Brexit information for staff

We value our staff and want to make sure you have all the information you need during the UK's exit from the European Union (EU). If you're a member of staff from the EU, you can see our help and advice below, or if you'd like to speak to someone in person, you can contact our Human Resources team (details below).

The information on this page was last updated on 20 December 2019.

This information was correct at the time of writing. Please check regularly for the most up-to-date information.

It is likely that the UK will leave the EU on 31 January 2020. This means EU law will remain in place during a transitional period at least until 31 December 2020.

We will keep our pages updated with any developments which may affect you.

EU Exit: ID App

The EU Exit: ID document check app is now available for iPhone 7 and above, in addition to Android.

For Android users

You'll need:

  • Android 6.0 and above – you can find this in your settings.
  • At least 135MB of storage space to install the app.
  • NFC (Near-Field Communication) so the app can scan your document – you can find this in your settings. If you can use your phone to pay for things using contactless, this means it has NFC and you can use the app.

For iPhone users

You'll need:

  • iPhone 7 or 7 Plus or newer mode.
  • iOS 13.2 or newer – to find the software version installed, go to Settings>General, then About.
  • at least 120MB of storage space to install the app.

Citizens' rights after the UK leaves the EU

There will be no change to the rights and status of EEA and Swiss nationals currently living in the UK until 30 June 2021 or 31 December 2020 if the UK leaves the EU without a deal. To continue living, working and studying in the UK, you and your family can apply to the EU Settlement Scheme. You'll get 'settled' or 'pre-settled' status, depending on how long you've been living in the UK. This enables you to continue to be eligible for public services (such as healthcare and schools), public funds and pensions. 

Those with five years’ continuous residency will be granted settled status and those with less than five years will be granted pre-settled status.

Those granted settled status can stay in the UK as long as they like. Those granted pre-settled status can stay for a further five years from the date they get pre-settled status and can apply for settled status once they reach five years of continuous residency.

With settled or pre-settled status you’ll be able to:

  • work in the UK
  • use the National Health Service
  • enrol in education or continue studying
  • access public funds such as benefits and pensions, if you’re eligible for them
  • travel in and out of the UK.

How do I make an application to the EU Settlement Scheme?

The UK government have produced a step by step guide on applying to the EU Settlement Scheme.

Proof of identity

You should use the ‘EU Exit: ID Document Check’ app to complete the identity stage of your application. For this you will need either an Android device with NFC (Near Field Communication) or an iPhone 7 or newer (see further information above).

The app will:

  • check that your identity document is genuine
  • verify that the document belongs to you.

You must use either:

  • Your biometric passport from an EU country, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway or Switzerland
  • Your UK residence card with a biometric chip if you are the non-EU family member of an EU, EEA or Swiss citizen.

There is further guidance on using the app on the UK government webpages.

Once you have completed the identity stage, you can complete the rest of the application either on that device or any smartphone, laptop or computer.

Proof of residence

The Home Office will do checks against other government databases to check that you have been resident in the UK. You will be asked to provide your National Insurance (NI) number, if you have one.

There is no requirement for you to have a NI number or to have worked in the UK to be eligible under the scheme. If you do not have one, the Home Office will ask you for evidence from a list of documents in Annex A of the Home Office guidance on the settlement scheme.

You will also need to declare any criminal convictions (and the Home Office will do their own checks too).

Frequently Asked Questions

How do I know that I am resident in the UK and eligible for the EU Settlement Scheme?

If you started living in the UK before 31 December 2020 (if there is a Brexit deal) or before 31 January 2020 (if there no Brexit deal) you are considered as resident, and therefore eligible to apply.

An exception to this is if you are a registered student and are currently overseas for study purposes (such as study abroad, a work placement or research fieldwork). In this case you are permitted to be absent for a single period of 12 months and can apply from overseas.

  • What is the EU settlement scheme

    In advance of the UK’s exit from the EU, the UK government has committed to protect the rights of EU citizens and their family members currently living in the UK. This includes the right to live here, work here and access public services such as healthcare and benefits. EU nationals wishing to retain these rights can apply for UK immigration status under the EU Settlement Scheme.

