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Publication Type J
Authors Becker, V. I., J. W. Goessling, B. Duarte, I. Cacador, F. L. Liu, E. Rosenqvist and S. E. Jacobsen
Title Combined effects of soil salinity and high temperature on photosynthesis and growth of quinoa plants (Chenopodium quinoa)
Source Functional Plant Biology
Author Keywords abiotic stress Chenopodium spp. developmental physiology photosynthesis seed yield stomatal conductance salt-tolerance mechanisms stomatal density phenotypic plasticity oxidative stress drought stress willd. halophytes light germination leaves
Abstract The halophytic crop quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) is adapted to soil salinity and cold climate, but recent investigations have shown that quinoa can be grown in significantly warmer latitudes, i.e. the Mediterranean region, where high temperature and soil salinity can occur in combination. In this greenhouse study, effects of saltwater irrigation and high temperature on growth and development of the Bolivian cultivar 'Achachino' were determined. Development was slightly delayed in response to saltwater treatment, but significantly faster at high temperature. Biomass and seed yield decreased in response to salt, but not to high temperature. Plants increased their number of stomata in response to salt stress, but reduced its size on both sides of the leaf, whereas high temperature treatment significantly increased the stomata size on the abaxial leaf surface. When salt and high temperature was combined, the size of stomata was reduced only on the abaxial side of the leaf, and the number of epidermal bladder cells significantly increased on the abaxial leaf surface, resulting in preservation of photosynthetic quantum yields. We hypothesise that this morphological plasticity improves the partition of water and CO2 resulting in maintenance of photosynthesis in quinoa under adverse environmental conditions. We present a GLM-model that predicts yield parameters of quinoa grown in regions affected by soil salinity, high temperature and the factors combined.
Author Address [Becker, Verena I.; Goessling, Johannes W.; Liu, Fulai; Rosenqvist, Eva; Jacobsen, Sven-Erik] Univ Copenhagen, Fac Sci, Dept Plant & Environm Sci, Hojbakkegard Alle 13, DK-2630 Taastrup, Denmark. [Duarte, Bernardo; Cacador, Isabel] Univ Lisbon, Fac Sci, MARE Marine & Environm Sci Ctr, P-1749016 Lisbon, Portugal. Goessling, JW (reprint author), Univ Copenhagen, Fac Sci, Dept Plant & Environm Sci, Hojbakkegard Alle 13, DK-2630 Taastrup, Denmark. johannesg@bio.ku.dk
ISSN 1445-4408
ISBN 1445-4408
29-Character Source Abbreviation Funct. Plant Biol.
Year Published 2017
Volume 44
Issue 7
Beginning Page 665-678
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1071/fp16370
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000403207800002

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