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Publication Type J
Authors Li, W., C. Y. Zhang, Q. T. Lu, X. G. Wen and C. M. Lu
Title The combined effect of salt stress and heat shock on proteome profiling in Suaeda salsa
Source Journal of Plant Physiology
Language English
Author Keywords Heat shock Photosynthesis Proteomics Salt stress Suaeda salsa L. abiotic stress responsive proteins arabidopsis-thaliana adenylate kinase drought stress wheat-grain tolerance salinity leaves plants Plant Sciences
Abstract Under natural conditions or in the field, plants are often subjected to a combination of different stresses such as salt stress and heat shock. Although salt stress and heat shock have been extensively studied, little is known about how their combination affects plants. We used proteomics, coupled with physiological measurements, to investigate the effect of salt stress, heat shock, and their combination on Suaeda salsa plants. A combination of salt stress and heat shock resulted in suppression of CO2 assimilation and the photosystem II efficiency. Approximately 440 protein spots changed their expression levels upon salt stress, heat shock and their combination, and 57 proteins were identified by MS. These proteins were classified into several categories including disease/defense, photosynthesis, energy production, material transport, and signal transduction. Some proteins induced during salt stress, e.g. choline monooxygenase, chloroplastic ATP synthase subunit beta, and V-type proton ATPase catalytic subunit A, and some proteins induced during heat shock, e.g. heat shock 70 kDa protein, probable ion channel DMI 1, and two component sensor histidine kinase, were either unchanged or suppressed during a combination of salt stress and heat shock. In contrast, the expression of some proteins, including nucleoside diphosphate kinase 1, chlorophyll a/b binding protein, and ABC transporter I family member 1, was specifically induced during a combination of salt stress and heat shock. The potential roles of the stress-responsive proteins are discussed. (C) 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.
Author Address [Li, Wei; Zhang, Chunyan; Lu, Qingtao; Wen, Xiaogang; Lu, Congming] Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Bot, Photosynth Res Ctr, Key Lab Photobiol, Beijing 100093, Peoples R China. Lu, CM (reprint author), Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Bot, Photosynth Res Ctr, Key Lab Photobiol, Beijing 100093, Peoples R China. lucm@ibcas.ac.cn
ISSN 0176-1617
ISBN 0176-1617
29-Character Source Abbreviation J. Plant Physiol.
Publication Date Oct
Year Published 2011
Volume 168
Issue 15
Beginning Page 1743-1752
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1016/j.jplph.2011.03.018
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000295703100005
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