Loading content, please wait..
loading..
Logo
Version 3.24
or
Publication Type J
Authors Shaygan, M., D. Mulligan and T. Baumgartl
Title The potential of three halophytes (Tecticornia pergranulata, Sclerolaena longicuspis, and Frankenia serpyllifolia) for the rehabilitation of brine-affected soils
Source Land Degradation & Development
Author Keywords Frankenia serpyllifolia rehabilitation revegetation salinity Sclerolaena longicuspis Tecticornia pergranulata saline-sodic soils salt-tolerance hydraulic conductivity clay soil germination phytoremediation stress water mechanisms plants
Abstract Brine, produced as a by-product of oil extraction, when contained in evaporation ponds can cause soil salinization in the vicinity of these ponds. Native halophytes may assist revegetation and rehabilitation of these salt-affected soils. This study was conducted to investigate the revegetation and rehabilitation potential of brine-affected land using native halophytes (Tecticornia pergranulata (J.M.Black) K.A.Sheph. & Paul G.Wilson, Sclerolaena longicuspis (F.Muell.) A.J.Scott and Frankenia serpyllifolia Lindl). Soil samples from adjacent bare and vegetated areas of brine-affected land were compared to assess the physico-chemical properties associated with the vegetation cover. The salt contents of the halophytes, plant bioaccumulation, bioconcentration, and translocation factors were measured to evaluate remediation capacity of the species. We hypothesized that the halophytes reduce the ions' concentrations and thus soil salinity and sodicity. The examined halophytes were associated with a reduction in salinity and sodicity by an average of 38.5% and 33% in the top 10cm of the soil, respectively. T.pergranulata had the highest shoot Na+ content (98g/kg dry wt), bioaccumulation (14.21), and translocation (23.09) factors for Na+ that indicated the higher remediation potential of this species. Despite the high remediation potential of the examined species, halophytes are not able to reduce the salt content of the landscape to create conditions for the growth of glycophytes. However, the salt-affected land can be revegetated by halophytes, and halophytes probably provide a stable vegetation cover for the landscape in ecological succession. An improvement in soil physical properties is required for revegetation success.
Author Address [Shaygan, Mandana; Mulligan, David; Baumgartl, Thomas] Univ Queensland, Sustainable Minerals Inst, Environm Ctr, Brisbane, Qld 4072, Australia. Shaygan, M (reprint author), Univ Queensland, Sustainable Minerals Inst, Environm Ctr, Brisbane, Qld 4072, Australia. mandana.shaygan@uqconnect.edu.au
ISSN 1085-3278
ISBN 1085-3278
29-Character Source Abbreviation Land Degrad. Dev.
Publication Date Jun
Year Published 2018
Volume 29
Issue 6
Beginning Page 2002-2014
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1002/ldr.2954
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000435278900041
Plants associated with this reference

LEGAL NOTICES — This website is protected by Copyright © The University of Sussex, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021, 2022. The eHALOPH database is protected by Database Right and Copyright © The University of Sussex and other contributors, 2006, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021, 2022. This database is based on an earlier work by James Aronson.
THIS WEBSITE AND THIS DATABASE ARE PROVIDED ON AN "AS IS" BASIS, AND YOU USE THEM AND RELY ON THEM AT YOUR OWN RISK.

Contact email: halophytes@sussex.ac.uk
Credits – Tim Flowers, Joaquim Santos, Moritz Jahns, Brian Warburton, Peter Reed