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Publication Type B
Authors Kitchen, SG; Jorgensen, GL
[=Group Author] USDA; USDA
Author Full Name Kitchen, SG; Jorgensen, GL
Title Winterfat decline and halogeton spread in the Great Basin
Source SHRUBLAND ECOSYSTEM GENETICS AND BIODIVERSITY: PROCEEDINGS
Series USDA FOREST SERVICE ROCKY MOUNTAIN RESEARCH STATION PROCEEDINGS
Language English
Document Type Proceedings Paper
Conference Title 11th Wildland Shrub Symposium
Conference Date JUN 13-15, 2000
Conference Location BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIV, PROVO, UT
Conference Host BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIV
Keywords Plus RANGE CONDITION; THRESHOLDS; VIEWPOINT; DYNAMICS
Abstract Winterfat (Ceratoides lanata) is a long-lived shrub with excellent drought tolerance and good to moderate tolerance for herbivory. It often occurs as near monocultures in deep fine-textured soils of alluvial fans and valley bottoms. Winterfat communities are second only to those of shadscale (A triplex confertifolia) in dominance of the 16 million ha of salt-desert shrublands found in Western North America. In spite of improved grazing practices, winterfat is declining in many areas of the Great Basin. The Eurasian summer annual, halogeton (Halogeton glomeratus), is well adapted to the soils and climate associated with winterfat communities and is invasive, replacing winterfat on degraded sites. Recolonization of halogeton stands by winterfat is rare. Subsequently, distinct winterfat- and halogeton-dominated communities often occur side by side. At the Desert Experimental Range (Utah), episodic winterfat mortality at the ecotone has been observed particularly after flood events and periods of higher than average precipitation. The upward translocation and accumulation of cations, particularly sodium, in the soil by halogeton may account, at least in part, for the lack of winterfat establishment in halogeton stands. Other evidence suggests that a possible halogeton-induced change in soil microbiota may also be unfavorable for winterfat. The development of viable management options to restore winterfat communities will require a greater understanding of plant-soil interactions for these species.
Author Address US Forest Serv, USDA, Rocky Mt Res Stn, Shrub Sci Lab, Provo, UT 84606 USA
Reprint Address Kitchen, SG (reprint author), US Forest Serv, USDA, Rocky Mt Res Stn, Shrub Sci Lab, Provo, UT 84606 USA.
Cited Reference Count 23
Publisher US DEPT AGR, FOREST SERV ROCKY MT FOREST & RANGE EXPTL STN
Publisher City FT COLLINS
Publisher Address FT COLLINS, CO 80526 USA
29-Character Source Abbreviation US FOR SERV RMRS-P
ISO Source Abbreviation USDA For. Ser. Rocky Mt. Res. Stat. Proc.
Year Published 2000
Issue 21
Beginning Page 200
Ending Page 203
Page Count 4
Web of Science Category Biodiversity Conservation; Ecology
Subject Category Biodiversity & Conservation; Environmental Sciences & Ecology
Document Delivery Number BU32J
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000175696900023
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