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Publication Type J
Authors Fan, L., G. N. Wang, W. Hu, P. Pantha, K. N. Tran, H. Zhang, L. Z. An, M. Dassanayake and Q. S. Qiu
Title Transcriptomic view of survival during early seedling growth of the extremophyte Haloxylon ammodendron
Source Plant Physiology and Biochemistry
Language English
Author Keywords Abiotic stress Desert Drought Extremophyte Psanunophyte Stress tolerance Transcriptome responsive gene-expression rna-seq data arabidopsis-thaliana drought stress polyethylene-glycol salt stress signaling pathways hydrogen-peroxide redox homeostasis reference genome Plant Sciences
Abstract Seedling establishment in an extreme environment requires an integrated genomic and physiological response to survive multiple abiotic stresses. The extremophyte, Haloxylon ammodendron is a pioneer species capable of colonizing temperate desert sand dunes. We investigated the induced and basal transcriptomes in H. ammodendron under water-deficit stress during early seedling establishment. We find that not only drought-responsive genes, but multiple genes in pathways associated with salt, osmotic, cold, UV, and high-light stresses were induced, suggesting an altered regulatory stress response system. Additionally, H. atrunodendron exhibited enhanced biotic stress tolerance by down-regulation of genes that were generally up-regulated during pathogen entry in susceptible plants. By comparing the H. ammodendron basal transcriptome to six closely related transcriptomes in Amaranthaceae, we detected enriched basal level transcripts in H. ammodendron that shows preadaptation to abiotic stress and pathogens. We found transcripts that were generally maintained at low levels and some induced only under abiotic stress in the stress-sensitive model, Arabidopsis thaliana to be highly expressed under basal conditions in the Amaranthaceae transcriptomes including H. ammodendron. H. ammodendron shows coordinated expression of genes that regulate stress tolerance and seedling development resource allocation to support survival against multiple stresses in a sand dune dominated temperate desert environment.
Author Address [Fan, Ligang; Hu, Wei; Zhang, Hua; An, Lizhe; Qiu, Quan-Sheng] Lanzhou Univ, Sch Life Sci, MOE Key Lab Cell Act & Stress Adaptat, 222 South Tianshui Rd, Lanzhou 730000, Gansu, Peoples R China. [Wang, Guannan; Pantha, Pramod; Tran, Kieu-Nga; Dassanayake, Maheshi] Louisiana State Univ, Dept Biol Sci, 202 Life Sci Bldg, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 USA. Qiu, QS (reprint author), Lanzhou Univ, Sch Life Sci, MOE Key Lab Cell Act & Stress Adaptat, 222 South Tianshui Rd, Lanzhou 730000, Gansu, Peoples R China.; Dassanayake, M (reprint author), Louisiana State Univ, Dept Biol Sci, 202 Life Sci Bldg, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 USA. maheshid@lsu.edu; qiuqsh@lzu.edu.cn
ISSN 0981-9428
ISBN 0981-9428
29-Character Source Abbreviation Plant Physiol. Biochem.
Publication Date Nov
Year Published 2018
Volume 132
Beginning Page 475-489
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1016/j.plaphy.2018.09.024
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000450377400050
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