    You'll have until 30 June 2021 to apply, or until 31 December 2020 if the UK leaves the EU without a deal.

    Any EU citizens who have lived in the UK for five years (with ‘permitted’ gaps, for example, for serious illness or study) can apply for ‘settled status’ under the scheme and those who have not yet been in the UK for five years can apply for ‘pre-settled status’, and then after five years of living in the UK you will be eligible for settled status.

  • What you need to do

    To apply to the EU Settlement Scheme you will need to complete a short and simple online application form to:

    • prove your identity;
    • show that you live in the UK; and
    • declare any serious criminal convictions.
  • Who can apply

    You can apply now if:

     The EEA includes the EU countries and also Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway. 

    This means you need to apply even if you: 

    Irish citizens enjoy a right of residence in the UK that is not reliant on the UK’s membership of the EU. They do not need to apply to the EU Settlement Scheme, but they can if they want to.

    See who else can apply.

  • Application process

    To apply for status under the EU Settlement Scheme you will need to complete an online application. When you apply, you can either:

    • use the 'EU Exit: ID Document Check' app to scan your document and send your photo. As part of your application, you need to provide proof of identity. The easiest way to do this is by using the EU Exit: ID Document Check app. Until recently, this was only available on Android devices with NFC capability (the technology to make contactless payments). It is now also available via the Apple App Store to use on Apple iPhone models 7 and above (see further information above).

      If you do not own a suitable device, it is also possible to borrow one from a family member or friend as the app will not store your personal data.

      You can also book an appointment with International HR to use a University-owned Android device.

      To book a slot, please email: InternationalHR@sussex.ac.uk
    • You can also attend a drop in document scanning service run by Brighton & Hove City Council at Brighton Town Hall. This service runs between 9:30am-12pm (Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday) and 10am-12pm (Wednesday).
    • Or, if you prefer, you can send your identity documents to the Home Office by post, and upload your photo using the online application (you can take this yourself).
    • You can also visit one of the organisations offering to scan your document for you. You'll need to book an appointment and you may have to pay a fee.
    • Criminality check: You will need to complete the criminality check by declaring any criminal convictions. Only serious or persistent criminality will affect your application. This should not affect the vast majority of EU citizens and their family members.
    • Verify your residence in the UK: There are a number of ways to provide evidence of your residence. Providing your National Insurance number should help the majority of applicants demonstrate whether they qualify for settled or pre-settled status. But there may be cases where residence cannot be proven automatically in this way for a variety of reasons. If this happens, or if you disagree with the outcome of the automated check, do not worry. You will be told if you need to give any further evidence which you can easily submit online by uploading photos or scanning documents into your application. Find out more about the type of evidence that can be used.
    • Application fee: On 21 January the Prime Minister announced that there will be no fee from 30 March 2019. Anyone who has applied already and paid a fee during the test phases will have their fee refunded. If you have paid an application fee you will receive a refund after 30 March 2019. If you are due a refund you do not need to do anything. The fee will be automatically refunded to the card that was used to pay it. An email will be sent to the contact address provided in the application, confirming when the refund has been processed. Prior to the Government waiving the fee, the University of Sussex had agreed to cover this.
  • Where to find support

    For more information on how to apply, visit:
    EU Settlement Scheme: applicant information

    For any questions about an application, contact the EU Settlement Scheme Resolution Centre by calling 0300 123 7379 (inside the UK) or +44 (0) 203 080 0010 (outside the UK). Find out about call charges. You can also submit an online form.

  • What is the difference between settled and pre-settled status?

    Settled status – allows you to remain in the UK indefinitely and you can continue to study and work without restriction. You can also access any public funds you may be eligible for and use the National Health Service (NHS). You are free to travel in and out of the UK. After obtaining settled status you can spend up to five years outside the UK without losing your status, you can choose to apply for British citizenship and any children born in the UK will automatically become British citizens. 

    Pre-settled status – gives you permission to remain in the UK for a further five years from the date that you were granted this status. Once you have reached five years continuous residence, you can apply again to obtain settled status if you want to remain in the UK longer. However, you must apply before your five years on pre-settled status expires if you wish to remain in the UK. Whilst in the UK with pre-settled status you can continue to study and work in the UK without restriction. You can also access any public funds you may be eligible for and use the National Health Service (NHS). You are free to travel in and out of the UK. After obtaining pre-settled status you can spend up to two years outside the UK without losing your status and any children born in the UK will automatically be granted pre-settled.

