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Publication Type J
Authors Nguyen, XV; Kletschkus, E; Rupp-Schroder, SI; El Shaffai, A; Papenbrock, J
Author Full Name Xuan-Vy Nguyen; Kletschkus, Elia; Rupp-Schroeder, Sofia Isabell; El Shaffai, Amgad; Papenbrock, Jutta
Title rDNA analysis of the Red Sea seagrass, Halophila, reveals vicariant evolutionary diversification
Source SYSTEMATICS AND BIODIVERSITY
Language English
Document Type Article
Author Keywords genetic diversity; Halophila spp; ITS; population genetics; seagrass; Suez Canal
Keywords Plus HYDROCHARITACEAE; PHYLOGENY; DIVERSITY; GENETICS; INSIGHTS; EVENTS; OVALIS; DNA
Abstract The effects of opening the Suez Canal as a connection between the Red Sea and the Mediterranean Sea were reported for a number of marine species. However, the evolutionary origin of the seagrasses in the Red Sea and the linking population genetics of seagrasses between the Arabian Sea, the Gulf of Aden, the Red Sea and the Mediterranean Sea have not yet been investigated in detail. The invasion of Halophila stipulacea Asch. from the Red Sea into the Mediterranean Sea after the opening of the Suez Canal was already recorded. We hypothesize that Halophila ovalis populations in the Red Sea developed through long-term historical processes such as vicariant evolutionary diversification. Seagrass samples were collected along the Egyptian coastline of the Red Sea and analysed by the molecular marker ITS. The sequences were compared with published ITS sequences from seagrasses collected in the whole area of interest. In this study, we reveal the linking population genetics, phylogeography and phylogenetics of two dominant seagrass species, Halophila stipulacea and Halophila ovalis, among species collected in the Red Sea and worldwide. The results indicate that the Red Sea Halophila ovalis populations do not group to Halophila ovalis worldwide, and Halophila major, Halophila ovalis collected worldwide and Halophila ovalis collected at the Red Sea are sister clades. Hence, vicariant evolutionary diversification for Halophila ovalis may occur in the Red Sea.
Author Address [Xuan-Vy Nguyen] Vietnam Acad Sci & Technol, Inst Oceanog, 01 Cau Da, Nha Trang City, Vietnam; [Xuan-Vy Nguyen] Grad Univ Sci & Technol, 18 Hoang Quoc Viet, Cau Giay, Ha Noi, Vietnam; [Kletschkus, Elia; Rupp-Schroeder, Sofia Isabell; Papenbrock, Jutta] Leibniz Univ Hannover, Inst Bot, Hannover, Germany; [El Shaffai, Amgad] Minist Environm, Egyptian Environm Affairs Agcy, Cairo, Egypt
Reprint Address Papenbrock, J (reprint author), Leibniz Univ Hannover, Inst Bot, Hannover, Germany.
E-mail Address Jutta.Papenbrock@botanik.uni-hannover.de
Cited Reference Count 46
Publisher TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD
Publisher City ABINGDON
Publisher Address 2-4 PARK SQUARE, MILTON PARK, ABINGDON OR14 4RN, OXON, ENGLAND
ISSN 1477-2000
29-Character Source Abbreviation SYST BIODIVERS
ISO Source Abbreviation Syst. Biodivers.
Year Published 2018
Volume 16
Issue 7
Beginning Page 668
Ending Page 679
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1080/14772000.2018.1483975
Page Count 12
Web of Science Category Biodiversity Conservation; Biology
Subject Category Biodiversity & Conservation; Life Sciences & Biomedicine - Other Topics
Document Delivery Number HC4CR
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000451750600004
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