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Publication Type J
Authors Pessarakli, M., D. D. Breshears, J. Walworth, J. P. Field and D. J. Law
Title Candidate halophytic grasses for addressing land degradation: Shoot responses of Sporobolus airoides and Paspalum vaginatum to weekly increasing NaCl concentration
Source Arid Land Research and Management
Author Keywords Alkali sacaton grass salt stress seashore paspalum true halophyte wind erosion salt tolerance salinity tolerance semiarid landscapes stress tolerance growth-responses plants desertification bermudagrass grassland saltgrass
Abstract In many arid and semiarid regions worldwide, high levels of soil salinity is a key driver of land degradation, as well as a key impediment to re-establishing plant cover. Combating land degradation and erosion associated with soil salinity requires experimental determination of plant species that can grow in soils with high levels of salinity and can be used to re-establish plant cover. Herein, we evaluated the responses of untested candidate cultivars of two halophytic grass species to high soil salinity: alkali sacaton (Sporobolus airoides Torr.) and seashore paspalum (Paspalum vaginatum Swartz). We evaluated the growth responses of both species in a greenhouse under control (no-salt) and various levels of NaCl salinity (EC 8, 16, 24, 32, 40, and 48dSm(-1)) using Hoagland solution in a hydroponics system in a randomized complete block design trial. At all salinity levels, sacaton grass had a greater shoot height, shorter root length, lower shoot fresh and dry weights, and poorer color and general quality compared to seashore paspalum. The shoot fresh and dry weights of both grasses were greatest at the low to medium levels of salinity, with the greatest response observed at EC 16dSm(-1). At the highest level, salinity significantly reduced shoot fresh and dry weights of both grasses. Because growth of both halophytic species exhibited high tolerance to salinity stress and were stimulated under low to medium levels of salinity, both species could be considered suitable candidates for re-establishing plant cover in drylands to combat desertification and land degradation associated with high levels of soil salinity.
ISSN 1532-4982
ISBN 1532-4982
29-Character Source Abbreviation Arid Land Res. Manag.
Year Published 2017
Volume 31
Issue 2
Beginning Page 169-181
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1080/15324982.2017.1284944
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000399546000005
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