  • Is the application process different for settled and pre-settled status?

    The application for settled or pre-settled status is the same process through the EU Settlement Scheme. You don’t need to choose which status you are applying for.

    Settled status: to be granted settled status you must complete the EU Settlement Scheme application and demonstrate that you have been resident in the UK for the last five years with no absences of longer than six months in any 12 month period. In exceptional circumstances, a one off absence from the UK of up to 12 months (such as for study abroad, pregnancy, childbirth or work posting can be discounted as absence. Any periods of compulsory military service are also allowed.

    If there is a Brexit deal, you must have started living in the UK before 31 December 2020 (or by 31 January 2020 if there is no deal). If you are under 21 and are applying with your parents, you may not need to have been resident in the UK for five continuous years to obtain settled status if your parent(s) have met the requirements.

    Pre-settled status: to be granted pre-settled status you must complete the EU Settlement Scheme application and demonstrate that you are resident in the UK.

    In a Brexit deal, you must have started living in the UK before 31 December 2020 (or by 31 January 2020 if there is no deal) but there is no minimum time you need to have spent in the UK in order to be eligible.

  • How do I get settled or pre-settled status?

    The application for settled or pre-settled status is the same process through the EU Settlement Scheme. You don’t need to choose which status you are applying for.

    Settled status – to be granted settled status you must complete the EU Settlement Scheme application and demonstrate that you have been resident in the UK for the last five years with no absences of longer than six months in any 12 month period. In exceptional circumstances, a one off absence from the UK of up to 12 months (such as pregnancy, childbirth, study or work posting) or in the case of compulsory military service of any length can be discounted as absence. You must have started living in the UK before 31 December 2020 (or before the date the UK leaves the EU in the case of the UK leaving the EU with no agreement). If you are under 21 and are applying with your parents, you may not need to have been resident in the UK for 5 continuous years to obtain settled status if your parent(s) have met the requirements.

    Pre-settled status – to be granted pre-settled status you must complete the EU Settlement Scheme application and demonstrate that you are resident in the UK. You must have started living in the UK before 31 December 2020 (or before the date the UK leaves the EU in the case of the UK leaving the EU with no deal).

  • How do I prove my residence?

    Settled status – to be granted settled status, you will need to evidence that you have been resident in the UK for five continuous years. If you have been working/self-employed in the UK during the last five years, the easiest and quickest way to prove this is by providing your National Insurance Number (NINo) on the form. UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) can check this with HM Revenues and Customs by accessing your NINo records. In this case no further documents will be needed to prove residence. If you haven't been working some or all of the last five years, you can upload other evidence of your UK residence to your application. Acceptable documents include annual bank statements, letters from your school or university confirming your attendance, or tenancy agreements. All documents you provide must be dated and have your name on them. Further details are available online

    If you have had an absence from the UK of longer than six months but less than 12 months for one of the ‘exceptional’ reasons listed above, you will need to provide official evidence.

    Pre-settled status – if you have been resident in the UK for any period of time less than five years, you will need to provide evidence that you are resident in the UK before 31 December 2020 (or by the date the UK leaves the EU if there is no deal) when you apply. Only one piece of evidence of residence is required to obtain pre-settled status. The document must be less than six months old. If you have a National Insurance Number and you have been working, the National Insurance Number should be sufficient evidence for pre-settled status. If you don't have a National Insurance Number and/or you haven't been working, you can provide other evidence.

  • Do I have to apply under the settlement scheme if I intend to leave the UK before 31 December 2020?

    It is not compulsory to apply, but it is advisable so you can keep your options open in case your circumstances change. For example, you may decide you wish to stay on in the UK for further study, or for a job opportunity. The settlement scheme is not only for those who intend to remain in the UK long term after studying. It is an immigration permission which will enable those who are here now to stay after Brexit, if they wish to do so. If you do not apply and decide at a later date that you wish to remain in the UK for work or study, you would need to apply under another category of the immigration rules, which is likely to incur a fee, whereas there is no fee for the settlement scheme. 

