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Publication Type J
Authors Torzilli, AP; Sikaroodi, M; Chalkley, D; Gillevet, PM
Author Full Name Torzilli, Albert P.; Sikaroodi, Masoumeh; Chalkley, David; Gillevet, Patrick M.
Title A comparison of fungal communities from four salt marsh plants using automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA)
Source MYCOLOGIA
Language English
Document Type Article
Author Keywords automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis; Distichlis; fungal community fingerprinting; Juncus; salt marsh fungi; Sarcocornia; Spartina
Keywords Plus SPARTINA-ALTERNIFLORA; RHODE-ISLAND; COPY NUMBER; RNA GENES; BIAS; PCR; DYNAMICS; HETEROGENEITY; AMPLIFICATION; DEGRADATION
Abstract Fungal decomposers are important contributors to the detritus-based food webs of salt marsh ecosystems. Knowing the composition of salt marsh fungal communities is essential in understanding how detritus processing is affected by changes in community dynamics. Automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) was used to examine the composition of fungal communities associated with four temperate salt marsh plants, Spartina alterniflora (short and tall forms), Juncus roemerianus, Distichlis spicala and Sarcocornia per-ennis. Plant tissues were homogenized and subjected to a particle-filtration protocol that yielded 106 mu m particulate fractions, which were used as a Source of fungal isolates and fungal DNA. Genera identified from sporulating cultures demonstrated that the 106 mu m particles from each host plant were reliable sources of fungal DNA for ARISA. Analysis of ARISA data by principal component analysis (PCA), principal coordinate analysis (PCO) and species diversity comparisons indicated that the fungal communities from the two grasses, S. alterniflora and D. spicala were more similar to each other than they were to the distinct communities associated with J. roemerianus and S. perennis. Principal component analysis also showed no consistent, seasonal pattern in the composition of these fungal communities. Comparisons of ARISA fingerprints from the different fungal communities and those from pure Cultures of selected Spartina ascomycetes supported the host/substrate specificity observed for the fungal communities.
Author Address George Mason Univ, Dept Environm Sci & Policy, Fairfax, VA 22030 USA; George Mason Univ, Dept Environm Sci & Policy, Manassas, VA 20110 USA; Amer Type Culture Collect, Manassas, VA 20110 USA
Reprint Address Torzilli, AP (reprint author), George Mason Univ, Dept Environm Sci & Policy, Fairfax, VA 22030 USA.
E-mail Address atorzill@gmu.edu
Cited Reference Count 28
Times Cited 29
Total Times Cited Count (WoS, BCI, and CSCD) 32
Publisher ALLEN PRESS INC
Publisher City LAWRENCE
Publisher Address 810 E 10TH ST, LAWRENCE, KS 66044 USA
ISSN 0027-5514
29-Character Source Abbreviation MYCOLOGIA
ISO Source Abbreviation Mycologia
Publication Date SEP-OCT
Year Published 2006
Volume 98
Issue 5
Beginning Page 690
Ending Page 698
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.3852/mycologia.98.5.690
Page Count 9
Web of Science Category Mycology
Subject Category Mycology
Document Delivery Number 125JP
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000243438500004
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