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Publication Type J
Authors Patrick, CJ; Weller, DE; Orth, RJ; Wilcox, DJ; Hannam, MP
Author Full Name Patrick, Christopher J.; Weller, Donald E.; Orth, Robert J.; Wilcox, David J.; Hannam, Michael P.
Title Land Use and Salinity Drive Changes in SAV Abundance and Community Composition
Source ESTUARIES AND COASTS
Language English
Document Type Article
Author Keywords Seagrass; SAV; Community; Time series; Trend; Watershed; Land cover
Keywords Plus SUBMERGED AQUATIC VEGETATION; UPPER CHESAPEAKE-BAY; WATER-QUALITY; ZANNICHELLIA-PALUSTRIS; HYDRILLA-VERTICILLATA; SEAGRASS ECOSYSTEMS; RANDOM FORESTS; ECOLOGY; MACROPHYTE; PLANT
Abstract Conserving and restoring submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) are key management goals for estuaries worldwide because SAV integrates many aspects of water quality and provides a wide range of ecosystem services. Management strategies are typically focused on aggregated abundance of several SAV species, because species cannot be easily distinguished in remotely sensed data. Human land use and shoreline alteration have been shown to negatively impact SAV abundance, but the effects have varied with study, spatial scale, and location. The differences in reported effects may be partly due to the focus on abundance, which overlooks within-community and among-community dynamics that generate total SAV abundance. We analyzed long-term SAV aerial survey data (1984-2009) and ground observations of community composition (1984-2012) in subestuaries of Chesapeake Bay to integrate variations in abundance with differences in community composition. We identified five communities (mixed freshwater, milfoil-Zannichellia, mixed mesohaline, Zannichellia, and Ruppia-Zostera). Temporal variations in SAV abundance were more strongly related to community identity than to terrestrial stressors, and responses to stressors differed among communities and among species. In one fifth of the subestuaries, the community identity changed during the study, and the probability of such a change was positively related to the prevalence of riprapped shoreline in the subestuary. Mixed freshwater communities had the highest rates of recovery, and this may have been driven by Hydrilla verticillata, which was the single best predictor of SAV recovery rate. Additional species-specific and community-specific research will likely yield better understanding of the factors affecting community identity and SAV abundance, more accurate predictive models, and more effective management strategies.
Author Address [Patrick, Christopher J.] Texas A&M Univ, 6300 Ocean Dr, Corpus Christi, TX 78412 USA; [Weller, Donald E.; Hannam, Michael P.] Smithsonian Environm Res Ctr, 647 Contees Wharf Rd, Edgewater, MD 21037 USA; [Orth, Robert J.; Wilcox, David J.] Virginia Inst Marine Sci, 1375 Greate Rd, Gloucester Point, VA 23062 USA
Reprint Address Patrick, CJ (reprint author), Texas A&M Univ, 6300 Ocean Dr, Corpus Christi, TX 78412 USA.
E-mail Address Christopher.Patrick@tamucc.edu
ResearcherID Number Hannam, Michael/M-7332-2016
ORCID Number Hannam, Michael/0000-0002-4589-5181; Weller, Donald/0000-0002-7629-5437
Funding Agency and Grant Number National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Center for Sponsored Coastal Ocean Research (CSCOR) [NA09NOS4780214]; AAAS Science & Technology Policy Fellowship
Funding Text We thank the Chesapeake Bay Program for providing the data used in our analysis. This work was supported by award number NA09NOS4780214 from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Center for Sponsored Coastal Ocean Research (CSCOR). Thanks to Meghan Williams for performing some of the spatial analyses that generated these data. The lead author was supported by a AAAS Science & Technology Policy Fellowship during the period when the manuscript was developed and written. The US EPA's Chesapeake Bay Program, Maryland Dept. of Natural Resources, Virginia Dept. of Environmental Quality, and Virginia's NOAA Coastal Program are primarily responsible for the long-term support of the SAV survey. This is contribution number 3617 from the Virginia Institute of Marine Science, The College of William and Mary.
Cited Reference Count 55
Times Cited 3
Total Times Cited Count (WoS, BCI, and CSCD) 3
Publisher SPRINGER
Publisher City NEW YORK
Publisher Address 233 SPRING ST, NEW YORK, NY 10013 USA
ISSN 1559-2723
29-Character Source Abbreviation ESTUAR COAST
ISO Source Abbreviation Estuaries Coasts
Publication Date SEP
Year Published 2018
Volume 41
Supplement 1
Special Issue SI
Beginning Page S85
Ending Page S100
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1007/s12237-017-0250-1
Page Count 16
Web of Science Category Environmental Sciences; Marine & Freshwater Biology
Subject Category Environmental Sciences & Ecology; Marine & Freshwater Biology
Document Delivery Number GO9UE
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000440452500007
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