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Publication Type J
Authors Mckee, KL; Rooth, JE
Author Full Name Mckee, Karen L.; Rooth, Jille E.
Title Where temperate meets tropical: multi-factorial effects of elevated CO2, nitrogen enrichment, and competition on a mangrove-salt marsh community
Source GLOBAL CHANGE BIOLOGY
Language English
Document Type Article
Author Keywords Avicennia germinans; biomass partitioning; coastal ecosystem; ecotone; herbivory; nutrients; plant productivity; seedling recruitment; Spartina alterniflora; vegetation shift
Keywords Plus SPARTINA-ALTERNIFLORA; NUTRIENT AVAILABILITY; ENVIRONMENTAL-CHANGE; AVICENNIA-GERMINANS; ATMOSPHERIC CO2; PLANT-GROWTH; RESPONSES; VEGETATION; LANDSCAPE; LOUISIANA
Abstract Our understanding of how elevated CO2 and interactions with other factors will affect coastal plant communities is limited. Such information is particularly needed for transitional communities where major vegetation types converge. Tropical mangroves (Avicennia germinans) intergrade with temperate salt marshes (Spartina alterniflora) in the northern Gulf of Mexico, and this transitional community represents an important experimental system to test hypotheses about global change impacts on critical ecosystems. We examined the responses of A. germinans (C-3) and S. alterniflora (C-4), grown in monoculture and mixture in mesocosms for 18 months, to interactive effects of atmospheric CO2 and pore water nitrogen (N) concentrations typical of these marshes. A. germinans, grown without competition from S. alterniflora, increased final biomass (35%) under elevated CO2 treatment and higher N availability. Growth of A. germinans was severely curtailed, however, when grown in mixture with S. alterniflora, and enrichment with CO2 and N could not reverse this growth suppression. A field experiment using mangrove seedlings produced by CO2- and N-enriched trees confirmed that competition from S. alterniflora suppressed growth under natural conditions and further showed that herbivory greatly reduced survival of all seedlings. Thus, mangroves will not supplant marsh vegetation due to elevated CO2 alone, but instead will require changes in climate, environmental stress, or disturbance to alter the competitive balance between these species. However, where competition and herbivory are low, elevated CO2 may accelerate mangrove transition from the seedling to sapling stage and also increase above- and belowground production of existing mangrove stands, particularly in combination with higher soil N.
Author Address [Mckee, Karen L.; Rooth, Jille E.] US Geol Survey, Natl Wetlands Res Ctr, Lafayette, LA USA; [Rooth, Jille E.] Elkhorn Slough Natl Estuarine Res Reserve, Watsonville, CA 95076 USA
Reprint Address Mckee, KL (reprint author), US Geol Survey, Natl Wetlands Res Ctr, 700 Cajundome Blvd, Lafayette, LA USA.
E-mail Address karen_mckee@usgs.gov
ResearcherID Number McKee, Karen/D-1365-2014
ORCID Number McKee, Karen/0000-0001-7042-670X
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Cited Reference Count 55
Times Cited 44
Total Times Cited Count (WoS, BCI, and CSCD) 45
Publisher BLACKWELL PUBLISHING
Publisher City OXFORD
Publisher Address 9600 GARSINGTON RD, OXFORD OX4 2DQ, OXON, ENGLAND
ISSN 1354-1013
29-Character Source Abbreviation GLOBAL CHANGE BIOL
ISO Source Abbreviation Glob. Change Biol.
Publication Date MAY
Year Published 2008
Volume 14
Issue 5
Beginning Page 971
Ending Page 984
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1111/j.1365-2486.2008.01547.x
Page Count 14
Web of Science Category Biodiversity Conservation; Ecology; Environmental Sciences
Subject Category Biodiversity & Conservation; Environmental Sciences & Ecology
Document Delivery Number 295GS
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000255463600003
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