Study Abroad for Sussex Students

Health and Safety

Be aware of possible risks that you may face whilst studying abroad by:

  • Identifying potential hazards

  • Thinking and planning ahead

This will reduce the risk and help ensure a smooth and safe transition to a new academic life abroad.

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office website offers invaluable information on travel advice by country.  Their pages cover:

  • Safety and security
  • Local laws and customs
  • Entry requirements
  • Health and natural disasters
  • Other useful information.

We strongly recommend that students read the section related to their destination prior to departure

https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice-guide

https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice

https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-checklist

You can also connect with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office advice and follow updates on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/fcotravel

The Travel Health Pro website also provides up-to-date and reliable information for travellers

https://travelhealthpro.org.uk

Please select from the headings below to reveal further information on each topic

Risk Assessment (North America, New Zealand and Australia)

The Sussex Abroad office has prepared this document with relevant information for those students going to North America, New Zealand and Australia. Please read this document very carefully and stay informed at all times.

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) provides travel advice by country. It covers safety and security, local laws and customs, entry requirements, health and natural disasters along with a host of other useful information. We strongly recommend that students read the section related to their destination prior to departure, during the stay abroad and before undertaking travel to another part of the county/region. 

Risk Assessment (Europe and Latin America)

The Sussex Abroad office has prepared this document with relevant information for those students going to the following countries: Austria, BelgiumChile, Columbia, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Germany, Iceland, Italy, Malta, Mexico, Morocco, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, SwedenTurkey and Uruguay. Please read this document very carefully and stay informed at all times.

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) provides travel advice by country. It covers safety and security, local laws and customs, entry requirements, health and natural disasters along with a host of other useful information. We strongly recommend that students read the section related to their destination prior to departure, during the stay abroad and before undertaking travel to another part of the county/region.

Risk Assessment (Asia)

The Sussex Abroad office has prepared this document with relevant information for those students going to the following countries: China, Hong Kong, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Russia, Singapore, Taiwan and Thailand. Please read this document very carefully and stay informed at all times.

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) provides travel advice by country. It covers safety and security, local laws and customs, entry requirements, health and natural disasters along with a host of other useful information. We strongly recommend that students read the section related to their destination prior to departure, during the stay abroad and before undertaking travel to another part of the county/region.

Risk Awareness Questionnaire - you must complete this

This questionnaire is designed to assist you as part of the preparation for your study abroad. The questions and notes will give you an opportunity to consider a range of issues you may face whilst living and studying abroad.

https://sussex.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/risk-assessment-2018

Insurance

Students going on Study Abroad MUST have fully comprehensive travel insurance cover.

Essential insurance requirements include the following:

  • Emergency Medical Expenses including the cost of medical treatment abroad and repatriation costs (i.e., returning the person to their country of residence or the nearest available medical facility in the event of injury/illness and bringing back the remains in the event of death)
  • Personal injury – lump sum payments in the event of death or permanent disabling injuries
  • Personal Liability
  • Personal Belongings/Money - credit/debit card; passport replacement
  • Cancellation/Delay/Missed Departure
  • Dental Injury
  • Legal Expenses


Minimum recommended insurance requirements [PDF 35.06KB]

Sussex will facilitate a comprehensive group insurance policy to students going on a study abroad term / year. However, students are free to purchase alternative insurance cover.  If they choose to purchase their own insurance, they must provide evidence that the policy has adequate cover.  Please note that the insurance offered on credit/bank accounts may provide annual insurance cover but this cover is often only for 30 days of a year and would therefore not be acceptable for long term periods of study abroad.  The date of cover must begin on the date the student leaves home and the cover must end on the date the student arrives back home.  Students must request the additional winter sports cover if they intend to go ski-ing or snowboarding. Furthermore, if they think they will be taking part in any activity (i.e. extreme sports), students must check that they are covered by their policy before they start the sport / activity. The policy also needs to cover all medical costs, including an air ambulance. If the student does not take out proper insurance, they will have to pay the costs of any emergency themselves, including expensive medical bills.  If the student had an accident when being intoxicated by alcohol, they will probably not be covered by their medical insurance.

Insurance Policy for students abroad during 17/18 academic year: AVIVA Insurance Policy [PDF 174.38KB]

The Student European Health Insurance Card (EHIC)

New NHS rules mean that if the student is going to on a study abroad placement which will last more than six weeks, they must apply for a special Student EHIC. The regular EHIC will not be valid for the year / term abroad placement. For more information please visit the NHS pages: http://www.nhs.uk/NHSEngland/Healthcareabroad/movingabroad/Pages/Studyingabroad.aspx 

Travel Vaccinations

You should visit your GP or practice nurse, at least 8 weeks before your trip, to find out whether your existing jabs are up-to-date, and to check whether you need any vaccinations or other preventive measures. You can also visit a local private travel vaccination clinic for your UK boosters and other travel jabs. The Health Centre on the Sussex campus offers Travel immunisations. 

