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Publication Type J
Authors Redha, A; Al-Mansor, N; Suleman, P; Al-Hasan, R; Afzal, M
Author Full Name Redha, A.; Al-Mansor, N.; Suleman, P.; Al-Hasan, R.; Afzal, M.
Title Modulation of antioxidant defenses in Conocarpus lancifolius under variable abiotic stress
Source BIOCHEMICAL SYSTEMATICS AND ECOLOGY
Language English
Document Type Article
Author Keywords Abiotic stress; Ascorbic acid; Conocarpus lancifolius; Drought; Electron transport; Flavonoids; Salinity; Phenols
Keywords Plus ASCORBIC-ACID; CELL-DEATH; ARABIDOPSIS; GROWTH; PHOTOSYNTHESIS; PLANTS
Abstract Conocangus lancifolius Engl. (Combretaceae) is a non-native ornamental shrub with a high tolerance to semi-arid conditions, grown in the State of Kuwait. Although the plant has a remarkable growth rate under extreme conditions of drought and temperature, biochemical defense-related mechanisms remain unexplored. The objective of this study was to gain an understanding of the physiology of C. lancifolius under abiotic stress conditions. The plant was exposed to variable drought, salinity and temperature stress conditions and in addition to antioxidant defense compounds, photosynthetic and electron transport rates were measured. Ascorbic acid, phenols and flavonoids were quantified as defense compounds in C. lancifolius. The photosynthetic and electron transport rates decreased under drought and high salinity, but increased with increasing temperature. Phenolic, flavonoid and ascorbic acid contents were positively correlated with electron transport and photosynthetic rates in experiments at higher temperature. Plant phenols increased significantly (p <= 0.05) from 5.37 mg g(-1) in controls to 8.75 mg g(-1), in drought-stressed plants. This increase paralleled with an increase in flavonoid content. A consistent increase in phenols/flavonoids was also observed with increasing temperature, salinity and polyethylene glycol (PEG stress). The tolerance of C. lancifolius to extreme temperature stress showed a high correlation with the synthesis of ascorbic acid and flavonoids, indicating their biochemical role in protecting plant cells from damaging reactive oxygen species produced under stress. Ascorbic acid significantly increased (p <= 0.05) from 426 mu g g(-1) in response to temperature stress at 10 degrees C to 477 mu g g(-1), in plants grown at 40 degrees C. Meanwhile, flavonoid content increased significantly from 3.38 to 5.07 mu g g(-1) DW in response to higher temperature and drought. A decrease in the concentration of ascorbic acid and photosynthetic and electron transport rates, however, was observed in PEG-induced drought, with water deficit and salt-stressed plants. The decrease in ascorbic acid was accompanied with an increase in the total phenols and flavonoids. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Author Address [Redha, A.; Al-Mansor, N.; Suleman, P.; Al-Hasan, R.; Afzal, M.] Kuwait Univ, Dept Biol Sci, Fac Sci, Safat 13060, Kuwait
Reprint Address Afzal, M (reprint author), Kuwait Univ, Dept Biol Sci, Fac Sci, POB 5969, Safat 13060, Kuwait.
E-mail Address Afzalq8@gmail.com
Funding Agency and Grant Number Kuwait Foundation for the Advancement of Science (KFAS) [2007/1207/07]; Research Administration, Kuwait University [SL04/08]
Funding Text The authors express their gratitude to the Kuwait Foundation for the Advancement of Science (KFAS, Grant #2007/1207/07) and the Research Administration, Kuwait University, (Grant #SL04/08) for funding this work. Thanks are also extended to the Public Authority for Agriculture Affairs and Fish Resources, Kuwait (PAAFR), for their constant support in providing Conocarpus plants. Technical help is acknowledged for the Research assistants Jacquilion Jose and Divya Saju.
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Cited Reference Count 31
Times Cited 4
Total Times Cited Count (WoS, BCI, and CSCD) 4
Publisher PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD
Publisher City OXFORD
Publisher Address THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, ENGLAND
ISSN 0305-1978
29-Character Source Abbreviation BIOCHEM SYST ECOL
ISO Source Abbreviation Biochem. Syst. Ecol.
Publication Date AUG
Year Published 2012
Volume 43
Beginning Page 80
Ending Page 86
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1016/j.bse.2012.02.026
Page Count 7
Web of Science Category Biochemistry & Molecular Biology; Ecology; Evolutionary Biology
Subject Category Biochemistry & Molecular Biology; Environmental Sciences & Ecology; Evolutionary Biology
Document Delivery Number 960CL
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000305365500014
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