Loading content, please wait..
loading..
Logo
Version 3.22
or
Publication Type J
Authors Yang, WH; Traut, BH; Silver, WL
Author Full Name Yang, Wendy H.; Traut, Bibit H.; Silver, Whendee L.
Title Microbially mediated nitrogen retention and loss in a salt marsh soil
Source ECOSPHERE
Language English
Document Type Article
Author Keywords denitrification; dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium; Distichlis spicata; forb; graminoid; gross nitrogen cycling; Jaumea carnosa; redox; Tomales Bay
Keywords Plus DISSIMILATORY NITRATE REDUCTION; TERM N-15-NITROGEN RETENTION; TROPICAL FOREST SOILS; BRACKISH TIDAL MARSH; FRESH-WATER MARSH; SEA-LEVEL RISE; INORGANIC NITROGEN; NUTRIENT AVAILABILITY; PHRAGMITES-AUSTRALIS; COASTAL WATERSHEDS
Abstract Salt marshes currently play an important role as filters for upslope nitrogen (N) inputs. This could change in the future with sea level rise, warming and eutrophication, which are expected to favor monocultures over diverse plant communities. We explored patterns in gross N cycling, dissimilatory nitrate (NO3-) reduction to ammonium (NH4+) (DNRA), and denitrification in a salt marsh soil under two typical redox conditions (aerobic and anaerobic), and in soils under plant communities manipulated to simulate potential future composition (forb and graminoid monocultures). Natural salt marsh soils exhibited high potential gross N mineralization rates, averaging 50.4 +/- 5.7 mu g N g(-1) d(-1) under aerobic conditions; rates declined to 23.6 +/- 3.4 mu g N g(-1) d(-1) under an N-2 headspace. Microbial NH4+ uptake and gross nitrification together accounted for only 14 % of gross N mineralization. Nitrogen retention via DNRA and microbial uptake greatly exceeded N losses via denitrification. Gross nitrification rates were greater in the forb and graminoid monocultures than in the control. This effect may be mediated by the lower plant biomass in the monocultures than in the control, which may have reduced competition between plants and nitrifiers for NH4+. Soil NO3- concentrations and net nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes were greatest for the forb monoculture, likely due to higher soil oxygen (O-2) concentrations in these plots. Our results suggest that salt marsh soils with a diverse plant community have high potential rates of N mineralization and microbial N retention, and the establishment of forb monocultures could lead to greater ecosystem N losses.
Author Address [Yang, Wendy H.; Traut, Bibit H.; Silver, Whendee L.] Univ Calif Berkeley, Dept Environm Sci Policy & Management, Ecosyst Sci Div, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA
Reprint Address Yang, WH (reprint author), Univ Illinois, Dept Plant Biol, Urbana, IL 61801 USA.
E-mail Address yangw@illinois.edu
Funding Agency and Grant Number National Parks Ecological Research Fellowship; U.S. National Science Foundation [DEB-0543558]
Funding Text This research was funded by a National Parks Ecological Research Fellowship to B. H. Traut and by a U.S. National Science Foundation grant (DEB-0543558) to W. L. Silver. We appreciate lab and field assistance from: Brie Lindsey, Jason Traut, Riley Traut, Tavish Traut, Andrew Thompson, Wendy Chou, Nicole Kim, and Karen Liu.
Cited Reference Count 84
Times Cited 9
Total Times Cited Count (WoS, BCI, and CSCD) 9
Publisher ECOLOGICAL SOC AMER
Publisher City WASHINGTON
Publisher Address 1990 M STREET NW, STE 700, WASHINGTON, DC 20036 USA
ISSN 2150-8925
29-Character Source Abbreviation ECOSPHERE
ISO Source Abbreviation Ecosphere
Publication Date JAN
Year Published 2015
Volume 6
Issue 1
Article Number 7
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1890/ES14-00179.1
Page Count 15
Web of Science Category Ecology
Subject Category Environmental Sciences & Ecology
Document Delivery Number CC5YG
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000350440400007
Plants associated with this reference

LEGAL NOTICES — This website is protected by Copyright © The University of Sussex, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021. The eHALOPH database is protected by Database Right and Copyright © The University of Sussex and other contributors, 2006, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021. This database is based on an earlier work by James Aronson.
THIS WEBSITE AND THIS DATABASE ARE PROVIDED ON AN "AS IS" BASIS, AND YOU USE THEM AND RELY ON THEM AT YOUR OWN RISK.

Contact email: halophytes@sussex.ac.uk
Credits – Tim Flowers, Joaquim Santos, Moritz Jahns, Brian Warburton, Peter Reed