School of Psychology

Undergraduate prizes

The following prizes are awarded each year for undergraduate work of outstanding merit:

The Lisa Rodrigues Prize for the Best Overall 1st Year Performance

To be awarded for the highest overall mark in the first year. In the case of equal top marks, Progression and Award Board can employ a justifiable tie-breaker, e.g. the most 1st year module marks of at least the same classification as the overall mark.

Lisa Rodrigues originally trained as a nurse and health visitor, but then earned a BA in Social Psychology at the University of Sussex and then a Masters in Public Sector Management. For 13 years she was the CEO of the Sussex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust and involved in creating the formal relationship that still continues between the Trust and the Sussex School of Psychology. In 2012, she was awarded a CBE for services to the NHS. She has spoken publically about her own struggles with depression since her adolescence. She contributes her time and knowledge to several charitable organisations to help others with their mental health. She is passionate about challenging the stigma of mental illness and promoting evidence-based practice.

The Jane Beaty Prize for the Best Overall 2nd Year Performance

To be awarded for the highest overall mark in the second year. In the case of equal top marks, Progression and Award Board can employ a justifiable tie-breaker, e.g. the most 2nd year module marks of at least the same classification as the overall mark.

Dr Jane Beattie (1960-1997) was a lecturer in the Laboratory of Experimental Psychology at the University of Sussex. Jane completed her undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology at Sussex in 1981 and then completed her MA and PhD at the University of Pennsylvania in the US. Although she had a tenure-track appointment at the prestigious Graduate Business School in Chicago, she returned to the University of Sussex in 1991, first to School of Social Sciences then to Experimental Psychology. Her research spanned both psychology and economics, but she is best known for her contributions to our understanding of judgment and decision making. Jane was a gifted lecturer and outstanding teacher.

The SAGE Publications Prize for Outstanding Application of Statistical Methods

To be awarded for the highest mark for a project that a supervisor has nominated based on outstanding application of statistical methods. Sage Publishing publishes some of the most influential and learning statistical textbooks for psychology students, including Discovering Statistics. In the case of equal top project marks, the finalist Progression and Award Board can employ a justifiable tie-breaker, e.g. the most 3rd year module marks of at least the same classification as the overall mark.

Students may not hold both the SAGE Publications Prize for Outstanding Application of Statistical Methods and any other dissertation prize with the exception of the Tony Gale Memorial Prize.

The Sussex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust Award for an Outstanding Project on Mental Health or Wellbeing

To be awarded for the highest mark for a project that a supervisor considers to be related to mental health or wellbeing. Sussex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust provides care and treatment for people of all ages with mental health conditions such as psychosis, depression, anxiety, dementia and personality disorder. In the case of equal top project marks, the finalist Progression and Award Board can employ a justifiable tie-breaker, e.g. the most 3rd year module marks of at least the same classification as the overall mark.

Students may not hold both the Sussex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust Award and any other dissertation prize with the exception of the Tony Gale Memorial Prize.

The George Butterworth Prize in Developmental Science

To be awarded for the highest mark for a project that a supervisor considers to be related to infant and child development. In the case of equal top project marks, the finalist Progression and Award Board can employ a justifiable tie-breaker, e.g. the most 3rd year module marks of at least the same classification as the overall mark.

Professor George Butterworth (1946-2000) was a professor in in the former School of Cognitive and Computing Sciences, at Sussex, from 1991-2000. He completed his DPhil at Oxford University. His contributions to the discipline include founding both the British Infancy Research Group and the Journal Developmental Science, which remains one of the top developmental psychology journals today. He also directed numerous groups ranging from the Scientific Affairs Board of the British Psychological Society to the European Society for Developmental Psychology. His most distinguished research contribution was his work on the origins of thought and perception in infants, a field in which he was a world authority.

Students may not hold both the George Butterworth Prize in Developmental Science and any other dissertation prize with the exception of the Tony Gale Memorial Prize.

The Alison Jolly Prize in Comparative Psychology

To be awarded for the highest mark for a project that a supervisor considers to involve non-human animals. In the case of equal top project marks, the finalist Progression and Award Board can employ a justifiable tie-breaker, e.g. the most 3rd year module marks of at least the same classification as the overall mark.

Dr Alison Jolly (1937-2014) had connections to the University of Sussex going back to the late 1960s and taught at Sussex in the 1970s. In 2001 she took an honorary position in Life Sciences in 2001. She earned a BA in zoology from Cornell University and a PhD in zoology from Yale University. Although she was based in Life Sciences at Sussex, several members of psychology attended her lectures on primate behaviour over the years. She is renowned for her work describing patterns of complete female dominance over males in lemurs. Her later research focused on how this female dominance evolved and its relationship to territory defence. She argued that social behaviour was more important than tool-use in the evolution of intelligence. Her writing often combined science and personal experience. She spoke out about how conservation impacts local people and how the environmental crisis impacts both humans and wildlife.

