical data journalism, exploratory landscape interpretation, and intimate expressions of the quantified self - will lead into a short practical design session. Participants will collaborate to sketch creative solutions either visualisation questions rooted in their own datas or in response to challenges proposed to them, with critique and advice for ongoing development.

Workshop 3: (29 November - please note change of date) Data Representation and Data Modelling

Workshop Leader: Sharon Webb

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/shl-open-workshop-3-data-representation-and-data-modelling-tickets-38539360264

This workshop will introduce participants to the theory of data modelling and the process by which we translate “objects’, or real world entities, into “data”. Data modeling considers how we interpret “things” and how we expect them to be interpreted by a computer programme. This process ensures that we can manipulate, interrogate and preserve information. By considering the difference between two key perspectives, document orientated and data oriented modelling, we will explore how to identify the most appropriate technologies, and approaches, based upon (your) research deliverables and questions (e.g. the difference between a database and a text encoding/XML). Specifically, participants will be introduced to hierarchical modelling and entity-relational modelling, and the querying languages related to these.

Workshop 4: (CANCELLED) Dataset Publishing and Compliance

Workshop Leader: Sharon Webb

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/shl-open-workshop-4-dataset-publishing-and-compliance-tickets-38539717332

This workshop is a practical introduction to datasets, their creation and their publication. It will consider best practice and practical approaches to research data management and introduce participants to the concept of metadata and its importance to describing and archiving digital objects and data. The workshop will also touch upon the importance of digital preservation and introduce participants to current university infrastructures that can help you publish data and therefore help you comply with funding and grant applications requirements.

Workshop 5: (22 November) Text Analysis

Workshop Leader: Jack Pay

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/shl-open-workshop-5-text-analysis-tickets-38539895866

In this session we will start with a brief presentation on the main areas of text analysis we will be covering in the workshop, including when and where they are best suited. The second part of the session will be a practical workshop that will start by introducing some simple tools for preparing some example data. This will be followed by some working examples of the common tools and techniques for text analysis and machine learning. To participate in the practical part of this session you will need a laptop which has access to the internet and a common web browser, such as Firefox or Chrome.

Workshop 6: (6 December) Web Scraping and Crawling

Workshop Leader: Jack Pay

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/shl-open-workshop-6-web-scraping-and-crawling-tickets-38540137589

This session will start with a brief presentation on the concepts and caveats which surround web-crawling which one should know before attempting any serious data gathering on the web. The second part of the session will introduce some easy to use web-crawling tools and how to set them up for web-crawling/scraping. We will then work through some examples and look at some output, so we can see what might come next. To participate in the practical part of this session you will need a laptop which has access to the internet and a common web browser, such as Firefox or Chrome.

Workshop 7: (13 December) Forensic Recovery from Data Storage

Workshop Leader: James Baker

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/shl-open-workshop-7-forensic-recovery-from-data-storage-tickets-38540346213

The aim of this workshop is to provide a practical introduction to digital forensics. This method of data recovery and analysis was first developed in law enforcement and is now being used in archival science, literary studies, and contemporary history. During the workshop you will use BitCurator to recover and analyse data from a data storage device.