    In a no deal, although the UK Government has confirmed that EEA and Swiss citizens who are lawfully residing in the UK before the Brexit date can continue to do so, 'free movement' will end. This means that anyone who arrives in the UK for the first time after the UK leaves the EU would be able to stay for a maximum of three months (unless they apply for European Temporary Leave to Remain). So if you do not have settled or pre-settled status, you are likely to need proof of previous residence in the UK when returning after any travel. 

    The application process has been designed to be easy and user-friendly and has been tested under three pilots (with modifications made to the application throughout these pilots). 

  • I have dual nationality. Should I apply for settlement status?

    You will not need to apply if you have dual British citizenship. If you have dual EU and non EU nationality, you can apply for settlement status using your EU passport.

  • If I leave the UK, do I lose settlement status?

    If you have settled status, this will be lost after an absence of five years from the UK (this is still subject to approval from Parliament).

    If you have pre-settled status, this will be lost after an absence of more than two years from the UK.

    If status is lost and you are no longer eligible to apply under the settlement scheme, you will only be able to apply under any other category of the Immigration Rules in place at the time you wish to come to the UK.

  • I am a EEA/Swiss national currently out of the country on research. Will I be able to apply to the EU Settlement Scheme? Do I need to return to the UK before the date the UK leaves the EU?

    If you are a member of staff from the EEA or Switzerland and are currently overseas on research, in most cases you should still be able to apply for the EU Settlement Scheme. The government has said that a single period outside the UK of up to 12 months still meets the ‘continuous residence’ requirement as long as it is for an important reason such as work or study. However, there are some variants, depending on whether or not there is a deal:

    • in a deal – you will not need to return to the UK before the date the UK leaves the EU, as you will have until 30 December 2020 to be resident in the UK. It's now possible to apply for the scheme from outside the UK (free of charge) based on your previous residence in the UK, without needing to travel here to make an online application. Alternatively, you will be able to apply after you re-enter the UK. If you decide to apply but have been out of the UK for more than 12 months, you will need to re-enter the UK to apply and are only eligible for pre-settled status. In this case, any previous time spent in the UK would not count towards the five years continuous residence required for full settled status. 
    • the UK exits without a deal – if you have not been out of the UK for more than 12 months by this date you will be eligible to apply for the settlement scheme but you will need to apply sooner than 12 months after you left the UK. It's now possible to apply to the scheme from outside the UK. If your total time outside the UK is likely to be longer than 12 months, and you wish to qualify for the scheme, you will need to come back to the UK for a day or two (keeping evidence of having done so) before 12 months have elapsed, and then ensure you do not exceed a further absence from the UK of more than six months. If you have been out of the UK for 12 months by 11pm on the date the UK leaves the EU, you will need to return before that date (even if only for a day or two) in order to be eligible for the scheme. If you do not do so, you will still be able to stay in the UK for more than three months when you eventually return, but you will need to apply for European Temporary Leave to Remain
  • I am a EEA/Swiss national currently at Sussex and I'm planning on undertaking research outside the UK in the future. Will I be able to apply to the EU Settlement Scheme?

    Your right to apply to the EU Settlement Scheme will not be affected if you are intending to take research outside the UK. You should apply to the scheme as soon as possible, and before leaving the UK. As your time outside the UK is for work purposes, it will be considered a permissible absence under the Settlement Scheme and your immigration status will not be adversely affected. Howeverif you are away from the UK for more than 12 months, your time away would not be counted towards your period of ‘continuous residence’.  Pre-settled status is lost after an absence of two years, and settled status after five years.

  • I am an EU national due to arrive in the UK after the date the UK leaves the EU. Will I be able to apply for settlement status?

    The government has published a policy paper and updated guidance on the arrangements that will apply to EU citizens and their families who move to the UK after Brexit, expected to be on 31 January 2020, in the event that the UK leaves the EU without a deal. These arrangements replace those set out in the policy paper published on 28 January 2019 and will also apply to citizens of the EFTA states (Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland). Although free movement as it stands is expected to cease on 31 January 2020, the legal framework will remain in place under the EU (Withdrawal Act 2018) until Parliament passes primary legislation to repeal it.

