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Publication Type J
Authors Klomjek, P; Nitisoravut, S
Author Full Name Klomjek, P; Nitisoravut, S
Title Constructed treatment wetland: a study of eight plant species under saline conditions
Source CHEMOSPHERE
Language English
Document Type Article
Author Keywords constructed wetland; nutrient assimilation; saline wastewater; salt-tolerant plant; treatment performance
Keywords Plus DOMESTIC WASTE-WATER; OXYGEN-DEMAND; REMOVAL; PHOSPHORUS; EFFLUENT; NITROGEN; GROWTH; SOILS
Abstract A series of investigations was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using constructed treatment wetlands to remove pollutants from saline wastewater. Eight emergent plants; cattail, sedge, water grass, Asia crabgrass, salt meadow cordgrass, kallar grass, vetiver grass and Amazon, were planted in experimental plots and fed with municipal wastewater that was spiked with sodium chloride (NaCl) to simulate a saline concentration of approximately 14-16 mS cm(-1). All macrophytes were found tolerant under the tested conditions except Amazon and vetiver grass. Nutrient assimilation of salt tolerant species was in the range of 0.006-0.061 and 0.0002-0.0024 gm(-2) d(-1) for nitrogen and phosphorus, respectively. Treatment performances of planted units were found to be 72.4-78.9% for BOD5, 43.2-56.0% for SS, 67.4-16.5% for NH3-N and 28.9-44.9% for TP. The most satisfactory plant growth and nitrogen assimilation were found for cattail (Typha angustifolia) though the plant growth was limited, whereas Asia crabgrass (Digitaria bicornis) was superior for BOD5 removal. Both were evaluated again in a continuous flow constructed wetland system receiving saline feed processing wastewater.A high removal rate regularly occurred in long-term operating conditions. The reduction in BOD5, SS, NH3-N and TP was in the range of 44.4-67.9%, 41.4-70.4%, 18.0-65.3% and 12.2-40.5%, respectively. Asia crabgrass often provided higher removal especially for BOD5 and SS removal. Nutrient enriched wastewater promoted flourishing growth of algae and plankton in the surface flow system, which tended to reduce treatment performance. (C) 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Author Address Thammasat Univ, Sirindhorn Int Inst Technol, Pathum Thani 12121, Thailand; King Mongkuts Univ Technol Thonburi, Joint Grad Sch Energy & Environm, Bangkok 10140, Thailand
Reprint Address Nitisoravut, S (reprint author), Thammasat Univ, Sirindhorn Int Inst Technol, POB 22,Thammasat Rangsit Post Off, Pathum Thani 12121, Thailand.
E-mail Address snitisor@siit.tu.ac.th
ResearcherID Number Nitisoravut, Suwanchai/A-2876-2009
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Cited Reference Count 32
Times Cited 89
Total Times Cited Count (WoS, BCI, and CSCD) 107
Publisher PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD
Publisher City OXFORD
Publisher Address THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, ENGLAND
ISSN 0045-6535
29-Character Source Abbreviation CHEMOSPHERE
ISO Source Abbreviation Chemosphere
Publication Date FEB
Year Published 2005
Volume 58
Issue 5
Beginning Page 585
Ending Page 593
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2004.08.073
Page Count 9
Web of Science Category Environmental Sciences
Subject Category Environmental Sciences & Ecology
Document Delivery Number 889XP
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000226476500007
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