Students may not hold both the Alison Jolly Prize in Comparative Psychology and any other dissertation prize with the exception of the Tony Gale Memorial Prize.

The Mike Scaife Prize in Cognition, Learning and Innovative Technology

To be awarded for the highest mark for a project that a supervisor considers to be related to applying developmental or cognitive psychology to problems in Cognitive Science and human-technology interaction. In the case of equal top project marks, the finalist Progression and Award Board can employ a justifiable tie-breaker, e.g. the most 3rd year module marks of at least the same classification as the overall mark.

Dr Mike Scaife (1949-2001) was a Reader in the Psychology Department in the former School of Cognitive and Computing Sciences at the University of Sussex. He earned his MA in Biology at the University of Liverpool and his PhD in Psychology at Oxford University. His research on problems in Cognitive Science and human- technology interaction include two major themes: The development of a theory of ‘external cognition’ to understand how external representations, such as multimedia, can support internal cognitive processes, like problem-solving, information search and collaborative learning; and understanding the cognitive principles for the design of information for new media in education and training and the development of innovative applications for school/workplace/home.

Students may not hold both the Mike Scaife Prize in Cognition, Learning and Innovative Technology and any other dissertation prize with the exception of the Tony Gale Memorial Prize.

The Peter B. Smith Prize in Social and Applied Psychology

To be awarded for the highest mark for a project that a supervisor considers to be related to social and applied psychology. In the case of equal top project marks, the finalist Progression and Award Board can employ a justifiable tie-breaker, e.g. the most 3rd year module marks of at least the same classification as the overall mark.

Professor Peter B. Smith is an emeritus professor within the School of Psychology. He earned both his BA and PhD at Cambridge University. He began teaching at Sussex in 1966. He was appointed Professor of Social Psychology in 1994. His research focus has been cross-cultural psychology, including indigenous forms of social influence such as wasta, guanxi and jeitinho, survey response styles across cultures, and studying aspects of managerial behaviour in more than 60 nations. From 1994 to 2001 he was editor of the Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology and from 2002-2004, he was President of the International Association for Cross-Cultural Psychology.

Students may not hold both the Peter Smith Prize in Social and Applied Psychology and any other dissertation prize with the exception of the Tony Gale Memorial Prize.

The Stuart Sutherland Prize for an Outstanding Third Year Project

To be awarded for the highest mark for a project that a supervisor is willing to submit for the EPS/British Science Association Undergraduate Project Prize. The prize- winner of the outstanding third-year BSc project would also normally be considered for entry into the national EPS competition for best experimental research project. In the case of equal top project marks, the finalist Progression and Award Board can employ a justifiable tie-breaker, e.g. the most 3rd year module marks of at least the same classification as the overall mark. EPS/BSA prize criteria include that the project is experimental such as might be eligible for publication in the Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, and for presentation at an EPS meeting and the candidate intends to pursue postgraduate studies in psychology, broadly construed, see: http://www.eps.ac.uk/index.php/epsbaas-undergraduate-project-prize.

Professor Norman Stuart Sutherland (1927-1998) completed his BA and DPhil at the University of Oxford. He founded the Laboratory of Experimental Psychology at the University of Sussex in the 1960s, attracting eminent researchers to come to Sussex. He was renowned for his work on perception and discrimination and contributed to many fields of psychological research. Stuart’s best known books are Breakdown, which is both a personal account of his own depressive illness and an exploration and critique of the available treatments for mental illness, A Dictionary of Psychology, an entertaining and at times tongue-in-cheek glossary, and Irrationality, a brilliant exposition of the essentially irrational behaviour of humans.

The Tony Gale Memorial Prize (BPS Wessex Branch) for the Best Third Year Project

To be awarded for the highest project mark. In the case of equal top project marks, the finalist Progression and Award Board can employ a justifiable tie-breaker, e.g. the most 3rd year module marks of at least the same classification as the overall mark.

Professor Maurice Anthony Gale (1937–2006) began studying psychology as a mature student at the University of Exeter and later earned a PhD by publication. He worked in psychology departments at both the University of Southampton and the University of Portsmouth, where he was department chair and Director of Research and Development, respectively. He is well-known for his research contributions in using the EEG to measure brain activity during information processing and during social interaction. He had a passion for undergraduate teaching and postgraduate supervision, He held many roles within the BPS including Honorary General Secretary, Chair of the Scientific Affairs Board, Chair of the Qualifying Examination Board and BPS President.

The British Psychological Society Undergraduate Award for Overall Degree Performance

To be awarded for the highest overall classification mark. In the case of equal top project marks, the finalist Progression and Award Board can employ a justifiable tie- breaker, e.g. the most 3rd year module marks of at least the same classification as the overall mark.