  • Euro TLR Scheme

    If the UK leaves the EU without a deal, EU citizens who move to the UK after this date for the first time will be able to apply for a 36-month temporary immigration status under a new voluntary immigration scheme – the Euro TLR Scheme. Applications to the new scheme will be free and will need to be made by 31 December 2020. Successful Euro TLR applications will result in a period of 36 months’ leave to remain in the UK, running from the date the leave is granted. The application process will be online, with identity, security and criminality checks. Applications can be made after the arrival in the UK.

    EU citizens may use the evidence of this immigration status to establish their entitlements to work and rent property during the transitional period until December 2020. If they subsequently qualify under a route that leads to settlement in the UK under the future immigration system, the time they have spent in the UK with a Euro TLR status will count towards the qualifying period for settlement.

    EU citizens who hold Euro TLR status and who wish to remain in the UK will only be required to apply for status under the new immigration system when their 36-month Euro TLR expires. They may apply earlier for status under the new points-based immigration system if they wish. If they do not meet the requisite criteria under the new immigration system they will be expected to leave the UK when their Euro TLR expires. EU citizens who move to the UK after Brexit who do not apply to the Euro TLR Scheme will need to apply under the new immigration system by 31 December 2020 if they wish to remain in the UK after that date.

    Non-EU family members accompanying EU citizens

    EU citizens who move to the UK after 31 January 2020 may be accompanied by their non-EU citizen family members, which includes direct family members such as spouse, civil partners or children and extended family members such as “durable” partners and dependent relatives. Close family members (spouses/partners/dependent children under 18) will also be able to apply under the Euro TLR scheme in the same way as EU citizens once their EU citizen sponsor has applied. The period of their Euro TLR will not exceed the end date of the Euro TLR of their EU citizen sponsor. A close family member who does not obtain a Euro TLR by 31 December 2020 and who does not have a right to remain in the UK will be expected to leave at that point.

  • Will the EU Settlement Scheme still operate if no agreement is reached?

    The UK government has given assurances that the scheme will still operate but:

    Will only be open to EU citizens and their eligible family members who are resident in the UK before 11pm on the date the UK leaves the EU unless:

    • You are temporarily absent from the UK (within the Rules of the scheme on permitted absences). In this case you will still be able to enter the UK after the date the UK leaves the EU and apply under the settlement scheme.
    • You are an eligible family member and the relationship with the EU citizen (who is eligible to apply under the settlement scheme) was formed before the date the UK leaves the EU. 
    • You are the child born to an EU citizen who is eligible to apply under the settlement scheme.

    The deadline to apply will be 30 December 2020.

  • I am a national of Norway, Iceland, Liechtenstein or Switzerland. Can I apply to the EU Settlement Scheme? 

    In the event of a deal, the EU Settlement Scheme will be open to non-EU EEA citizens and Swiss nationals in the same way as for EU nationals. However, if there is no deal, there may be a different deadline to apply to the scheme than for EU nationals. At this point, the UK government have said only that the deadline will be ‘no less than six months from exit day’. There would also be different deadlines for family members. 

  • I am from the Irish Republic. Do I need to apply to the EU Settlement Scheme?

    The rights of Irish citizens residing in the UK are protected after the UK leaves the EU under the UK-Ireland Common Travel Area arrangements. This means that Irish citizens do not need to apply for the EU Settlement Scheme.

    Visiting the UK after Brexit

    EU/EEA/Swiss nationals will be able to continue to travel to the UK for short trips without requiring a visa.

    If the UK leaves with a deal

    If the UK exits with a deal, your ability to travel to the UK will not change until at least 2021:

    • If you are an EU/EEA national living in the UK before Brexit, you will be able to use your national ID card for travel until at least 31 December 2025.
    • If you are a Swiss national living in the UK on or before 31 December 2020, you will be able to use your national ID card until at least 31 December 2025.
    • If you arrive in the UK after Brexit, the use of national ID cards for travel to the UK will be phased out from 2021. You may wish to consider obtaining a passport if you know you need to travel to the UK in the future.
    If the UK leaves without a deal

    If the UK leaves without a deal there will be changes to the way that you can enter the UK as a visitor:

    • Free movement as it currently stands under EU law will end on 31 January 2020
    • Initially border crossings for EU/EEA/Swiss nationals will remain unchanged
    • The use of EEA national identity cards for travel to the UK will be phased out during 2020
    Find out more on the UK Government’s website.

