Summer School: Law

Browse our law modules below, and if you're unsure what to study this summer, follow our top tips for how to choose a module.

Students in a mock courtroom at the University of Sussex

Browse our modules

You can see our full list of law modules below.

Session One 

28 June - 16 July 2021

  • Gender Equality and the Law

    Module code: IS433

    This module introduces the relationship between law and gender. You will explore different areas where law interacts with, and regulates, gender relations while also introducing feminist legal theory. You will acquire a deeper understanding of current affairs and the substantive areas of study may include issues such as reproductive rights (abortion, surrogacy, and new reproductive technologies), sexual violence, body image and pornography, prostitution, parity democracy, and maternity rights. The module is framed around feminist theory; therefore, you will gain a basic understanding of how this can be applied to law, and the impact of laws upon gender equality.

    This is a first year module, therefore you will not be required to have a background in Law or Politics. Students on this module will benefit from the research expertise in the School of Law, Politics and Sociology University of Sussex; due to the School’s research centres of:

    • Centre of Gender Studies
    • Centre for Human Rights Research
    • Centre for the Study of Sexual Dissidence

    Learning outcomes:

    • Acquire an understanding of the relationship between gender, law and society
    • Evaluate the impact of laws upon gender equality
    • Have a basic knowledge of the ways in which feminist theory can apply to the law.

    Teaching method: Lectures, seminars and tutorials
    Assessment: 65% essay, 25% in-class test, 10% observation
    Contact hours: 40 hours 
    Credits: 15 Sussex Credits

  • Human Rights Law

    Module code: IS434

    This module explores how rights are protected within different human rights systems at a regional and international level. Contemporary human rights issues (e.g. religious dress, minority and indigenous rights and LGBT rights) and current challenges facing the human rights community are considered; focusing on the interpretation of rights in contemporary issues, the effectiveness of mechanisms and whether rights are universal. You will focus in particular on the core UN human rights treaties and the role of regional human rights courts such as the European Court of Human Rights.

    You will consider key critiques such as feminism and cultural relativism, and with this theoretical knowledge you will demonstrate the ability to develop arguments, and critically understand and engage with contemporary challenges and debates within the field of human rights law. This module will interest those with a background in Law, International Relations, and Global and Development studies.

    This module benefits from teaching and research expertise through the Sussex Centre for Human Rights Research; a recognised centre of excellence in human rights research. The School of Law, Politics and Sociology is ranked 23rd in the UK for Law in the Guardian University League Table 2018.

    Learning outcomes:

    • Evidence a coherent and detailed knowledge of major human rights institutions and frameworks
    • Critically understand the protection of rights within these institutions and frameworks and the implications of this for the universality of rights
    • Critically understand and engage with contemporary challenges and debates within the field of human rights law
    • Demonstrate the ability to develop arguments.

    Teaching method: Lectures, seminars and tutorials
    Assessment: 65% essay, 25% in-class test, 10% observation
    Contact hours: 40 hours 
    Credits: 15 Sussex Credits

Session Two 

19 July – 13 August 2021

  • Global Migration Law

    Module code: IS435

    This module covers the legal and policy frameworks governing migration at international, regional and domestic levels. This will include understanding how the United Nations, European Union, Council of Europe, and UK authorities govern migration, through a range of tools. The module will interest students with a background in Law, International Relations, Global Studies, Politics and Sociology.

    The module will combine the legal analysis of legislation and case law, on the one hand, with the contextual analysis of migratory trends at a global level on the other. You will explore broader theoretical, ethical, normative and political debates regarding human rights, security and solidarity.

    Throughout this module you will develop through the following areas:

    • Expand understanding and acquire new competencies in evaluating legal and policy frameworks relating to migration, and a critique and appreciation of broader ethical, normative and political debates.
    • Think critically and demonstrate theoretical knowledge of key trends in migration law and policy at a global level.
    • Devise and sustain arguments in assessing the governance tools used to regulate migration by international, regional and domestic actors.

    This is a second-year university-level module, and you will be expected to demonstrate coherent and theoretical knowledge, show critical skills, develop arguments in assessing the governance tools, and evaluate legal and policy frameworks. This module benefits from the teaching and research expertise from the University of Sussex Centre for Human Rights Research; a recognised centre of excellence in human rights research. The School of Law, Politics and Sociology is ranked 23rd in the UK for Law in the Guardian University League Table 2018.

