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Publication Type J
Authors Rotini, A; Mejia, AY; Costa, R; Migliore, L; Winters, G
Author Full Name Rotini, Alice; Mejia, Astrid Y.; Costa, Rodrigo; Migliore, Luciana; Winters, Gidon
Title Ecophysiological Plasticity and Bacteriome Shift in the Seagrass Halophila stipulacea along a Depth Gradient in the Northern Red Sea
Source FRONTIERS IN PLANT SCIENCE
Language English
Document Type Article
Author Keywords seagrass holobiont; plant morphometry; total phenols; photosynthetic pigments; plant-microbe interaction; marine bacteria; Gulf of Aqaba
Keywords Plus MICROBIAL COMMUNITY; POSIDONIA-OCEANICA; ECOLOGICAL STATUS; JORDANIAN COAST; ZOSTERA-MARINA; MICROORGANISMS; VARIABILITY; EVOLUTION; SPONGE; PLANTS
Abstract Halophila stipulacea is a small tropical seagrass species. It is the dominant seagrass species in the Gulf of Aqaba (GoA; northern Red Sea), where it grows in both shallow and deep environments (1-50 m depth). Native to the Red Sea, Persian Gulf, and Indian Ocean, this species has invaded the Mediterranean and has recently established itself in the Caribbean Sea. Due to its invasive nature, there is growing interest to understand this species' capacity to adapt to new conditions, which might be attributed to its ability to thrive in a broad range of ecological niches. In this study, a multidisciplinary approach was used to depict variations in morphology, biochemistry (pigment and phenol content) and epiphytic bacterial communities along a depth gradient (4-28 m) in the GoA. Along this gradient, H. stipulacea increased leaf area and pigment contents (Chlorophyll a and b, total Carotenoids), while total phenol contents were mostly uniform. H. stipulacea displayed a well conserved core bacteriome, as assessed by 454-pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene reads amplified from metagenomic DNA. The core bacteriome aboveground (leaves) and belowground (roots and rhizomes), was composed of more than 100 Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) representing 63 and 52% of the total community in each plant compartment, respectively, with a high incidence of the classes Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Deltaproteobacteria across all depths. Above and belowground communities were different and showed higher within-depth variability at the intermediate depths (9 and 18 m) than at the edges. Plant parts showed a clear influence in shaping the communities while depth showed a greater influence on the belowground communities. Overall, results highlighted a different ecological status of H. stipulacea at the edges of the gradient (4-28 m), where plants showed not only marked differences in morphology and biochemistry, but also the most distinct associated bacterial consortium. We demonstrated the pivotal role of morphology, biochemistry (pigment and phenol content), and epiphytic bacterial communities in helping plants to cope with environmental and ecological variations. The plant/holobiont capability to persist and adapt to environmental changes probably has an important role in its ecological resilience and invasiveness.
Author Address [Rotini, Alice; Mejia, Astrid Y.; Migliore, Luciana] Tor Vergata Univ, Dept Biol, Rome, Italy; [Costa, Rodrigo] Univ Lisbon, Inst Super Tecn, Dept Bioengn iBB, Lisbon, Portugal; [Winters, Gidon] Dead Sea Arava Sci Ctr, Neve Zohar, Israel
Reprint Address Rotini, A (reprint author), Tor Vergata Univ, Dept Biol, Rome, Italy.; Winters, G (reprint author), Dead Sea Arava Sci Ctr, Neve Zohar, Israel.
E-mail Address alice.rotini@gmail.com; wintersg@adssc.org
ORCID Number Migliore, Luciana/0000-0003-3554-3841; da Silva Costa, Rodrigo/0000-0002-5932-4101
Funding Agency and Grant Number Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology (FCT) [UID/Multi/04326/2013, IF/01076/2014]; Israeli Ministry of Environmental Protection [121-4-1]; Israeli Nature Park Authority (INPA); Dead Sea-Arava Science Center (ADSSC); COST Action scientific programme (ES0906) on
Funding Text This work was partially supported by the Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology (FCT) through the project UID/Multi/04326/2013 and the Investigator Grant IF/01076/2014 to RC. This work was also supported by the Israeli Ministry of Environmental Protection (grant number 121-4-1), the Israeli Nature Park Authority (INPA) and the Dead Sea-Arava Science Center (ADSSC).; AM and AR were recipients of a Short Term Scientific Mission grant from the COST Action scientific programme (ES0906) on
Cited Reference Count 68
Times Cited 5
Total Times Cited Count (WoS, BCI, and CSCD) 5
Publisher FRONTIERS MEDIA SA
Publisher City LAUSANNE
Publisher Address PO BOX 110, EPFL INNOVATION PARK, BUILDING I, LAUSANNE, 1015, SWITZERLAND
ISSN 1664-462X
29-Character Source Abbreviation FRONT PLANT SCI
ISO Source Abbreviation Front. Plant Sci.
Publication Date JAN 5
Year Published 2017
Volume 7
Article Number 2015
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.3389/fpls.2016.02015
Page Count 12
Web of Science Category Plant Sciences
Subject Category Plant Sciences
Document Delivery Number EG8TB
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000391328800001
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