What will happen to reciprocal EU/EEA healthcare arrangements after the date UK leaves the EU?

The UK government has published information about access to healthcare for EU, EEA and Swiss nationals visiting the UK after Brexit. You will still be able to use your EHIC issued by the country where you live if you arrive in the UK before the UK leaves the EU. This cover will last until the end of your stay, even if after exit day.

Eligible staff are advised to apply to the EU Settlement Scheme for pre-settled/settled status as this protects your access to healthcare as well as your immigration status.

Your EHIC may not be valid if you arrive in the UK after the UK leaves the EU. You should buy insurance to cover your healthcare as you would if visiting another non-EU country.

University of Sussex briefing for staff who are non-UK EEA nationals

Staff who are non-UK EEA nationals, and wished to learn more about how their immigration status in the UK could be secured, were invited in spring 2017 to attend a briefing session delivered by a corporate immigration solicitor from law firm Pinsent Masons.

If you were unable to attend any of the sessions, you may find these documents useful: 

A follow-up webinar was also arranged in May 2017 for any staff who were unable to attend the live sessions. To access the recording of this webinar, use the following password: Sussex.Brexit


Current and future funding opportunities for EU projects

At this stage, we are unable to say how applications that are in process will be dealt with when the UK/EU negotiations are finalised or beyond that. However for now, we are encouraging all staff to continue to work on future research grants and to get in touch with colleagues/partners in Europe to let them know that we will be continuing with our work as usual.


Horizon 2020 projects and European Structural and Investment Funds (ESIFs)

At the moment nothing has changed as result of the 2016 referendum. Academic staff in the UK continue to be eligible to apply for and receive EU funding. For now, we are encouraging all staff to continue to work on future research grants and to get in touch with colleagues/partners in Europe to let them know that we will be continuing with our work as usual.

  • Horizon 2020 projects

    The UK government confirmed in a statement in August 2016 that European Commission research grants, including Horizon 2020 programme grants, awarded while the UK is still a member of the EU will be guaranteed by the Treasury. This will be the case even when the project continues beyond the UK's departure from the EU. UUK responded to the announcement in a statement on the same day.

  • European Structural and Investment Funds (ESIFs)

    It has also been announced that all European Structural and Investment Funds (ESIFs) projects signed before the Autumn Statement will be fully funded, even when they continue beyond the UK's departure from the EU. The Treasury has also said it will assess whether to guarantee funding for specific Structural and Investment Fund projects that might be signed after the Autumn Statement, but while the UK remains a member of the EU.

    Shortly after the EU referendum result in 2016 it was confirmed by Jo Johnson, Minister of State for Universities and Science and the EU commissioner for research and innovation that there would be no change to the UK university sector's ability to participate in EU research and innovation programmes while the UK is still a member of the EU.

  • Further information

    Via Universities UK, we are making the case to the UK government of the importance and impact of our strong research collaboration with European partners, highlighting how EU programmes play a central role in supporting this.

    The long-term future of UK participation in European science programmes will be decided as part of the UK's exit negotiations. These talks are expected to take up to two years.

    Horizon 2020 is open to institutions in non-EU countries as well as the EU. We recognise that some people might be concerned that regardless of this, collaboration and funding opportunities for UK researchers might be diminished as a result of leaving the EU. However, there are many examples of successful research initiatives that have been undertaken by academics from non-EU countries and we hope that we will be able to access and participate to the same degree. We are working closely with Universities UK to ensure that is the case.

    See also our answers to the frequently asked questions from staff.

Travelling to or from the UK after the UK leaves the EU 

In the event of a no-deal Brexit, EU nationals will be able to enter the UK as now but for those arriving in the UK for the first time after the UK leaves the EU, there will be restrictions on their ability to stay beyond three months.

Find out more information on the Government's website.