Vaccinations are available to protect you against infections such as hepatitis A, yellow fever and typhoid. Country specific information and advice is published by the National Travel Health Network and Centre on the TravelHealthPro website and there is also useful information and advice about healthcare abroad available on the NHS Choices website (http://www.nhs.uk/NHSEngland/Healthcareabroad/Pages/Healthcareabroad.aspx). Not all vaccinations are available free on the NHS, even if they are recommended for travel to a certain area. 

When considering your travels, think ahead to other countries you may visit whilst you are abroad, and what other parts of the country you may travel to at weekends, during holidays or at the end of your time abroad. You may be more at risk of disease in rural areas, and if you are backpacking and staying in hostels or camping. You may also be further away from a hospital in certain areas, for emergency treatment. Also, think about when you are travelling, as some diseases are more common at certain times of the year and what you'll be doing, whether you'll be spending a lot of time outdoors, or likely to come into close contact with animals.

Emergency Situations

Unfortunately, unexpected events can happen whilst students are studying abroad and we never know when or where these may be.  For example, we had students in Japan when the earthquake struck in 2011 and it was difficult to make contact with them as they were, in fact, away from the university at the time.

  • If an emergency situation occurs, be guided by your exchange university as they will have procedures in place and will be prepared for emergencies
  • If you are not on campus then check your university’s home page where they usually give advice on what you should be doing
  • Listen to local news broadcasts and heed local and national government advice
  • Make contact with your parents/next of kin as soon as you can to let them know that you are safe.  Email us if you are able to, so that we know that you are OK too
  • If the Foreign and Commonwealth Office are recommending that people leave the country, or area, then students are advised to leave. Please always check their web site (see above)
  • Embassies will work to get their nationals out of a country

    Websites of embassies and FCO equivalent offices should give information on the services that are being provided

    https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/98058/embassy-list.pdf

It is important that Sussex has your address and a telephone number that we can contact you on whilst you are abroad.  You must update your study abroad address on Sussex Direct so in the event of an emergency situation we can try and contact you or get someone else to check on you.

Registering your safety on Facebook

For those students who regularly use Facebook, it has a very useful function called 'Safety Check.' If you happen to be near a disaster area while abroad, this allows you to quickly and easily let friends and family know that you are safe, and to check that they are OK too.

Sexual Assault

*The main thing is to let people know that you are safe.*

 

Sussex Emergency out-of-hours contact number: +44 (0)1273 873333

In Case of Personal Accident

In the first instance, use the support structures in place at your exchange university. Please note and always have available the names and contact details of the relevant staff in the International Office (or its equivalent) where you are. They have a 'duty of care' responsibility to you and will be the ones who can accommodate your local needs, whether in terms of housing, affected coursework, or transportation.

Contact your subject/department representative and relevant staff in the Study Abroad Office, as quickly as possible, so that we can make sure that your needs are being met:

Additional Support Requirements

Before you leave for your study abroad please consider any health issues, disability or any additional support requirements (including mental health and dyslexia) for which you receive help from Sussex. Please contact Student Support at Sussex to try and arrange for an equivalent level of support to be put in place at your exchange campus.  Please discuss with the relevant department at Sussex if you wish your current support to continue whilst you are abroad.

Protecting your physical and mental health during your time abroad

Study abroad can be a hugely positive experience, but it can also be an intense and stressful time. Students living and studying abroad face a range of challenges that can create, or compound, mental health issues. Such challenges include the sudden change of environment, travel stress, culture shock, adjusting to local conditions, being removed from support networks, homesickness, loneliness, and social pressures. In this link you will find a list of digital resources on health and wellbeing for students abroad compiled by Go International.

On return to the UK

We hope that students will come back fit and healthy from their time away.  However, should you experience any unusual symptoms, or persistent symptoms, then you should go and see your doctor and let them know where you have been living abroad and where you may have recently travelled, in case you have picked up an infectious disease, such as Avian Flu.

On return from living abroad it is not unusual for the initial euphoria of returning to friends and family and home comforts, to be followed quite quickly by feelings of flatness, sadness, and even homesickness for the country and life you’ve left.  This adjustment to life back home is called Reverse Culture Shock, and is quite normal. For further reading see: Reverse Culture Shock

 

 

 

Please download and complete this form with key points that you will need to know

Travel checklist [PDF 184.83KB]