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Publication Type J
Authors Mata-Gonzalez, R., M. A. B. Abdallah, R. Trejo-Calzada and C. G. Wan
Title Growth and leaf chemistry of Atriplex species from Northern Mexico as affected by salt stress
Source Arid Land Research and Management
Author Keywords Arid shrubland Atriplex acanthocarpa Atriplex canescens Chihuahuan desert forage value halophyte osmoregulation reclamation root shoot ratio salinity water-use efficiency canescens chenopodiaceae desert grasses biosolids application salinity tolerance resistant plants halophytes accumulation agriculture responses
Abstract Atriplex species are tolerant to salinity and water stress and thus they are suitable for restoration of many degraded ecosystems. In addition, many Atriplex species offer good value as forages. We compared growth and leaf chemistry of Atriplex canescens, a well-known halophyte, and A. acanthocarpa, a poorly-studied species, as affected by salinity in a greenhouse study. Seeds and soil were collected in northern Mexico, the native range of these species. Plants were grown in pots containing native soil and irrigated with NaCl solutions of 0, 50, and 100mM. Shoot growth of A. canescens declined 37% as NaCl treatments increased from 0 to 100mM while shoot growth of A acanthocarpa was not significantly affected by salinity. The high salt tolerance of A. acanthocarpa was linked to a high accumulation of leaf sodium (Na) (7- to 13-fold higher than A. canescens). A. acanthocarpa had also higher growth rate than A. canescenes, making the former species a good candidate for cultivation, especially under saline conditions. Tissue concentration of potassium (K) in both species was minimally affected by the salinity treatments. Leaf nitrogen (N) concentration increased as plants faced higher salinity treatments, especially in A. canescens. The high salt tolerance and higher Na accumulation of A. acanthocarpa make this species an attractive choice for reclamation of saline areas. We suggest A. acanthocarpa should be explored as viable forage for cultivation and for reclamation of degraded areas just as A. canescens has been throughout the world.
Author Address [Mata-Gonzalez, Ricardo; Abdallah, Mohamed A. B.] Oregon State Univ, Dept Anim & Rangeland Sci, 120 Withycombe Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331 USA. [Trejo-Calzada, Ricardo] Univ Autonoma Chapingo, Unidad Reg Univ Zonas Aridas, Bermejillo, Durango, Mexico. [Wan, Changgui] Lanzhou Univ, Coll Pastoral Agr Sci & Technol, State Key Lab Grassland Farming Syst, Lanzhou, Peoples R China. ricardo.matagonzalez@oregonstate.edu
ISSN 1532-4982
ISBN 1532-4982
29-Character Source Abbreviation Arid Land Res. Manag.
Year Published 2017
Volume 31
Issue 1
Beginning Page 57-70
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1080/15324982.2016.1199065
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000392424500005
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