    Learning outcomes:

    • Demonstrate a coherent and detailed theoretical knowledge of the key trends in migration law and policy at a global level
    • Critically understand and appreciate the key traits of the international, regional and UK laws and practices governing the regulation of migration
    • Develop arguments in assessing the governance tools used to regulate migration by international, regional and domestic actors
    • Acquire new competencies in evaluating the legal and policy frameworks regulating migration, including from the perspective of broader ethical, normative and political debates.

    Teaching method: Lectures, seminars and tutorials
    Assessment: 65% essay, 25% in-class test, 10% observation
    Contact hours: 40 hours 
    Credits: 15 Sussex Credits

  • Global Antitrust in a Digital World

    Module code: IS436

    This module explores the importance of the role of antitrust (competition) law in a global and digital context. We will consider whether the role of antitrust is to protect consumers or to protect the market. We will focus upon the biggest challenge for governments, regulators and consumers. How should antitrust law used to regulate “Big Tech”? The growth of large cross-border power and digital companies, allegedly wield an outsized influence over intellectual property rights, democracy, human rights and our data. Can, and should, antitrust law be used to regulate this power?

    Through interactive lectures, you will demonstrate an awareness of the major contemporary issues involved in the use of antitrust law, particularly in the Big Tech industry – Facebook, Apple, Amazon, Netflix, Google and Uber may be used as case studies. You will need to demonstrate engagement with up-to-date knowledge of the common features of global antitrust law including cartels, monopolies, dominant positions, mergers, state intervention in markets and intellectual property rights.

    This is a second-year module, so whilst no specific academic background is required, students will be expected to analyse and evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of using antitrust law. In particular, how antitrust deals with emerging contemporary issues involving intellectual property and alleged power of digital platforms. This module will interest students from academic backgrounds in Business, Law, Marketing, Digital Technology and Politics.

    This module benefits from the teaching and research expertise from a range of fields, including EU Market Law, Free movement provisions and Competition Law.

    Learning outcomes:

    • Demonstrate an up-to-date knowledge of the common features of global antitrust law. This involves cartels, monopolies and dominant positions, mergers, state intervention in markets and intellectual property rights
    • Demonstrate an awareness of the major contemporary issues involved in the use of antitrust law by governments and regulators
    • Analyse and evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of using antitrust law to deal with emerging contemporary issues involving intellectual property and the alleged power of digital platforms. This will include an understanding of the business model of digital platforms
    • Interact effectively with different policy approaches towards the use of antitrust law and policy as a regulatory tool at the national and international level.

    Teaching method: Lectures, seminars and tutorials
    Assessment: 65% essay, 25% in-class test, 10% observation
    Contact hours: 40 hours 
    Credits: 15 Sussex Credits

Not sure how to choose?

Follow our top tips for choosing your modules. You can also find out about our teaching structure, assessment process and how your credits transfer back to your home institution.

Find out more.

 

Find out how to apply

 

The University of Sussex reserves the right to cancel modules due to staff availability, student demand, minimum enrolment, or updates to our curriculum. We’ll make sure to let our applicants know of such changes to modules at the earliest opportunity.
  • Top 20in the UK for Law*

  • Expertteaching – our academics are passionate about law**

  • 1stcity in England for student happiness***

  • 7research centres focusing on human rights, sustainability and crime

Which school will I study in?

You'll study in the law department, which is part of the School of Law, Politics and Sociology. 

**Our academics are passionate about teaching law, some of whom have won awards including the CareersNet Lecturer of the Year.  

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Our law research

Our staff focus on social justice issues in the context of rights and responsibilities. Research areas include, gender, trade Policy and information governance.

Our research influences the way we teach, and you learn from academics at the forefront of their fields.

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Contact us

If you are studying at Sussex for a summer and have questions, email summer@sussex.ac.uk.

 *Times Higher Education World University Rankings by Subject 2021***(Our campus is nine minutes by train from Brighton & Hove) survey by accommodation providers Student Living by Sodexo. Rankings based on full undergraduate degree at Sussex.


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