Until there is clarity on the nature of UK’s withdrawal from the EU, it is not possible to provide specific advice about travel arrangements. For the time being, you should continue to arrange your travel as you would have previously, and check this page on the UK Government website for updates as close to the date of travel as possible.

  • What will happen if there is a Brexit deal?

    If a deal with the UK and EU Government is reached before this date, there will be no changes to current visa requirements or entitlements until the end date of the transition period, which is likely to be December 31, 2020.

    For EU citizens already resident in the UK but travelling after Brexit, the UK government has said that, in the event of a no deal, the same entry requirements that currently apply to EU nationals will continue to apply until the end of 2020. This means that EU nationals will continue to be able to use the ePassport gates at UK airports and should not be subject to detailed scrutiny about their intentions while in the UK. 

  • What will happen if there is no-deal?

    In the event of a no-deal Brexit, the government has outlined arrangements for those arriving to live in the UK after the date the UK leaves the EU.

    On 28 January 2019, the UK government published details of proposals on the temporary immigration system they will put in place for EU nationals in the event of a no deal Brexit. Please note that the Bill is not yet law and is subject to amendment.

    It states that EEA (and Swiss) citizens arriving in the UK after the date the UK leaves the EU will be able to enter the UK without a visa and stay for up to three months. If you intend to stay in the UK for longer than three months, you will need to apply for ‘European Temporary Leave to Remain’. This will be granted for a period of 36 months.

    If you want to stay in the UK for more than 36 months, you will need to apply for an immigration status under the new immigration system which will come into effect from 1 January 2021. Those who do not qualify will need to leave the UK when their European Temporary Leave to Remain expires.

    Further details of the scheme and how to apply are not yet available.

    In a no deal situation, travellers could face extra costs associated with a fall in the value of the pound. It may be advisable to obtain currency before you travel so that you are secure in the value at time of purchase.

    The UK government has already agreed a deal with Switzerland and the non EU EEA states (Norway, Iceland and Liechtenstein) so if you’re travelling to or from one of these countries, there may be some differences to the above. Please check the details of this deal for more information.

  • UK nationals

    For UK citizens travelling in Europe, the European Council has confirmed that, in the event of no deal, it will allow visa-free travel to all EU/EEA and Swiss countries, including those not in the Schengen zone, for a period of up to 90 days (across any 180 day period). This will remain the case provided the UK reciprocates on the same basis. There will be no restrictions on stay during that 90 day period.

    Further information for UK nationals who will be travelling to the EU in the event of no deal, including the requirement to have a minimum six months remaining on your passport, is provided on the UK Government website.

    Useful travel information for UK students/staff on travel to the EU from the UK:

Travelling in Europe

UK citizens

For the latest information on visiting Europe after Brexit, go to the Government’s website.

All travellers

For all travellers in a ‘no deal’ situation, if you are planning on travelling into or out of the UK after the date the UK leaves the EU, you should expect disruption, especially for the first few weeks, unless a deal has been made. Make sure you allow plenty of time to reach, and move between travel hubs, to ensure that you do not miss compulsory academic commitments at Sussex.

Consider your contingency arrangements if travel is delayed, either going or coming back, for example ensuring you have access to additional funds or a credit card. In a no deal situation, travellers could face extra costs associated with a fall in the value of the pound. It may be advisable to obtain currency before you travel so that you are secure in the value at time of purchase.

Take extra care to ensure that all your travel documentation is up-to-date, have the right travel insurance, and that you have checked the requirements for your travel. If you’re a UK citizen, see the advice for health insurance while in Europe.

Erasmus scheme for staff teaching and training visits

The Sussex Abroad office has once again been awarded Erasmus+ funding to enable Sussex staff to complete Erasmus staff teaching and training visits during the academic year 2019/20. Staff interested in taking part in an Erasmus-funded visit should contact the Sussex Abroad office in the usual way to find out how to apply.

As the final Brexit negotiations are ongoing, it is not yet clear whether UK universities will be eligible to bid for funding for the Erasmus scheme in future years.

I’m a non-EEA national. Is there any impact on me?

There are no foreseeable changes to the arrangements for non-EEA nationals to visit, study, work or settle in the UK.

Advice and guidance